web site hit counter Democracy: A History - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Democracy: A History

Availability: Ready to download

For the last twenty-five years, fostering democracy around the world has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Why is democracy so important today? Why should it hold such sway over the political speech of the modern world? In Democracy: A History , John Dunn – England's leading political theorist — sets out to explain the extraordinary presence of democracy in today' For the last twenty-five years, fostering democracy around the world has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Why is democracy so important today? Why should it hold such sway over the political speech of the modern world? In Democracy: A History , John Dunn – England's leading political theorist — sets out to explain the extraordinary presence of democracy in today's world. The story begins in Greece, where it began as an improvised remedy for a very local difficulty twenty–five hundred years ago. Athens gave democracy a name (demokratia) and worked out an elaborate, highly distinctive, and astonishingly thorough interpretation of the political conditions required to achieve it. However, democracy's tenure was short–lived, flourishing briefly and then fading away almost everywhere for nearly two thousand years. Democracy then suddenly reappeared with the founding of the new American republic and amid the struggles of France's Revolution. The word democrat suddenly became a partisan label and a badge of political honor, lending credibility to the idea of transforming human collective life, anywhere and everywhere, to fit the requirements of democracy that are so familiar to us today.


Compare

For the last twenty-five years, fostering democracy around the world has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Why is democracy so important today? Why should it hold such sway over the political speech of the modern world? In Democracy: A History , John Dunn – England's leading political theorist — sets out to explain the extraordinary presence of democracy in today' For the last twenty-five years, fostering democracy around the world has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Why is democracy so important today? Why should it hold such sway over the political speech of the modern world? In Democracy: A History , John Dunn – England's leading political theorist — sets out to explain the extraordinary presence of democracy in today's world. The story begins in Greece, where it began as an improvised remedy for a very local difficulty twenty–five hundred years ago. Athens gave democracy a name (demokratia) and worked out an elaborate, highly distinctive, and astonishingly thorough interpretation of the political conditions required to achieve it. However, democracy's tenure was short–lived, flourishing briefly and then fading away almost everywhere for nearly two thousand years. Democracy then suddenly reappeared with the founding of the new American republic and amid the struggles of France's Revolution. The word democrat suddenly became a partisan label and a badge of political honor, lending credibility to the idea of transforming human collective life, anywhere and everywhere, to fit the requirements of democracy that are so familiar to us today.

30 review for Democracy: A History

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fyodor Kafka

    النجمة الوحيدة للترجمة لأنني لم أطلع على الكتاب بلغته الأصلية ولا أستطيع الحكم عليه. هذه أسوأ تجربة لي في حياتي مع الكتب المترجمة!! لم أقرأ في حياتي ترجمة على هذا القدر من السوء والرداءة! لم أستطع طوال قراءتي للكتاب أن أفهم جملة مفيدة واحدة أو أن أستخلص منه أية فكرة واضحة ومفهومة! لا أدري إن كان الكتاب أساساً مكتوباً بأسلوب صعب ومرهق وأتوقع ذلك على الأرجح، لكن هذا لا يشفع للمترجم فمن الواضح أن ضعفه الشديد وعدم تمكنه قد زاد الطين بلةً وحول الكتاب في نسخته العربية إلى مجموعة طلاسم وألغاز! أتمنى ألا النجمة الوحيدة للترجمة لأنني لم أطلع على الكتاب بلغته الأصلية ولا أستطيع الحكم عليه. هذه أسوأ تجربة لي في حياتي مع الكتب المترجمة!! لم أقرأ في حياتي ترجمة على هذا القدر من السوء والرداءة! لم أستطع طوال قراءتي للكتاب أن أفهم جملة مفيدة واحدة أو أن أستخلص منه أية فكرة واضحة ومفهومة! لا أدري إن كان الكتاب أساساً مكتوباً بأسلوب صعب ومرهق وأتوقع ذلك على الأرجح، لكن هذا لا يشفع للمترجم فمن الواضح أن ضعفه الشديد وعدم تمكنه قد زاد الطين بلةً وحول الكتاب في نسخته العربية إلى مجموعة طلاسم وألغاز! أتمنى ألا تكون كافة الترجمات الصادة عن مكتبة العبيكان بنفس هذه السوية فلديهم العديد من العناوين الرنانة والجذابة في مجال الكتب المترجمة لكن إن كان المحتوى بنفس هذه السوية فتلك خيبة أمل وكارثة حقيقية!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nasser Moh'd

