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This magnificent book is a collection of stories, anecdotes, and legends from all six of the regions where celtic ways have persisted in the modern world.


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This magnificent book is a collection of stories, anecdotes, and legends from all six of the regions where celtic ways have persisted in the modern world.

30 review for The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries

  1. 4 out of 5

    James

    When I lived in a cabin in Big Sur, I holed up with a copy of Fairy-Faith. It awakened me to the reality of subtle beings indwelling the immense silence of the redwood forests. Evans-Wenz, who was a friend of Yeats, takes a half-poetic, half-anthropological approach. The most exciting passages are interviews with rural folk dwelling in Celtic lands. For some, the fairy-faith is just that, something of the mind, a belief system inherited from centuries or mellenia of folklore and immersion in Nat When I lived in a cabin in Big Sur, I holed up with a copy of Fairy-Faith. It awakened me to the reality of subtle beings indwelling the immense silence of the redwood forests. Evans-Wenz, who was a friend of Yeats, takes a half-poetic, half-anthropological approach. The most exciting passages are interviews with rural folk dwelling in Celtic lands. For some, the fairy-faith is just that, something of the mind, a belief system inherited from centuries or mellenia of folklore and immersion in Nature. I consider those passages the "smoke" of the narrative. But where there is smoke, there is fire, and the fire Evans-Wentz discovers consists of seers' actual perceptions of subtle beings. Seers see. What they see are subtle impulses of Nature that are intimate with what one seer in the book speaks of as The Soul of the World. Thus, intimacy with spirit is the prerequisite for perception of subtle worlds and the beings who inhabit them. It is from this indwelling, infinite presence that these subtle beings, and seers, draw their energy and luminosity. Perception of such beings is a matter neither of the imagination nor of belief. Such perception consists of the ability to cognize WHAT IS, to look beyond the smoke, directly into the fire.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leo .

    Let me take you down 'Cause I'm going to strawberry fields Nothing is real And nothing to get hung about Strawberry fields forever Living is easy with eyes closed Misunderstanding all you see It's getting hard to be someone But it all works out It doesn't matter much to me Song by the Beatles What happens when one trips with DMT? Does one enter a world of fantasy? Does one lose the ego, find oneself? Have a conversation with a Gnome? An Elf? Question the Dwarves, the Goblins, Orcs and a sprite Wonder at a Wizar Let me take you down 'Cause I'm going to strawberry fields Nothing is real And nothing to get hung about Strawberry fields forever Living is easy with eyes closed Misunderstanding all you see It's getting hard to be someone But it all works out It doesn't matter much to me Song by the Beatles What happens when one trips with DMT? Does one enter a world of fantasy? Does one lose the ego, find oneself? Have a conversation with a Gnome? An Elf? Question the Dwarves, the Goblins, Orcs and a sprite Wonder at a Wizard, a Faerie, a Griffon, as it takes flight A Leprechaun, a rainbow, a pot of gold, a yellow brick road A cauldron, a black cat, and eye of toad A King, a Princess, a frog, a Prince and a Witch A wizened old hag, a Sorceress, a women in red, a bitch A peer through the veil, a fantasy land A land a mere mortal, will never understand By Leo🐯👍

  3. 4 out of 5

    SusannaF

    I got this book as part of my research for a novel about Faerie. It is an old book, and refers often to pseudosciences that are laughed at nowadays. It uses the outdated "Aryan" to refer to white cultures. However, it's a very earnest and amazingly well-researched book. It delves into the origins of various aspects of Celtic fairy lore and briefly covers other world cultures that have similar beliefs. The best and longest section is the collection of stories, including eye-witness accounts. The I got this book as part of my research for a novel about Faerie. It is an old book, and refers often to pseudosciences that are laughed at nowadays. It uses the outdated "Aryan" to refer to white cultures. However, it's a very earnest and amazingly well-researched book. It delves into the origins of various aspects of Celtic fairy lore and briefly covers other world cultures that have similar beliefs. The best and longest section is the collection of stories, including eye-witness accounts. The "scientific" exploration is also quite convincing. I've been hearing for years that fairies are different from spirits, because they can take physical form or because they are nature elementals or whatever. Evans-Wentz' conclusion is much more logical. If fairies exist, as there are many today who will vow they do, than they are no more or less than spirits. For those with a Christian background, this will sound familiar. For those who want to believe in the existence of a lovely Otherworld where humans may go, and beings who are light and good and not dangerous...well, you're not going to agree. But believer or not, the book is still stunning in its sheer volume of information and details, and is worth it to anyone interested in the lore.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Watkins

