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There's a deadly menace somewhere in Empire City, and The Fixer only has until dawn to save his town - and civilization as we know it! This title features the desperate and brutal quest of a hero as he is forced to run down an army of murderous zealots in order to stop a crime against humanity. There's a deadly menace somewhere in Empire City, and The Fixer only has until dawn to save his town - and civilization as we know it! This title features the desperate and brutal quest of a hero as he is forced to run down an army of murderous zealots in order to stop a crime against humanity.


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There's a deadly menace somewhere in Empire City, and The Fixer only has until dawn to save his town - and civilization as we know it! This title features the desperate and brutal quest of a hero as he is forced to run down an army of murderous zealots in order to stop a crime against humanity. There's a deadly menace somewhere in Empire City, and The Fixer only has until dawn to save his town - and civilization as we know it! This title features the desperate and brutal quest of a hero as he is forced to run down an army of murderous zealots in order to stop a crime against humanity.

30 review for Holy Terror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chip'sBookBinge

    Holy Terror? Try Holy Sh*t, that was horrible!!! What the phuck was this garbage? This is what Frank Miller spent all his time writing, not writing, writing, not writing, changing the character from Batman to The Fixer? Mr. Miller just outdid himself here. He made me forget the abysmal Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again. I didn't think that was even a remote possibility. I stand corrected. Now about this pile of dung. First off, the art is horrible. It's a lazy man's, bastardization of his Si Holy Terror? Try Holy Sh*t, that was horrible!!! What the phuck was this garbage? This is what Frank Miller spent all his time writing, not writing, writing, not writing, changing the character from Batman to The Fixer? Mr. Miller just outdid himself here. He made me forget the abysmal Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again. I didn't think that was even a remote possibility. I stand corrected. Now about this pile of dung. First off, the art is horrible. It's a lazy man's, bastardization of his Sin City style. Second, things that take place within the panels are so chaotic that you really can't tell if you're looking at a foot or a hand or a car or what. Third, the main characters are poorly thought out both in design and background story. Forth, the story itself was lame. There was no set up at all. Let me put it this way. Go rent True Lies and then fast-forward all the way to the final 20 minutes of the movie and there you have it. Reading this "book" was just one long fight scene and then it's over. There is no set up and there certainly is no resolution other than..... Oh forget it. I've already wasted enough of my time here. This is a Skip for me and the rest of humanity. So, if this is so bad, then how did it get even a half star rating? I'm glad you asked. You know when you buy a new car and it comes with that "new car smell?" Well, this "new book smell" is AWESOME, which is the only good thing about this $30 book. I feel sorry for any saps that actually pay good money for this. I'm just fortunate to know saps that allowed me to borrow this book. It's now safe to say that Frank Miller has written more sh*tty books than actual good ones. :::sigh::: Well, it sure seems that way lately. I need to revisit Sin City and read something good of his to get the taste of this one out. Rating: 1/2 Star out of 5 You can find more of my Book, DVD, TV and Movie reviews at my Forum (Penny Can) at... http://pennycan.createaforum.com/inde... Feel free to stop by and contribute your 2 cents.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ma'Belle

