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In Blyton's final book about the girls at Malory Towers, Darrell becomes head girl. Unfortunately not all the girls are as responsible as she is and in her last term Darrell sees many changes in her old school friends. In Blyton's final book about the girls at Malory Towers, Darrell becomes head girl. Unfortunately not all the girls are as responsible as she is and in her last term Darrell sees many changes in her old school friends.


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In Blyton's final book about the girls at Malory Towers, Darrell becomes head girl. Unfortunately not all the girls are as responsible as she is and in her last term Darrell sees many changes in her old school friends. In Blyton's final book about the girls at Malory Towers, Darrell becomes head girl. Unfortunately not all the girls are as responsible as she is and in her last term Darrell sees many changes in her old school friends.

30 review for The LAST TERM AT MALORY TOWERS

  1. 5 out of 5

    C.

    I've spent the last few days rereading my copies of Enid Blyton's Malory Towers series. Unfortunately I only have the third, fifth and sixth, but I am now determined to get my hands on the other three and read them obsessively. I love them for a few of reasons, which I shall enumerate here: 1. They bring back so many memories, primarily of the days when I actually read the damn things (when I was about six to eight years old). At the time I was living in England, where people actually did say "yo I've spent the last few days rereading my copies of Enid Blyton's Malory Towers series. Unfortunately I only have the third, fifth and sixth, but I am now determined to get my hands on the other three and read them obsessively. I love them for a few of reasons, which I shall enumerate here: 1. They bring back so many memories, primarily of the days when I actually read the damn things (when I was about six to eight years old). At the time I was living in England, where people actually did say "you'd jolly well better not do that again!", where it seemed not only possible, but likely, that fairies lived down the bottom of the garden, where an adventure and a mystery was just waiting around every corner, and where life was so full of simple wonder. 2. It's just so GOOD! Good as in everyone is good and kind and perfect, except for the people who aren't. It's totally black and white, and the baddies always either get their commeuppance or admit their faults and are reformed, the goodies are always recognised and loved, the ending is always happy and OH MY GOD I LOVE ENID BLYTON. Example: "Sometimes hard things are good for us,' said Miss Grayling, and Miss Peters nodded. After all, the girls didn't come to Malory Towers only to learn lessons in class - they came to learn other things too - to be just and fair, generous, brave, kind. Perhaps those things were even more important than the lessons!" 3. The moment when Darrel steps out onto the stage to rapturous applause at the end of the pantomime which she wrote has remained in my subconscious for years as the ultimate image of success and happiness. I know that while Enid might have difficulty moving us to tears or making us ponder the deeper existentialist dilemmas, this is what she does brilliantly - portraying the glorious happiness that comes from the act of living life to the fullest. This is also pretty hilarious, it has to be said. I won't deny that this has something to do with my enjoyment. Kids these days don't read her, I've noticed. Perhaps even 'in my day' - gosh, that makes me sound old - they didn't. But I lived within miles of the house where darling Enid lived, and I was a sweet, innocent, happy child to whom the idea of gallivanting around in secret passages and tackling 'rogues' and playing lacrosse was ridiculously appealing, and for whatever reason I read and loved those books for so many years. Then, all of a sudden, I went off them. This was because it abruptly dawned on me that the prose is crazy. Commonly used words include: 'super' as in 'oh super! Lacrosse game tomorrow!', 'rotten' as in 'rotten breakfasts they have here!', 'wizard' as in 'that's a wizard drawing, Belinda!', and many other wonderful examples that I noticed at the time but have now slipped my mind. Not to mention the overabundance of explanation marks, as evidenced by my thoughtfully chosen examples. No matter. I am having a wonderful, nostalgic trip to the past and I am eternally grateful to Enid Blyton, because it was basically her (and Roald Dahl) who introduced me to reading, and it's really great. You should totally try it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stef Rozitis

    Oddly readable for a shallow book full of 2-dimensional characters. It consistently makes classist gibes as well as casually plays with racism. The children in the book are quite right wing and conformist in their views; meanwhile institutionalised bullying is wholeheartedly promoted. I think it's not a fantastic thing to give to actual children to read (I know we are all supposed to see Blyton as "innocent" but look at what she is actually and oh-so-lightly saying). Reading critically as an adul Oddly readable for a shallow book full of 2-dimensional characters. It consistently makes classist gibes as well as casually plays with racism. The children in the book are quite right wing and conformist in their views; meanwhile institutionalised bullying is wholeheartedly promoted. I think it's not a fantastic thing to give to actual children to read (I know we are all supposed to see Blyton as "innocent" but look at what she is actually and oh-so-lightly saying). Reading critically as an adult, or using it as an example with children of why they ought to read carefully and critically it at least flows well, the writing draws you into reading on. There are some immature slapstick laughs in it as well as moments of joy. The ending is as patronising as usual in a Blyton novel, for some reason she tends to use the final sentence to smash the fourth wall (I am not sure why).

