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I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy

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A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposÉ of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us. Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. Over a half a billion people are on Facebook alone. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world. But whil A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposÉ of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us. Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. Over a half a billion people are on Facebook alone. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world. But while that nation appears to be a comforting small town in which we can share photos of friends and quaint bits of trivia about our lives, it is actually a lawless battle zone—a frontier with all the hidden and unpredictable dangers of any previously unexplored place. Social networks offer freedom. An ordinary individual can be a reporter, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster or a political crisis. A layperson can be a scientist, participating in a crowd-sourced research project. Or an investigator, helping cops solve a crime. But as we work and chat and date (and sometimes even have sex) over the web, traditional rights may be slipping away. Colleges and employers routinely reject applicants because of information found on social networks. Cops use photos from people’s profiles to charge them with crimes—or argue for harsher sentences. Robbers use postings about vacations to figure out when to break into homes. At one school, officials used cameras on students’ laptops to spy on them in their bedrooms. The same power of information that can topple governments can also topple a person’s career, marriage, or future. What Andrews proposes is a Constitution for the web, to extend our rights to this wild new frontier. This vitally important book will generate a storm of attention.


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A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposÉ of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us. Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. Over a half a billion people are on Facebook alone. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world. But whil A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposÉ of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us. Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. Over a half a billion people are on Facebook alone. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world. But while that nation appears to be a comforting small town in which we can share photos of friends and quaint bits of trivia about our lives, it is actually a lawless battle zone—a frontier with all the hidden and unpredictable dangers of any previously unexplored place. Social networks offer freedom. An ordinary individual can be a reporter, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster or a political crisis. A layperson can be a scientist, participating in a crowd-sourced research project. Or an investigator, helping cops solve a crime. But as we work and chat and date (and sometimes even have sex) over the web, traditional rights may be slipping away. Colleges and employers routinely reject applicants because of information found on social networks. Cops use photos from people’s profiles to charge them with crimes—or argue for harsher sentences. Robbers use postings about vacations to figure out when to break into homes. At one school, officials used cameras on students’ laptops to spy on them in their bedrooms. The same power of information that can topple governments can also topple a person’s career, marriage, or future. What Andrews proposes is a Constitution for the web, to extend our rights to this wild new frontier. This vitally important book will generate a storm of attention.

30 review for I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy

  1. 5 out of 5

    William Lawrence

    Frightening cases and examples. Great ideas for an internet constitution.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette (Again)

    This book is written by an attorney, which places it in the dry and wordy category. However, the information is important enough that it's worth the slog. I scanned much of it that doesn't apply to me, and am gladder than ever that I never joined Facebook and don't share much personal info on the internet. BUT -- "they" can collect info from your most private communications online. Even your e-mails, which we all tend to think are sacrosanct. VERDICT: Every internet user needs to read this book, This book is written by an attorney, which places it in the dry and wordy category. However, the information is important enough that it's worth the slog. I scanned much of it that doesn't apply to me, and am gladder than ever that I never joined Facebook and don't share much personal info on the internet. BUT -- "they" can collect info from your most private communications online. Even your e-mails, which we all tend to think are sacrosanct. VERDICT: Every internet user needs to read this book, regardless of whether or not they belong to a social networking site. Yes, it's very thorough, with lots of densely packed small print. But you can easily skip-read the stuff that doesn't apply to you. Meanwhile, for the luvva Gordy, show some restraint in what you post online! ANYWHERE online. Exhibitionism seems to be an unfortunate outgrowth of internet access. Not only is it unseemly, it can come back to ruin your life. It can cost you your job, convict you of a crime you didn't commit, or make you lose custody of your child. It really IS worse than you think.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jena Anderson

    If you are looking for a book that is written in any form other than dry this is not the book for you. This book is written by Lori Andrews who is not only an author, but also a lawyer. She makes this book interesting with the various points she brings up, overall it is an easy read. I chose to read this book because I have always heard about how much of your privacy is destroyed by the things we post on Facebook and the various other websites. This book not only covers how our privacy is destro If you are looking for a book that is written in any form other than dry this is not the book for you. This book is written by Lori Andrews who is not only an author, but also a lawyer. She makes this book interesting with the various points she brings up, overall it is an easy read. I chose to read this book because I have always heard about how much of your privacy is destroyed by the things we post on Facebook and the various other websites. This book not only covers how our privacy is destroyed, but also about cyber bullying and much more. Andrews’ main purpose of this book is to show just how our personal information is becoming public. I think all of us generally know that the information we post on Facebook is not as private as they may make it seem. This book reveals just how public all of our information is and how it could be held against you. There are various examples that are used on how it is held against you. Many crime cases are solved by evidence posted on Facebook, and other websites. Judges cannot be friends with lawyers and various other court members. They can, however, search on Facebook to find out information for the case at hand. Andrews also brings up a site by the name of Spokeo which has a lot of what should be private information that is made public. She brings up many different sites such as this, but Spokeo is the one that really lite up my eyes. Spokeo provides more information publicly than should be legal. That is one of the things this book really makes you question is what should be legally public information, what should be able to be held against you, and is it right for us to allow this to go on. This book covers more topics and situations than I can compile into this one book review, but I highly recommend this book. I think it is important for us all to beware of the behind the scene things that are going on. This book will really make you stop and think before posting your next status on Facebook, or the pictures from last night’s party. Lori Andrews will make your vision more clear over these issues, but at the same time boggle your mind and make you want to stand up for your own rights.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This book is about more than Facebook. I'm really surprised about all the data aggregation stuff. There's no blocking, no opting out . . . you can't hire someone to remove things for you from the web, can't sue, can't get a bill through Congress. And, even just to mess with the aggregators' data, you can't pretend to be someone else b/c the they really do know who you are. Part of me thinks, who cares, it's been happening for years, and maybe that's the trade-off for free access to sites. Worryin This book is about more than Facebook. I'm really surprised about all the data aggregation stuff. There's no blocking, no opting out . . . you can't hire someone to remove things for you from the web, can't sue, can't get a bill through Congress. And, even just to mess with the aggregators' data, you can't pretend to be someone else b/c the they really do know who you are. Part of me thinks, who cares, it's been happening for years, and maybe that's the trade-off for free access to sites. Worrying about how the data could be used somewhere down the line--that way lies paranoia. But it's still troubling. Most of us never would agree to let companies record our every move in our homes or cars, not even for a price. Have we actually agreed to this on our computers, and now phones?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kannadin