    Holy shit, I had my suspicions that Frank Miller was a right-wing, racist, misogynist wingnut, but this book just confirmed it. I spent the first half of this just trying to figure out what the fuck was up and down and whether or not the stylized disorientation was an effective story-telling device. (Hint: my conclusion was a resounding "NO.") The second half just made me ashamed that I was reading this trash in public. Holy Terror is a shiny turd serving only as a platform for Miller to scream Holy shit, I had my suspicions that Frank Miller was a right-wing, racist, misogynist wingnut, but this book just confirmed it. I spent the first half of this just trying to figure out what the fuck was up and down and whether or not the stylized disorientation was an effective story-telling device. (Hint: my conclusion was a resounding "NO.") The second half just made me ashamed that I was reading this trash in public. Holy Terror is a shiny turd serving only as a platform for Miller to scream at anyone opposed to the various military operations and wars in the Middle East. He is convinced that al Qaeda really is a looming terrorist threat that's growing in power under every freedom-loving American city. Rather than buying this or even checking it out from the library (as I did), just read this much more interesting debate between Frank Miller and Alan Moore: [begin quoted comment from http://io9.com/5894937/calm-down-befo... with excerpts from recent interviews with Miller and Moore]: "What bothered me more, lately, was finding out Frank Miller was a radical, militant, corporatist, Rightist saying stuff like this about the 99%, "The 'Occupy' movement, whether displaying itself on Wall Street or in the streets of Oakland (which has, with unspeakable cowardice, embraced it) is anything but an exercise of our blessed First Amendment. 'Occupy' is nothing but a pack of louts, thieves, and rapists, an unruly mob, fed by Woodstock-era nostalgia and putrid false righteousness. These clowns can do nothing but harm America. ...This is no popular uprising. This is garbage. And goodness knows they’re spewing their garbage – both politically and physically – every which way they can find. Wake up, pond scum. America is at war against a ruthless enemy. Maybe, between bouts of self-pity and all the other tasty tidbits of narcissism you’ve been served up in your sheltered, comfy little worlds, you’ve heard terms like al-Qaeda and Islamicism. ...In the name of decency, go home to your parents, you losers. Go back to your mommas’ basements and play with your Lords Of Warcraft." What an asshole. And Alan Moore (author of the original Watchmen, and the only Watchmen, for me, that will ever exist) called him out on it, saying: "Frank Miller is someone whose work I’ve barely looked at for the past twenty years. I thought the Sin City stuff was unreconstructed misogyny, 300 appeared to be wildly ahistoric, homophobic and just completely misguided. I think that there has probably been a rather unpleasant sensibility apparent in Frank Miller’s work for quite a long time. Since I don’t have anything to do with the comics industry, I don’t have anything to do with the people in it. I heard about the latest outpourings regarding the Occupy movement. It’s about what I’d expect from him. It’s always seemed to me that the majority of the comics field, if you had to place them politically, you’d have to say centre-right. That would be as far towards the liberal end of the spectrum as they would go. I’ve never been in any way, I don’t even know if I’m centre-left. I’ve been outspoken about that since the beginning of my career. So yes I think it would be fair to say that me and Frank Miller have diametrically opposing views upon all sorts of things, but certainly upon the Occupy movement. As far as I can see, the Occupy movement is just ordinary people reclaiming rights which should always have been theirs. I can’t think of any reason why as a population we should be expected to stand by and see a gross reduction in the living standards of ourselves and our kids, possibly for generations, when the people who have got us into this have been rewarded for it; they’ve certainly not been punished in any way because they’re too big to fail. I think that the Occupy movement is, in one sense, the public saying that they should be the ones to decide who’s too big to fail. It’s a completely justified howl of moral outrage and it seems to be handled in a very intelligent, non-violent way, which is probably another reason why Frank Miller would be less than pleased with it. I’m sure if it had been a bunch of young, sociopathic vigilantes with Batman make-up on their faces, he’d be more in favour of it. We would definitely have to agree to differ on that one."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Gosh, Batman Fixer! People really don't like this comic book... I can't think of another book I've seen on Goodreads with this many one star reviews. People hate this. I didn't hate it, I didn't feel anything for it. I didn't know it was supposed to be Batman versus Al-Queda and that DC decided not to go with it, but I did think, wow these characters are an awful lot like Batman and Catwoman. But then I also thought they were also a bit like a really angry Daredevil and Elektra, which I guess is Gosh, Batman Fixer! People really don't like this comic book... I can't think of another book I've seen on Goodreads with this many one star reviews. People hate this. I didn't hate it, I didn't feel anything for it. I didn't know it was supposed to be Batman versus Al-Queda and that DC decided not to go with it, but I did think, wow these characters are an awful lot like Batman and Catwoman. But then I also thought they were also a bit like a really angry Daredevil and Elektra, which I guess is sort of the same thing. Either way though I kept thinking, cannibalize your own work much, you bitter asshole? I didn't find the anti-Islam stuff very offensive, although I can see how some might. I did find the character who looked like that Rorschach from Watchmen with a blue star of David on his face to be the stupidest looking character in any comic book I've ever seen (I guess he would be tied with that character who popped up in a Daredevil comic back in the late 1980's (maybe this was Frank Miller's doing, too) who had an American Flag painted on his face, that character was pretty awful looking too). I found the ending of the book, well the climax part to be really stupid, especially the part where some jihadist starts blabbing about how he is part of something bigger, some vast conspiracy that Al-Queda is only a speck of. This reeked too much of unintelligible right-wing conspiracy lunacy, and was an unnecessary and unexplained 'plot-twist' that weakened an already frail story. The final kick to the head this book delivers is in the final pages where Police Commissioner Gordon (or whatever his name is changed to in this book) is unable to sleep, has nightmares and sweats from the suicide bombings from the beginning of the book, and he thinks something like, "This is why they call it terror." Ugh! Melodramatic sentimentalism! Oh, and the artwork sucks. I think I know why a lot of people gave it one star, and I think everything I've said would make you wonder why I gave it two stars. Maybe because I'm not a comic book geek, I have very strong feelings for Frank Miller, but they are safely enclosed in the past, they are part of my childhood and I expect nothing of him anymore. If I had been expecting something from him I would have been very disappointed by this, but I have erected some kind of wall around my love for him for creating the Daredevil story arc that was my very first and greatest comic book love as a kid and him as a person who does anything else (except for some of his Batman, pre-minimalism stuff, but I read most of that when I was older and it has no emotional attachment to me). Miller excelled when he gave emotional depth and darkness to comic book characters, here he has gone from the extreme of giving depth to just reveling in the brute force of characters. It's like he's just gone to the flip-side of the comic book conventions that he helped to destroy. I don't know what I save my one-star ratings for. Maybe those books have to really offend or hurt me. This is just very unspectacular and badly drawn angry man revenge fantasy, yeah it's against people who I have no love at all for, but this is just the comic book equivalent of watching an awful Chuck Norris type of movie from the 80's.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Yikes. But I say that in a morbidly satisfied kinda way. I knew I was in for a train wreck when I picked this one up. I wanted to bear witness to the horror. And in that regard, this book didn't disappoint. Rather than assigning this book merit points based on any "so-terrible-it's-hilarious" value it might offer the reader, I'd better just rate this a 1. That is precisely why I read this book in the first place. So much revulsion and critical condemnation is bound to attract curious readers. I w Yikes. But I say that in a morbidly satisfied kinda way. I knew I was in for a train wreck when I picked this one up. I wanted to bear witness to the horror. And in that regard, this book didn't disappoint. Rather than assigning this book merit points based on any "so-terrible-it's-hilarious" value it might offer the reader, I'd better just rate this a 1. That is precisely why I read this book in the first place. So much revulsion and critical condemnation is bound to attract curious readers. I was curious, and it turns out this book is as horrible as the reviews claimed it would be. Was I offended? Not personally, but the rampant racism was staggering. Frank Miller is pouring all his hatred into this one. Even the art looks angry. I've never battled so hard to identify a drawing. Was I amused by how awful this was? Oh, very much so. Hence the feeling of morbid satisfaction. So here I am, passing on my 1-star review with the hope that people searching for universally reviled and hilariously bad graphic novels will experience Holy Terror.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    This book was originally a Batman story and it’s easy to see how as the book opens with “Cat Burglar” being chased by “the Fixer” across rooftops a la just about every Catwoman/Batman story there’s been, and it’s equally easy to see why DC turned Frank Miller down for the use of the “goddamn Batman”. Explosions rock the city and buildings fall down – Cat Burglar and Fixer witness this and immediately chase up suspects, all of them al-Qaeda terrorists (there is some real world input throughout) v This book was originally a Batman story and it’s easy to see how as the book opens with “Cat Burglar” being chased by “the Fixer” across rooftops a la just about every Catwoman/Batman story there’s been, and it’s equally easy to see why DC turned Frank Miller down for the use of the “goddamn Batman”. Explosions rock the city and buildings fall down – Cat Burglar and Fixer witness this and immediately chase up suspects, all of them al-Qaeda terrorists (there is some real world input throughout) via the Police Chief who looks remarkably like Jim Gordon, and bring them all to justice before they achieve their coup de grace at midnight – blowing up the entire city! Frank Miller doesn’t really seem to have a message for this book except pointing out that Islam has some truly despicable practices such as burying women up to their necks in sand and throwing rocks at their heads and making women wear tent-like clothing covering every inch of their bodies and then, behind closed doors, having their husbands beat them senseless. Obviously this doesn’t apply to most Muslims but the practice of stoning is still used today and just by inserting them into the story with no further comment, Miller seems to be using those examples as justification for the way Fixer and Cat Burglar use torture to extract information from the terrorists. It’s clear Miller sides with the way the US government has conducted the war on terror. He seems to be saying that the terrorists started it, they hit us so we hit back, and that the terrorists’ extremism makes them different from other humans in the way they should be treated. No time is taken to discuss why terrorists might feel this way towards the West, simply that their religion forces them to be this way – a quote at the start of the book reinforces this view: “Kill the infidel” – Mohammed. And the dedication at the back – to Theo Van Gogh, murdered in the street by being stabbed dozens of times by an Islamic extremist – makes clear Miller’s idea of Islam. Judged from a political standpoint, I’d say it’s up to the reader. No doubt some would argue Miller has a point with his views that Islam is a religion stuck in the past (the subjugation of women is central to this argument), and others would say this is the work of an ultra-conservative nutjob. After all, the core of this book is nothing but pure vengeance against a group of people and that smacks of the worst legacy that the 20th century left us. Judged solely as a comic book I’d say the book is a disappointment as the story is barely together, the characters mere shadows of their more famous inspirations, and the art is so shoddy as to be completely indecipherable in places. It’s a disappointment because this is a man who played a central part in comic books being taken seriously as literature, the man who reinvented Batman with “The Dark Knight Returns” and who created a visionary and unique series in “Sin City” as well as stunning albums like “300”. With “Holy Terror” the things that made Frank Miller the respected artist he is today are absent in this book and in their place is a one-sided seething rage against the terrorism and violence of the 21st century, almost propaganda in a way. I would say fans of Frank Miller will read this but wind up disappointed while from the sheer bombast of the story, the book will no doubt garner attention from the press and become an event book of the year for infamous reasons, but ultimately am I recommending this book? No; if anyone other than Frank Miller wrote this I don’t think it’d even be published. But then that’s the only reason people will read this, because it’s written by one of the greats, albeit one on the downturn of his illustrious career. It’s a shame Miller didn’t try to make a more thoughtful book instead of the shallow, hate-filled tract it became.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Credit to Miller for doing what he wants, at least? To some people, I guess, the world is completely black and white. Or black and white with occasional spot colors here and there, like on shoes, or peoples faces and stuff. I had a hard time following some of the plot until I realized 'Empire City' and 'The Fixer' were metaphors. For Gotham City and Batman. A very visceral, emotional reaction to 9/11 and terrorists, but unfortunately lacks any nuance or the ability to see how complex situations Credit to Miller for doing what he wants, at least? To some people, I guess, the world is completely black and white. Or black and white with occasional spot colors here and there, like on shoes, or peoples faces and stuff. I had a hard time following some of the plot until I realized 'Empire City' and 'The Fixer' were metaphors. For Gotham City and Batman. A very visceral, emotional reaction to 9/11 and terrorists, but unfortunately lacks any nuance or the ability to see how complex situations and motivations really are in the world.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Holy Terror(ism), Batman! Biff! Bam! Pow to Islam! This is a Batman book Miller wrote that DC rejected, so Miller changed it and made it The Fixer, an enraged post 9/11 pro-American and anti-Islam attack that makes Miller seem racist and misogynist and shallow, a right wing nut job. This is one of a few that may permanently turn people against him, those that he might still have supporting him (I mean, the second Sin City is getting a lot of viewers, so he's not hurting for support from those ab Holy Terror(ism), Batman! Biff! Bam! Pow to Islam! This is a Batman book Miller wrote that DC rejected, so Miller changed it and made it The Fixer, an enraged post 9/11 pro-American and anti-Islam attack that makes Miller seem racist and misogynist and shallow, a right wing nut job. This is one of a few that may permanently turn people against him, those that he might still have supporting him (I mean, the second Sin City is getting a lot of viewers, so he's not hurting for support from those able to distinguish between his art and his crap). Now, I just taught The Dark Knight Returns in the past two weeks, so I have a fresh comparison to what Miller is or was capable of. And while these works do not exactly welcome in feminist readers, for instance, and while others may now see even these as too dark and violent, they are to me ambitious and rich and insightful and morally complex works of art. Speaking of art, the art in Holy Terror is sort of post-Sin City splash and scratch and smudge, and while it is not always clear what is going on, I liked some of the feel of the visuals, but it, like the plot, is pretty simplistic and thin and more diatribe than art, by which I mean it is politically and morally didactic and stereotypical instead of complex and enriching our notion of humans and the world. So much of art leans left and when we see caricatures of, for instance Bush, we are used to there being critiques of him most readers might agree with; here, Miller is angry at Clinton and Obama and all the pinkos that he thinks are naive peaceniks, which is fine, he is entitled to his views, but not (for me, at least) at the expense of the complexity of art. If I wanted a political poster, regardless of political direction, I would go to a political rally or convention. There you find white-(washed) vs black, a simplistic world view. But that's not why I read novels.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    I dont tend to buy in to controversy surrounding books and films and I like to make my own mind up regarding the matter in my own time. That being said I have to say that even if you put the blatant and utterly offensive content (and not in a good way because I am far from one of the PC brigade) you are still left with the most poorly written graphic novel I have ever read, in fact make that the worst book. There is little to no character building, a shoddy romance that as a reader I couldnt hav I dont tend to buy in to controversy surrounding books and films and I like to make my own mind up regarding the matter in my own time. That being said I have to say that even if you put the blatant and utterly offensive content (and not in a good way because I am far from one of the PC brigade) you are still left with the most poorly written graphic novel I have ever read, in fact make that the worst book. There is little to no character building, a shoddy romance that as a reader I couldnt have given a hoot about, and a plot that comes across as a pathetic attempt to voice a dated and incorrect political opinion. Miller was originally supposed to be writing this as a batman novel which is why there is such a lack of character building but how he ever believed that they would publish this with the batman name on it is beyond me. I also have no idea why he didnt write in a starting section when the publisher refused to do it, thus allowing the reader to gain some idea of what the characters are about. Throughout America is clearly the big hero and the muslims are horrid barbaric scum. I dont understand the half hearted attempt at deepening the story by creating some crazy secret muslim society and found the jewish character david totally pointless but again proving that Frank Miller has some twisted and misguided views on our world situation. I wont go into politics because I honestly just think everything he stated in this novel is so wrong. I feel so disappointed in him for writing this and it feels like he has thrown his career down the toilet although Im sure some moronic half wits will enjoy the triumph of the west over the muslims theme. Dont waste your money or your time on this. Nothing good can come of it. If I could have given it less than one star I would have.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Gay