  3. 4 out of 5

    thelastword

    Malory Towers is awesome! Unless you're french. Or fat. Or transferred from a better school. Or afraid of water. Or annoy our leads' many sensitivities. Or are different in any way. If you are any of that, you will be mercilessly bullied and Blyton thinks you deserve it. This is just your average English boarding school I tell ya. (If you're still a child and you're enjoying this series, just pretend the Fifth was the last because the Last term was a mean close.) Malory Towers is awesome! Unless you're french. Or fat. Or transferred from a better school. Or afraid of water. Or annoy our leads' many sensitivities. Or are different in any way. If you are any of that, you will be mercilessly bullied and Blyton thinks you deserve it. This is just your average English boarding school I tell ya. (If you're still a child and you're enjoying this series, just pretend the Fifth was the last because the Last term was a mean close.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    This is the another great Malory Towers book. The original series ends here, though Pamela Cox wrote another six books following June and Felicity up the school. Last Term at Malory Towers is one of the few Blyton books where reality peeps in at times. For instance, Bill's brothers are said to have enlisted into the army (though the world war is by now over in 1948, Britain is still involved in conflicts all over the place). And other things happen ... Darrell becomes the head girl while Sally ge This is the another great Malory Towers book. The original series ends here, though Pamela Cox wrote another six books following June and Felicity up the school. Last Term at Malory Towers is one of the few Blyton books where reality peeps in at times. For instance, Bill's brothers are said to have enlisted into the army (though the world war is by now over in 1948, Britain is still involved in conflicts all over the place). And other things happen ... Darrell becomes the head girl while Sally gets to be the games captain. I will never understand why Darrell is chosen, but at least she does not physically assault anybody in this book. There are three new girls: Suzanne, Amanda, and Jo. The book is intertwined between the sixth and second forms so the old girls as well as Felicity, June, Susan, etc. get some character development. It is no wonder that Cox chose to continue their journey up the school as this book lays down the foundation for the second formers so well. Suzanne does not really have a story. She is just there as a release for Blyton's racism. She is Mam'zelle Rougier's niece and is in England to learn some English. She hates games and physical activities. This is getting old real fast. I am just glad Blyton is still not writing stories today or she would be stereotyping Muslim, Polish, and Indian kids today just like she did with American and French in the past! The stars of the story are really Amanda and June. Amanda comes from a famous sports school and is planning to go in for the Olympics. She does not really want to spend time coaching the lower forms but she finds June promising and begins to coach her. Both strong personalities, they eventually clash. Amanda also has an adventure that ends in disaster for her. It's an interesting story. Another interesting story is that of Jo, who is in the second form. The child of parents with "new money", Jo is set aside from the beginning. Her father is rudely treated by the other parents and the teachers, while Jo receives the same treatment from the youngsters. Apparently, he drops his Hs, which is the biggest crime in Blytondom. Jo's own behaviour does not help matters and both she and her father are forced to see the error of their ways. However, unlike poor Gwen's father, Jo's actually loves her, so all will always be well for her. Gwen's dad, having said "cutting" things to her for years has now taken it into his head to refuse to send her to a finishing school. But when the fifteen year old girl (let's bring that into perspective here!) insists, he gives in and goes around looking sad and forlorn trying to make everyone upset. While her father may have the right ideas and getting a job would have given Gwen a head start in life, his behaviour sounds abusive. Gwen's own comment that it is impossible to know whether her father is really ill or just sulking is quite revealing. He also fails to work on his own marriage. However, when he really falls ill, Gwen picks up the responsibility and shows the stuff she is made of. The Last Term in Malory Towers does not really follow the lives of the usual bunch but we see what plans the girls have for the future. It is very interesting to note that most plan to have jobs! Well done, Blyton!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore

    The final Malory Towers book, and thus the final part of my revisit of these books, which I ended up picking up many months after I’d read book 5. In this one Darrell and Sally, and the rest of their form are returning to Malory Towers for their last term. Darrell and Sally and also Alicia and Betty are headed after that to college—St Andrews in Scotland, while Irene will go on to study music and Belinda art. Bill (Wilhemina) and Clarissa also have plans of their own to the others’ surprise. Bei The final Malory Towers book, and thus the final part of my revisit of these books, which I ended up picking up many months after I’d read book 5. In this one Darrell and Sally, and the rest of their form are returning to Malory Towers for their last term. Darrell and Sally and also Alicia and Betty are headed after that to college—St Andrews in Scotland, while Irene will go on to study music and Belinda art. Bill (Wilhemina) and Clarissa also have plans of their own to the others’ surprise. Being their last term, Sally and Darrell want to savour every moment and Darrell, now the head-girl, takes in the new students to Miss Grayling to hear once more the wise words she says to every new student. Being in the sixth form, they don’t think there will be any new students but there are in fact two—the domineering Amanda, a genius at sport who has come to Malory Towers because her own school Treningan Towers was destroyed in a fire, and is inclined to turn up her nose at the fact that Malory Towers isn’t as focused on sport as her old school was. And there is Suzanne, a French girl, Mam’zelle Rougier’s nice who speaks as all EB’s French characters too—with an exaggerated style but is still likeable and good fun. The term is as usual a mix of work and play, with some conflict thrown in. Now that the sixth formers’ time at Malory is coming to an end, the only question before them is what they have made of their time at the school. While some like Darrell and Sally have learnt to overcome their flaws or at least be more in control of them, others like Alicia continue to be as they are but perhaps in a milder form. But of all of them, it is Gwen (Gwendolen Mary Lacy) who has gained absolutely nothing from her time there—and continues to be as she always was, no longer even listening to her governess Miss Winter who seems to be talking some sense rather than simply pandering to her now. Amanda too is difficult and clashes with the equally headstrong Moira, but when she decides to coach June, Alicia’s cousin, in tennis and swimming, as she sees a lot of potential in her, the project turns out to be good for them both. But there is also the inevitable clash of two rather strong personalities. Among the younger ones, the spoiled Jo Jones is a misfit, encouraged by her brash father to do just as she likes, and she ends up not just putting off her fellow students but taking steps from which there can be no return. And on a lighter note, since the sixth formers are now no longer in a position to play tricks, this too falls to the younger ones with the Mam’zelles once again being at the receiving end. This was an enjoyable close to the series with both light moments as well as grave ones. Many of the girls have their certificate exams to take though Darrell and Sally don’t find it as hard since they have been putting in work consistently. But academic issues apart, there are plenty of dilemmas and crises in some of their lives. Gwen for one refuses to see sense, even though Miss Grayling charges Darrell to try one last time, and continues to pursue her own path. But lessons must be learnt in life and poor Gwen has to end up learning the hard way. Amanda too has to learn hers when she thinks certain advice is inapplicable to her. Among the younger ones too, this is the case for some of them. But whether the hard way or on their own, most of them at the end learn to face up to their flaws and perhaps try to work at being better. Of course (while not defending all of the characters), EB does have certain preconceptions or fixed ideas of how children should be to be ‘good’ or ‘appreciated’ as against being looked down upon which sometimes may be isn’t so accepting of difference; at the same time, I like the fact that even her main characters like Darrell and Sally are not without their flaws, and realistically, these don’t magically vanish or are magically overcome either but must be faced again and again, and dealt with. But of course all is not as grave and bleak as I may have made it sound, there are plenty of fun moments too—no plays or performances but there are tricks, this time played by the younger ones—Felicity and June’s form—one involving a magnet and the Mam’zelles’ hairpins, which turns out so much fun that they decide to give the sixth formers a chance to enjoy themselves as well, finding excuses to play it in their form too, not once but twice, and with something further added on. Suzanne, the French girl, is like Claudine from St Clare’s, with ‘piggyhoolear’ English, and an outlook much like EB’s notion of ‘foreigners’ (and why she faces criticism) adds a further touch of humour. I liked how the series wrapped up with us being told what lies ahead for all the students, even ones who’ve left, though overall, it was perhaps on a graver note than the rest of the books.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    These characters became very dear to both me and my daughter. She loves when I read some of the older books. Ones written around the times my grandmother (here great) was born or young. Two quotes from my daughter "I can't wait to read these all again" "Too bad there wasn't another series that had the younger forums in it" Little does she know another author picked up where Enid Blyton left off. I was pleasantly surprised to see that someone had myself. But then again these are wonderful books a These characters became very dear to both me and my daughter. She loves when I read some of the older books. Ones written around the times my grandmother (here great) was born or young. Two quotes from my daughter "I can't wait to read these all again" "Too bad there wasn't another series that had the younger forums in it" Little does she know another author picked up where Enid Blyton left off. I was pleasantly surprised to see that someone had myself. But then again these are wonderful books and it really shouldn't have come to a surprise that another wanted more as well. So it isn't good bye Malory Towers is so long for now.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    Listened to in audio format. Darrell and her friends were now in the sixth form and then off to pastures new. Darrell, Sally and Alicia were going to St Andrews University. Mary Lou would be going into nursing and Bill and Clarissa would start a riding school. Gwendolyn was due to start a finishing school but her father had a heart attack which nearly killed him. Gwendolyn had to leave school early to look after her father, he would never work again so Gwendolyn would have to get a job. More humble Listened to in audio format. Darrell and her friends were now in the sixth form and then off to pastures new. Darrell, Sally and Alicia were going to St Andrews University. Mary Lou would be going into nursing and Bill and Clarissa would start a riding school. Gwendolyn was due to start a finishing school but her father had a heart attack which nearly killed him. Gwendolyn had to leave school early to look after her father, he would never work again so Gwendolyn would have to get a job. More humble Gwendolyn wrote to Darrell to apologise and said she had changed her ways. I enjoyed this final book but I thought the characters deserved a better sending off. In the words of Darrell, Bye Malory Towers see you soon.