    Anybody who has or has not used social networks should read this book in order to be more cautious about which kind of information, comments or photos they post on the Internet. As a European citizen, I feel more protected from the kind of abusive collecting of data Americans are subjected to, yet I do feel the right to be forgotten is difficult to apply on the web even in the EU. I remember an instance when some years ago I used a bogus e-mail address to register on Facebook. More than 6 years a Anybody who has or has not used social networks should read this book in order to be more cautious about which kind of information, comments or photos they post on the Internet. As a European citizen, I feel more protected from the kind of abusive collecting of data Americans are subjected to, yet I do feel the right to be forgotten is difficult to apply on the web even in the EU. I remember an instance when some years ago I used a bogus e-mail address to register on Facebook. More than 6 years after leaving the website, I used the same bogus address to create a new account, this time with another name... ALL of the former friends I had on my previous account were proposed to me to be friended even BEFORE I had entered any other information. It was so scary and disturbing that I completely erased this new account within the next 24 hours. Increasingly, we're made to feel that without a Facebook account, it's difficult - even impossible - to have a social life. But is spending hours in front of a screen posting about your various states of mind, having a social life? Data collection is already a problem of magnificent proportion when you are just surfing on the web but the price to pay for the connectivity offered by social networks is, as far as I am concerned, too much for what it is. I can do without, but for those of us who are Facebook/MySpace/Twitter addicted, the author advocates the creation of a Social Network Constitution. However bright this idea is, no doubt businesses are gonna fight tooth and nail to thwart any attempt to get one, so don't expect your rights to be protected in the near future. The stakes are high and few of us are truly aware of the deep ramifications of using such services. It is common knowledge that it's only once you've lost something that you realize how precious it was: privacy has on the whole already been lost, it's now time to reclaim it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Farhana

    In the end , about the book I would like to quote Miranda warning in criminal cases: "You have the right to remain silent. Everything you say can and will be held against you in a court of law." :p Okay that's a hell of thing with social networking!! This book has made me quite curious to dig into farther in this topic. Maybe a little more thought is required when we assert our freedom of speech, freedom of expression. As of after reading the book , while writing this review I am quite wondering In the end , about the book I would like to quote Miranda warning in criminal cases: "You have the right to remain silent. Everything you say can and will be held against you in a court of law." :p Okay that's a hell of thing with social networking!! This book has made me quite curious to dig into farther in this topic. Maybe a little more thought is required when we assert our freedom of speech, freedom of expression. As of after reading the book , while writing this review I am quite wondering how this review of my goodreads account is going to affect my digital profile ~ [[ 23 September: I wrote the review yesterday & this morning when I logged into my fb account fb was offering me to see their privacy policy like thing at the top of my news feed . So I took a look at them. :p I wonder if this happened at random or has something to do with it :p ]]

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Davis

    And yes, I get the irony of posting this on a social network.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Billy Wiggins

