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Pakistan's Drift Into Extremism: Allah, the Army, and America's War on Terror: Allah, the Army, and America's War on Terror

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This book examines the rise of religious extremism in Pakistan, particularly since 1947, and analyzes its connections to the Pakistani army's corporate interests and U.S.-Pakistan relations. It includes profiles of leading Pakistani militant groups with details of their origins, development, and capabilities. The author begins with an historical overview of the introductio This book examines the rise of religious extremism in Pakistan, particularly since 1947, and analyzes its connections to the Pakistani army's corporate interests and U.S.-Pakistan relations. It includes profiles of leading Pakistani militant groups with details of their origins, development, and capabilities. The author begins with an historical overview of the introduction of Islam to the Indian sub-continent in 712 AD, and brings the story up to the present by describing President Musharraf's handling of the war on terror. He provides a detailed account of the political developments in Pakistan since 1947 with a focus on the influence of religious and military forces. He also discusses regional politics, Pakistan's attempt to gain nuclear power status, and U.S.-Pakistan relations, and offers predictions for Pakistan's domestic and regional prospects.


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This book examines the rise of religious extremism in Pakistan, particularly since 1947, and analyzes its connections to the Pakistani army's corporate interests and U.S.-Pakistan relations. It includes profiles of leading Pakistani militant groups with details of their origins, development, and capabilities. The author begins with an historical overview of the introductio This book examines the rise of religious extremism in Pakistan, particularly since 1947, and analyzes its connections to the Pakistani army's corporate interests and U.S.-Pakistan relations. It includes profiles of leading Pakistani militant groups with details of their origins, development, and capabilities. The author begins with an historical overview of the introduction of Islam to the Indian sub-continent in 712 AD, and brings the story up to the present by describing President Musharraf's handling of the war on terror. He provides a detailed account of the political developments in Pakistan since 1947 with a focus on the influence of religious and military forces. He also discusses regional politics, Pakistan's attempt to gain nuclear power status, and U.S.-Pakistan relations, and offers predictions for Pakistan's domestic and regional prospects.

30 review for Pakistan's Drift Into Extremism: Allah, the Army, and America's War on Terror: Allah, the Army, and America's War on Terror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ravi

    The book is about the political history of Pakistan since its independence in 1947. Any analysis of the country's drift into extremism is only incidental. So the book title is misleading. Ironically, the way the author chooses to narrate Pakistan's history explains why the country is in such a pitiful state right now and why it was dismembered in 1971. The author starts off with a threat that Pakistan will self-destruct and in the process do some damage to its neighboring countries, unless USA and The book is about the political history of Pakistan since its independence in 1947. Any analysis of the country's drift into extremism is only incidental. So the book title is misleading. Ironically, the way the author chooses to narrate Pakistan's history explains why the country is in such a pitiful state right now and why it was dismembered in 1971. The author starts off with a threat that Pakistan will self-destruct and in the process do some damage to its neighboring countries, unless USA and India accommodate Pakistan's views on various issues. These kinds of threats have become fashionable among "moderates" in Pakistan over the last 10 years, while the extremists are waging jihad. The author is completely infatuated with Pakistani army officers. The book is littered with descriptions of the personal traits of hundreds of army officers with adjectives like tall, laid back, easy smiling, courageous, honest, stocky, comes from a good family, dashing, etc. The fact that 240 pages of a country's history refer to hundreds of army officers says something about its culture and priorities. The basic principles of parliamentary democracy (e.g. leader of the majority party becoming the Prime Minister), don't seem to be completely sensible in the author's view. E.g. the author implies that there is nothing unreasonable about Bhutto wanting two Prime Minsters - one for the East Wing and one for the West Wing - after elections in 1970 in which Mujib won a clear majority in the National Assembly. The military and West Pakistani politicians taking such ridiculous positions is what caused the country's dismemberment. Finally Pakistan's obsession with Kashmir is one of the main reasons for its sorry state. The author unwittingly conveys that in this book. There is no mention of India's point of view in the Kashmir dispute while he repeatedly refers to "India's oppression of Kashmiris".

  2. 4 out of 5

    Z Sayed

    Why is Pakistan the way it is today? That is the question that this book answers. It is an excellent overview of Pakistani politics from its independence to the immediate post-9/11 world. The author provides historical context for most major events, as well as the key players involved. By learning where the current factions came from, you start to understand why they do what they do. Why they support who/what they support. And why the country seems to be be trapped in a cycle of hope and tragedy. H Why is Pakistan the way it is today? That is the question that this book answers. It is an excellent overview of Pakistani politics from its independence to the immediate post-9/11 world. The author provides historical context for most major events, as well as the key players involved. By learning where the current factions came from, you start to understand why they do what they do. Why they support who/what they support. And why the country seems to be be trapped in a cycle of hope and tragedy. His analysis is well-informed and balanced, and his biting criticism of so many military and political figures is tempered with ample sarcasm and wit. An all-around great read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Junaid Noor

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abeer Hamid

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amjid Ali

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jim Hardesty

  7. 5 out of 5

    G

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yousaf Tahir

  9. 5 out of 5

    Qurat

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Lee

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aarish Khan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anupam Pandey

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul D. Miller

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pranhita Sharma

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sohaib

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shahid Raja

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bilal Sulehri

  18. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Shoaib

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maryam Javed

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aasem Bakhshi

  21. 5 out of 5

    E B

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dave Whitelaw

  23. 5 out of 5

    Abdul

  24. 4 out of 5

    Manav

  25. 4 out of 5

    Behzad Saljook

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Aslam

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sadia

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anna

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