  8. 5 out of 5

    she who shall not be named

    Just finished re-reading my childhood favourite series! And although I loved them all, this book in particular I liked the least. However, this time round I enjoyed it the most! My views on the characters haven’t changed much though (aside from the fact that Sally isn’t as boring as I remembered) I still feel sorry for Gwen and even sorta like her. Always have, always will. Thinking of re-reading St Clare’s next.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    I have always loved this series and reading it as an adult it still stands up for me. It was written back when everything wasn't so PC and over the top, so you have to ignore certain things and enjoy it as a story. I actually went to school with some of the girls described here, especially the nasty ones. A great read. I have always loved this series and reading it as an adult it still stands up for me. It was written back when everything wasn't so PC and over the top, so you have to ignore certain things and enjoy it as a story. I actually went to school with some of the girls described here, especially the nasty ones. A great read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    maidenofrohan

    Sometimes nostalgia is best left alone

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zarish Fatima

    End of an Era for me. I seriously doubt i would be reading anymore of Enid Blyton any more. But i have read quiet a number of books by her and so far have not been disappointed. Enid does not just write but she tries to teach the best she could. To respect ones parents, to care, to compromise, to listen, to share, to be humble, to be courageous, to learn, to grow. Malory Towers was a beautiful series, a handful of teenage girls who live together, learn together and become better people together. End of an Era for me. I seriously doubt i would be reading anymore of Enid Blyton any more. But i have read quiet a number of books by her and so far have not been disappointed. Enid does not just write but she tries to teach the best she could. To respect ones parents, to care, to compromise, to listen, to share, to be humble, to be courageous, to learn, to grow. Malory Towers was a beautiful series, a handful of teenage girls who live together, learn together and become better people together. They are about to graduate and they are taking away number of valuable lessons which they have learned in last six years of schooling and leaving behind number of memories and their juniors to whom they have taught and learned from many small things. there is this thing writer states through two different narratives "From what you have told me you've made the nice father of yours miserable. You've got what you want at the expanse of someone else's peace of mind"... "I have to stand on my own feet haven't i?"... "Not if you stamp on someones else's toes to do it." Something we all need to remember before making unreasonable demands of our parents and peers. Many character flaws we see in our society are mistakes and miscalculations of our parents. People really need to get their priorities straight. How important parents are!....Really, I think somebody should start a School for Parents too! I am kind off crying inside. The horrible feeling of an end :(