    Enlightening and infuriating, but ultimately a fascinating read. Andrews does a nice job of laying out the ways society is incorrectly dealing with social network privacy issues, and builds the book around proposals for a Social Network Constitution. The enlightening part of the book is in learning the many ways that data-aggregating companies will troll for, purchase, and abuse a person's data. Most of us know this is done on some level, but to have it laid out specifically in black and white, y Enlightening and infuriating, but ultimately a fascinating read. Andrews does a nice job of laying out the ways society is incorrectly dealing with social network privacy issues, and builds the book around proposals for a Social Network Constitution. The enlightening part of the book is in learning the many ways that data-aggregating companies will troll for, purchase, and abuse a person's data. Most of us know this is done on some level, but to have it laid out specifically in black and white, you come to realize how large the operation is. The infuriating part comes in the many, many real-life cases of people being cruel and deceitful to one another over social networks (getting them fired, snooping, talking teens into suicide, threatening lawyers, etc) and the invariably light sentences these people receive. It is mind-boggling the light view of internet privacy that is held by our court system. Many times, the author drills home the point that if the same threats, or intimidation, or snooping were done through phone or snail mail, they would be federal offenses. Due to either ignorance or a cavalier attitude about the web, many courts are inexplicably lenient. I KNOW WHO... is a brisk, easy read, dotted with salacious and exciting real-life cases throughout to keep your interest. If you are reading this review, chances are you are a Facebook/internet addict and will appreciate this book. 4/5 stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Media and the Death of Privacy by Lori Andrews will tell you who many social media users are and what many of them did, particularly when Facebook removed privacy controls causing posts intended to be shared with friends to be seen by “friends of friends,” and personal descriptions to be seen by “liked” products and services. As Andrews points out, even members who are willing to work at maintaining their own privacy controls are discouraged by t I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Media and the Death of Privacy by Lori Andrews will tell you who many social media users are and what many of them did, particularly when Facebook removed privacy controls causing posts intended to be shared with friends to be seen by “friends of friends,” and personal descriptions to be seen by “liked” products and services. As Andrews points out, even members who are willing to work at maintaining their own privacy controls are discouraged by the 45,000-word Facebook policy statement. Andrews has assembled a fascinating collection of anecdotes on social media woes from commercial sales of personal information to introduction of social media posts as evidence in divorce courts. Her proposed solution, a global “Social Media Constitution” seems a bit naive, however, and more information on privacy safeguards used in European countries would have been a welcome addition.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gosunflowers

    skimmed the book, but basically am convinced that there is no such thing as privacy any more (cue sad and dooming music now).

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mariam Omar

    This intensive and heavily detailed book serves as a wealth of knowledge and relevant facts. The book introduces the idea of privacy in a world filled with the cracks and loopholes that we know as social media. I chose this specific book because the topic of privacy when it comes to the internet is one that will always be up for discussion and it is a lifelong learning topic, with new changes coming for very frequently. As technology advances, so do privacy laws and social media laws as well. T This intensive and heavily detailed book serves as a wealth of knowledge and relevant facts. The book introduces the idea of privacy in a world filled with the cracks and loopholes that we know as social media. I chose this specific book because the topic of privacy when it comes to the internet is one that will always be up for discussion and it is a lifelong learning topic, with new changes coming for very frequently. As technology advances, so do privacy laws and social media laws as well. The audience for this read would vary, ranging from non-fiction readers, educators, cybersecurity professionals, law students, or anyone merely interested in the decline of online privacy. This book was also written by a lawyer, who really went into a lot of depth about the state of our privacy in this booming technological age from a legal perspective. With new technology coming out at an increasingly rapid pace, it’s no doubt that we depend on technology for everyday functions. This includes social media, online shopping, networking, and performing basic Google searches. While these might be very basic and daily things that you may do, you really would have no idea that any information could be sold or put out in other public areas that you are not aware of. This can be to the extent of a gross violation of your privacy rights, all without your knowledge. In an essence, this is what the book touches on. The author, Lori Andrews, gives you the insight you need on what could be lurking behind your Facebook pictures, your apps, posts, and even likes. The privacy theme of this book reminded me of the Wikipedia topic we discussed. Since Wikipedia can be edited at any time by anyone, it really made me wonder why there is not much security or even private editing available of the site. I think this poses a great threat to anyone looking for information, just like any one of us posting on social media or ordering from online poses some type of threat. This book is extremely well researched since the author is someone who not only has a lot of knowledge on the subject but can also refer to examples and situations as well. For example, in the first chapter of the book “Facebook Nation”, Andrews discusses how Facebook, one of the first revolutionary networking sites, has managed to slowly change its privacy of the site throughout the years. “Not only does Facebook make the private public, but also the public private” ((Andrews 2013 27). Here, she is referring to the ever so changing privacy policies through social media. In the past, government officials used to need warrants to obtain intimate facts about anyone. Now, all it takes is a simple search on the Facebook search bar to find first and last names, date of births, and sometimes even addresses. This book also contains many stories about people putting their information up online, and later finding out how their own information will come back to haunt them. It makes you question how much privacy you really have, if any. Although the book was a great read, it was at times, overwhelming. There is so much information thrown at you that you can’t help but take a step back to breathe. This book also made me become a bit more conscious with what I post, and give it a second thought because at the end of the day, we really don’t have much privacy. It's a scary book, basically telling you that you are jeopardizing your privacy every time you plug in. In addition to this, I believe Andrews gave all of us a harsh sense of reality and really reminded us that not everything that has to do with technology is positive, despite what has been pounded into our heads over the years.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hanan