    بحث حول الديمقراطيه المصطلح والنشأه والأفكار ، الكتاب فيه انصاف كثير وحياد علمي حول كيفية تشكل المصطلح منذ البدايه إلى اليوم ، ستجدون فيه الإجابه عن لماذا ألتهمت الديمقراطيه العالم اليوم ؟ . إلا أن الترجمه خذلتني في بعض الأحيان

  3. 5 out of 5

    Todd Stockslager

    Dunn studies the history of the word and the idea of democracy from its inception in Athens, suggests why it went dormant for 2000 years, then picks up the study again with the American revolution and the French Revolution. But this isn't primarily a linguistic or historical exercise, but rather a study of democracy as a process ("democratization") and as a form of government ("capitalist republic"), and a study of how the word "democracy" has been co-opted and changed and why it still has power Dunn studies the history of the word and the idea of democracy from its inception in Athens, suggests why it went dormant for 2000 years, then picks up the study again with the American revolution and the French Revolution. But this isn't primarily a linguistic or historical exercise, but rather a study of democracy as a process ("democratization") and as a form of government ("capitalist republic"), and a study of how the word "democracy" has been co-opted and changed and why it still has power today. Dunn seems democracy as a split (framed in philosophy by Sieyes and in practice by Robespierre during the French Revolution) between equality and "egoism" - Ayn-Randian capitalism, basically, is how I'd describe Dunn's use of the word. The American experiment resolved the dialectic (Marxism is dead as a form of government but not forgotten as a way of thought) in favor of egoism by accepting limits on equality, with controls on egoism as envisioned by Madison in Federalist No. 10. This framed the success (i.e. avoidance of Terror) of the American revolution, while taking the practice of democracy as a form of government another step removed from the original Athenian definition and practice. This salvation and distress is the form in which democracy has conquered the world. Dunn restates and sometimes overstates the uniqueness of his question, but the study is a worthy one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pavol Hardos

    Good historical overview, very erudite framing, but too rambling and vague (despite being rather short). Often reads like a first draft of transcribed lecture notes, lacking a more exacting editorial supervision. [Also: referring to contemporary events at the time of writing (Blair, Bush, Iraq War) may have seemed like a good idea, but it only makes the book appear more dated.]

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alaa

    هذا الكتاب فيه جانب حلو لكن لا أظن أنه يمكنني الاعتماد عليه أكاديميًا هو أشبه بورقة لم تكتمل بقيت مسودة مترجمة ونشرت.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luke Dubbelman