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rishmitha Koppuravuri

    Spoiler Alert Kay guys, I wrote this for a class assignment years back and I was a kid, please ignore the childish language and go ahead if you want the entire story.. All children are back to school, even our famous Darrell of sixth term who is also the head girl with Sister Felicity of second term and Friend Sally of sixth term who is the sports head girl. Sally and Darrell are going to study in the same university after this sixth term, their last term, Clever and Wicked Alicia of sixth term wi Spoiler Alert Kay guys, I wrote this for a class assignment years back and I was a kid, please ignore the childish language and go ahead if you want the entire story.. All children are back to school, even our famous Darrell of sixth term who is also the head girl with Sister Felicity of second term and Friend Sally of sixth term who is the sports head girl. Sally and Darrell are going to study in the same university after this sixth term, their last term, Clever and Wicked Alicia of sixth term with Cousin June of second term came with a happy mood. Belinda, Moira, Betty, Mary-Lou and Irene too came back to school; they are also of sixth term. Irene’s’ health certificate was always confusion which is famous all over the school, even Belinda’s scowl sketch book was not less where she drew sketches of the scowls made by people. Gwen also came back but she was with an angry face, who just had a row with her father with the mother always supporting her who didn’t even say proper good bye to her father and always talked of the school in Switzerland and her victory over her father in arguing by saying bad words and selfish things. Another girl, Maureen was exactly like Gwen, but was not at least cruel to her parents; Clarissa and Bill came on the horse back. Two new girls Amanda and Suzanne joined in Malory Towers in this year and that too in sixth term. Amanda was an incredible sports player; she looked big, had strong muscles and the French girl Suzanne looked very short, with innocence in her face. Jo got down her car with her strong and big looking father of hers, they were very rich, Jo is spoilt mainly because of her father who never bared any trouble occurring to Jo, he treated her as a queen in a palace with all the things she wanted. There are three main situations in this school relating to the spoilt Jo, stubborn Amanda and wicked June and Disrespectful Gwen. Amanda took up the challenge of training June for the school’s second team for tennis and swimming. She always said that June is capable of learning anything and everything if trained properly with interest. People gathered round to see the tennis couching given by Amanda especially the first formers and the second formers, Amanda was continuously pointing the mistakes of June and it was the hardest training for June. The swimming training was no less, where June was excelling; Amanda thought that June can even race the fourth formers if she practiced well. This continued every day, tennis to swimming and swimming to tennis. One day in the tennis court, as usual June was not able to face Amanda’s strong shots. Amanda became impatient, there was a great row between June and Amanda and they separated, with them stopping the practice. One day, when dawn arrived, Amanda went to the sea to swim as she thought that the school’s pool was a small one and it was not enough for a future Olympic swimmer, though restricted to swim in that sea, she made up her mind to even break the school rules and go to swim and got caught in the current, she was fighting the current with her strong muscles, she weakened up, she couldn’t fight the current any more. June got up from bed to take a morning bath in the pool, the sea was looking very pleasant from the school, she them changed her mind and thought to stand at the beach letting her legs wet by the waves that rise and fall. June went there and saw someone trying to fight then current, without knowing what to do; she just dragged a heavy boat, got inside and rowed to the person. Immediately June recognised that the person was Amanda but decided to help. She started pulling Amanda, Amanda’s leg got struck in the rocks, June pulled, Amanda struggled and then it’s done, Amanda was out in the boat, she was taken to the school carefully. Amanda decided not to act rude again with anyone and they became friends again. The first situation got over, second one is about Jo and Deirdre, Jo was sent to isolation by her own classmates as Jo didn’t own up to the teacher when she asked, ‘who went out with the first former Deirdre?’, which was not allowed by the school for the first formers to go out with the second formers or any other formers except teachers or sixth formers. Jo tried to explain the whole story, that she had taken Deirdre for buying the things required for making a party on Jo’s birthday and that Marton found the five pounds with Jo and called Jo to her room for questioning Jo why she hadn’t given the money to the school and to Jo’s luck Marton was not there when she went in, so she just grabbed nine pounds instead of five pounds and rushed out and bought plenty of things required for the party. Her classmates were not ready to listen to anything so Jo convinced Deirdre to run away from the school and go to Jo’s home. One night, when everyone slept Jo and Deirdre escaped but they were caught and Jo was expelled from the school. This made Jo change her ways. Deirdre was kept back at school as she was still young and got influenced by Jo’s words of harm. The third situation is about Gwen and her altitude towards her father. Gwen was a very bad girl; she was very rude to her farther. She was the only girl who hated Malory towers very much though she studied there from her first term, one day Darrell scolded her and tried to change her, but she refused. Miss Marton only told one thing that something will happen that will change Gwen. As told something happened, Gwen’s father became ill and he may die, this scared Gwen and made her kind towards her father and she became a good girl ever after. This book is just a piece of information that describes various problems that may be faced by us and we should always be ready to face any problem.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carly

    I confess that had the Malory Towers series not been on the agenda for my British Children's Literature module in my next year at university, I shouldn't ever have come to read them. How wonderful they were, and how they just go to show that the best written books are not restricted by the age of the reader. I imagine my five year old niece would love to hear these tales just as much as I have enjoyed reading them myself over the past month. Such a pleasant read, I look forward to analysing them i I confess that had the Malory Towers series not been on the agenda for my British Children's Literature module in my next year at university, I shouldn't ever have come to read them. How wonderful they were, and how they just go to show that the best written books are not restricted by the age of the reader. I imagine my five year old niece would love to hear these tales just as much as I have enjoyed reading them myself over the past month. Such a pleasant read, I look forward to analysing them in further detail come October.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Francesca Lee

    Another great Malory Towers book! What makes these so fun to read is the mischief the girls get up to. An ongoing trick throughout the book this time was one of the teacher's hair pins falling out repeatedly from her bun. The girls are also thinking about their future careers for when they leave. However, there isn't all fun and games for the last term. One of the girls decides to go for a swim in the sea which results in her getting swept out by the current as it is so strong. Luckily, one of t Another great Malory Towers book! What makes these so fun to read is the mischief the girls get up to. An ongoing trick throughout the book this time was one of the teacher's hair pins falling out repeatedly from her bun. The girls are also thinking about their future careers for when they leave. However, there isn't all fun and games for the last term. One of the girls decides to go for a swim in the sea which results in her getting swept out by the current as it is so strong. Luckily, one of the girls spotted her and she managed to get rescued by a boat.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Juli(◕ᴗ◕✿)