    In I Know Who You Are And I Saw What You Did, we learn the rules and regulations that really don’t protect us in the World Wide Web. Social networks is the greatest thing that has happened since the internet was created, but Lori Andrews shows us the darker side of of social networks and the so called privacy that we have on these sites. Although social networks gives us extensive long online consent forums to consent to, many of us don’t really know what were signing up to. Lori Andrews points In I Know Who You Are And I Saw What You Did, we learn the rules and regulations that really don’t protect us in the World Wide Web. Social networks is the greatest thing that has happened since the internet was created, but Lori Andrews shows us the darker side of of social networks and the so called privacy that we have on these sites. Although social networks gives us extensive long online consent forums to consent to, many of us don’t really know what were signing up to. Lori Andrews points out clearly that we are not truly safe on social networks and neither is our information. Anyone who truly tries hard enough can obtain our entire existence. The book explains how our social rights are nonexistent and that we truly are not as safe as we think with what we post on social media. Many of us know that if one’s applying for a job, that the new employer can dig up information on us. But what we learn from this book is that some things we post can and will be used against us in every aspect of life. It’s not just your employer or your graduate school that can find your unpleasant party days pictures, but its lawyers, and stalkers that can find your entire social life. Lori did an absolute job finding real life cases that showcased the monstrosity of social networks. She identified the lack of laws that govern social networks and the long lasting affects it has on those who become the victims. Additionally, we learn about how our information is used when data is collected from internet companies and instead of protecting our information, its sold so that these huge internet companies can make money of our personal private information. There’s this huge claim that we have rights and are protected, but our information is slowly being leaked to everywhere and anywhere. Furthermore, this book is non-fiction and is backed up by phenomenal research. In every case that Lori has given us, she has statistics and factual information to allow the reader to understand how privacy is not present on social networks. The cases that she used where real life factual incidents that took place due to the lack of privacy on social media and the lack of protection from those who abuse the internet. I expect from a non-fiction book to be able to be informative and to educate its readers. Lori defined and explained what the issues facing our privacy is and in the end she gave us a solution to the problem. The solution is something that can be adopted and implemented and I truly enjoyed what she had proposed. Her solution was not only for the social networks and the internet to implement it and for the people to act on it and use it as a protection, but for governments to learn and educate themselves more on the harsh realities of the internet. I truly enjoyed reading this book, because it opened my eyes to what really goes on in the world when it comes to social networks. Although what we do online may be helpful to us and bring us a lot of joy and accessibility, it also exploits our information and the trust we easily hand over to our browsers. It’s the best and worst thing that has happened to us. Additionally, I wish this book was written when I was younger and was truly educated of the dangers of social networks and the internet. I think we all know the dangerous that comes with the internet, but when you read this book, you suddenly become disgusted with the parts of your life that has easily become public without even knowing. I would advise anyone and everyone to read this book, because it teach us the horrors of how our own privacy can be used against us and taken from us at the same time.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Ketzner

    If you use the internet, this book gives you valuable insight on how you are opening yourselves up to potentially damaging privacy violations and provides a means to dealing with these issues. Andrews’s points out that many of our traditional rights we take for grant, have diminished in cyberspace and wants to get them back. It goes into depth on the legal aspects and how the laws have not stayed up with the ever changing technology. The book definitely has some great insights on the misuse of o If you use the internet, this book gives you valuable insight on how you are opening yourselves up to potentially damaging privacy violations and provides a means to dealing with these issues. Andrews’s points out that many of our traditional rights we take for grant, have diminished in cyberspace and wants to get them back. It goes into depth on the legal aspects and how the laws have not stayed up with the ever changing technology. The book definitely has some great insights on the misuse of our private online data without us even knowing which could have the potential to harm us in numerous ways and the privacy rights that people should have on the internet that could help protect us. The use of the internet offers many freedoms, but as we access and use the internet we are opening ourselves to unwelcoming privacy violations by anyone. Once something gets posted on the internet, it is nearly impossible to remove information from the web. Not only can it come back to haunt you but can sabotage your chances at getting a job, cause you to lose a job and even convict you of a crime that you did not commit. Four boys from Glenbard South High School in Chicago who appeared to be drinking in a photo posted on Facebook were criminally prosecuted for underage drinking and the aunt of one of the boys, at whose house the picture taken was charged with contributing to the delinquency of minors (Andrews, 164). As social media website such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter become more popular, more of our personal data will become public and that public personal data now can be used against you. Andrew argues we cannot count on the legal system to protect us. Our legal system is not safeguarding us from all the misuse of personal information online without our awareness or protecting us against persecution, defamation or vengeance. People's private information is being sold to marketers for ads that you see on your social media sites. These ads are specifically tailored to your taste. A site I found fascinating and did not know existed was introduced to me by Andrews called Spokeo. It provides people's personal information to anyone who searches for it. The free Spokeo search can provide information on full names, employer, addresses, relationship status, birth dates and telephone numbers and for a fee you can view more extensive information on an individual (Andrews, 99-100). Also the information listed about the individual on Spokeo might not even be correct; yet banks credit card companies and other institutions routinely use it to determine whether or not to offer a job or extend credit based on such information (Andrews, 78). I think Andrew’s main purpose of the book is to show us that our personal information is becoming public even if our social media accounts are set to private. Andrews does a good job proving there is no privacy on the internet and people don’t think about the effect it has on our rights we take for granted. Andrews will make your vision more clear on why we need a Social Network Constitution to protect us from our personal data online being used against us in the wrong way because the results can be highly damaging.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Jones-Abdullah

