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From the creator of "A Prairie Home Companion" and bestselling author of Lake Wobegon Days comes the trade paper edition of the hilariously bawdy novel that is "irresistibly delicious . . . a satisfying romp with a yarnmaster who can make you howl" (Los Angeles Times Book Review). In the spring of 1926, the Soderbjerg brothers plunge into broadcasting to rescue their faili From the creator of "A Prairie Home Companion" and bestselling author of Lake Wobegon Days comes the trade paper edition of the hilariously bawdy novel that is "irresistibly delicious . . . a satisfying romp with a yarnmaster who can make you howl" (Los Angeles Times Book Review). In the spring of 1926, the Soderbjerg brothers plunge into broadcasting to rescue their failing restaurant and go on to make radio history over the next quarter century.


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From the creator of "A Prairie Home Companion" and bestselling author of Lake Wobegon Days comes the trade paper edition of the hilariously bawdy novel that is "irresistibly delicious . . . a satisfying romp with a yarnmaster who can make you howl" (Los Angeles Times Book Review). In the spring of 1926, the Soderbjerg brothers plunge into broadcasting to rescue their faili From the creator of "A Prairie Home Companion" and bestselling author of Lake Wobegon Days comes the trade paper edition of the hilariously bawdy novel that is "irresistibly delicious . . . a satisfying romp with a yarnmaster who can make you howl" (Los Angeles Times Book Review). In the spring of 1926, the Soderbjerg brothers plunge into broadcasting to rescue their failing restaurant and go on to make radio history over the next quarter century.

30 review for WLT: A Radio Romance, Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Hills

    Whenever I have read parts of the Bible, I always imagine God to talk in this author's voice. Also, there should be a law passed that Garrison Keillor is the ONLY man allowed to talk on the PA system at planetariums.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bill Rogers

    Full disclosure here: I love this book because I enjoy Garrison Keillor's work, and because like him I love the romance of radio as it was. For a few years in my youth REAL rock and roll arrived in my small town-- they were big on Beautiful Music and Easy Listening there, and Baptist church services on Sunday-- after dark, when the AM powerhouses like CLKW and WCFL would start to come in. The Grand Ole Opry (which is still on) from WSM, too, and KYW in Philadelphia, which was the novelty of news Full disclosure here: I love this book because I enjoy Garrison Keillor's work, and because like him I love the romance of radio as it was. For a few years in my youth REAL rock and roll arrived in my small town-- they were big on Beautiful Music and Easy Listening there, and Baptist church services on Sunday-- after dark, when the AM powerhouses like CLKW and WCFL would start to come in. The Grand Ole Opry (which is still on) from WSM, too, and KYW in Philadelphia, which was the novelty of news 24 hours a day. Within a couple years FM exploded (or rather the ongoing FM explosion reached us, even where I was). Whatever music you favored, you had many choices of it, day or night. And of course online streams took that and multiplied it to an unlimited degree. But for a while there I was touched by the magic of radio that came to my little world from far-away cities I couldn't imagine ever visiting. Radio's glory days were long before that, before and during World War II. In WLT, Keillor tells the story of a Minneapolis powerhouse radio station that decided to go ahead with all local talent instead of joining one of the networks. At the same time, you get the magic of radio that broke the isolation of the small towns and lonely farms, and the sordid reality of the all too human radio folk; the small-time businessmen and small-talent performers who had the foresight (or more often just the luck) to get into this new medium on the ground floor. And at the other end, the people who didn't have the foresight to get off the ship when it started sinking, and who went down with it. Often the same people who rose to radio's glory days were the same ones who sank down into obscurity with it in the end. For all our talk of the Glory Days of Radio, this was a very short era in our history. Maybe fifteen years. It would have been even shorter if World War II hadn't stopped civilian projects like the introduction of television. There is much about the glory days of radio, of how it felt to be there. There's also quite a lot about breasts. I get the feeling that Garrison Keillor has had to keep _A Prairie Home Companion_ clean and wholesome to the standard his fictional prairie Lutherans would approve. He's had to do it for decades, and the strain was too much for him. He's let fly a lifetime's worth of comments about titties, knockers, hooters, all in this one book. I hope it made him feel better. The book is a bit disjointed, especially in its early chapters. It started as a few short stories and this shows. But if you'd like a love letter to radio, either because you love it yourself or because you'd like to know about how it felt when the age of electronic information began, I think you'll enjoy this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jan Ackerson