    And 27 minutes later, I emerge, bleary-eyed and wondering what the hell I just read. Don't get me wrong, I'm not part of the legion that automatically shits on anything that Frank Miller puts out these days. He has produced some of the most entertaining comics out there (Sin City, Batman: Year One). He's also produced some of the funniest comics out there (All Star Batman & Robin). This, however.. This is just bad. It isn't even entertainingly bad. It is vile, poorly-written, poorly-drawn, and il And 27 minutes later, I emerge, bleary-eyed and wondering what the hell I just read. Don't get me wrong, I'm not part of the legion that automatically shits on anything that Frank Miller puts out these days. He has produced some of the most entertaining comics out there (Sin City, Batman: Year One). He's also produced some of the funniest comics out there (All Star Batman & Robin). This, however.. This is just bad. It isn't even entertainingly bad. It is vile, poorly-written, poorly-drawn, and ill-conceived crap. There isn't even a story to really comment on here. This graphic novel is a collection of poorly-connected scenes. There isn't any real sense of cohesion or plot - just a series of events that happen without any sort of justification or explanation. The dialogue is a series of stereotypical exchanged at best and outright racism at worst. Oh, yeah - let's mention the racism (and anti-Islamic sentiments). I'm not a person that gets offended. Ever. Holy Terror came close, and I'm not even a Muslim. I couldn't believe some of the things I was reading. Wow. I was searching for something good in this graphic novel, and the closest I can come is the artwork... for the first third of the novel. The opening scenes of the book are excellently drawn, stylish as hell, and make great use of blacks and whites. After the first third, it all goes to shit. The art just turns sloppy - frankly, it looks rushed and unfinished. Also, at times and without explanation, the art shifts from Miller's distinctive style to badly-sketched political cartoon caricatures of real-world figures. For no reason. This graphic novel exists solely as therapy for some deeply ingrained emotional problems within Frank Miller. That's the only reason I can see for this random, gruesome violence and deep-seated racism. Miller has some emotional issues to work out, and it's pretty obvious how cathartic Holy Terror was for him. Avoid it. Just don't go near it. It's easy to see why DC decided to drop the book, and it is just a sad piece of sloppy shit from a writer who has put out some legitimately good pieces of graphic fiction.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I re-read this tonight just to see if it was as terrible as I remember. I didn't even finish it the first time I read this book before I promptly gave it a one-star. Having read more of Miller's work in the interim, I think I understand Miller's stance more thoroughly. This comic is pretty much a Sin City story substituting the protagonist for Batman* and the enemy for the Al-Qaeda. And, like how Sin City is over-the-top and stereotypical, this comic is as well. I didn't like it because the ster I re-read this tonight just to see if it was as terrible as I remember. I didn't even finish it the first time I read this book before I promptly gave it a one-star. Having read more of Miller's work in the interim, I think I understand Miller's stance more thoroughly. This comic is pretty much a Sin City story substituting the protagonist for Batman* and the enemy for the Al-Qaeda. And, like how Sin City is over-the-top and stereotypical, this comic is as well. I didn't like it because the stereotypes in this case were not against mafia-esque gangs but entire groups of people (people living in the middle-east). Batman says to a captured enemy: "So Mohammed, pardon me for guessing your name, but you've got to admit the odds are pretty good it's Mohammed" - I don't know if that's Miller being racist (is that racist? its a bit like assuming a white English man is named John - in one of my highschool classes there were three Michaels, out of 15 boys, so I would call anyone I didn't know Mike), or making fun of America as captured in the persona of Batman. I wonder if this book would be higher rated if Miller took out Al-Qaeda and substituted a made-up group, as is common to super-hero literature ('Hydra'). In his previous works, Miller seems very critical of a hands-on government. Even in his latest blog post condemning the Wall-street protests, the reader can deduce that Miller is against any kind of government intervention - preferring the lesser evil of a free-market allowing the 1% to thrive. I would like to read this book not as Miller wanting to attack the Al-Qaeda, but rather as his fears of how the government can take control of its populace during a period of 'terror'. (ie, the ridiculous USA PATRIOT Act** post-9-11.) *The character is called The Fixer, but this story is obviously a revision of a Batman story **stand for: Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (lolololcopter)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mza

