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Geronimo: his own Story (with original photographs, edited for the Nook)

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Nothing tells a story like when it is written from the own words of someone. The biography that Geronimo wrote called Geronimo: His Own Story: The Autobiography of a Great Patriot Warrior. br/This book talks about his life as a child, his role as a leader of the Apache Indians, the problems he had with both the US government and the Mexicans, and why he felt that the Apach Nothing tells a story like when it is written from the own words of someone. The biography that Geronimo wrote called Geronimo: His Own Story: The Autobiography of a Great Patriot Warrior. br/This book talks about his life as a child, his role as a leader of the Apache Indians, the problems he had with both the US government and the Mexicans, and why he felt that the Apache had no choice but to stand up and fight for their rights and their survival like they did. br/br/The biography depicts the various methods that were used by the Apache for war, how he felt betrayed yet again by the US government when he surrendered, and why he feels that his people have never been treated fairly by the white people. His biography also covers information about being a prisoner of war.br/Geronimo was very specific about what was to be in the book when he met with the writer, S.M. Barrett. He had an agenda for each interview, and covered only what was on it. He wouldn#x2019;t answer questions either, and simply told them to write what he had spoken.br/Even though the book about Geronimo has been very popular, there are plenty of controversies that surround it. One of the biggest ones has to do with what really occurred when he surrendered. According to the reports of the US government, he didn#x2019;t just surrender. Rather he had no other choice but to do so.


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Nothing tells a story like when it is written from the own words of someone. The biography that Geronimo wrote called Geronimo: His Own Story: The Autobiography of a Great Patriot Warrior. br/This book talks about his life as a child, his role as a leader of the Apache Indians, the problems he had with both the US government and the Mexicans, and why he felt that the Apach Nothing tells a story like when it is written from the own words of someone. The biography that Geronimo wrote called Geronimo: His Own Story: The Autobiography of a Great Patriot Warrior. br/This book talks about his life as a child, his role as a leader of the Apache Indians, the problems he had with both the US government and the Mexicans, and why he felt that the Apache had no choice but to stand up and fight for their rights and their survival like they did. br/br/The biography depicts the various methods that were used by the Apache for war, how he felt betrayed yet again by the US government when he surrendered, and why he feels that his people have never been treated fairly by the white people. His biography also covers information about being a prisoner of war.br/Geronimo was very specific about what was to be in the book when he met with the writer, S.M. Barrett. He had an agenda for each interview, and covered only what was on it. He wouldn#x2019;t answer questions either, and simply told them to write what he had spoken.br/Even though the book about Geronimo has been very popular, there are plenty of controversies that surround it. One of the biggest ones has to do with what really occurred when he surrendered. According to the reports of the US government, he didn#x2019;t just surrender. Rather he had no other choice but to do so.

30 review for Geronimo: his own Story (with original photographs, edited for the Nook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    This edition of Geronimo's life story has a fascinating introduction by Frederick Turner that provides background not only for Geronimo's life, but for the shameful attitudes held by the white man towards the Apache and other Native Americans. Geronimo was only convinced to share his life story after hearing that then-President Theodore Roosevelt approved of S. M. Barrett's idea. Barrett had met Geronimo and become friends with him during the warrior's captivity at Fort Sill Oklahoma, where he s This edition of Geronimo's life story has a fascinating introduction by Frederick Turner that provides background not only for Geronimo's life, but for the shameful attitudes held by the white man towards the Apache and other Native Americans. Geronimo was only convinced to share his life story after hearing that then-President Theodore Roosevelt approved of S. M. Barrett's idea. Barrett had met Geronimo and become friends with him during the warrior's captivity at Fort Sill Oklahoma, where he spent his final years. Barrett had wanted to publish the stories Geronimo had told him in private, but Geronimo refused permission. So Barrett wrote a letter to Roosevelt saying that the war chief had never had the opportunity to tell his own story and he asked Roosevelt for permission to publish. And when he explained to Geronimo that the President wished to hear about his life, Geronimo agreed at last. So in a way this book came into being because of yet another deception on the part of a white man in Geronimo's life. How ironic. Geronimo begins with an outline of the Apache creation stories, then tells of his childhood, his marriage, and how he became a warrior. We learn about trips into Old Mexico, not always raiding, sometimes the people went to trade. During one trading journey, the men had gone into town to do business and while they were away Mexican troops slaughtered most of the Apache who had remained in camp, including Geronimo's mother, wife, and three children. From that day on Geronimo had an intense hatred for the Mexican people, and they all suffered his thirst for revenge. The Americans of the era were not much better towards the Apache, and he learned not to trust them. He never gave up trying to live as an Apache should. So was he a barbarian or a patriot? I cannot review this book objectively. I have lived in the area Geronimo was most familiar with; I have felt the echo of Apache spirits in their desert homelands. My sympathies are completely with Geronimo, from beginning to end. He had reasons for everything he did, even his decision to tell his story was ultimately an appeal for himself and his people to be allowed to return home. The final sentence of the book: If this cannot be done during my lifetime ~~ if I must die in bondage ~~ I hope that the remnant of the Apache tribe may, when I am gone, be granted the one privilege which they request ~~ to return to Arizona.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wee Lassie