    An early book by the guy who brought us (in English) The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and in its own way it too is a serious book on alternate realities and/or other dimensions. Plus the edition I have is part of the Library of the Mystic Arts and has an intro by Terence McKenna, the late psychonaut, who elsewhere had paralleled fairies and the little gibbering beings he encountered after taking DMT. The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries offers plenty of speculation and theories regarding who or what An early book by the guy who brought us (in English) The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and in its own way it too is a serious book on alternate realities and/or other dimensions. Plus the edition I have is part of the Library of the Mystic Arts and has an intro by Terence McKenna, the late psychonaut, who elsewhere had paralleled fairies and the little gibbering beings he encountered after taking DMT. The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries offers plenty of speculation and theories regarding who or what fairies are and where they come from, which is interesting though probably futile. But it is also an anthropological study of fairy faith which involved interviews with hundreds of people in Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Isle of Man, etc. in the early 20th century. This is probably my favorite part of the book, in that the interviews help create in my mind one of the most evocative portraits of down-to-earth country life tinged with the supernatural I’ve ever come across. Just reading these oral tales can make you get up from your chair and go fall asleep in a haystack, or climb a stile in farmland at twilight, the back of your neck tingling in expectation of something subtle but very weird waiting to happen. Reading this can make air itself seem thicker; thicker with darting intelligences and mystery and fleeting meaning. There are so many images and definitions of fairies swirling around in our culture that it’s probably hard to read a book like this with a clear mind, but if you can do it you’ll see that there are no pat definitions of fairies and that anyway it’s all about the human imagination and the ability to regard the imagination as just another component of reality and source of information as we continue to try to make heads or tails of life and its infinite intrigue and complexity.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steve Cran

    The book might be old but it is not dated. I think most people these days that right on Faery-Craft often times refer to this book. I would call it the bible of the Faery faith. Back around the turn of the century the author went on a little tour of the Celtic countries in order to assess the Faery faith. He travelled to Iraeland, Wales, Scotland, and Britany in France. In this book he talks with people who have stated that they have had Faery experiences. Information from the interviews is prese The book might be old but it is not dated. I think most people these days that right on Faery-Craft often times refer to this book. I would call it the bible of the Faery faith. Back around the turn of the century the author went on a little tour of the Celtic countries in order to assess the Faery faith. He travelled to Iraeland, Wales, Scotland, and Britany in France. In this book he talks with people who have stated that they have had Faery experiences. Information from the interviews is presented along with historical research. The Faery faith might not be too much alive in the city but in the country side it was being practiced more regularly. There are several theories as to what the faeries are and what their origins are. The one the author favors is the psychological theory where in the faeries or belief in them stems from a need to explain phenomena in nature. Other theories would suggest that the faeries descends from the Tuatha De Danan, or Celtic gods. They have been reduced to small being thanks to Christianization. This theory hold weight in Ireland. They are often described at being of light and extremely tall. Driven underground by Milesian invader they dwell in underground dwellings. They come out at night sometimes riding in a crowd. People will leave offering for them on their front steps so as to placate them and avoid vengeance. In Scotland they are viewed as fallen angels. It was said that during Satans rebellion, the renegade Angels were cast out of heaven. Some went to Hell others were trapped on Earth. In Wales they are considered the spirits of the dead who can come back at certain times. In Brittany it is more animist where they are the spirits of the trees and plants. The faeries no matter where they are or their origins seem to behave the same. They need offerings in rider to gain their favor and keep vengeance at bay. They can steal a baby and replace it with a changeling. Sometimes a Faery can possess a human being. So not only is the lore examined but also ancient religious belief of the Celts. They believe that every living thing had a nu men or life essence. They believed in reincarnation where once someone died they would come to life in another body. The world of the fae is sometimes underneath the sea, the ground r in the land of the dead. Sometimes not much distinction is rented between the dead and the fae as they share the same characteristics.. In some places they are larger than humans and in others they have are smaller. You want too read a good book on the fae well then right this way.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tami