    Listen, this is shitty in exactly the way all the shitty parts of Frank Miller's non-shitty comix (e.g., Elektra: Assassin , Ronin , Batman: Year One ) are shitty -- retarded telegraphic speech, lack of attention to details of human behaviour, video game villains, and a heavy dose of nerd sex that will help impressionable boys dry girls' vaginas for years to come -- but I'm not here to shoot barrel fish. Miller's simpleminded politics and psychology aside, the book's a rip-off -- ultra- Listen, this is shitty in exactly the way all the shitty parts of Frank Miller's non-shitty comix (e.g., Elektra: Assassin , Ronin , Batman: Year One ) are shitty -- retarded telegraphic speech, lack of attention to details of human behaviour, video game villains, and a heavy dose of nerd sex that will help impressionable boys dry girls' vaginas for years to come -- but I'm not here to shoot barrel fish. Miller's simpleminded politics and psychology aside, the book's a rip-off -- ultra-thin storytelling for 100 pages in which nearly every page is a minimalist splash page. You get some familiar dynamic silhouetted poses from Batman and Catwoman; some drawings that are sketchy to the point of not knowing quite what you're looking at; limited, specific use of solid red and green (Catwoman's shoes and eyes, respectively); and a lot of textural flourishes such as dripped ink and what looks like streaks of watery white-out. None of these things are bad per se, and I'm actually a fan of Miller's post- Sin City minimalism as a look; but these drawings leave nothing to become attached to. Nothing funny or weird, no faces that suggest a whole history of feeling, not even a reliably ordinary everyman upon which a chaotic world may imprint its confusing messages. There's no real chaos, only page after page of bare-bones figure drawing backlit by explosions. If all of this was intended as anti-terrorist propaganda, it falls unathletically short: nobody wants to jump from roof to roof with these two aerobics instructors.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hayden

    ** Purchased and read this earlier tonight, before I had a chance to add it to my 'currently reading' shelf** I'm of the opinion that there's no such thing as racist art. It always irks me, for instance, to hear people say Quentin Tarantino is a racist because his movies Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown have extensive uses of the N-word. If it works within the context of the story, then it shouldn't be applied to real life. So color me shocked when, about a third of the way into this, I sit it back ** Purchased and read this earlier tonight, before I had a chance to add it to my 'currently reading' shelf** I'm of the opinion that there's no such thing as racist art. It always irks me, for instance, to hear people say Quentin Tarantino is a racist because his movies Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown have extensive uses of the N-word. If it works within the context of the story, then it shouldn't be applied to real life. So color me shocked when, about a third of the way into this, I sit it back in my lap and think to myself, "Damn... This is some racist shit". Honestly, a publishing company actually picking this comic up and releasing it for wide distribution is nothing short of a miracle. This rather short outing from the legendary Frank Miller features 'The Fixer' and 'Cat Burglar' (which is sort of ironic, because these two characters reminded me of those generic bootleg Batman and Catwoman toys you'd find at the back of your local dollar store, that were made by those shady companies in the middle east), as they run through Empire City and blast away anyone who has dark skin, a turban, and doesn't speak English. There's not much character background or development on the two leads, they just show up, and start shooting. I would've liked for this to be much longer, maybe if he had made it the length of one of his Sin City yarns instead of about one hundred pages and shaped like a children's picture book, it could've been executed better as a whole. In the end, this was far, far away from Miller's classic stuff, but I found the art to be absolutely beautiful, and it kept me entertained for about an hour and a half, which I guess in the end is all I can ask for. I'm a little mad that I spent $32 on it, but I think it's one of those I can read again and again when bored. I will say that if you feel you could be offended by copious amounts of Islamic/Muslim racism, then steer far clear of this one. 3/5