    An extraordinary and heartbreaking book, well worth the read

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Nonfiction books about the way the native Americans were steam rolled to make way for the European immigrants always breaks my heart. It is so sad. It hurts my heart. Geronimo's history is one of the most well known stories. I liked that this was Geronimo's own story told my him. There was a frankness to this that I appreciated. His word was his word. The fact that he expected that same honor from the US government, was probably a rude awakening. Nonfiction books about the way the native Americans were steam rolled to make way for the European immigrants always breaks my heart. It is so sad. It hurts my heart. Geronimo's history is one of the most well known stories. I liked that this was Geronimo's own story told my him. There was a frankness to this that I appreciated. His word was his word. The fact that he expected that same honor from the US government, was probably a rude awakening.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Heikkinen

    Excellent insight into the life and times of Geronimo, the Apache chieftan. The introduction is written in 1906, seven years after Geronimo's death. The book largely consists of Geronimo's own words as he narrated his life story to the author. The author adds historical context as well as some editorial commentary. Significant is the relation of injustices done to Native Americans at the hands of both the United States and Mexican governments. Much of Geronimo's notoriety stems from his seeking Excellent insight into the life and times of Geronimo, the Apache chieftan. The introduction is written in 1906, seven years after Geronimo's death. The book largely consists of Geronimo's own words as he narrated his life story to the author. The author adds historical context as well as some editorial commentary. Significant is the relation of injustices done to Native Americans at the hands of both the United States and Mexican governments. Much of Geronimo's notoriety stems from his seeking redress for the wrongs done him and his people after being betrayed time and again by representatives of government.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    There is so much going on in Geronimo's story, including his telling it to his second cousin who then interpreted it to Barrett, the photograph of the three of them with Geronimo in a headdress and Barrett intently writing everything down, and Geronimo's dedication to Teddy Roosevelt. I was moved by Frederick W. Turner's introduction to the 1970 edition. "Out of the eyes of that incorruptible Chiricahua leader glares a challenge to our cherished notions of ourselves, of Western Civilization, and There is so much going on in Geronimo's story, including his telling it to his second cousin who then interpreted it to Barrett, the photograph of the three of them with Geronimo in a headdress and Barrett intently writing everything down, and Geronimo's dedication to Teddy Roosevelt. I was moved by Frederick W. Turner's introduction to the 1970 edition. "Out of the eyes of that incorruptible Chiricahua leader glares a challenge to our cherished notions of ourselves, of Western Civilization, and of the relentless energy which for centuries has nerved it, " he writes. "Geronimo and his people were unwilling sacrifices to Progress, but we are, too. The men and women strapped to business machines and those in assembly lines are equally victims with Geronimo, Black Kettle, and the Cherokee. And those of us who think we have escaped such dehumanizing routines are no less victims in virtually every aspect of our daily lives, in the food we eat, the air we breathe, the waters we drink and play in. All of us, red and white, have been sacrificed to being steadily devoured by those huge metallic jaws that not so long ago ground up the Indian exceedingly small" (p. 41). Turner does not neglect to acknowledge which race was ground up exceedingly small, which race did the grinding, and how they did it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amle