    Have you ever thought about your privacy when accessing the internet? Are you a frequent user of social media? Do you value your privacy? If you can answer yes to either one of these questions this book is a must read. Some of the most shocking details of how your privacy does not exist on social media platforms. Unfortunately, Privacy issues is something that we all face, and it is important to know how and when our information is being used. Private information about people is readily availabl Have you ever thought about your privacy when accessing the internet? Are you a frequent user of social media? Do you value your privacy? If you can answer yes to either one of these questions this book is a must read. Some of the most shocking details of how your privacy does not exist on social media platforms. Unfortunately, Privacy issues is something that we all face, and it is important to know how and when our information is being used. Private information about people is readily available to third parties (5). Have you ever heard the cliché “whatever goes on in Vegas stays in Vegas”? Well, what happens in Facebook does not stay in Facebook. It reminds me of the song “I always feel like somebody’s watching me and I have no privacy” by Rockwell. After reading this book it is clear that we can’t count on the legal system to protect us regarding privacy matters. Therefore, we all should support the constitution of the web. We must take action to protect our privacy. Did you know that everything you post on social networks or other websites is being digested, analyzed and monetized? A second self of you is being created digitally (19). And if that is not scary enough this second self can be viewed by colleges and potential employers. What is worse is that you have no control of the data being aggregated. Have you ever heard of applied for a job or school and your application was denied? It is possible the information collected about you digitally and sold to public may have caused you to lose that opportunity. This is called web lining. Your web searches provide data on which you can be judged erroneously or not (29). Technology is not always our friend. We need to be careful of what we post online because it could come back to haunt us. Consider before you make your next post, is this something I will regret in the future? What if a judge or lawyer had access to your social media pages? Can it be incriminating? Could that photo of you holding a drink prevent you from getting a job or losing custody of your children? Social networks have come to play a vital role in our public and private lives. The need to protect individuals rights to lead a full and social life in the face of intrusive technology has never been greater. A Social Network Constitution, capable of shielding people against the distorting lens of public scrutiny and the misuse of social network information, promises to align the latest technologies with some of society’s oldest values (58-59). This book really had me on edge. Lori Andrews does a great job of breaking down how our information is shared and how it can be used against us. There are several examples of techniques used to track us that will have you cringing at the very thought of how your information is being used. I personally have always been skeptical of doing activity online especially with the use of my bank account or credit card information. We have a right to connect and a right to privacy, and this should include social networks. The surveillance of each internet user has created a second self that undermines our character as individuals. It is unlawful and we must take a stand together.

  15. 4 out of 5

    CTEP

    For May book club I decided to read I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did by Lori Andrews. I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did serves as a proposal of sorts for what the author calls a "Social Network Constitution" which would protect the right to privacy for people when they use the internet. The author goes through various examples while arguing why such a constitution is needed, such as the fact that websites and internet collect data to send you targeted ads, that websites can chan For May book club I decided to read I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did by Lori Andrews. I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did serves as a proposal of sorts for what the author calls a "Social Network Constitution" which would protect the right to privacy for people when they use the internet. The author goes through various examples while arguing why such a constitution is needed, such as the fact that websites and internet collect data to send you targeted ads, that websites can change settings on a whim without allowing users a chance to secure their information, and the right to disconnect themselves from data aggregators. Andrews, who is a lawyer and law professor, lays out her arguments piece by piece, much in a way a lawyer would argue a case, providing plenty of examples as to why she believes what she does, all the while drawing heavily on cases and legal precedent. One of the more substantial arguments she makes is that the internet serves as a way for government agencies to collect evidence on suspects without a warrant or their knowledge. Before the age of the internet, there were laws on the books to protect against things like that (e.g. wiretapping laws) but the laws are slow to catch up, which leads to judges ruling different ways and people being punished with evidence that would not normally have been deemed acceptable. This book relates to my service experience because it touches quite a bit on issues such as internet privacy, which is a topic that comes up quite a bit during the social media class I teach, especially amongst older students. Many students I have spoken to are afraid of their information getting out there, with one woman being incredibly frightened that her information is on data aggregators. I always try to answer questions about things like that as best as I can, and I feel that at the very least I learned more about how sites like data aggregators work and I am better able to explain some of the risks of using social media and what happens when you enter in your info online. To be completely honest, I’m not sure if I would recommend this book to other CTEPs. The book is incredibly long and dry, containing lots of examples in an overwhelming sort of way. The book uses so many case studies that they begin to blend together. Another issue with the book is that it is over 8 years old, which is quite significant when talking about technology (The author talks about Myspace being a key player). I sort of stumbled across this book on accident while looking for stuff about Mike Zuckerberg and recent Facebook controversies, and I wouldn’t say that I wish I hadn’t read it, but I feel that there are better sources to consult when interested in the topic of data privacy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather Wehrenberg