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    I'm not ever sure where to begin... this was a mess ... a steaming pile of it. First off: Why didn't I read this when it came out? Well, I don't have a good answer for that. I've always enjoyed Frank Miller's work in the comics. His run on Daredevil is nothing short of visionary. The mini-series Ronin was wonderful. I absolutely loved the Martha Washington stories. I've even purchased several versions of the Sin City collections. And at least his initial stuff with Batman was quite good. Things I'm not ever sure where to begin... this was a mess ... a steaming pile of it. First off: Why didn't I read this when it came out? Well, I don't have a good answer for that. I've always enjoyed Frank Miller's work in the comics. His run on Daredevil is nothing short of visionary. The mini-series Ronin was wonderful. I absolutely loved the Martha Washington stories. I've even purchased several versions of the Sin City collections. And at least his initial stuff with Batman was quite good. Things did start falling apart though, his follow-up series to The Dark Knight Returns was rather mediocre. And his newer stuff leaves a lot to be desired. Has he just fallen into the trap that many best-selling authors encounter? Has he become so full of himself that he thinks he can just put out anything and his adoring fans will lap it up like cream? Or is there something a bit darker going on? I've realized that most of the stuff of Miller's that I really like are collaborations. So perhaps that's missing ingredient (although I don't think that alone is the sole problem). Actually I think Miller has given in to fear and joined the white-American-male-vigilante mind-set. The underlying message that he's playing around here is hateful and xenophobic. But that alone isn't the only problem. I suppose my second problem is the art which is ... well ... amateurish at best. There are panels that are nearly indecipherable and many of the figures are little better than stick figures. The whole thing looks sophomoric and lazy. And it's certainly uninspired. Or rather it is seemingly inspired by the author's fears and how he wants to salve those fears by perpetrating (and encouraging) violence against a stereotyped group of individuals that he feels embody the source of that fear. OK, now I have to go back the rampant xenophobia. As a post-911 graphic novel this is probably the most blatantly xenophobic piece of propaganda I've ever read. The hate drips from every page and the fear trembles in every panel. Has Miller succumbed to so much fear in this life that he was that compelled to produce this story? This is basically a Donald tRump wet dream. I'd like to think he produced this as satire on these xenophobic tendencies, but his juxtaposition of the depiction of terrorists destroying the equivalent of the Statue of Liberty with images of Obama and Biden and the phrase now is the moment is so rampantly offensive that I can't simply pass this off as satire or some kind of twist dark humor. Because even if it is just satire, it can be far too easily mistakenly read as endorsing violence against an entire ethnicity or members of a particular religion (even though those who truly practice Islam are no more war-mongers than those who truly practice Christianity). Third: and this is probably the most troubling for me - this book was published by Legendary Entertainment, a division of a company that has produced quite a number of films over the last dozen-plus years. While some have been quite good and financially successful, others have not. But there are also a string of films from this company that also promote this xenophobic mind-set. Not all the films from this company are such, but many are and several directors that I've become increasingly disgusted with are associated with the company. This really makes me wonder if there is some correlative presence or agenda at work, that Legendary (like the Weinstein Company) won't end up tainting everything it produces. Pretty scary for me that this graphic novel is such virulent propaganda that it inspires such a conspiracy in my mind. That's very troubling indeed. So, I've decided to see if I can give this a no-star review. That would make it the first of such for me. I found this graphic novel to be particularly distasteful and personally offensive.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    I once naively thought that Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again was the worst comic that Frank Miller had written. I also declared it to be the worst comic I had ever read. That was only a couple weeks ago, and I had not yet read Holy Terror. This book makes think back fondly to The Dark Knight Strikes Again. Holy Terror was announced some years ago as a Batman book that would portray Batman fighting Al Qaeda. After years of writing, Miller declared that it wasn't actually about Batman after a I once naively thought that Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again was the worst comic that Frank Miller had written. I also declared it to be the worst comic I had ever read. That was only a couple weeks ago, and I had not yet read Holy Terror. This book makes think back fondly to The Dark Knight Strikes Again. Holy Terror was announced some years ago as a Batman book that would portray Batman fighting Al Qaeda. After years of writing, Miller declared that it wasn't actually about Batman after all and that he had discovered he was writing another superhero all this time. Now I do agree that Miller's recent books are not about Batman, but this book is about Miller's version of Batman. And it was so clearly written to be Batman that it makes it fairly obvious that he lied about the change being his idea. Holy Terror is about a vigilante named The Fixer who is having an affair with the Cat Burglar and works with the one good cop in the city. The changes are so obvious that they somewhat remind me of superhero ripoff toys where they would rename Spider-Man Spader Man in order to avoid copyright infractions. Its also incredibly hard for me to believe that anybody could have spent years working on this horrendous book since it reads as though it was tossed together one weekend. The art is so awful that I started to find it hard to believe that it was not intentionally bad. It looked sort of like a foul parody of the style Miller used in Sin City. The art was so bad that I often couldn't even tell what was going on. I remember one page in particular where it shows destruction and there is a large red object in the midst of it. I could not figure out whether the object was a car or a shoe or something else entirely. The writing is equally bad. Its hard to sum up just how bad it is. If Sin City was a satire of the hardboiled detective genre, then this is a bad parody of Sin City's satire. This comic is not just racist. It is extremely racist. But it fails at being the propaganda piece that Miller claimed it would be. The Al Queda are so powerful that they feel like over the top James Bond villains. They are portrayed as being evil, stupid, and ugly, which while extremely racist, was not very effective in a story telling capacity. This is supposed to harken back to when Captain America was used as a propaganda piece who once punched Hitler on the cover of a comic. That was an awful idea, but it even failed at that by being an incomprehensible mess of drivel. The only good thing I can think of saying about this book is that it is mercifully quite short. Frank Miller has gotten so bad at writing and drawing that I honestly wonder if it's somehow deliberate. He was always flawed but every flaw has been accentuated so much that one must wonder if the man has gone completely insane.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alger

    I am torn. I liked this book on the grounds that it had allot of the same ambiance of his earlier "Sin City" stories and I am a big fan of that noir storytelling. Where the confliction enters in is the piece's EXTREME Islamophobic and anti-Arab sentiments. The scene in which they torture and maim a terrorist and taunt him with patronizing dialogue, such as generically calling him "Mohammad" really sat badly with me. Analyzing the duality between my liking and disliking of the book is eerily te I am torn. I liked this book on the grounds that it had allot of the same ambiance of his earlier "Sin City" stories and I am a big fan of that noir storytelling. Where the confliction enters in is the piece's EXTREME Islamophobic and anti-Arab sentiments. The scene in which they torture and maim a terrorist and taunt him with patronizing dialogue, such as generically calling him "Mohammad" really sat badly with me. Analyzing the duality between my liking and disliking of the book is eerily telling. That scene above as well as others were very much like those in "Sin City" and I think that as fucked up as it is, I was ok with those similar scenes, such as Marv dismembering Kevin to a armless/legless gimp and leaving him to be eaten alive by ravenous dogs in "The Hard Goodbye." Those stories were surreal, whereas "Holy Terror" was strikingly real in the portrayal of the terrorist acts that the over the top portrayal and generalizations of the protagonists are very insensitive and unnerving. Also, "Sin City" deals with the sins and infamy of individuals or small groups and gangs, not entire religions. Yes, Miller says that villains are Al-Qaeda, but he also makes great generalizations such as "all terrorists being named Mohammad." This was supposed to be "Holy Terror Batman" when he first wrote it, but clearly this is the reason why he had to revoke the Batman personas from the story. Batman, Catwoman, and Commissioner Gordon are clearly in the story, but are now written under different names for another comic company. I liked the realism he brought to the terrorist incidents and the environment in which the story takes place. These scenes were beautifully and accurately portrayed, I think. The actions and thoughts of the Batman-esque "Fixer" and his cronies I feel are where the story declines into repugnance.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    A complete f---ing mess. Miller referred to this as unabashed propaganda, but that certainly doesn't excuse this waste of paper. It would be one thing if this actually told a coherent story, but the writing and art are incomprehensible. For instance, Miller will often take breaks from the story to include caricatures of well known political figures for no discernible purpose, or, in one case, cut away to a panel of a woman being stoned to death. Bear in mind that this last thing has absolutely n A complete f---ing mess. Miller referred to this as unabashed propaganda, but that certainly doesn't excuse this waste of paper. It would be one thing if this actually told a coherent story, but the writing and art are incomprehensible. For instance, Miller will often take breaks from the story to include caricatures of well known political figures for no discernible purpose, or, in one case, cut away to a panel of a woman being stoned to death. Bear in mind that this last thing has absolutely no bearing on the main story; it's simply there to paint Muslims as evil savages with no regard for human life. (That's right; not only is it a story poorly told, it's also a vile, ugly celebration of racism.) The panel immediately following says, "Meanwhile, back in Empire City" as if it's a PSA, and he's now returning to the regularly scheduled program already in progress. I'm really not sure what happened to Frank Miller. While I've never enjoyed The Dark Knight Returns as much as others have, Batman: Year One is--as I've said before--just about one of the most perfect pieces of storytelling I've ever experienced. His historic run on Daredevil is also one of the greatest in comics history. I've heard rumors of alcoholism, but I've never seen or heard anything definitive. All I know is that a man who used to be considered one of the greatest talents in the medium is now a total hack. As for Holy Terror, I don't know if there's much overlap between comics readers and Fox News viewers, but that's really the only audience for it. Thank goodness the library allowed me to go without spending a dime on this dreck, and thank goodness Frank Miller decided not to make this a Batman story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Derrick