    I would not read this as an autobiography but as a statement and witness of events from a prisoner to his capturer. Reading this feels like we get to sit next to this old man, his wrinkled face still emanates great power and his presence inspires respect to those near him. We can almost hear him speak right next to us with a gruff voice in a language we don't understand and the interpreter is sitting there right next to us, almost just as spellbound as we are. This is a historical document about I would not read this as an autobiography but as a statement and witness of events from a prisoner to his capturer. Reading this feels like we get to sit next to this old man, his wrinkled face still emanates great power and his presence inspires respect to those near him. We can almost hear him speak right next to us with a gruff voice in a language we don't understand and the interpreter is sitting there right next to us, almost just as spellbound as we are. This is a historical document about cyclical violence and destruction so present in the Apache life. The almost constant battles with the Mexicans and about the arrival and many betrayals of the white man and his soldiers. We hear little parts about the daily life of the Apache Indian; his trading, wandering, rituals into adulthood, and a little about the way marriage works - and sometimes doesn't work. Like so many other autobiographies this made me hungry for more. I wonder what more he would have liked to have said. I wonder what was misinterpreted, badly translated, and what was censored by those in power of his life. I'm definitely going to read more about the Native American history in he near future.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Everyone should read this book. What a treasure! An account of Geronimo's life in his own words. Everyone should read this book. What a treasure! An account of Geronimo's life in his own words.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Carl Ludwig Dorsch