    It's been so long since I last read these, and since I'm nearly 14 I'm probably too old for them . But I think that they are so good for escapism, and for comfort reading. The last chapter still makes me sad! It's been so long since I last read these, and since I'm nearly 14 I'm probably too old for them . But I think that they are so good for escapism, and for comfort reading. The last chapter still makes me sad!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wow

    2.5 stars I'm quite glad to have finished this series for multitude of reasons . Most importantly is that I wanted to experience Enid Blyton writings. I believe that she's a talented author as children are one the hardest things to portray in story telling. Her younger character were uncanny ! The mix of innocence and cruelty was quite astounding ! I also liked how she implemented scenario to teach life long lessons . The ugly parts were in how bullying uncertain scenes was permitted and encouraged 2.5 stars I'm quite glad to have finished this series for multitude of reasons . Most importantly is that I wanted to experience Enid Blyton writings. I believe that she's a talented author as children are one the hardest things to portray in story telling. Her younger character were uncanny ! The mix of innocence and cruelty was quite astounding ! I also liked how she implemented scenario to teach life long lessons . The ugly parts were in how bullying uncertain scenes was permitted and encouraged was quite disgusting! Aside from that I liked how she wrapped the story !

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Ford

    This was my least favourite book. I thought it didn't focus on Darrell and her friends enough; instead we were given a lot about the first and second formers. I still really enjoyed this series and if someone knows of similar books that take place in a boarding school please please let me know. This was my least favourite book. I thought it didn't focus on Darrell and her friends enough; instead we were given a lot about the first and second formers. I still really enjoyed this series and if someone knows of similar books that take place in a boarding school please please let me know.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alison C

    Note: This review covers all six Malory Towers books. I think many child readers who grew up in the UK 40 or 50 years ago had a yen to go to boarding school, based on the numerous series that were popular in the UK at that time. I happened to discover Enid Blyton's Malory Towers series, written between 1947 and 1951, when I was around 7 or 8, and I loved them from the beginning. Partly this was due to the setting - a castle-like building complex on a stormy coastal hilltop in Cornwall, the southe Note: This review covers all six Malory Towers books. I think many child readers who grew up in the UK 40 or 50 years ago had a yen to go to boarding school, based on the numerous series that were popular in the UK at that time. I happened to discover Enid Blyton's Malory Towers series, written between 1947 and 1951, when I was around 7 or 8, and I loved them from the beginning. Partly this was due to the setting - a castle-like building complex on a stormy coastal hilltop in Cornwall, the southernmost region of the British Isles, where I lived for a time and the Celtic land that has been my family's homeland for many centuries. Aside from my personal investment in the country in which it was set, the Towers themselves were terribly romantic looking, in that wind-swept, storm-off-the-shores kind of way! Part of my fondness for Blyton's series was simply the idea of boarding school as a place where young girls not only learned, but bonded and grew and developed a strong character, healthy body, creative mind and compassion for others - at least, that's how the stories in these books always seemed to turn out. As is standard with this genre, there is a core of recurrent characters - Darrell, our straightforward but somewhat tempestuous heroine, Sally her steady best friend, Alicia the smart but sometimes callous one, and so on. Each year brings a certain number of new characters into the school, some of whom stay on into the later books and some who do not. There's always at least one transgressor who Learns A Lesson, and there's always at least one moral drawn for all the girls from that experience. There's a certain amount of social consciousness in the sense that some girls at the school are poor, some are not, and that class difference is shown to be not a "real" difference at all (pretty heady stuff in late 1940s Britain's children's fiction!), but most of the dilemmas have to do with the sin of "disobeying the rules of the school," with dire consequences, although not too dire. It's all very innocent and the children are all quite "improved" by their stay (except for Gwendolyn, and even she is redeemed in the end!). Enid Blyton is known for several other series that she wrote, including other school series, but this is the one that reached my heart as a young child, and it's still the series that, at 48 years old and counting, I turn to whenever I have a cold and need something to cheer me up. I believe these books are all long out of print now, but if you enjoy boarding school fiction from a time before Harry Potter, this is worth a search in the more obscure realms of the Internet library!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evelina