    One of my favorite quotes (I don't remember where I read it, probably in a book about consciousness or neurology) is, "what you see is your brain's best guess about what's out there." Most brains, at least in the US, don't guess "fairy." I like imagining a world where brains did. I loved this book. One of my favorite quotes (I don't remember where I read it, probably in a book about consciousness or neurology) is, "what you see is your brain's best guess about what's out there." Most brains, at least in the US, don't guess "fairy." I like imagining a world where brains did. I loved this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melody Daggerhart

    Hard to rate older books because sometimes it's the fact that they are older that affects a modern rating. I'm giving this one four stars because I liked the majority of the content, found it very useful to my purposes, and enjoyed the "atmosphere" in which the information was related. But parts of the data arrangement felt dry and intrusive. It was a bit of a chore to read in places. What I liked about it ... I loved the slow pace at which the author is strolling about the countrysides of the UK, Hard to rate older books because sometimes it's the fact that they are older that affects a modern rating. I'm giving this one four stars because I liked the majority of the content, found it very useful to my purposes, and enjoyed the "atmosphere" in which the information was related. But parts of the data arrangement felt dry and intrusive. It was a bit of a chore to read in places. What I liked about it ... I loved the slow pace at which the author is strolling about the countrysides of the UK, talking to individuals about their experiences with "the good people". I loved the fact that it was personal. I loved the fact that he's trying to stay genuine to the atmosphere of the collected tales of folk lore. And I loved the fact that it felt like stepping back in time to hear a person from the past speak of people who are from an even further past. This "fireside chat" quality matters when speaking of oral traditions in folklore cultures. That the author attempted to be as exact as possible to the details given by the people he spoke to makes this feel like a primary resource, even if it is via interview. So, that is what I appreciate most. I chose to read this book because I'm researching and writing about the lore of elves and fairies, as well. I'm truly envious of the author being able to travel about the UK talking to people about this and calling it work, while I am stuck with only his notes. Information-wise, it's very useful to me because it is eyewitness accounts and beliefs from a generation that, as the author observed, no longer exists. Even if I were able to travel the UK and ask people about their beliefs or experiences with Fairies, I wouldn't get the same rich answers he did in his own time. So, this is book as a time machine is the best I can do, and I'm glad that he delved into the aspects of scientific, psychological, religious, and historical theories that were new or popular during his time, so I could compare that to today's standards, as well. On the down side ... Since the book is a study of faith philosophy and psychology, it does tend to be a bit text-book mechanical in places. It's slow getting started because of all the gratitudes and discussion on the psychology of faith, although I realize those are necessary and due. The author's language wasn't too much of a problem as a modern reader, but it did draw my attention in places and run on a bit. I appreciate this as a by-product of the time period, but at the same time I found myself skimming sections when I got tired of slowing down to adapt. If you've ever wanted to go back a century and talk to people who believed in fairies to get a first-hand account of what they saw, or hear folklore they swear by, I'd recommend this book. The author's approach was surprisingly modern for his time, while also being sympathetic to the people he interviewed to give their tales respect and authenticity. It's good for history buffs. But if you're looking for a current scientific or psychological approach to the subject, this isn't it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jimyanni