    This book gets 5 stars for content and quality but 3 stars for being difficult to read. I am sure if I was a little better versed in political philosophy and the history of democracy it would not have been as difficult to read. I am just saying this as a warning for the would be reader that it is a good but not easy intro to the history of democracy. However, since it was a short book (188 pages before about 40 pages of notes) it was like a small dive into the deep end. Dunn splits the history o This book gets 5 stars for content and quality but 3 stars for being difficult to read. I am sure if I was a little better versed in political philosophy and the history of democracy it would not have been as difficult to read. I am just saying this as a warning for the would be reader that it is a good but not easy intro to the history of democracy. However, since it was a short book (188 pages before about 40 pages of notes) it was like a small dive into the deep end. Dunn splits the history of democracy into two comings - the first coming (ch.1)- athenian democracy and the 2nd coming (ch.2)- modern day democracy from the lens of the french and american revolutions. Both chapters have great historical context, original thoughts and a good overview of each democratic era and model. As a beginner to political history I was introduced to characters like Pericles, Robospierre and Babeuf along with the usual suspects of Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Locke, the Federalists etc. After going through the two "comings of democracy", Dunn has a chapter titled "the long shadow of thermidor" that I recall being mainly about "egoism and equality" as political forces and how modern day democracy embodies egoism perfectly as to allow the people to put up with under the belief that they live in a society where everyone is equal (this is my very simplistic idea of his well worded and complex presentation of the dynamics of equality and egoism within modern political systems going under the name of democracy). His last chapter is titled "why Democracy" and seeks to answer the question "why has democracy become the standard system of legitimating political power in the modern world. This chapter also has some good original thoughts on the modern push for "deliberative democracy" and an enlivening of the publich sphere and some good reflections on the pitfalls and importance of representative democracy. One of the more interesting and constant themes throughout the book is actually about the word democracy. In a way this book tells the history of a word and how it has been used and understood by people from Athens till today. I did not know that "democracy" was usually said with negative connotations for the larger part of philosophical history ranging from Plato up to the Federalist party that wrestled with how to use the term. So Dunn wrestles with how this word which used to be viewed negatively and as a sign of a country in chaos became a rallying cry of hope and has enabled America and Britian to storm into Iraq by justifying the move as liberating from tyranny and establishing democracy. How did democracy shift from a negative political term to a modern day war cry? This question, and Dunn's answers, rolls throughout the whole book. Quotes: “Why should it be the case that, for the first time in the history of our still conspicuously multi-lingual species, there is for the present a single world-wide name for the legitimate basis of political authority? Not, of course, uncontested in practice anywhere, and still roundly rejected in many quarters, but never, any longer, in favor of an alternative secular claimant to cosmopolitan legitimacy.” (pg.15) “When any modern state claims to be a democracy, it necessarily misdescribes itself” (pg.18) Pericles: “for we alone regard the man who takes no part in public affairs, not as one who minds his own business, but as good for nothing…. it is not debate which is a hindrance to action, but rather not to be instructed by debate before the time comes for action.” (pg.27) “What happened in France in the few short years between 1788 and 1794 changed the structure of political possibilities for human communities across the world almost beyond recognition.” (pg.92) “A representative democracy was no system of direct citizen self-rule. Instead, what it offered was a system of highly indirect rule by representatives chosen for the purpose by the people.” (pg.122) “Once the happiness and strength of a society is placed in riches, the exercise of political rights must necessarily be denied to those whose fortune provides no guarantee of their attachment to the creation and defense of wealth. In any such social system, the great majority of citizens is constantly subjected to painful labour, and condemned in practice to languish in poverty, ignorance and slavery.” (pg.124) “In America, once the Constitution was firmly in place, democracy soon became the undisputed political framework and expression of the order of egoism.” (pg.125-126) “To delegate government to relatively small numbers of citizens but also insist that they be chosen by most, if not all, of their fellows was a cunning mixture of equality and inequality.” (pg.128) “As a modern political term, democracy is above all the name for political authority exercised solely through the persuasion of the greater number, or for other sorts of authority in other spheres supposedly exercised solely on a basis acceptable to those subjected to it.” (pg.132)`

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom Calvard

    Very learned and thoughtful reflections on the history of the concept and word democracy. However, I agree with another review I saw that said it reads like a series of disorganised essay materials to an extent. I did not find it easy to follow in parts. At the same time, there are many profound and careful arguments about the limits and status of democracy, both as a value and a way of governing. But the book is theoretical and abstract rather than concrete and specific. So it's not always clea Very learned and thoughtful reflections on the history of the concept and word democracy. However, I agree with another review I saw that said it reads like a series of disorganised essay materials to an extent. I did not find it easy to follow in parts. At the same time, there are many profound and careful arguments about the limits and status of democracy, both as a value and a way of governing. But the book is theoretical and abstract rather than concrete and specific. So it's not always clear what to take from some of its careful and reasonable arguments, along with its necessarily pessimistic and detached conclusions. Lots of food for thought perhaps, particularly towards the end when it discusses the limits and status of modern democracy around the globe today. However, the climax of the book ends up inevitably being a bit underwhelming and depressing. Democracy is something widespread today, but existing in a constrained, limited form - a sort of 'least worst' way for humans to continue living together in societies, ensuring the relative autonomy and stability of populations. One wonders what Dunn would have to say about Brexit, Trump and other relevant events that have transpired since the publication of this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Alhrbi

    رغم أن الكتاب وعنوانه ومبحثه شيق إلا أن الترجمة سيئة جداً جداً ... أتمنى صدور طبعة جديدة بترجمة غير تجارية