    Feb 12, 2014 -- I thought this book couldn't possibly be as bad as I had heard. But now that I have finally tackled it: It's easily the worst comic by a major creative name that I've ever read. Frank Miller doesn't bother me, usually. Heck, I liked All-Star Batman and Robin, the Boy Wonder, Vol. 1. But this book is ugly, sloppy, confusing, racist, paranoid, stupid, and lazy. Worst of all, it's boring. It took me about 15 minutes to read it - maybe - and I was saying, "When will this finally end? Feb 12, 2014 -- I thought this book couldn't possibly be as bad as I had heard. But now that I have finally tackled it: It's easily the worst comic by a major creative name that I've ever read. Frank Miller doesn't bother me, usually. Heck, I liked All-Star Batman and Robin, the Boy Wonder, Vol. 1. But this book is ugly, sloppy, confusing, racist, paranoid, stupid, and lazy. Worst of all, it's boring. It took me about 15 minutes to read it - maybe - and I was saying, "When will this finally end?" the whole time. Miller has done great things with Batman in the past, taking him to his gritty extremes both seriously and humorously. "All Star Batman" is crazy, but it's kind of amusing because the very idea of Batman is ludicrous. "DKR" Batman makes sense within the era and the character himself. But The Fixer reads like an insult. Maybe DC rejected his Batman-vs-AlQueda story, and Miller was angry. So he wrote this unfunny and offensive graphic novel in retaliation. I hope that's the reason, because I would hate to think Frank Miller thinks this book is actually good. Note: I do like the widescreen hardcover format, reused from Miller's own 300. And that's just about all.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bracken

    Frank Miller's new work is so bad that it's actually beginning to color my opinion of his previous work. While Batman: Year One is one of my favorite graphic novels, looking back with Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again and Holy Terror behind me I can definitely see the beginnings of Miller's downward spiral in works I enjoy, like Year One and 300. Holy Terror carries all the hallmarks of Miller's descent into abject mediocrity. The dialogue is laughably bad and the art is even worse. The firs Frank Miller's new work is so bad that it's actually beginning to color my opinion of his previous work. While Batman: Year One is one of my favorite graphic novels, looking back with Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again and Holy Terror behind me I can definitely see the beginnings of Miller's downward spiral in works I enjoy, like Year One and 300. Holy Terror carries all the hallmarks of Miller's descent into abject mediocrity. The dialogue is laughably bad and the art is even worse. The first half of the book is barely readable because the art is obscured by what appear to be sand paper scratches (I guess it's supposed to be raining) and the second half of the book is barely readable because it looks like a storyboard sketchbook and not a finished product. I'd add spoilers to the review but the story is so horribly shallow it makes an evaporated gasoline puddle look deep.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angus Stirling

    Holy Terror is a propaganda comic in which Frank Miller finally loses the grip on reality he's been threatening to completely dispense with for such a long time. Here, Islam is equated wholesale with Al-Qaeda in an us-or-them war of cultures. The plot is quite thin (terrorists explode nail bombs in New York, and a Batman figure tortures and kills those responsible) and all subtlety is jettisoned in reducing humans from characters to simply propaganda symbols - for example: a character has the st Holy Terror is a propaganda comic in which Frank Miller finally loses the grip on reality he's been threatening to completely dispense with for such a long time. Here, Islam is equated wholesale with Al-Qaeda in an us-or-them war of cultures. The plot is quite thin (terrorists explode nail bombs in New York, and a Batman figure tortures and kills those responsible) and all subtlety is jettisoned in reducing humans from characters to simply propaganda symbols - for example: a character has the star of David tattooed on his face and his name is David and he's an Israeli intelligence officer who is Not-Batman's ally against evil. I'm not sure what coherent message I'm meant to take away from a comic that cherry-picks an inflammatory quote from the Quran, entirely represents Islamic people as members of a barbaric, bloodthirsty Dark Age mentality, and then has a superhero representing the civilised US christian right retaliate with torture, cultural slurs, and killing, but I'm fairly sure what I left with isn't quite what Frank Miller intended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Regardless of your feelings on Frank Miller's politics - and while he's ruinously wrong about the Occupy movement, I suspect I agree with more of them than most people - this reworking of his 'Batman versus al Qaeda' idea has a bigger problem. It's lazy. I don't mean how quick it is to read - though it is less a graphic novel than a picture book with extreme violence. I mean that, apart from the opening pages, the figures look rushed, even beyond the common Miller-by-numbers stuff, into the leve Regardless of your feelings on Frank Miller's politics - and while he's ruinously wrong about the Occupy movement, I suspect I agree with more of them than most people - this reworking of his 'Batman versus al Qaeda' idea has a bigger problem. It's lazy. I don't mean how quick it is to read - though it is less a graphic novel than a picture book with extreme violence. I mean that, apart from the opening pages, the figures look rushed, even beyond the common Miller-by-numbers stuff, into the level of outright incompetence at times. A missed opportunity.

  21. 4 out of 5

    أحمد

    This could easily be the worst graphic novel created by a comic legend. Oh, and.. FM you MF!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Clay Fernald