    Stylistically impenetrable, virtually empty of logic or sense., July 10, 2010 By James Yanni (Bellefontaine Neighbors, Mo. USA) - See all my reviews This review is from: The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries: The Classic Study of Leprechauns, Pixies, and Other Fairy Spirits (Paperback) This author, writing in the early days of the 20th century, attempts to prove the existence of fairies and other mythical entities, and claims to have done so. He hasn't. I'm not such a sceptic as to insist that a Stylistically impenetrable, virtually empty of logic or sense., July 10, 2010 By James Yanni (Bellefontaine Neighbors, Mo. USA) - See all my reviews This review is from: The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries: The Classic Study of Leprechauns, Pixies, and Other Fairy Spirits (Paperback) This author, writing in the early days of the 20th century, attempts to prove the existence of fairies and other mythical entities, and claims to have done so. He hasn't. I'm not such a sceptic as to insist that a failure to prove the existence of something, or even (as in this case) a particularly weak attempt at proof, necessarily proves the nonexistence of such phenomena. But his entire 500 page book fails to provide so much as a smidgeon of evidence that would convince anyone above the mental age of, say, 13, who was not already inclined to agree with him. What's more, it fails to do so in an overly wordy, pompous and pseudo-scientific way that approaches unreadability; not only does he fail in his major purpose, but he doesn't even manage to be an enjoyable read in the process. His primary "evidence" for the existence of fairies and other creatures of the spirit world is interviews that he had with numerous elderly folk of the British Isles, folk who were elderly in the first decade of the 20th century and thus were at their youthful prime in the mid-19th century. These were folk who had grown up in the rural areas of the country, and many of them swore to him that they had had personal experience of the "little folk". And, of course, he took them at their word, never considering the possibility that the locals might "have a bit of fun" with the big-city urban researcher coming to study their "backwards" ways. Granted, I have no proof that this is the explanation for the results of his interviews, but I think it's at least as likely as the hypothesis that all of his subjects were being perfectly straightforward with him. And even if some of them were serious, there is certainly no proof that they saw or heard what they thought they had; I once saw a sunset shining off of the clouds that looked for all the world like a giant flaming bird with wings that stretched from horizon to horizon. That doesn't prove that phoenixes truly exist. All in all, every single scrap of "evidence" Evans-Wentz provides is either heresay or speculation. If you're interested in reading interviews with people who claim experience with the "other side", there's some minor value in this book. Otherwise, there is none.

  9. 5 out of 5

    The Elves

    It is essential reading for those studying the faerie faith. The Silver Elves authors of Through the Mists of Faerie: A Magical Guide to the Wisdom Teaching of the Ancient Elven It is essential reading for those studying the faerie faith. The Silver Elves authors of Through the Mists of Faerie: A Magical Guide to the Wisdom Teaching of the Ancient Elven

  10. 4 out of 5

    Redsteve

    Interesting, but it would have been better if the author wasn't an Edwardian-era Spiritulist (in my option). Some of the "scientific" parts near the end of the book were painful to read. Interesting, but it would have been better if the author wasn't an Edwardian-era Spiritulist (in my option). Some of the "scientific" parts near the end of the book were painful to read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

    This was given to me by my dear friend, Darius, as a parting gift before I moved to Scotland to study Social Anthropology and Linguistics at the University of St Andrews. It was published by an American who had, like myself, been accepted to one of Britain's finest universities (Jesus College, Oxford, in his case) to study at a late age. He had not studied Social Anthropology (as I was leaving to), although he acknowledges "the kindly advice and constant encouragement of Mr. R.R. Marett, Reader This was given to me by my dear friend, Darius, as a parting gift before I moved to Scotland to study Social Anthropology and Linguistics at the University of St Andrews. It was published by an American who had, like myself, been accepted to one of Britain's finest universities (Jesus College, Oxford, in his case) to study at a late age. He had not studied Social Anthropology (as I was leaving to), although he acknowledges "the kindly advice and constant encouragement of Mr. R.R. Marett, Reader in Social Anthropology in the University of Oxford, and Fellow of Exeter College," and his knowledge of Gaelic allowed him to frame the stories and remarks in terms used by his informants. A very colourful character, Evans-Wentz traveled for much of his life, at first collecting and translating Celtic Myths and Faerie Stories, later publishing translations of the Tibetan Book of the Dead, and later, compiling several other volumes of Eastern Religious Texts. I very much enjoyed reading this book, especially since many of the accounts therein are translated from the Gaelic with their colourful colloquialisms intact. A great parting gift, and a wonderful read for anyone interested in historical folklore of the British Isles.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Carroll