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hamad Abdulsamad

    قرأت الكتاب باللغة الانجليزية، طلبتها من موقع أمازون ولم أجد إلا نسخة مستعملة. كان قرار قراءته باللغة الانجليزية قرار سيء فاللغة صعبة علي، والمصطلحات إن كنت أعرف بعضها إلا أن استيعابها بطيء في ذهني. بالإضافة إلى أن الآمال على الكتاب كانت عالية جدا. ببساطة، لم أستمتع، أبطأ مسيري في جدول القراءة كما أنه أعادني لتلك العادة التي أقرأ بها فقط حتى أقلب الصفحة! أظن أن الكتاب مفيد، وبصراحة حفزني للبحث أكثر، إلا أني أظن أن اللغة كانت حاجزا استطاع أن يلوث التجربة. الترجمة حسب ما أعرف سيئة. هنا بعض الاقتباسا قرأت الكتاب باللغة الانجليزية، طلبتها من موقع أمازون ولم أجد إلا نسخة مستعملة. كان قرار قراءته باللغة الانجليزية قرار سيء فاللغة صعبة علي، والمصطلحات إن كنت أعرف بعضها إلا أن استيعابها بطيء في ذهني. بالإضافة إلى أن الآمال على الكتاب كانت عالية جدا. ببساطة، لم أستمتع، أبطأ مسيري في جدول القراءة كما أنه أعادني لتلك العادة التي أقرأ بها فقط حتى أقلب الصفحة! أظن أن الكتاب مفيد، وبصراحة حفزني للبحث أكثر، إلا أني أظن أن اللغة كانت حاجزا استطاع أن يلوث التجربة. الترجمة حسب ما أعرف سيئة. هنا بعض الاقتباسات: Democracy: a history 'Whithin the last three-quarters of a century democracy has become the political core of the civilization which the wests offer to the rest of the world' p14 !!!!!!!!!؟ Every where that the word democracy has fought its way forward across time and space, you can here both themes: the purposeful struggle to improve the practical circumstances of life, and to escape from arbitrary and brutal coercion, but also the determination and longing to be treated with respect and some degree of consideration. p19 This regime, which is called democracy (demokratia), because it is adminstered with a view to the interest of the many, not of the few, hasnt merely made athens great. p26 In the eyes of the old Oligarch, it was true in every country that those greater distinction oppose democracy, seeing themselves as repositories of decorum snd respect for justice, and their social inferiors as ignorant, disorderly and vicious. p28 For the old oligarch, in stark contrast, the democracy of Athens was a robust but flagrantly unedifying system of power, which subjected the noble elements of of its society to the meaner, transferred wealth purposefully from one to the other, and distributed the means of coercion clear-headidly and determinedly to cement this outcome and keep the nobler elements in control. p28 For the people do not want a good government underwhich they themselves are slaves, they want to be free and to rule. Democracy in Athens arose out of struggles between wealthier landowners snd poorer families who had lost, or were in danger of losing, their land, and who therefore risked being forced into unfree labour by their accumilated devts. it didnt arise, directly and self-consciously through that struggle itself, by unmistakable victory of the poor over the rich, but through a sequence of political initiatives which reshaped the social geography and institutions of Athens, and endowed it with a political identity, and a system of self-rule, which equipped it to express and defend that identity. p32 The survival of democracy as a word, its penetration from ancient greek into wide range of later languages, and still more its inforced translation over a much briefier time-span into the language of every other substantial human population across the globe, came less from its continuing capacity to elicit enthusiasim than from its utility in organizing thoughts, facilitating argument and dhaping judgment. p39 To reject democracy today may just be, sooner or later, to write yourself out of politics. it is definitely to write yourself more or less at once out of polite political conversation. Democracy has come to be our preferred name to our sole basis on which we accept either our belonging or our dependence. we may not embrace either with joy, or even ease, but, at least on this proviso, these might be communities which on balance we can accept rather fhan repudiate. it is, above all, our term for political identification, we, the people. what the term means (even now, when that so clearly is not how matters are in the outside world) is that the people (we) hold power and excercise rule. That is what it meant in Athens, where the claim bore some relation to the truth. That is what it means today, when it very much appears a thumping falsehood, a process within which democracy has often proved a far from preferred term for political identification. p51 Revolution sndcpunter revolution were born together... p102 They may try in