    Frank Miller’s most recent, and somewhat anticipated Holy Terror surprised me with its form factor immediately. Landscape comics are decidedly uncommon, but a clever way to have books stick out on the shelf. Miller has been working on this conceptually since 9/11. Partly a tribute to the Cap punching Hitler days, this work pits a superhero against a real world terrorist threat. Unfortunately, the master cartoonist, storyteller, and artist has missed the target. Storytelling was awkward, abstracti Frank Miller’s most recent, and somewhat anticipated Holy Terror surprised me with its form factor immediately. Landscape comics are decidedly uncommon, but a clever way to have books stick out on the shelf. Miller has been working on this conceptually since 9/11. Partly a tribute to the Cap punching Hitler days, this work pits a superhero against a real world terrorist threat. Unfortunately, the master cartoonist, storyteller, and artist has missed the target. Storytelling was awkward, abstractions were obtuse, and politically the story was tough to swallow. Also, make no mistake, this is a Batman story. Co-starring Catwoman. And Jim Gordon. Originally slated for a pre-relaunch “Dark Knight Returns” continuity DC Comics release entitled “Holy Terror, Batman”, we miss out on all of the good stuff in this release from Legendary Comics. A WORD ABOUT LEGENDARY COMICS Legendary Comics is a subsidiary of Legendary Pictures. The studio dropping such great comic book movies from directors Nolan, Snyder, & Singer drops Holy Terror as its inaugural title. Safe bet there, with Miller being a true master of the genre. We look forward to books from other Batman creators Paul Pope (Batman Year 100), Matt Wagner and Simon Bisley. Editor-in-Chief Bob Schreck was installed in late 2010. The personable Schreck is perfect for the job with over 30 years in comics. As a writer and editor he’s worked at Dark Horse, Oni Press, DC, and most recently at IDW. Will Legendary be the new ‘boutique’ publisher for high-end graphic novels and creator owned work? That answer has yet to reveal itself, with only three titles announced. HOLY TERROR All the pretending and dancing around that this is not a Batman book is most certainly a copyright and intellectual property issue, and not the truth. DC Comics would never back this up. Seventy years of establishing this important Bat-brand, only to be sullied by an attention grabbing pro-American graphic novel would not be good business. I estimate The Fixer to be sitting comfortably in the timeline of Bruce after his retirement, and roughly five years before putting the cowl back on in Dark Night Returns. THE ART There’s minimal dialogue, and no lettering credit. It’s safe to assume Miller lettered the book himself. Cool lettering and sound effects, too. His voice and his penstrokes are definitive. I’d love to watch him ink a page of rain coming down on a character! Ever since Sin City I’ve been in awe of his black and white Sumi-e brush strokes, the balance of the page, his chunky flat spotted blacks, wide eyes, and dynamic action. Dave Stewart provides masterful, well-directed, minimalist coloring (with a palette of no more than three colors). I’ll drool over Frank Miller’s art any time, but this was more late-period Sin City than it was of earlier works of personal favorite cross hatch inkgasm, Ronin. AS A COMIC BOOK / GRAPHIC NOVEL The biggest failure here is that the work is painfully aware of itself. This is a comic book. There are comic book tropes such as callbacks to other Miller comics, and a rather awesome play on the nine panel grid structure. Is this book for comic book fans or the general public? I had trouble figuring that out, and still have no answer. The Fixer is murderously acting out a revenge fantasy that most Americans dreamed of post our nation’s greatest tragedy (and many still do). Is there much of an audience for that, even ten years on? Or have we all grown from those feelings, focused on our families, regretted our wars, and decided to live our lives? I have buyer’s remorse after reading this. I feel like this was a cash grab from both fans of Frank Miller and from über-Patriots who would read abour this book in USA Today and relive a hatred never to be forgotten. The story was compelling, but not surprising. I had known the plot from the original title, and internet rumors. The location change to Al-Queda’s Subterranea parallel was interesting, but by that point I was just wanting the whole thing to be over. I kept struggling to imagine that this was a young independent creator, speaking volumes on our social troubles. But this book was not the product of that. I was reading the work of an elder statesman of comicdoms’ elite who had nothing to say that wasn’t hateful, short-sighted, and frankly a bit empty. MAYBE I JUST DON’T GET IT Is Miller’s intention of this book being “bound to offend just about everybody” justified? By that, am I to be offended and just walk away feeling offended and say he did his job? That would be irresponsible and dishonest. Since when are critics to listen to an artist’s intention? The public is to digest and make their own opinions on ‘the work’. My strong relationship with Ronin and Dark Knight Returns are based on my formative years as a comic book fan wanting to read more of Miller’s work, and emulate it. Now I’ve got sour grapes because he’s telling me how to react to it. No way dude. You put out Dark Knight and I heard about it in 1987 because it was an amazing story. Not because you said it was. I’m not detecting an homage to old comics or irony at all in Holy Terror. Why is that, Frank? Hey, I stuck with you through that Spirit movie…is this how you’re going to leave us? I’ll remain a Frank Miller fan, and I’ll be cuious as to what he comes up with for a next move. I’d love to see an apology, an explaination, or for Miller to go back to making great films and comics. I stand by Sin City as being as close to perfect a translation of comic book page to film as you can get. Hate speech, hate actions, hate anything will keep me away for good. If we continue to get more of this, you can be sure I’ll stay far from it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    If this was actually a parody of Frank Miller's later work and his political and cultural xenophobia, it might actually be kind of clever. As an actual work from a formerly great comics creator, it's disturbing, depressing, and shitty. If this was actually a parody of Frank Miller's later work and his political and cultural xenophobia, it might actually be kind of clever. As an actual work from a formerly great comics creator, it's disturbing, depressing, and shitty.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Corban Ford

    Aside from an admittedly spectacularly illustrated opening pages, this book was a racist, hateful, embarrassing, paranoia driving graphic novel against basically all foreigners. The story was wafer thin, the characters massively underdeveloped. "Holy Terror" is basically a crack back knee jerk reaction to 9/11 that was released almost 15 years after the tragic incident and without any nuance to distinguish it from being a satirical piece of work to something truly offensive. This is very much a Aside from an admittedly spectacularly illustrated opening pages, this book was a racist, hateful, embarrassing, paranoia driving graphic novel against basically all foreigners. The story was wafer thin, the characters massively underdeveloped. "Holy Terror" is basically a crack back knee jerk reaction to 9/11 that was released almost 15 years after the tragic incident and without any nuance to distinguish it from being a satirical piece of work to something truly offensive. This is very much a pro-American Anti-Islam assault through the eyes of a racist, almost completely far-right nutcase. When I read works like Batman the Dark Knight Returns, and then read stuff like this that came out 30 years later and realize it's from the SAME author, I shudder internally.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    A little heavy handed. Just a little.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julian