    Very dry and academic BUT full of interesting stories, theories, thoughts, and conclusions. 3.5 stars from me, so I marked 4 stars :-) It definitely took me a while to plow through, mostly because I read it off and on over the years prior to falling asleep...and the content ensured I would fall asleep only moments after beginning reading. I'm glad I read it, and I intend to keep it handy as a reference. Section IV, pages 454-516, ended up being continuously the most interesting to me, and having Very dry and academic BUT full of interesting stories, theories, thoughts, and conclusions. 3.5 stars from me, so I marked 4 stars :-) It definitely took me a while to plow through, mostly because I read it off and on over the years prior to falling asleep...and the content ensured I would fall asleep only moments after beginning reading. I'm glad I read it, and I intend to keep it handy as a reference. Section IV, pages 454-516, ended up being continuously the most interesting to me, and having read all of the book, I will say that it is not necessary to read all previous sections in order to understand or find meaning in the ultimate section. If you're going to read it, though, I encourage you to eventually check out all sections. There are lots of tales of unexplained phenomena and points to ponder that may not have changed much in the 100 years since the book was written-

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    In the early 20th century, Evan-Wentz compiled a collection of folklore from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall and the Isle of Man and created a comprehensive guide to the fairy faith. A fascinating read, even if it isn't always completely believable (although I find myself believing, more often than not!) In the early 20th century, Evan-Wentz compiled a collection of folklore from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall and the Isle of Man and created a comprehensive guide to the fairy faith. A fascinating read, even if it isn't always completely believable (although I find myself believing, more often than not!)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Willow

    This is an incredibly in depth compilation of old Celtic and pre-Celtic stories of fairies, the Tuatha de Dannan, and other between-the-worlds beings. The edition I have has an intro by Terrance McKenna, which is interesting. Lots of references to old old books, and most of the stories are from the early 1800s regarding traditions on how to deal with various forms of the good folk.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ann M

    Really gives you a sense of the little folk.

  16. 5 out of 5

    An overlooked book of real value. Give it a read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Amazing. An actual study of the belief in faeries by anthropologist Evans-Wentz in the early 1900's. Amazing. An actual study of the belief in faeries by anthropologist Evans-Wentz in the early 1900's.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I did not finish but would like to read more of it. I may but my own copy. What I have read is interesting but it is very wordy and slow.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy Ross

    I have always been interested in Celtic mythology and the long standing culture of continuing oral history, through story telling and song. The Irish managed to maintain lots of their old stories and culture due to their relative isolation. I believe by capturing the faerie folklore when he did over (100 years ago, when belief was still prevalent). Evans has preserved a very important part of all our heritage. The similarities of stories from all the Celtic countries is something which could be I have always been interested in Celtic mythology and the long standing culture of continuing oral history, through story telling and song. The Irish managed to maintain lots of their old stories and culture due to their relative isolation. I believe by capturing the faerie folklore when he did over (100 years ago, when belief was still prevalent). Evans has preserved a very important part of all our heritage. The similarities of stories from all the Celtic countries is something which could be studied to uncover our ancient beliefs and understanding. I'm sure in many ways we've lost our connection to nature and real spirituality. Evans conclusions seem very Eastern. And in fact he went on to become a Buddhist and translated the Tibetan book of the dead. It's fascinating to think that before Christianity and in fact the early Christians, believed in reincarnation and an inter connectedness. An excellently researched book. Not easy to read, quite academic, but well worth it. I have much deeper understanding of Celtic mythology and pagan beliefs.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This encyclopedic book -- you don't read it, you read around in it -- was one I purchased for deep background information on the novel I am currently writing. What a treasure trove it is. Evans-Wentz spent 2 or 3 years traveling about Ireland, England, Scotland, Wales, and Brittany from about 1908-1910 and collecting lore about fairy folk. The stories he transcribed, often with aid of a translator, might have been lost otherwise. They are in the words of the tellers. There is material, too, on t This encyclopedic book -- you don't read it, you read around in it -- was one I purchased for deep background information on the novel I am currently writing. What a treasure trove it is. Evans-Wentz spent 2 or 3 years traveling about Ireland, England, Scotland, Wales, and Brittany from about 1908-1910 and collecting lore about fairy folk. The stories he transcribed, often with aid of a translator, might have been lost otherwise. They are in the words of the tellers. There is material, too, on the roots of the Arthurian legend, the influence of Christianity, witchcraft, and theories about the fairy faith. An amazing and fascinating resource.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Haught