    I'm just not sure that the novel is Keillor's best form. This has his trademark quirky characters and settings, but after a couple of hundred pages, I got weary of all the quirkiness.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Rodkey

    Perhaps Garrison Keillor felt he needed to balance his depiction of tranquil, bucolic Minnesotan life in the Lake Wobegone books. Perhaps he felt the need to say things in a book that he couldn't say on the air in his radio show. Perhaps he was simply expressing frustration at the dwindling influence radio variety shows have had over the past 5 decades. Whatever the reason, WLT is a novel ostensibly centering on the coming of age and developing romance of a young North Dakota boy as he breaks hi Perhaps Garrison Keillor felt he needed to balance his depiction of tranquil, bucolic Minnesotan life in the Lake Wobegone books. Perhaps he felt the need to say things in a book that he couldn't say on the air in his radio show. Perhaps he was simply expressing frustration at the dwindling influence radio variety shows have had over the past 5 decades. Whatever the reason, WLT is a novel ostensibly centering on the coming of age and developing romance of a young North Dakota boy as he breaks his way into radio and ultimately T.V. as radio's prominence fades. Garrison laces this novel with violent and vulgar sexual depictions of 'real life' that are so over the top we must recognize it as anti-Lake-wobegonesque. The bitterness toward the clergy and radio administration also find extreme expression here are only hinted at in the Lake Wobegone series. Yet there are moments of tenderness and insight, and Garrison has not lost his noted ability to communicate. I'd suggest taking a pass on this book, and listen to a couple podcasts of old Lake Wobegone classics instead. You won't be missing much.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    WLT: A Radio Romance by Garrison Keillor covers the maverick days of radio much as The Rocky Mountain Moving Picture Association by Loren D. Estleman does for the early days of filmmaking in Hollywood. With all his years in radio, Keillor excels at pointing out the oddities of running a small radio station and the dangers of competing against the big networks. WLT's history is believable even down to the detail that the call letters stand for "with lettuce and tomato." Where WLT falters is in the WLT: A Radio Romance by Garrison Keillor covers the maverick days of radio much as The Rocky Mountain Moving Picture Association by Loren D. Estleman does for the early days of filmmaking in Hollywood. With all his years in radio, Keillor excels at pointing out the oddities of running a small radio station and the dangers of competing against the big networks. WLT's history is believable even down to the detail that the call letters stand for "with lettuce and tomato." Where WLT falters is in the telling of the romance. The romance is focused on Frank White, né Francis With and his long time love of WLT and how he builds his life and career at the station. He also falls in love with one of the less popular employees. Unfortunately Frank's story is buried under all the long tangential stories about WLT and the folks who work there and how the station affects the community and so forth. Imagine if you will, a 7 hour Prairie Home Companion broadcast (normally the show runs 2 hours). That's how WLT reads. Even though I love listening to Keillor's broadcasts and love the film that was inspired by the radio show, WLT was too much of a good thing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abby T.

    I've gotten sort of bored of this book - at least I did a year ago when I last put it down. I think I may give up on it soon, because the other option would be to start over from the beginning. I was about halfway through, and the idea of slogging through it all again just isn't attractive to me. Plus, I've since learned that Garrison Keillor is a rampant homophobe, which colors everything I read or hear in his voice with an off-putting hypocritical tinge.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rrshively

    This may have been a good book, but I couldn't get past the pubescent male humor of the first 2 chapters, so I quit reading it. I really loved Lake Woebegon Days, so was especially disaapointed with this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Read too long ago to rate.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Found this among my mother's books when cleaning out her house. She loved Keillor and I had time on my hands, so there you go. It read like his radio show, at times I could hear his voice in the narrations. The folksy way he charmed his audience. However, I found a lot of the material in this disturbing, especially given recent allegations of abuse in the #metoo movement. Initially, upon hearing the charges, I thought "well, this can't be", but having read the book and his treatment of the femal Found this among my mother's books when cleaning out her house. She loved Keillor and I had time on my hands, so there you go. It read like his radio show, at times I could hear his voice in the narrations. The folksy way he charmed his audience. However, I found a lot of the material in this disturbing, especially given recent allegations of abuse in the #metoo movement. Initially, upon hearing the charges, I thought "well, this can't be", but having read the book and his treatment of the female characters by the male characters in the book, I'm not so sure. The allegations are not the only reason I rated this a two star. I found it laborious in some spots and just too downright wordy in others. There were back stories I would just rather not have read. That said, there was something about sitting down and reading a book my mother cherished that made me feel a bit better. Two stars for Keillor, full heart for me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    There's a good story here, perhaps more than one, but it gets bogged down to me. Perhaps it is that there is more than one story like it feels like and Keillor never decides which he wants to tell. Perhaps it's more that I just didn't like the style and others would find it fine. I did enjoy much of it, but overall it felt like a bit of a slog. I like other Keillor better, but also some other Keillor worse. Oh well, whatever.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Ann