    Excellent commentary on the occupation and cyclical violence thus engendered. The entirety of the 1906 edition can be downloded at: http://www.ibiblio.org/ebooks/Geronim... From S. M. Barrett's Introduction: On June 2d, 1906, I transmitted the complete manuscript to the War Department. The following quotation is from the letter of transmission: “In accordance with endorsement number eight of the ‘Brief’ submitted to me by the commanding officer of Fort Sill, which endorsement constituted the instr Excellent commentary on the occupation and cyclical violence thus engendered. The entirety of the 1906 edition can be downloded at: http://www.ibiblio.org/ebooks/Geronim... From S. M. Barrett's Introduction: On June 2d, 1906, I transmitted the complete manuscript to the War Department. The following quotation is from the letter of transmission: “In accordance with endorsement number eight of the ‘Brief’ submitted to me by the commanding officer of Fort Sill, which endorsement constituted the instructions of the Department, I submit herewith manuscript of the Autobiography of Geronimo. “The manuscript has been submitted to the President, and at his suggestion I have disclaimed any responsibility for the criticisms (made by Geronimo)of individuals mentioned.” Six weeks after the manuscript was forwarded, Thomas C. Barry, Brigadier General, Assistant to the Chief of Staff, sent to the President the following: “MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY OF WAR. “Subject: Manuscript of the Autobiography of Geronimo. The paper herewith, which was referred to this office on July 6th, with instructions to report as to whether there is anything objectionable in it, is returned. “The manuscript is an interesting autobiography of a notable Indian, made by himself. There are a number of passages which, from the departmental point of view, are decidedly objectionable. These are found on pages 73, 74, 90, 91, and 97, and are indicated by marginal lines in red. The entire manuscript appears in a way important as showing the Indian side of a prolonged controversy, but it is believed that the document, either in whole or in part, should not receive the approval of the War Department.” The memorandum is published that the objections of the War Department may be made known to the public. The objection is raised to the mention on pages seventy-three and seventy-four of the manuscript of an attack upon Indians in a tent at Apache Pass or Bowie, by U. S. soldiers. The statement of Geronimo is, however, substantially confirmed by L. C. Hughes, editor of The Star, Tucson, Arizona. On pages ninety and ninety-one of the manuscript, Geronimo criticised General Crook. This criticism is simply Geronimo’s private opinion of General Crook. We deem it a personal matter and leave it without comment, as it in no way concerns the history of the Apaches. On page ninety-seven of the manuscript Geronimo accuses General Miles of bad faith. Of course, General Miles made the treaty with the Apaches, but we know very well that he is not responsible for the way the Government subsequently treated the prisoners of war. However, Geronimo cannot understand this and fixes upon General Miles the blame for what he calls unjust treatment. One could not expect the Department of War to approve adverse criticisms of its own acts, but it is especially gratifying that such a liberal view has been taken of these criticisms, and also that such a frank statement of the merits of the Autobiography is submitted in the memorandum. Of course neither the President nor the War Department is in any way responsible for what Geronimo says; he has simply been granted the opportunity to state his own case as he sees it. The fact that Geronimo has told the story in his own way is doubtless the only excuse necessary to offer for the many unconventional features of this work.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    I wrote a short piece on Geronimo on my Blog The Evitable, (http://theevitable.blogspot.com)which was based on a close reading of a couple of chapters and a skim of some of the rest, but I'm now reading it through, having bought a copy second hand at a church book sale last week along with a biography of Tecumseh I plan to read soon as well. I read about him first because a columnist in a Toronto paper, in passing, referred to him as a 'futile intifadist' who was implacable in refusing to accomo I wrote a short piece on Geronimo on my Blog The Evitable, (http://theevitable.blogspot.com)which was based on a close reading of a couple of chapters and a skim of some of the rest, but I'm now reading it through, having bought a copy second hand at a church book sale last week along with a biography of Tecumseh I plan to read soon as well. I read about him first because a columnist in a Toronto paper, in passing, referred to him as a 'futile intifadist' who was implacable in refusing to accomodate himself to the legitimate government of the day--which begs a huge number of questions, not least how an occupying power became simply by self-assertion the legitimate government of his day, over territory that had been Apache. Geronimo's first encounter with the whites (as he calls them to distinguish them from the Mexicans, with whom the Apaches had an ongoing war, raiding back and forth) was a friendly one. His tribe (at that time the chief was Mangus-Colorado) treated and traded with them before they moved west--from the sound of it I'd say they were surveyors. It baffles me how his defensive wars thereafter can be described as implacable opposition, or why he should have trusted an army which had offered to treat, in succession, with Cochise and Mangus Colorado, in order to get them in position to be easily captured and killed along with their retinues. How you accomodate a legitimate government as treacherous as that is anybody's guess, but even at that Geronimo live on terms of peace with at least one commander, General Howard, for the simple reason that he didn't break his word. Everyone else he dealt with, right up to his final surrender and ignominious imprisonment, did.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    A surprising account whose highlight is Geronimo's early childhood -- told with such enchantment, you're transported to an idyllic ancient age when our ancestors roamed the pristine earth, just and true... sigh. Rated 3 stars because the narrative's bulk is repetitive and boring : shoot-Mexicans-and-steal-supplies stuff. I realize he was a warrior, but details about his multiple wives would've made the book fascinating :) Gleaned facts: ----------- ** Geronimo was a POW for 20 years ** He dedicates t A surprising account whose highlight is Geronimo's early childhood -- told with such enchantment, you're transported to an idyllic ancient age when our ancestors roamed the pristine earth, just and true... sigh. Rated 3 stars because the narrative's bulk is repetitive and boring : shoot-Mexicans-and-steal-supplies stuff. I realize he was a warrior, but details about his multiple wives would've made the book fascinating :) Gleaned facts: ----------- ** Geronimo was a POW for 20 years ** He dedicates the book to Teddy Roosevelt, who he felt "was wise and would listen" ** His name means “he who yawns” ** His biographer relates that each day Geronimo came for an interview, he knew exactly what he was going to say. He was utterly clear and concise. “Write what I have spoken.” ** Incredible integrity. "When he fulfills his word, nothing will prevent him from keeping his promise." ** In a tribute to his people, he starts with the Apache origin story. There were 2 tribes on earth: birds and beasts. When birds wanted light, and beasts did not, war erupted and the birds won. There is a monotheistic-like Creator, named Yusin. ** The Apache consisted of 6 tribes. They neighbored and traded with the Navajo, who were not of the same bloodline. ** Apaches considered fish unfit to eat. ** He never wanted to be a warrior, doing so only after Mexicans slew his 1st wife and 3 kids. “I had no purpose left… I spoke to no one, and no one spoke to me. I had lost all.” The most telling quote : "We are vanishing from the earth, but I cannot think we are useless.” .