    I wanted to read this because I so love the Celtic lands and culture. This is book is very academic, and it was written at the beginning of the 20th century, and references books from the 19th century. Most of it features first-person accountings of fairy sightings and stories from "peasants" of the Celtic lands. I got partway through the Scottish stories, and realized that this is an interesting reference book - and that I don't necessarily want to actually read a reference book cover to cover. I wanted to read this because I so love the Celtic lands and culture. This is book is very academic, and it was written at the beginning of the 20th century, and references books from the 19th century. Most of it features first-person accountings of fairy sightings and stories from "peasants" of the Celtic lands. I got partway through the Scottish stories, and realized that this is an interesting reference book - and that I don't necessarily want to actually read a reference book cover to cover. I'm shelving it, but keeping it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    Wonderful treasure of folk practice. Some very odd theories in places, but it was written over a hundred years ago, so you can forgive the writer for believing in Celtic solar cults! There's never going to be such a range of evidence of belief in the Good Folk collected again, since the fairy faith is really a thing of the past in Ireland and Britain now. So this is absolutely worth reading, even if the old-fashioned style makes it a bit of a struggle to read. Wonderful treasure of folk practice. Some very odd theories in places, but it was written over a hundred years ago, so you can forgive the writer for believing in Celtic solar cults! There's never going to be such a range of evidence of belief in the Good Folk collected again, since the fairy faith is really a thing of the past in Ireland and Britain now. So this is absolutely worth reading, even if the old-fashioned style makes it a bit of a struggle to read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Molly Ringle

    How strange and wonderful that this book exists! But then, perhaps asking the native Celts about their belief in fairy-type spirits is no different, anthropologically, than asking the native Americans or Polynesians or so on about their belief in various spirits. Really cool stuff for that first half, then too dense and dry in the academic discussion for the second half. I ended up skimming that part.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Isobelpoe

    I don't know what exactly I was expecting but this was just a bit cheesy. It was really exactly like listening to my relatives discuss these things, barely able to hide their laughter, and no more believable. But read it. It is good to be able to carry this info around in your head, if only to share with little kids. Picture me walking away muttering about wanting 'verifiable evidence!'. ;-) I don't know what exactly I was expecting but this was just a bit cheesy. It was really exactly like listening to my relatives discuss these things, barely able to hide their laughter, and no more believable. But read it. It is good to be able to carry this info around in your head, if only to share with little kids. Picture me walking away muttering about wanting 'verifiable evidence!'. ;-)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stephany

    Yes, this book is based in Victorian fancy, what of it? I think more folklorists should look to preserving the oral narrative of the past and fewer should tediously dissect that narrative in terms of metaphorical meanings which are at best conjecture. Perhaps fairy, really meant a fairy and we all have too much faith in consensual reality?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carmon

    A good reference but the way it was written was too wordy for me to actually enjoy reading it. There was so many cases of sentences that were the size of paragraphs and the writing structure was just all wrong.

  27. 4 out of 5

    DAN

    This was a very difficult book for me to read when I read it. It reads in part as a school text with much research and Geo and Sociopolitical information included along side mythical and lyrical content. do not if I would tackle it again but it was worth the time it took to digest it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This book was interesting. I anticipated a book about fairies and the first half was just that. The last portion of the book was a more difficult read and full of "hoodoo". I really enjoyed it for the historical look at the beliefs of the time...Freud was spoken of as a contemporary! This book was interesting. I anticipated a book about fairies and the first half was just that. The last portion of the book was a more difficult read and full of "hoodoo". I really enjoyed it for the historical look at the beliefs of the time...Freud was spoken of as a contemporary!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is an amazing book!!!!!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kim Briggs

    A dry, but interesting guide to the fairy faith. 1st person accounts recorded of actual encounters/stories.

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