vain to shut their eyes to the revolution which time and the force of things has brought about: it is real for all that. There was once a time when the third estate were serfs and the nobility was everything. Now the thirs estate is everything and nobility is only a word.But beneath this word, a new and intolerable aristocracy has slid in, and the people has every reason not to want any aristocrats. p109 Sieyes: 'During the long night of feudal barbarism, it was possible to destroy the true relations between men, to turn all concepts upside down, and to corrupt all justice, but as day dawns, so gothic absurdities must fly and the remnants of ancient ferocity collapse and disappear. This is quite certain. p110 we merely be substituting one evil for another, or will social order, in all its beauty, take the place of former chaos? will the changes we are about to experience be the bitter fruit of a civil war, disastrous in all respects for the three orders and profitable only to ministerial power; or will they be neutral, anticipated and well comtroled consequence of a simple and just outlook, for a happy co-opperation favoured by the weight of circumstances, and sincerely promoted by all the classes concerned? p111 The quest to combine democracy with monarchy in varying proportions persisted in France itself in intervals for almost a century, with at least one notable triumph along the way in the person of Napeleon. It was emulated widely elsewhere for quite some time, and is still not wholly discredited in some settings (Morocco, Thailand, Holland, Sweden, Britain and in future perhaps Saudi Arabia). p120 The main motif in Buonarrotis account was his insistence on equality as the Revolution's deepest and most transformative goal, and on the profound gulf between the true defenders of equality and their sly and all too politically effective adversaries, the partisians of the order egoism, or 'the english doctrine of the economists', who had struggled against them throughout its course, and ended by triumphing over them. p124 What had lost France both democracy and liberty even before Thermindor was the diversity of views, the conflicts of interests, the lack of vertue, unity and virtue, unity and perseverance in the National Assembly at which the conspirators aimed, democrats to a man, would display none of these vices and weaknesses. The point of vetting, and the grounds for operating not merely in secret but as tightly organized body bound together in shared conviction, was precisely to eliminate them. p125 in America, democracy soon became the undisputed political framework and expression of the order of egoism. ... It arose from and indorsed a society both self-consciously and actually in rapid motion, expanding in territory, growing in wealth, and looking forward to a future of permenant and all but limitless change. p126 For us it has come to name not merely a form of government, but also, and very bit as much, a political value. p130 The market economy is the most powerful mechanism for dismantling equality that humans ever fashioned. p137 Under democracy, it must be the people of Iraq who decide whom or what they wish to be friend or oppose. they prove to differ bitterly with one another over the question: and very few of them seem drawn to American views on the matter. p141 Democracy in itself, as we have seen, does not specify any clear and difinite structure of rule. p149 BeforeOxtober 1917 virtually all all twentieth-centurywestern socialists were democrats in their own eyes, however much they might differ in goals, political temperament or preferred institutional expediments. Within three years, socialists across the world were divided bitterly by the new russian regime, rejecting it catagorically for its tyranny and oppression, or insisting that it and it alone was the true bearer of the torch of the equals. For those who adopted the second point of view, anyone who disputed its title to democracy or censured it governmental style simply showed themselves partisians of the order of egoism: object lackeys of the rich. p157 ><^ Democratization is open-ended, indeterminate and explaratory. It sets out from, and responds to, the conception of democracy as a political value, away on which whatever matters deeply for a body of human beings should in the end be decided. P179 ... democracy as it now is cannot be all for which we can reasonably hope. p185 the more governments control what their fellow citizens know the less they can claim the authority of those citizens for how they rule. 185