    I am so glad I came upon these Enid Blyton’s books :) It really was a pleasant sort of time machine that took me to the past, when I used to devour all Famous Five instalments, and live their adventures alongside them and their incredibly intelligent dog Timmy :) Books are not too long, 160 pages each, or 90 pages on your tablet screen :) The protagonist of these books are Darrell Rivers (1-6) and her younger sister Felicity (7-12)-written by Pamela Cox ( I don’t know if this is pseudonym or a g I am so glad I came upon these Enid Blyton’s books :) It really was a pleasant sort of time machine that took me to the past, when I used to devour all Famous Five instalments, and live their adventures alongside them and their incredibly intelligent dog Timmy :) Books are not too long, 160 pages each, or 90 pages on your tablet screen :) The protagonist of these books are Darrell Rivers (1-6) and her younger sister Felicity (7-12)-written by Pamela Cox ( I don’t know if this is pseudonym or a group of writers), who has made a modern sequel (I will leave it on the side for now). It’s a great book to get young 10-11 year old girls to start reading, and even I enjoyed them a lot as a childish adult that I am :) The atmosphere of the books will make you feel a lot like Hogwarts, it’s just that all students are girls and there is no magic and supernatural stuff :) However, the life lessons still remain, delivered to us through various problems that girls face in their school years, mainly facing with the subjects they need to learn, respecting their authority/or not and getting along with their classmates, which comes across as difficult for some of them. All girls have different personalities, some are hyperactive, other disobedient, there are also some who are shy, nerdish or egotistical/spoiled-it’s a bit stereotypical mix but ways in how these problems were handled raise reader’s social intelligence as well. Books realistically explore the very idea of constructing and maintain a friendship. Enid underlines the importance of kindness, being just and helping others, as they build they character, discover their gifts and talents and grow up. In third term, some girls from other countries are introduced, and in fourth term, there are twins :) This topic was particularly interesting to me, Blyton depicted perfectly the fact that the girls were identical and so different at the same time, and they were even occasionally bothered to be so alike. You might also notice that 1940s British old fashion-ness in Enid Blyton’s books, but they are in no way an obstacle which will stop you from immersing yourself into Mallory Towers world. I have been on this Enid Blyton’s binge reading for some days now. I seriously respect Enid Blyton as children’s author; I regret leaving this world, but memories of my spent time with them shall remain. Good-bye, Mallory Towers :) It was a wonderful, nostalgic trip to past and some better days that have long since gone with the wind.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Again, this comes with lots of memories of reading it for the first time. Another one of my favourites of the original series. Saying goodbye to Darrell and her friends never fails to be bittersweet, but it's still always fun regardless. But at least it doesn't stop here now. When I was a kid, I always wished I knew how Felicity's other years had gone and that Enid Blyton had added those times to the series too. Thanks to Pamela Cox writing them, I do know now. I'll always prefer the original si Again, this comes with lots of memories of reading it for the first time. Another one of my favourites of the original series. Saying goodbye to Darrell and her friends never fails to be bittersweet, but it's still always fun regardless. But at least it doesn't stop here now. When I was a kid, I always wished I knew how Felicity's other years had gone and that Enid Blyton had added those times to the series too. Thanks to Pamela Cox writing them, I do know now. I'll always prefer the original six books, but at least nowadays leaving Darrell as an adult (nearly) doesn't mean I have to also say goodbye to Malory Towers yet either. :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Moira

    No, just no. I wish I had never re read them. In these books, the characters are either good or bad there is no in between and in the previous book one character who had been bossy, domineering etc had come around, now in this book she's not liked again, apparently the change was completely forgotten. I know they are children's books and I am an adult but I think the main issue is that childrens literature has come on so much since my childhood that these books are simply dated. If only I had had No, just no. I wish I had never re read them. In these books, the characters are either good or bad there is no in between and in the previous book one character who had been bossy, domineering etc had come around, now in this book she's not liked again, apparently the change was completely forgotten. I know they are children's books and I am an adult but I think the main issue is that childrens literature has come on so much since my childhood that these books are simply dated. If only I had had the wealth of of great writing that's out there today!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ludmila Marton

    These days young girls in books are portrayed in a rather limited way - timid or arogant. Enid Blyton is the old school and these are no Famous Five books. Characters in here are so varied and just - realistic. They can be lovely, flawed, wonderful or cranky, and all of them have many things to learn - some more than the others. And none of them are black-and-white; even when they seem so - in the end they never are. Oh, they don't write books like that anymore... Just, dear publishers, give the These days young girls in books are portrayed in a rather limited way - timid or arogant. Enid Blyton is the old school and these are no Famous Five books. Characters in here are so varied and just - realistic. They can be lovely, flawed, wonderful or cranky, and all of them have many things to learn - some more than the others. And none of them are black-and-white; even when they seem so - in the end they never are. Oh, they don't write books like that anymore... Just, dear publishers, give them some dignity and clothe them in decent covers please.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    It always makes me sad when I get to the end of this series and I always just want to start it from the beginning. Darrell and Felicity grow up and move on and it is always a pleasure to go back to the first book and experience their journey all over again which I have been doing since I was 6 years old.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    I'm so sentimental about these books, someone might say TOO sentimental. This book made me sob and laugh out loud. I love reading my old copies as well, just the smell of them takes me back 20 years. I'm so sentimental about these books, someone might say TOO sentimental. This book made me sob and laugh out loud. I love reading my old copies as well, just the smell of them takes me back 20 years.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debb