  11. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    I didn't know much about Geronimo going into this, and I found it to be a very fascinating record of an era gone by. Throughout the book there are moments of commentary and notes from the US captors and facilitators of the project. It is really unlike any other book I've read, and while there is certainly an autobiographical element to it I see it more as a bearing witness of an age and time that will never exist again. We need more literature like this. While I know Geronimo wasn't perfect, it I didn't know much about Geronimo going into this, and I found it to be a very fascinating record of an era gone by. Throughout the book there are moments of commentary and notes from the US captors and facilitators of the project. It is really unlike any other book I've read, and while there is certainly an autobiographical element to it I see it more as a bearing witness of an age and time that will never exist again. We need more literature like this. While I know Geronimo wasn't perfect, it was wonderful to get a sense of his upbringing, culture, and life before and after the coming of the white man. His heart wrenching tale is a great example of the stories we might hear if we take the time and energy to seek them out and give them space. I recommend this book not because it stands as a glorious literary accomplishment, but because it opens a window of a people and perspective that is so often left neglected and untold.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Yibbie

    I picked this story up because of its connection to southern AZ. I’m always interested in the history of my home state. It’s an interesting mix of cultural details, autobiography, military documents, and battle details. That is partly the author’s attempt to provide a balanced narrative, and partly the requirements imposed upon him by the government in their permission to publish. I preferred the bits about his personal life or life in the tribe, but most of the book is taken up with details of I picked this story up because of its connection to southern AZ. I’m always interested in the history of my home state. It’s an interesting mix of cultural details, autobiography, military documents, and battle details. That is partly the author’s attempt to provide a balanced narrative, and partly the requirements imposed upon him by the government in their permission to publish. I preferred the bits about his personal life or life in the tribe, but most of the book is taken up with details of the raids he leads and the battles they fought. There are also several gruesome descriptions of animal attacks. So it’s not for the faint of heart. No one in this story comes out as an innocent hero. It’s one long chronicle of atrocity and revenge. But that’s history. We better know what happened so we can know how we got here and what not to do again. So I would recommend it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lis

    Imagine you could sit an old Geronimo down and just let him talk and tell you all about his life, in his own words. Well, someone did just that, and wrote it down, with just the occasional editorial footnote for clarification and to claim no responsibility for any shit talking Geronimo did along the way. I recently spent a lot of time in Arizona, which I'm not crazy about but too the opportunity to see some of it's museums and natural beauty (e.g. Grand Canyon, Superstition Mountain). Couldn't l Imagine you could sit an old Geronimo down and just let him talk and tell you all about his life, in his own words. Well, someone did just that, and wrote it down, with just the occasional editorial footnote for clarification and to claim no responsibility for any shit talking Geronimo did along the way. I recently spent a lot of time in Arizona, which I'm not crazy about but too the opportunity to see some of it's museums and natural beauty (e.g. Grand Canyon, Superstition Mountain). Couldn't leave without picking up this book to learn more.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Original source history, both sides. Intensely fascinating (even if the final surrender was detailed in such an anticlimactic manner).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I liked the world exposition part best.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Israel von Niederhauser

    A quick read but fascinating. My first read about anything Native American related. I loved reading about the Apache way of life and hearing stories told in Geronimo's own words (more or less so). Sad we couldn't have had more peace with the Native Americans and done more to preserve their heritage. Surely this continent was big enough for us all. A quick read but fascinating. My first read about anything Native American related. I loved reading about the Apache way of life and hearing stories told in Geronimo's own words (more or less so). Sad we couldn't have had more peace with the Native Americans and done more to preserve their heritage. Surely this continent was big enough for us all.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Richard Seltzer