    #116 I kept hearing how funny Keillor is? To whom? Funny is: Carl Hiaasen, Jennifer Crusie, Christopher Moore, Elmore Leonard, Janet Evanovich, et. al., not Keillor. This was awful & boring: Brothers Ray & Roy own a restaurant which they partially convert into a radio Station, WLT. Ray, although married, is a womanizer. Roy is mostly an inventor & farmer. The book revolves around WLT, its owners, those who work there, & the programs. 300+ pages of boring... #116 I kept hearing how funny Keillor is? To whom? Funny is: Carl Hiaasen, Jennifer Crusie, Christopher Moore, Elmore Leonard, Janet Evanovich, et. al., not Keillor. This was awful & boring: Brothers Ray & Roy own a restaurant which they partially convert into a radio Station, WLT. Ray, although married, is a womanizer. Roy is mostly an inventor & farmer. The book revolves around WLT, its owners, those who work there, & the programs. 300+ pages of boring...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Lake Wobegon it ain’t! Chronicles the rise and fall of radio station W L T and various characters connected therewith. Funny (sometimes bizarre), ribald and definitely not sweet. Is this Keillor’s reaction to people’s mistaking Lake Wobegon for reality or is it the way radio really is behind the scenes? It helps to read it with Keillor’s voice in your head.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Funny and entertaining. Downsides were the frequent and unnecessary X-rated scenes and a randomly introduced character being followed by the narrative for the rest of the book, when the day-to-day happenings of the radio station seemed more effective in my opinion.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sally Andrews

    This book took me a long time to read, and I normally breeze through books. It was a good story about the early days of radio, but not mind-blowing or emotion-causing. I liked it ok. No backflips over it, but it wasn't bad.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Love of Hopeless Causes

    Opened like a refrigerator that makes perpetual farting sounds, but has nothing substantial inside.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katrin

    A very entertaining read!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Gave up on page 84.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Great read, especially if you like Garrison Keillor.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Clive Thompson