    This book is an educational tool for everyone that thinks what you post on the internet is safe. If you use the internet for Facebook to post pictures of your life, Google to do searches on information you need, a blog that you like to read or add commentary to, then this book is for you. That means that all of us could read this book to be informed on how anonymity is not anonymity and everything you look at and everything you post is for anyone to see and/or find. Lori Andrews wrote this book t This book is an educational tool for everyone that thinks what you post on the internet is safe. If you use the internet for Facebook to post pictures of your life, Google to do searches on information you need, a blog that you like to read or add commentary to, then this book is for you. That means that all of us could read this book to be informed on how anonymity is not anonymity and everything you look at and everything you post is for anyone to see and/or find. Lori Andrews wrote this book to educate everyone that uses the internet in any way. She’s letting us know that while we may believe what we put on the internet is private, it is actually not. Facebook has proven to us that they can change our privacy settings at any time. This means everything we all have put on Facebook and we thought it was private, is not. Nothing is private, the privacy rules for social media have gotten longer and longer, more tedious to the point where it’s pretty much stating that no one has privacy. This book explains what data aggregators are, which was helpful in my case. The information that is provided to them are sold to other companies. That means every click you make on every website you go to is sent to data aggregators who will sell to the other businesses as I stated. So, if you click on a pair of headphones you want to purchase and all of a sudden you start to see those headphones in your newsfeed on Facebook, now you know why. The cookies on all the website collect your clicks and your information and distribute (sell) it. Have you tried going to a website and not accepting the cookies from that website? The website won’t let you in, it’s forcing you to use their cookies so they can get information on you. What I like about this book is the author, who’s also a lawyer, wrote this book and gave true accounts of what has happened to people who’ve posted items onto their social media and the repercussions that have come with those postings. This shows that this book was well-researched with the facts she gave for each story/example she provided. Lastly, I enjoyed reading this book even though it was written in 2011, the privacy of our information is still an issue today. This book highlights the issues that American has with privacy and it’s clear that our laws need to change to be stricter on privacy laws. Europe already has this figured out, so it’s time we (U.S.) get there as well.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Uzong

    This is a non-fiction book written by Lori Andrews, who is an attorney. The amount of research and real-life examples presented in this book are quite overwhelming, but nonetheless a great read. This book exposes the truth about social media, and how the content that you choose to share on your social media platforms, and the worldwide web can and most likely will be used against you. This book helps explain thought of having privacy on social media is just not realistic. Many see social media a This is a non-fiction book written by Lori Andrews, who is an attorney. The amount of research and real-life examples presented in this book are quite overwhelming, but nonetheless a great read. This book exposes the truth about social media, and how the content that you choose to share on your social media platforms, and the worldwide web can and most likely will be used against you. This book helps explain thought of having privacy on social media is just not realistic. Many see social media as a place to share all the moments, that people they have been separated from for years can reunite. However, Andrews uncovers all the ways in which the information you share on social media can cause a misrepresentation of who you are. People can use the information you post as ways to keep you from getting a job, or just finding away into your private life. The privacy laws which are in place do not support social media and protecting you from people obtaining access to your life. As technology advances, and most of the world depends on it for our everyday things such as: news, shopping, networking, sharing photos, and connecting with friends and family members. People need to remember that anything you post to social media is being put out into the worldwide web. There is a way that “someone” can gain access to it, one way or another. Not always for negative use, but if they are looking for information on you, it is there. People have to be cautious on what they chose to share on social media, and Andrews present researched facts on suggesting how the information can be used against you. This book is a great read for those who are on social media already, but even better for parents who have children wanting to join social media. Or for those who are not on social media, and have some uncertainty about joining social media. You will find all the answers to how private is your information actually being kept, and is it actually possible to keep your information private once you are on social media. I know for myself after reading this book, I have realized that I have shared way too much on social media even though, I didn’t think I was sharing much at all. I know however for the future, what to share and what not to share moving forward.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ceará

    There are some points that are repeated again and again even though the gist had been said earlier. nonetheless, i like the analogy Andrews did of the internet and cameras alike. In the past, picture taking was totally considered a formal and prepared kind of thing. and with the advancement of camera technology, people could just take a picture of you no matter if you wanted to have your picture taken or not. Good thing there are some regulations imposed on picture taking, taking into account th There are some points that are repeated again and again even though the gist had been said earlier. nonetheless, i like the analogy Andrews did of the internet and cameras alike. In the past, picture taking was totally considered a formal and prepared kind of thing. and with the advancement of camera technology, people could just take a picture of you no matter if you wanted to have your picture taken or not. Good thing there are some regulations imposed on picture taking, taking into account the right to privacy of those subjected to harrassment. Those who were harassed could easily sue those people. On the internet, however, it might take a long way to have the correct intervention of regulating the information aggregated by third parties. It is sad that this thing occurred and people are oblivious to it just like me. I would rate this 2.5 because I was having a difficult time understanding terms that are considered esoteric. But this topic is good and important to be understood by the general public. For now, we have to rely on these new found technology. I'm also disappointed about M.Zuckerberg because it is true that we are under the mercy of Facebook's constant changing policy. It isn't only Facebook who practices this by the way. But then, most people rely on computers now. we are indeed at the mercy of the Internet and hoping for the best that the population would be more careful about what they search.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Lori Andrews is a Law Professor. This book was published in 2011 with extensive case examples depicting each of her points. My 2 rating is based on its similarity to a history book instead of a who-done-it, just not as fun of a read, but very well written. Had I read the book in 2011, I may have been shocked and awed by the facts presented. Reading the book in 2020 is just a disappointment that data security concerns remain the same, or potentially worse, for anyone using the internet or social Lori Andrews is a Law Professor. This book was published in 2011 with extensive case examples depicting each of her points. My 2 rating is based on its similarity to a history book instead of a who-done-it, just not as fun of a read, but very well written. Had I read the book in 2011, I may have been shocked and awed by the facts presented. Reading the book in 2020 is just a disappointment that data security concerns remain the same, or potentially worse, for anyone using the internet or social networks. Laws as we know them for our privacy do not apply to the internet. Data collecting is occurring from our every keystroke whether we like it or not AND potentially pigeon holing us into a marketing category that is far from who we are. Laws have not kept pace with technology! "Cyber cesspools", pretty well sums it up! A couple facts presented that, I do find astonishing and curious: 1) In 2010 Reporters Without Borders ranked the USA 20th of 178 countries on issues of press freedom. Northern European countries ranked top of the list. 2) No privacy with online date in the USA. Throughout Europe, laws and treaties about data aggregations outlaws the types of privacy invasions seen in the USA.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dea