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert Corbett

    Should be required reading for all citizens of US. A lovely example of a scholar and philosopher who has contributed more than their share of technical and esoteric work to gain his professorship writes (usually towards the sunset of a career) a book that asks a simple question and then elaborates it in necessary and fascinating ways. The q: Why is Democracy the standard that nearly all reform and reactionary movements in our contemporaneity march under? It may seem obvious but it is not. Democr Should be required reading for all citizens of US. A lovely example of a scholar and philosopher who has contributed more than their share of technical and esoteric work to gain his professorship writes (usually towards the sunset of a career) a book that asks a simple question and then elaborates it in necessary and fascinating ways. The q: Why is Democracy the standard that nearly all reform and reactionary movements in our contemporaneity march under? It may seem obvious but it is not. Democracy the word and many of its connotations is the work of classical Athens which only gave franchise to men of standing and depended on slavery for its economy. The Romans would have called democracy mob rule which tenured professors will still say it is, though their standard was Liberty. It lay virtually dormant for some 2000 years (in the West) until it emerged in England (but not really, Shelley signed himself in to lodgings as an Atheist and a Democrat by which he was trolling). It got more than a little push from Robespierre and the Jacobins, and the confusions of US also exported it. One thinks one knows what it is, but pause .,. exactly who gets to weigh in on what decision? US is by no means a country that enacts one person one vote policies (this makes Wyoming and Delaware happy). Is it more observed in the breach? In a country of such demographic diversity and geographic splay is practicable. (No theorist of organization would say 50 administrative units was a good idea!) Democracy is a critical genealogy in the best sense (borrowed from Jonathan Arac). A book that asks searching questions with one point examples and provides a frame for further discussion. It can be read quickly but returned to for further inspiration. Democracy by John Dunn is simply one of the necessary books of our time along with Sebastian Junger's Tribes and Ta-Nehisi Coates Between the World and Me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    I enjoyed Dunn's writing and use of language. And I appreciated his obvious breadth of knowledge. Anyone who can characterize people living under modern democracies as being in a state of involuntary befuddlement clearly has something to say. But his insights are hidden behind his brilliant turn of phrase. I'd like to either re-read the book, carefully, or interview Mr. Dunn to understand his points. I get the outline but would like a clearer understanding. I enjoyed Dunn's writing and use of language. And I appreciated his obvious breadth of knowledge. Anyone who can characterize people living under modern democracies as being in a state of involuntary befuddlement clearly has something to say. But his insights are hidden behind his brilliant turn of phrase. I'd like to either re-read the book, carefully, or interview Mr. Dunn to understand his points. I get the outline but would like a clearer understanding.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Faisal ElBeheiry

    كتاب ممل نوعا ما عن تاريخ الديمقراطية.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amaël

    Insightful at times, but rambling and hard to get into even for political theory nerds.

  14. 4 out of 5

    M7md Alghanmi

    معرفة الاعتبارات الكثيرة وراء اهم كلمة سياسية حاليا "الديمقراطية" هو موضوع مهم جدا. الكتاب عبارة عن بحث عظيم يتحدث عن تاريخ الديمقراطية ويُطَعِّمه الكاتب بالأفكار والاعتراضات. الكتاب محايد جدا وهذا يضيف كثيرا الى قيمته. … الترجمة سيئة جدا وظالمة جدا لعظمة الكتاب الأصلي!! وجمع الهوامش في آخر الكتاب من أشد الغباء و تشتيت القراء!! معرفة الاعتبارات الكثيرة وراء اهم كلمة سياسية حاليا "الديمقراطية" هو موضوع مهم جدا. الكتاب عبارة عن بحث عظيم يتحدث عن تاريخ الديمقراطية ويُطَعِّمه الكاتب بالأفكار والاعتراضات. الكتاب محايد جدا وهذا يضيف كثيرا الى قيمته. … الترجمة سيئة جدا وظالمة جدا لعظمة الكتاب الأصلي!! وجمع الهوامش في آخر الكتاب من أشد الغباء و تشتيت القراء!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Graham Cammock

    This is a fascinating book, it tells the history of democracy and how it was a bad term for most of its existence but ultimately came be to the most favoured form of government. It highlights the difference between Athenian democracy which was practiced on a small city-state scale and representative democracy which had to be invented for larger modern countries. Well worth a read!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Badghaish

    اسم الكتاب بالإنجليزية "تاريخ الديموقراطية" والطبعة المترجمة سميت "قصة الديموقراطية"، وأعتقد بأن هذا وحده يبين ضعف الترجمة الكتاب عبارة عن سرد لتاريخ كلمة الديموقراطية، وكيف تغير استخدام الكلمة ودلالتها عبر الزمن .. الكتاب لطيف ويستحق ترجمة أفضل اسم الكتاب بالإنجليزية "تاريخ الديموقراطية" والطبعة المترجمة سميت "قصة الديموقراطية"، وأعتقد بأن هذا وحده يبين ضعف الترجمة الكتاب عبارة عن سرد لتاريخ كلمة الديموقراطية، وكيف تغير استخدام الكلمة ودلالتها عبر الزمن .. الكتاب لطيف ويستحق ترجمة أفضل

  17. 5 out of 5

    KHALID©

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Russo

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  20. 4 out of 5

    حياة الناصري

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saawani Raje

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve Book

  24. 4 out of 5

    Obeikan Publishing

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shafira Hexagraha

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo

  27. 5 out of 5

    أمل

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bassem Alfiky

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steven

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.