    I nearly didn't post a review of this novel as initially I was disappointed after reading the reviews on the back of the book. If you are expecting a belly laugh book (as stated on the rear cover) then I think you too may be disappointed. It is worth reading however as it is amusing and very well written. The book is long and, in parts, funny. It is longer and makes you smile more because it has to be read in Keillor's voice. If you were lucky then some years ago you will have heard Keillor on BB I nearly didn't post a review of this novel as initially I was disappointed after reading the reviews on the back of the book. If you are expecting a belly laugh book (as stated on the rear cover) then I think you too may be disappointed. It is worth reading however as it is amusing and very well written. The book is long and, in parts, funny. It is longer and makes you smile more because it has to be read in Keillor's voice. If you were lucky then some years ago you will have heard Keillor on BBC radio 4, between 8.30 and 9.00 AM reciting stories from Lake Wobegon. His slow, deep and rich voice stays with you and is the voice that is in your head when you read this novel. Should you have not heard the recital then you should look for cassetttes or CDs of Lake Wobegon to get a taste of the voice before reading. In my opinion the two talking books are way funnier than the book under review and reflect small town mentality that Keillor has observed in a way that only he can. If you check the reviews of the two cassettes above you will find scores of 5/5 and reviews that talk about stopping driving as the listeners are laughing so much!! Back to the book 'Radio Romance' - as we change centuries, from the 20th to the 21st, we live in an age of perfection, where tv and radio broadcasts aim to be perfect and digital. In 1937, where this novel starts off, radio is new and practical jokes abound within the studio area. This is what makes the first two chapters so funny and I will not quote from the book for fear of spoiling your enjoyment. After the first two chapters, we go back to 1926 to the reasons for starting the station, keeping it going and, eventually, for struggling in the 50's against the onslaught of TV. A good read but listen to the Wobegon cassettes first. Addendum to review - Some years after writing this review we stayed in a B&B in Norfolk where the hosts had breakfast for all guests at a large table and insisted that everyone introduce themselves and chat with each other. I told one visitor that I couldn't place his accent between the USA and Canada and placed him somewhere near the border - he asked me why. I told him that his voice was very similar to Garrison's and he laughed. Apparently they were from the same town and were good friends and he often helped Garrison out in his stage shows, reciting from books to give Garrison's voice a rest.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Tedium, thy name is Keillor. After loving parts of We Are Still Married, I thought Lake Wobegon Days was a blip of boringness. Not so. Though, to be fair, I only bought this for the subplot: I have a very dear friend whose name, like the hero, is Frank/Francis and whose twin goals, like those of the hero, are to break into radio and marry the love of his life. The parallels were extraordinary. My Frank is currently having, I understand, conversations very similar to this one with Maria: She sighe Tedium, thy name is Keillor. After loving parts of We Are Still Married, I thought Lake Wobegon Days was a blip of boringness. Not so. Though, to be fair, I only bought this for the subplot: I have a very dear friend whose name, like the hero, is Frank/Francis and whose twin goals, like those of the hero, are to break into radio and marry the love of his life. The parallels were extraordinary. My Frank is currently having, I understand, conversations very similar to this one with Maria: She sighed. "I've never been this confused," she said. "I like you a lot, Frank. You're sweet and you're more level-headed than anybody I ever knew and you're gentle and good and I have tender feelings when we're together. Maybe that's the same as love, I don't know. But-" Another exquisite sigh. But reading this book to find out what becomes of Frank is a bit like becoming friends with a really boring person who knows someone you fancy, and you have to put up with their droning on about all these people (half of whom are fictional characters in a radio show) you don't care about, for the brief moments when you can coax little snippets of information from them about your beloved. Still, should my Frank ever read this review (DON'T read the book!) - probably not likely as he's a Goodreader in name only - Roy Jr. has this piece of advice for you: "The only unforgivable sin is to not show up. Punctuality. The first law of radio: BE THERE. Remember that. The corollary of that law is: a radio man should own two alarm clocks and have a third available. Not many people were ever fired for not being brilliant, but the list of brilliant guys who wound up as shoe salesmen because they came late for the shift is as long as your leg." Also, (view spoiler)[Frank White marries Maria and (quite literally) walks into a job in television. (hide spoiler)] So there's hope for you yet, sweetie. xx

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brett

    WLT is Keillor's first novel and it definitely feels like it. I've very much enjoyed the books of short stories of his that I've read (in fact his story "After a Fall" remains one of my all time favorites) but WLT feels stretched and forced into a novel length manuscript. As is often observed, Keillor's books can sometimes surprise listeners of his radio show. The books are set in a universe very similar to what we hear on A Prairie Home Companion, but they are darker and characters are allowed t WLT is Keillor's first novel and it definitely feels like it. I've very much enjoyed the books of short stories of his that I've read (in fact his story "After a Fall" remains one of my all time favorites) but WLT feels stretched and forced into a novel length manuscript. As is often observed, Keillor's books can sometimes surprise listeners of his radio show. The books are set in a universe very similar to what we hear on A Prairie Home Companion, but they are darker and characters are allowed to have sexual lives that we never hear about on the radio. This is not what I object to in WLT, though some readers no doubt will. Instead, and I feel weird saying this, Keillor has real trouble getting his characters across. Normally, I find drawing convincing characters to be a strength of Keillor's, but in WLT the brothers Ray and Roy are inscrutable and opaque, Frank White feels largely devoid of inner life, and all the women characters are empty shells. With the exception of the description of a train accident early in the novel, there is very little that leaps off the page. I also wonder if part of the issue is the book's setting of Minneapolis. Minneapolis a great city, and as Keillor well knows, the cultural capital of the region. But Keillor's pacing and observational style have been so trained on smaller communities that it seems somewhat incongruous when being used to describe city life. The rhythm is never quite there the way it is in his more rural stories. Nonetheless, as a resident of the upper plains, I've always felt that Keillor had a way of speaking about this part of the country that is true to life, and of course someone as talented as Keillor can't write an entire novel without some good turns of phrase. WLT isn't exactly a waste of time, but it is far from Keillor's best.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aimee Massey