    This book felt a lot like a senior project expanded to the size of a book. From the wishy-washy handful of examples to the repeated insistence on a social network constitution. I am used to these types of books following essentially the same formula: introduction of a problem, examples of the problem, explanation of how those problematic examples would be fixed by the proposed solution. This book had the first two sections pretty well covered, but the solution never really materialized. There wa This book felt a lot like a senior project expanded to the size of a book. From the wishy-washy handful of examples to the repeated insistence on a social network constitution. I am used to these types of books following essentially the same formula: introduction of a problem, examples of the problem, explanation of how those problematic examples would be fixed by the proposed solution. This book had the first two sections pretty well covered, but the solution never really materialized. There was a lot of “we would have to figure out X” as if that is just some minor aspect of the problem and not the core of the problem. And a lot of the examples pointed out how the proposed solution would actually make the situation worse, rather than fix it. I think if I had read a handful of articles on the topic of internet surveillance and how it can impact the real world, I would have felt less like my time was wasted.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book had very important and disturbing information. The writing was very dry, but so was the material. I went to most of the websites discussed in the book and it was very enlightening. My life is so boring, but yet it shows up. One site I went to has my information as "male - 100%" "married - 100% and making a lot more money than I actually do. There was so much incorrect information. I also went through the process of trying to "opt out" of some of these site and they do not make it easy. This book had very important and disturbing information. The writing was very dry, but so was the material. I went to most of the websites discussed in the book and it was very enlightening. My life is so boring, but yet it shows up. One site I went to has my information as "male - 100%" "married - 100% and making a lot more money than I actually do. There was so much incorrect information. I also went through the process of trying to "opt out" of some of these site and they do not make it easy. It's like a secret treasure hunt that ends in a dead end. Argh!! Anyway, lots of good information.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Ewald

    Lots of cautionary tales are related in here. This book was written in 2011 so there is the whole election 2016 subject that could bring this book up to date. Interesting read, if somewhat difficult as written from a lawyer's perspective. I was taken by her Acknowledgements when she said that she rarely bought anything from the web until someone requested an item from Amazon.com. That opened the door to her profile getting on the Internet. We have all fallen prey to the bargains to be had and ou Lots of cautionary tales are related in here. This book was written in 2011 so there is the whole election 2016 subject that could bring this book up to date. Interesting read, if somewhat difficult as written from a lawyer's perspective. I was taken by her Acknowledgements when she said that she rarely bought anything from the web until someone requested an item from Amazon.com. That opened the door to her profile getting on the Internet. We have all fallen prey to the bargains to be had and our information to be sold.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Riegs