    I read this getting ready for a trip to the Southwest.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    Superb book! First and foremost it is a story of a great man, who believed he had been done wrong by first Mexicans and then Americans. He developed a hatred for Mexicans because of what was done to him and his family. He went to war with The US, but always had respect for our government and way of life. Later in life Geronimo because a Christian. This I did not know. In reading this book, we see through Geronimo's eyes the ways of his people. To the average American, this would be a hard life, Superb book! First and foremost it is a story of a great man, who believed he had been done wrong by first Mexicans and then Americans. He developed a hatred for Mexicans because of what was done to him and his family. He went to war with The US, but always had respect for our government and way of life. Later in life Geronimo because a Christian. This I did not know. In reading this book, we see through Geronimo's eyes the ways of his people. To the average American, this would be a hard life, but to an Apache, it was THE way of life. I won't judge the things that were done to the Apache's because I was not there, but I can say there was a lot that was done that just was not right. Let the reader draw his own conclusion. I will look for other books on Geronimo and hope to better understand the man, his people, and their way of life.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kaj Samuelsson

    What a story! The life of Geronimo told by himself. Told in a very matter of fact fashion and very interesting, not dry, but very alive. And he became a Christian in old age.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Geronimo tells us the story of his life and the history of his people. One of the most heartbreaking books I have ever read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Noel

    I was really excited to read this book to learn more about Geronimo, his life, and about him as a person. This book mostly felt like a recollection of battles which I know was a big part of his life as a warrior, but it left much to be desired to learn more about Geronimo outside of battle. Given that Geronimo himself wrote this book I was really excited because I generally prefer autobiographies over biographies to have a more intimate understanding of the person. However, after reading this I' I was really excited to read this book to learn more about Geronimo, his life, and about him as a person. This book mostly felt like a recollection of battles which I know was a big part of his life as a warrior, but it left much to be desired to learn more about Geronimo outside of battle. Given that Geronimo himself wrote this book I was really excited because I generally prefer autobiographies over biographies to have a more intimate understanding of the person. However, after reading this I'd like to read a biography about Geronimo that will explain his entire life rather than the selected battles that were the main focus of this book. I did learn, however, much to my surprise that many indigenous tribes like the Apaches were against eating pork when it was introduced to them by the colonizers which I thought was fascinating. This book also showed that Geronimo suffered a lot of loss in his life of family members, wives, and children slain. It was really sad to read. I'm excited to search for more books about him to learn about Geronimo and the life he led that created the legend.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    "History is written by the victor.", here history was attempted to be censored by the victor, and largely made it through in-tact. A raw and important account of history from the perspective of a culture that was largely erased. When cultures are destroyed, unique world views are lost and this is a rare chance to gain broader understanding of history and life. It can be a little tedious to read some times, but that's not the point here. "History is written by the victor.", here history was attempted to be censored by the victor, and largely made it through in-tact. A raw and important account of history from the perspective of a culture that was largely erased. When cultures are destroyed, unique world views are lost and this is a rare chance to gain broader understanding of history and life. It can be a little tedious to read some times, but that's not the point here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    John Cornelius

    This has been an incredible read! Learned a great deal about this American warrior and all he endured. Highly recommend it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Woodman York

    I saw this while browsing my library's audio options. After having recently taken a Native American literature course, I thought it might be interesting. I liked getting the views of Geronimo, instead of just reading about him from a history book. I did have to speed up the narrator, so that it didn't seem quite so "laggy." That being said, it was nice that I was able to hear the (what I assume to be) correct pronunciation. It was short, but my heart went out to him for the sadness that seemed t I saw this while browsing my library's audio options. After having recently taken a Native American literature course, I thought it might be interesting. I liked getting the views of Geronimo, instead of just reading about him from a history book. I did have to speed up the narrator, so that it didn't seem quite so "laggy." That being said, it was nice that I was able to hear the (what I assume to be) correct pronunciation. It was short, but my heart went out to him for the sadness that seemed to stalk his life, as well as the numerous broken promises made to him, and all other Native Americans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    DonnaJo Pallini

    Very informative. I like that it was in Geronimo’s own words. The author puts several footnotes that “this is Geronimo’s opinion and not that of the author”.