    Man, this guy has issues! Reading WLT was lots of fun, but Keillor's issues were made pretty clear within it, which probably was his intention. For one thing, I think Keillor really hates the radio business. He paints radio work as something that just sucks you dry and leads you nowhere and makes you completely insignificant even as fans clamor to meet you (or more accurately, your character) in the station lobby. The fans themselves are painted as total morons who can't grasp the idea that the s Man, this guy has issues! Reading WLT was lots of fun, but Keillor's issues were made pretty clear within it, which probably was his intention. For one thing, I think Keillor really hates the radio business. He paints radio work as something that just sucks you dry and leads you nowhere and makes you completely insignificant even as fans clamor to meet you (or more accurately, your character) in the station lobby. The fans themselves are painted as total morons who can't grasp the idea that the stories they listen to are just plays with actors and a script. When a character on the beloved "Friendly Neighbor" program drops a piece of glass fruit, hundreds of idiots send in replacement glass fruit, and after that the scripts for that show are written so that when accidents or other misfortunes occur, listeners will be sending in food or clothing for charity, without even realizing it. Keillor also seems to harbor a nearly pathological fear of children. The children we meet in WLT are almost universally sly, mean and nasty, in a creepy, almost-adult way. The only exception is Francis With, who grows up listening to WLT and begins working at the station as a teenager. Francis is a sad, lonely, fearful kid who is teased or ignored by most everybody, even his own sister. Autobiographical, much? The adults in WLT aren't that much better. They play vicious pranks on each other, engage in very juvenile and very explicit gossip, and the religious ones are total hypocrites. The Shepherd Boys, a gospel quartet are heavy drinkers, womanizers and brawlers, for instance. If you're a fan of a Prairie Home Companion and have never read Keillor's other works, you might be in for a shock. This ain't your grandma's Lake Wobegon. But it's still a hill of fun.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Coogs7

    WLT is about the early days of radio. What I find about this piece is that it has a unique style when compared to some of his other work, it is more outspoken, sometimes raunchy and vulgar, yet very vivid and true to life in a sense. The characters presented all work very well together, the story is almost enlightening in a humorous yet sometimes serious way, I found myself considering what it would be like to make the transition from radio to television in just those few short years. Perhaps th WLT is about the early days of radio. What I find about this piece is that it has a unique style when compared to some of his other work, it is more outspoken, sometimes raunchy and vulgar, yet very vivid and true to life in a sense. The characters presented all work very well together, the story is almost enlightening in a humorous yet sometimes serious way, I found myself considering what it would be like to make the transition from radio to television in just those few short years. Perhaps this is sort of a spoiler, but it is not in fact, a romance novel. It is funny at times, at many moments in fact it is hilarious, but there are also times when it can be dark and sort of depicts the life and death of radio. Don't pass this one by if you are interested in all in Garrison Keillor's books, this is the fourth I have read in his collection and I enjoyed it the most in many ways. It is not as long-winded so to speak, it flows well, the comedy is more apparent at the surface level, and I thought the plot was rich enough to keep me interested in reading five or ten chapters in one sitting.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Deb Higginbotham

    written like the home prairie radio show. many story lines and characters. a LOT of sexual content...bawdy. more of a tragedy- wasn't my favorite

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Shepherd

    The Lake Wobegone series seems best suited to the AARP set, but Keillor's Short stories and novels would be enjoyed by any reader. WLT is ostensibly a romance, but Keillor handily weaves in a history of radio broadcasting. This book is quite funny, somewhat educational, and even contains an epistimological treatise on the nature of media. This reader happens to be a fan of the cartoonist Keith Knight (The K Chronicles, usually found in your local free weekly [The City Weekly, The Stranger, The The Lake Wobegone series seems best suited to the AARP set, but Keillor's Short stories and novels would be enjoyed by any reader. WLT is ostensibly a romance, but Keillor handily weaves in a history of radio broadcasting. This book is quite funny, somewhat educational, and even contains an epistimological treatise on the nature of media. This reader happens to be a fan of the cartoonist Keith Knight (The K Chronicles, usually found in your local free weekly [The City Weekly, The Stranger, The Village Voice, et al]) and recalls that this is only book he's ever recommended. If you're looking for something really funny, try Keillor's Book of Guys, if you want a light but solid novel, WLT is a great choice.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    Well this was a disappointment. I never thought I’d describe a Keillor novel as vulgar, but that kinda describes this one for me. The book starts off great, with descriptions of the early days of radio through the workers at WLT, a Minneapolis radio station. But it soon goes downhill with talk of boobies and farts and so on. I only finished the novel to see how things would turn out, and it really wasn’t worth the time. There is some tenderness in the novel, and that helped me keep reading. In M Well this was a disappointment. I never thought I’d describe a Keillor novel as vulgar, but that kinda describes this one for me. The book starts off great, with descriptions of the early days of radio through the workers at WLT, a Minneapolis radio station. But it soon goes downhill with talk of boobies and farts and so on. I only finished the novel to see how things would turn out, and it really wasn’t worth the time. There is some tenderness in the novel, and that helped me keep reading. In Mr. Keillor’s favor, I will say that this was written during the time he’d left “Prairie Home Companion” the first time and was living in New York City. So maybe he was trying to shake up his writing style a bit. This really is the worst thing I’ve read by the guy.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hira Nosheen (Booklover ♡)