    Well, goodbye Malory Towers. I enjoyed the high jinx, lashings of ginger beer, lacrosse, swimming. I read these as a child and used to act them out and even had a brown cloak! If you haven't read these, give them a try. Well, goodbye Malory Towers. I enjoyed the high jinx, lashings of ginger beer, lacrosse, swimming. I read these as a child and used to act them out and even had a brown cloak! If you haven't read these, give them a try.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather W

    A trip down memory lane for me, I love this story and Enid Blyton's writing style. It is interesting looking back at what I used to read and this still carries the magic I remember growing up. I love it. A trip down memory lane for me, I love this story and Enid Blyton's writing style. It is interesting looking back at what I used to read and this still carries the magic I remember growing up. I love it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aulia Koesmeidisari

    My favorite childhood read. It makes me want to go to school there.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Isabel Thorndike

    The books in this series, order of best to worst in my ho opinion: 3, 2, 1, 5, 4, 6. Three is the best because of the lesbian subtext❤️😌 I loved all the dialogue and language. I started out liking all the characters and stories, but by the end of the series I was pissed at all of them! They are quite one dimensional and there is very little character development among Darrell and her friends. The thing that bothered me the most is when they would be so rude to anybody they didn’t like, and that The books in this series, order of best to worst in my ho opinion: 3, 2, 1, 5, 4, 6. Three is the best because of the lesbian subtext❤️😌 I loved all the dialogue and language. I started out liking all the characters and stories, but by the end of the series I was pissed at all of them! They are quite one dimensional and there is very little character development among Darrell and her friends. The thing that bothered me the most is when they would be so rude to anybody they didn’t like, and that person would always end up with some horrific injury or punishment that causes them to suddenly see the error of their ways and grovel and beg the forgiveness of the other girls, and then Alicia or whoever would be like “serves her right, that horrid selfish idiot girl! How she came to be such a frightful ass I will never know!” They got increasingly more insufferable each book, as each year they were allowed more power over their peers. There’s much more I could say, I’ve been immersed in this series for about a month now! I’ve really enjoyed my reading it, but was disappointed by the characters and the repetitive plot lines in the end.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bukhari

    Darrell is finally in the sixth form and prepares for one last final term at Malory Towers before she sets off for university. The girls are much grown up, wiser, though as usual, you have Gwen who doesn't seem to have learnt anything in the past six years. Jo, in the second form, also proves to be a nuisance, egged on by her insouciant and erratic father. Amanda, whose sports' school burnt down comes to join the sixth form and demonstrates her athletic prowess. She eyes a second former in parti Darrell is finally in the sixth form and prepares for one last final term at Malory Towers before she sets off for university. The girls are much grown up, wiser, though as usual, you have Gwen who doesn't seem to have learnt anything in the past six years. Jo, in the second form, also proves to be a nuisance, egged on by her insouciant and erratic father. Amanda, whose sports' school burnt down comes to join the sixth form and demonstrates her athletic prowess. She eyes a second former in particular and is determined to set her up to standard to compete in the second school team. Overall, these series gives a bit of a revelation into what British boarding schools were like post-war. Some of the practices may shock today's readers, some are particularly quirky notably certain use of words that are démodé ('wizard', 'smashing', 'queer', 'your people', 'scorn' etc.). Re-reading the whole series after twenty years made me wonder why I found it amusing then, but this Enid Blyton series deserves at least a read to understand the psyche of the people at the time. 

  30. 5 out of 5

    Simone

    So, more than two years after starting it, I finally finished the Malory Towers series. It feels longer, to be honest. I first picked these up because my mum read them when she was young, and my opinion on the books has varied to the point where I couldn't rate book 5, because I kind of hated it, but I knew it didn't deserve that. I put aside my issues for this last instalment and enjoyed it quite a lot. I do wish it would have focused on the main characters more. Pitty (Darrell) didn't actually So, more than two years after starting it, I finally finished the Malory Towers series. It feels longer, to be honest. I first picked these up because my mum read them when she was young, and my opinion on the books has varied to the point where I couldn't rate book 5, because I kind of hated it, but I knew it didn't deserve that. I put aside my issues for this last instalment and enjoyed it quite a lot. I do wish it would have focused on the main characters more. Pitty (Darrell) didn't actually have a plotline, let alone Irene and Linda (Belinda) and Mary Lou, who were my favourites. I would have liked a better send off for these girls. The end of their time at Malory Towers felt kind of flat, because we'd spent barely any time with them. That said, the second formers made for some good plots. I'm actually considering picking up the continuation books that Pamela Cox wrote about them. Not any time soon, though, these are very much 'once in a while' books.

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