  26. 4 out of 5

    gerald a card

    Interesting History was truly an eye opener seems the other side of the story is quite interesting an really believable very interesting.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    Memoirs told largely in the words of Geronimo himself with the help of a trusted Indian translator. As a result, the reading and syntax are simple making for quick reading. Geronimo's memoirs open with the Apache account of the beginning of the world, which involves one divine creator named Ussen. The number four figures prominently in the Apache creation account and becomes personally important for Geronimo as he is the fourth of a family of four girls and four boys. It's a sign of his destiny. Memoirs told largely in the words of Geronimo himself with the help of a trusted Indian translator. As a result, the reading and syntax are simple making for quick reading. Geronimo's memoirs open with the Apache account of the beginning of the world, which involves one divine creator named Ussen. The number four figures prominently in the Apache creation account and becomes personally important for Geronimo as he is the fourth of a family of four girls and four boys. It's a sign of his destiny. His life changes when his wife and small children are butchered by an attack from Mexicans. It's hard to hold back tears while reading his recollection of this, and in one sense you never stop feeling sympathy for him as his life progresses. His whole life is controlled by this one tragic event, which sets him on a trajectory of vengeance and bloodshed. (Pardon the genre blending here, but it very much reminded me of the vengeful and transformative trajectory Anakim Skywalker launched into after the murder of his mom.) Even at the end of life, and even after all he endured by the emerging U.S., he still expresses nothing but raw hatred for Mexicans. He wishes he were still a young man so he could go on the warpath again against Mexicans. What might be saddest of all is that Geronimo spent his entire life pursuing vengeance and as a aged man it's still left him hollow, grieving, and worst of all unsatisfied. On a lighter note, Geronimo does provide his humorous, albeit unintended, recollections of the St. Louis World's Fair, which come off sounding like some long lost Dave Barry article. His memoir ends rather abruptly and closes with a letter of gratitude to President Roosevelt for letting his story be told. Along with a certain kind of admiration and deep sympathy for Geronimo, when the book ended I felt very much like I did when I walked under the ironmongery at Aushwitz bearing the words "Arbeit Macht Frei." One "evil" race was involved there. Three were involved in this story-Mexicans, Apaches, and Americans. Who will deliver us from the blood on the hands of the entire human race? Who will take the book and opens its seals?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barakiel

    This was a very interesting read. I do not know much about American history, but the conflict between Cowboys and Indians are, of course, famous and therefor I was interested to see the Indian perspective (especially since there are parallels with South African history). This book provides that perspective and more. The author made an effort to corroborate Geronimo's assertions where possible. Pros: 1. I enjoyed the story of the war between the Birds and Beasts, which leads to the origin of the Ap This was a very interesting read. I do not know much about American history, but the conflict between Cowboys and Indians are, of course, famous and therefor I was interested to see the Indian perspective (especially since there are parallels with South African history). This book provides that perspective and more. The author made an effort to corroborate Geronimo's assertions where possible. Pros: 1. I enjoyed the story of the war between the Birds and Beasts, which leads to the origin of the Apaches and the reason why chiefs wear eagle feather headdresses. (view spoiler)[ Which stands for the justice, wisdom and power of the Eagle. (hide spoiler)] 2. The description of the life of Indian children was interesting, as well as their burial and marriage customs. 3. This is a heart-wrenching story. Something very evil happened to Geronimo which put him on a warpath. 4. He tells about the wars between the Indians and Mexico, before the white man came to Arizona. 5. He tells about the first encounters with white men and how things escalated. 6. My favourite part perhaps was when Geronimo was later permitted to attend a fair, which he found very strange and wondrous. (view spoiler)[ He was amazed by the magicians and bear trainers and, what I assume was, a ferris wheel. (hide spoiler)] Cons: 1. The introduction was tedious, what with the thorough description of how they author had to obtain permission. I found this book very informative and am thankful it was permitted to be published. There is much to be gained from the study of history and different cultures. Times are changing and it is inevitable that cultures will die out; it is important that we keep a record of it. The feeling I am left with after finishing this book is one of... confusion and dubiousness. I like to keep things in boxes of "right" and "wrong" to help me make sense of the world, but it is impossible to so simply judge the events of this time in history. Ultimately, I think that all men have seeds of evil, regardless of culture, race, age, gender or religion. Audiobook: I listened to the Librivox version. The woman who read it was a bit wooden, but it was acceptable.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kit Donner