    What a piece of crap. I was so misguided and sort of tricked to buy it on reading the back cover, i thought it was a funny book with a good story of someone aspiring to have a career in radio, having been into radio myself as an RJ i literally picked it to give myself a happy ride down the nostalgia track. Turned out to be so lousy, i couldn't even finish reading it and i never leave any book but the innuendos, almost porn like situations, disconnected characters, absolutely no storyline at all, What a piece of crap. I was so misguided and sort of tricked to buy it on reading the back cover, i thought it was a funny book with a good story of someone aspiring to have a career in radio, having been into radio myself as an RJ i literally picked it to give myself a happy ride down the nostalgia track. Turned out to be so lousy, i couldn't even finish reading it and i never leave any book but the innuendos, almost porn like situations, disconnected characters, absolutely no storyline at all, perhaps the writer thought he should gather everything from his dustbin and publish it in a combined form. Doesn't even deserve one star. My rating 0/5 stars. Recommendo-meter : Not at all recommended even if someone gives it to you for free!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Garrison Keillor is one of my favorite humorists and I've always loved his Prairie Home Companion radio show. I've also read several of Keillor's other novels. WLT: A Radio Romance has the same wry humor that is Keillor's trademark but with an R rated twist. Great characters as usual, funny situations as usual, but plot was nearly non-existent. I still loved it though because of the ridiculous situations the characters find themselves in. Keillor fans would enjoy it although some might be shocke Garrison Keillor is one of my favorite humorists and I've always loved his Prairie Home Companion radio show. I've also read several of Keillor's other novels. WLT: A Radio Romance has the same wry humor that is Keillor's trademark but with an R rated twist. Great characters as usual, funny situations as usual, but plot was nearly non-existent. I still loved it though because of the ridiculous situations the characters find themselves in. Keillor fans would enjoy it although some might be shocked if they've only heard Prairie Home Companion. If you've never read any of Keillor's work, you might find it slow because of the weak plot line.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Currie

    I would give this 4.5 stars if they had that rating. I read the vast majority of this while watching the 2016 Worlds Series between Chicago and Cleveland with the sound turned down. I've read several of Garrison's books over the years I listened to APHC but I enjoyed this one the most. This isn't a book with a strong narrative. It is more like a bunch of vignettes than a novel, but it works. I can hear Garrison's voice telling these stories about a local radio station in the early years of radio. I would give this 4.5 stars if they had that rating. I read the vast majority of this while watching the 2016 Worlds Series between Chicago and Cleveland with the sound turned down. I've read several of Garrison's books over the years I listened to APHC but I enjoyed this one the most. This isn't a book with a strong narrative. It is more like a bunch of vignettes than a novel, but it works. I can hear Garrison's voice telling these stories about a local radio station in the early years of radio. They are short and consistently funny and more than a bit risqué in parts. Just a pleasure to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I grew up on this book. My parents thought that modern culture was decadent, depraved, and disgusting but books were a-ok (which, in retrospect was kinda of myopic and naieve in a way but quite a blessing in disguise) and Garrison Keillor wasn't anything bad, so.... they left this one lying around the house and I dug into it. Heheheheh....sexy scenes a go go. Horny midwesterners fantasizing, having, talking about having massive amounts of slightly kinky sex! It's a fine yarn besides, I just happen t I grew up on this book. My parents thought that modern culture was decadent, depraved, and disgusting but books were a-ok (which, in retrospect was kinda of myopic and naieve in a way but quite a blessing in disguise) and Garrison Keillor wasn't anything bad, so.... they left this one lying around the house and I dug into it. Heheheheh....sexy scenes a go go. Horny midwesterners fantasizing, having, talking about having massive amounts of slightly kinky sex! It's a fine yarn besides, I just happen to have experienced it as a sort of parable, which I think is nice.

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