    I read this because a friend asked me to (and bought me a copy). Let me just say that if I could give it zero stars, I would. One star is too many. Plot summary: nasty muslims kill lots of obviously innocent Americans and so our hero and heroine go on an Islamophobic rampage because there's killing to be done. The end. This was originally intended as a Batman story, and one can see clear signs of that: the heroine is clearly Catwoman, and there's a clear reference to Commissioner Gordon. But, my I read this because a friend asked me to (and bought me a copy). Let me just say that if I could give it zero stars, I would. One star is too many. Plot summary: nasty muslims kill lots of obviously innocent Americans and so our hero and heroine go on an Islamophobic rampage because there's killing to be done. The end. This was originally intended as a Batman story, and one can see clear signs of that: the heroine is clearly Catwoman, and there's a clear reference to Commissioner Gordon. But, my, I can see why DC Comics refused to have anything to do with it. This book is vile and stands directly counter to everything Batman stands for. I could only read the book a few pages at a time. It's not just that it made me angry, but the manic scrapings and scribblings in the art just make it too hard to read for any length of time. So let's start with the art. The art is so over-drawn I can hardly tell what's going on. However, when Miller calms down and stops drawing ugly people and sticks to cityscapes, the art can be breathtaking, like the moon growing from the top of a skyscraper, and the long views across the city at night. When he forgets to be 'edgy' and draws planes or buildings with simple blocks of colour and clear lines, Miller's art is really rather impressive. It's such a shame that he insists on messing it up with his dreadful action scenes, which are incoherent. It could be argued that Miller is trying to imitate Jack Kirby's action scenes, but, as you can see from this example, Kirby's art is dynamic, it's chaotic, but everything is clear, precise, you can see every tiny detail. It has a raw immediacy. Miller's, on the other hand, is just a mess. I thought a nice example of the problem with this art was the scene of the jet flying into the statue: the jet itself was menacing and powerful, but the face of the statue looked like crap. Why not draw a face with the same clean grandeur? Or does he correlate good art with 'them'? Who knows? Certainly the only person in the book who's remotely well drawn is the evil female suicide bomber; all the 'good' Americans look incredibly ugly. Which leads nicely into the plot. In the scene of evil foreign muslim woman suicide-bomber seduces good American boy into taking her into the club so she can commit mass murder, the good American boy is such a perfect example of the Ugly American, who can't imagine that there might be cultural norms other than his, and who is utterly intolerant of them, that I found it hard to feel very sad at his immanent demise. And that's the problem with the story. According to Miller, it's bad to kill Americans because you hate their culture, and I wouldn't disagree. But then he goes on to tell us that torturing and then killing Muslims just because they're Muslims is perfectly acceptable. But what he seems to see as good about Americans is their worst feature, and what he sees as bad about Muslims is about as representative of Islam as the Ugly American is of the US. The idea that mosques are all just centres of armed preparation for attack is laughable as is the idea that an individual suicide bomber would know of Al Qaida's wider plans. Not to mention that Miller doesn't seem to realise that 'The Cell' is not a reference to biology, but to the standard structure of revolutionary movements. I suppose that kind of knowledge is un-American. The truth of the matter is that, with the exception of the Jihadist Q'tubist Wahabist Salafist Sunni, that is a sect within a sect within a sect within a sect within a sect, a vanishingly small number of people, Islam is principally quietist, about living your life in peace and the way of God. Al Qaida represent Islam as accurately as Rick Perry represents Christianity. And the most loathsome thing about this loathsome book is that Miller misuses the whole 'hero saves the girl' theme from standard fiction, so, albeit very briefly, one almost wants the hero to kill all the evil Muslims who are threatening the heroine. Or, to put it another way, he manages to find the little bit of monster within each of us and presses its buttons, so we're co-opted to agree with him. And because of that I feel truly unclean.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I needed to read this. I needed to see how Frank Miller would write a comic with Al Qaeda as the villains to see if he would treat the complex subject matter with his trademark subtlety, sensitivity, delicacy and tastefulness. Also, when Frank Miller is good, he's really, really good. When he's not, he is balls-out, bat-shit, lunatic-crazy. The moment he announced he was writing a comic in which Batman fights Al Qaeda I knew this was going to be the latter. So, five years later I find out that N I needed to read this. I needed to see how Frank Miller would write a comic with Al Qaeda as the villains to see if he would treat the complex subject matter with his trademark subtlety, sensitivity, delicacy and tastefulness. Also, when Frank Miller is good, he's really, really good. When he's not, he is balls-out, bat-shit, lunatic-crazy. The moment he announced he was writing a comic in which Batman fights Al Qaeda I knew this was going to be the latter. So, five years later I find out that NOT ONLY has he not abandoned the project that sounds so obviously like a bad idea, but that he has carried forward with it despite having Batman removed as a character (because, again, it is so obviously a bad idea that SOMEBODY at DC eventually must have filled in Frank that there was no way they would let their most profitable property be attached to something so controversial, let alone one being handled by a writer notorious for going offensively over the top). All that being said, this was disappointing... but not for the obvious reasons one would expect to be disappointed in a Frank Miller comic book in which a gritty superhero kills muslim extremists. In fact, it was exactly what you'd expect from the premise, and nothing more. It is racist, it is jingoistic, it is blunt and it is offensive... but not to any absurd degree. The visual style is at times grotesque and confused and frequently inscrutable. This is not new from Frank Miller and I often get the feeling that he has done so in the past intentionally to frustrate and defy the expectations set for his work. You liked Dark Knight Returns? Well just try and like Dark Night Strikes Again! There is almost nothing the two books have in common thematically, and everything glorious about the first one seems to have been intentionally messed with and distorted with the second one. Same with Batman: Year One and All Star Batman and Robin. Frank Miller has time and time again found ways to pull extreme reactions from his audience-- whether it be from taking characters and the medium to whole new levels to the ecstatic adulations of fanboys everywhere, or by breaking them down, deconstructing and ultimately destroying the same characters and mediums' conventions to the howls and reproaches of the same fanboys. No matter what Frank Miller attempts with his work, he commits himself and the result is extreme. I guess that's what I was hoping for here... and I didn't get it. Maybe he did it to me on purpose... maybe I'm giving him too much credit as a subversive. Conclusion: I can't hate this book because it is so obvious, oafish and clumsy. I can't love this book because it is uninspired and does nothing interesting or innovative or expectation-defying. I can't enjoy this book because it is not absolutely ridiculous and absurd. Has Frank really been working on this for 5 years?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joshlynn

    This was a weird one on several levels. Frank's always vacillated between being brilliantly insane and just being insane, and Holy Terror is mostly on the wrong end of that spectrum. He himself describes it as a work of propaganda, akin to Adolf taking it on the jaw from Superman or Cap. But unlike those early comics, which were the dashed-off labors of artists living hand-to-mouth, Holy Terror is the work of a man influential enough to do whatever he wants and get it published. And the result i This was a weird one on several levels. Frank's always vacillated between being brilliantly insane and just being insane, and Holy Terror is mostly on the wrong end of that spectrum. He himself describes it as a work of propaganda, akin to Adolf taking it on the jaw from Superman or Cap. But unlike those early comics, which were the dashed-off labors of artists living hand-to-mouth, Holy Terror is the work of a man influential enough to do whatever he wants and get it published. And the result is this: a masturbatory, incoherent mess. And yet, despite all of its flaws - and they are myriad - I didn't feel like my time had been wasted reading it, simply because at the end of the day, it's Frank Miller, and even at his ugliest/clumsiest/most ignorant, there's almost always a kernel of substance to carry us through the idiocy. In this case, it came in the form of a page of blank white rectangles.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fredrik Strömberg

    Just reread this in preparation for an interview and it was just as bad this time around. Hate literature in its most sickening form. I used to really admire and respect Frank Miller in the 1980s, for the artistic inventiveness and sheer visual beauty of comics like Daredevil, Electra Assassin and Dark Knight Returns of course Then his misogynic and downright fascist tendencies started to shine through and a few volumes into Sin City I gave it all up, writing him off as a disgruntled old man and Just reread this in preparation for an interview and it was just as bad this time around. Hate literature in its most sickening form. I used to really admire and respect Frank Miller in the 1980s, for the artistic inventiveness and sheer visual beauty of comics like Daredevil, Electra Assassin and Dark Knight Returns of course Then his misogynic and downright fascist tendencies started to shine through and a few volumes into Sin City I gave it all up, writing him off as a disgruntled old man and a has-been. This, though, again kindred my interest, though now it's the academic in me that finds this book fascinating. The, as far as I know, uncorroborated story about this originally being written as a Batman story that DC turned down sounds very plausible indeed. And the fact that Miller's other publishing house Dark Horse obviously also turned it down says a lot about the industry's view on this hateful story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Exactly as awful as I imagined it would be, but I owed it to my inner 12 year old to give Frank Miller the benefit of the doubt. I have such high regard for Miller's early work, but over the years his work has suffered a tangible decline in quality, and this book is a dreadful waste of time. I don't see it as being effective as propaganda, but I don't think it's harmful either; it's such low quality that it won't change anyone's mind about the issues at hand. I'm pretty open minded so I didn't f Exactly as awful as I imagined it would be, but I owed it to my inner 12 year old to give Frank Miller the benefit of the doubt. I have such high regard for Miller's early work, but over the years his work has suffered a tangible decline in quality, and this book is a dreadful waste of time. I don't see it as being effective as propaganda, but I don't think it's harmful either; it's such low quality that it won't change anyone's mind about the issues at hand. I'm pretty open minded so I didn't find the rightwing reactionary Islamophobic violent revenge fantasy offensive, but it is painfully simplistic and not at all what you would expect if the last Miller book you read was Give Me Liberty. The story is scant and hardly worth repeating, the artwork is crude, primitive and way below Miller's best. The presentation of the book is high quality and professional which is a big surprise, considering the trashy nature of the book.

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