    Well Written Account of the Life and Adventures of a Famous Apache Leader Portions of this story were apparently edited by the person to whom they were told, and other portions are labeled as being his own unedited version, particularly parts that were highly critical of high ranking military personnel. But I expect that this is mostly so that the person recording Geronimo's story would not get in trouble for the criticisms Geronimo made of officers who made treaties with the Apaches that were no Well Written Account of the Life and Adventures of a Famous Apache Leader Portions of this story were apparently edited by the person to whom they were told, and other portions are labeled as being his own unedited version, particularly parts that were highly critical of high ranking military personnel. But I expect that this is mostly so that the person recording Geronimo's story would not get in trouble for the criticisms Geronimo made of officers who made treaties with the Apaches that were not completely kept in most cases by the people who were responsible for protecting and supplying the Apache people who agreed to the treaties, and in a few cases the outright treachery where leaders who surrendered were killed and occasionally whole groups that surrendered were slaughtered. Very believable account overall of escalating violence as interaction between first Apache and Mexicans increased, while originally there was little contact with "whites" North of the Mexican border. Later the same pattern repeated north of the Mexican border. Finally Geronimo tried to arrange a treaty with General Miles that he believed would be kept well enough that his people could live adequately protected under it and that the United States would do at least most of what they had promised. This treaty was not fully kept in Geronimo's opinion, but his own people fared better under it than many other Native Americans, so to that extent it was successful. President Theodore Roosevelt had to order that Geronimo was allowed to tell his story in his own words and his white friend was allowed to write it down and publish it, and even then certain bits critical of the United States were apparently edited out, and other parts that are critical of the United States are identified as being Geronimo's personal opinion and not necessarily accurate. Still, we are very lucky to have this much information of these events from this point of view. Recommend this book to anyone interested in American History, and to many readers who just like a good story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    Roughly rendered from first hand reports from Geronimo himself, this narrative provides a vital description of the Apache experience as their livelihood became hemmed in on all sides but cowboys and settlers, and by both the US and Mexican governments. I am ashamed to admit that much of my impression of that time is based on the westerns of my childhood - movies with little claim on accuracy except maybe to hint at the raw fear that clouded how much of our country' relations with with so many of Roughly rendered from first hand reports from Geronimo himself, this narrative provides a vital description of the Apache experience as their livelihood became hemmed in on all sides but cowboys and settlers, and by both the US and Mexican governments. I am ashamed to admit that much of my impression of that time is based on the westerns of my childhood - movies with little claim on accuracy except maybe to hint at the raw fear that clouded how much of our country' relations with with so many of the native groups we displaced. (In reading about "King Phillip's War", it was said that the sense of betrayal and fear felt by the Puritan settler of new England colored every conflict the US had with native peoples that followed. Reading this, I and hard-pressed to reject that concept) It is stunning to hear the small size of the Apache tribes recounted by Geronimo. To imagine the whole of the post-Civil War army chasing down these bands of a few hundreds, just on its own, gives serious voice to the misplaced panic felt by the people of the US, and to the minuscule threat that they would have posed had we only been able to live faithfully by each others' sides. Of course, now story of such conflict can be told without some understanding that each party has different perspectives, and truth as each sees it may be rather different. The editor does a good job to secure testimony from others about the surrender of Geronimo and a few other parts of his life story as well. These are illuminating and generally lend credence and strength to the idea that Geronimo's reports are in the main accurate and truthful, at least inasmuch as I can say being fairly ignorant of that time. The description of the World's Fair had a few particularly amusing notes, as well. I won't spiol them by attempting to describe them. It's a short read, but very worthwhile.

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