    It’s the end of 2017 and this one was written in 2011... Some of the details are old news but damn if it isn’t still scary AF. The FCC repealed Net Neutrality rules two days ago, making some of the warnings and predictions from this book suddenly very real.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    The whole premise of the book is based around having a Social Network Constitution, which Andrews hammers you over the head with in every chapter. I understand why she did it, but it wasn't the most enjoyable of formats. The whole premise of the book is based around having a Social Network Constitution, which Andrews hammers you over the head with in every chapter. I understand why she did it, but it wasn't the most enjoyable of formats.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    In today’s society, technology is ever advancing, becoming a dependency for connection and every day function; whether it is through social networks, online purchasing, or simply searching for information. What the public doesn’t know are the hidden methods of collecting and selling that information to the highest bidder and what we do personally online that is no longer personal. This is to the point of violating our most basic human rights and potentially damaging our futures. Lori Andrews exp In today’s society, technology is ever advancing, becoming a dependency for connection and every day function; whether it is through social networks, online purchasing, or simply searching for information. What the public doesn’t know are the hidden methods of collecting and selling that information to the highest bidder and what we do personally online that is no longer personal. This is to the point of violating our most basic human rights and potentially damaging our futures. Lori Andrews exposes these shocking truths, showing the world what is really behind every mouse click, letter typed, or smart phone app used, and the dangers it can cause. Andrews begins with a shocking first chapter, describing the mass impact of social networks, like Facebook, and how easily it could be a nation of its own. As the chapters continue, Andrews shows the readers how our data aggregators (data information methods) are used by collecting more information about us than we realize, forming a second self of us virtually. These data aggregators can cause severe damage, as it is often wrong. Just by simply using a credit card in the wrong zip code, for example, can affect your financial future without your knowledge. Or by venting to your friends online, your job or education can be in immediate jeopardy. These occur through the use of web lining, aggressive data aggregators, and the sharing of personal information we assumed was confidential. Many are used for profit and greed from organizations, while other members viewing our information can use it against us. Andrews shows how outside of the online world, these methods are unlawful, discriminatory, and immoral. The online world, however, has moved so quickly that the law has yet to keep up, allowing an entire world of violations to our basic human rights to run rampant. Andrews’ method to stop these issues is by developing a social network constitution. I believe Andrews presents this book with profoundly shocking facts. Her first chapter makes you realize the impact of social media around the world. Finding out that social media leaders are meeting with actual governmental leaders is a lot to grasp on its own. Each chapter seems to bring out more shocking information that left me reeling. It is clear this is her goal and her theme is showing the Death of Privacy to the readers. Her extensive research skills on data gathering, companies using this information, how it is used, etc. are nothing short of in-depth. Her references span over 30 pages alone. However, the book, though profound, is heavy by means of an overwhelming amount of facts packed tightly together. Specifically in the first few chapters, each sentence it seems carries another load of information to think about. It had a feel shortly after beginning, of an information dump of facts, losing its message on me. It is an extensive amount of information to process, at times to the point that I wasn’t absorbing all of the facts. At first, the book seemed to give the idea that the remaining portion would be of the governmental and organizational concept of violating our right to privacy. But Andrews shifts halfway into the book discussing our actions online and the First Amendment that kept me interested. The author moves to our right to connect online, but what if it is violating the rights of others? I feel this chapter and the following brought about a personal connection to what choices we as individuals make, rather than just looking at government and profit-focused privacy invasion. Andrews provides stories of all ranges of individuals that have been victims of online posting. What people feel is private, isn’t. Firing, expulsion, and unending court cases have erupted from social media. This hits home to all members of social media with real stories and makes you wonder what you have posted in the past. Will it come back to haunt me in the future, no matter how vague you may feel it was? The author concludes with an official Social Network Constitution (189). It is inspiring to read and agreeable to those who have read the horrifying ways our privacy is now invaded online. However, the reality of it seems to be a bit out of a reach. This was disappointing. Some profit has to occur for these sites to stay afloat and this constitution would make that quite difficult. It also seems more realistic to get the public to help change the laws to match online with offline actions rather than make a Facebook constitution. I believe the ending of the book was flat, resulting in unachievable resolutions, rather than realistic ones for the readers. Overall, I do recommend this book. Though the information was overwhelming at times, Lori Andrews discovered a vast amount of truths that the public needs to know about. Everyone should become aware of these findings, of these dangers, and unconstitutional acts as they personally affect us all. If you are looking for ways to make a change, however, this author may not provide that for you realistically. But it more importantly is a start in the right direction toward awareness for change.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Cosin

    Zzzzzzzzzz. Not a book to listen to while driving. Interesting topic though and may have been a good read. At least then I could have skipped over parts like the lines of cookie codes.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Donald

    3.5 stars A little too weird and dark for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    An eye opening book, but a little too technical and dry for my taste.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kyra

    Not as timely as it once was, but really gives you insight into the privacy you sacrifice online. Scary insight- read it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deanna Hayes

    This tell all book by Laurie Andrews dives right in by explaining the relationship between not only Mark Zuckerberg and the Prime Minister of England, but the many intertwinings of social media and the government as a whole. The Internet has revolutionized the way society and the individuals within are judged, rated, and exposed to and by whom. In one of the shocking segments of her book, Andrews talks about released Yahoo searches of multiple people. She reads out each person’s incriminating an This tell all book by Laurie Andrews dives right in by explaining the relationship between not only Mark Zuckerberg and the Prime Minister of England, but the many intertwinings of social media and the government as a whole. The Internet has revolutionized the way society and the individuals within are judged, rated, and exposed to and by whom. In one of the shocking segments of her book, Andrews talks about released Yahoo searches of multiple people. She reads out each person’s incriminating and personal search history – some of which makes your skin crawl! Andrews also talks about the major data collection companies and the millions they make off of selling your personal information on to creditors, advertisement companies and government agencies. Data aggregators, as well as our own government are finding loopholes in the outdated laws created decades ago to protect our privacy in order to satisfy their own agenda. Police are able to gather evidence and incentives that may lead to arrests through pictures or posts submitted online. Not only does the Internet allow us to be vulnerable to those seeking our information but it also prompts us to question what rights we do have to our own privacy. Privacy is not the only focus Andrews writes about. She also tells us about how Internet has changed the way we can become involved in current events, such as immigration. Social media platforms have the ability to connect people from around the world, easily creating groups based on their social or political standpoint on various subjects. This book is an excellent read for anyone who uses the Internet. Many subjects discussed in the book may make one’s pulse rise, place tape over their computer camera or even stray away from the Internet entirely! However, the eye opening information that Andrews provides gets the cogs in your head turning and sucks you in wanting to go deeper into what is really happening behind the screens of our computers. It’s a good source in learning how information is used and how the Internet has formed a new society that enables us to become more involved in what used to be a distant, difficult and to some impossible task. This book is anything but boring. With each chapter revealing the connections and gateways of how each stroke of a key is distributed to the hands of many, you become more gobsmacked. Even at this very moment as I begin to publish my review, I am conscious that they too, will now know not only who I am or what I did but also what I read.

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