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The long-awaited memoir from the Academy Award–winning director of such legendary films as The French Connection, The Exorcist, and To Live and Die in LA, The Friedkin Connection takes readers from the streets of Chicago to the suites of Hollywood and from the sixties to today, with autobiographical storytelling as fast-paced and intense as any of the auteur's films. Willia The long-awaited memoir from the Academy Award–winning director of such legendary films as The French Connection, The Exorcist, and To Live and Die in LA, The Friedkin Connection takes readers from the streets of Chicago to the suites of Hollywood and from the sixties to today, with autobiographical storytelling as fast-paced and intense as any of the auteur's films. William Friedkin, maverick of American cinema, offers a candid look at Hollywood, when traditional storytelling gave way to the rebellious and alternative; when filmmakers like him captured the paranoia and fear of a nation undergoing a cultural nervous breakdown. The Friedkin Connection includes 16 pages of black-and-white photographs.


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The long-awaited memoir from the Academy Award–winning director of such legendary films as The French Connection, The Exorcist, and To Live and Die in LA, The Friedkin Connection takes readers from the streets of Chicago to the suites of Hollywood and from the sixties to today, with autobiographical storytelling as fast-paced and intense as any of the auteur's films. Willia The long-awaited memoir from the Academy Award–winning director of such legendary films as The French Connection, The Exorcist, and To Live and Die in LA, The Friedkin Connection takes readers from the streets of Chicago to the suites of Hollywood and from the sixties to today, with autobiographical storytelling as fast-paced and intense as any of the auteur's films. William Friedkin, maverick of American cinema, offers a candid look at Hollywood, when traditional storytelling gave way to the rebellious and alternative; when filmmakers like him captured the paranoia and fear of a nation undergoing a cultural nervous breakdown. The Friedkin Connection includes 16 pages of black-and-white photographs.

30 review for The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tom Stamper

    I have only seen two Friedkin films, Blue Chips which was entertaining enough and the French Connection that I found a bit slow moving for a action thriller. Luckily I heard an interview with Friedkin last year that made me read this. I'm glad I did because it's among the better Hollywood memoirs I have read. First, Friedkin doesn't dwell on his private life, his girlfriends, and his wives. He spends the pages telling us about his career in TV and movies mostly going chronologically relating his I have only seen two Friedkin films, Blue Chips which was entertaining enough and the French Connection that I found a bit slow moving for a action thriller. Luckily I heard an interview with Friedkin last year that made me read this. I'm glad I did because it's among the better Hollywood memoirs I have read. First, Friedkin doesn't dwell on his private life, his girlfriends, and his wives. He spends the pages telling us about his career in TV and movies mostly going chronologically relating his education as he went along. He has a rare ability to look back on his earlier work and not only see the faults in it, but understand how his youthful exuberance would sometimes lead him to the wrong conclusions. He's honest. Rather than defend decisions that were poor he admits his mistakes. He admits he risked his life and the lives of others to get a certain shot. He admits that he spent some of the counterfeit money from the movie TO LIVE AND DIE IN LA. He admits that his first documentary designed to free a man from death row was probably a mistake. The man he thought innocent was probably guilty after all. He should have cast Ali McGraw in the Sorcerer so that Steve McQueen would have taken the lead role. He paid off a NYC civil servant for permission to shoot the L-Train chase scene in French Connection. Best of all, the book flows easily and stories are told well. I zoomed through the thing and I wasn't even expecting to finish when I began.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anthony McGill

    This is one of the best film autobiographies I have read. Mr Friedkin must have taken copious notes during the production of his films as his memory of even the smallest of details is remarkable. I haven't seen many of his later films but have seen all the earlier ones -and enjoyed revisiting them many times as they are all great entertainment- movies such as "The Night They Raided Minsky's"/ "The Birthday Party"/ "The Boys in the Band"/ "The Exorcist"/ even the much maligned "Cruising" and of cou This is one of the best film autobiographies I have read. Mr Friedkin must have taken copious notes during the production of his films as his memory of even the smallest of details is remarkable. I haven't seen many of his later films but have seen all the earlier ones -and enjoyed revisiting them many times as they are all great entertainment- movies such as "The Night They Raided Minsky's"/ "The Birthday Party"/ "The Boys in the Band"/ "The Exorcist"/ even the much maligned "Cruising" and of course his Oscar winning stint as director of the 1971 Best Picture winner: "The French Connection". If you enjoy reading first-hand and intelligent books about the filmmaking process this is a must. Friedkin comes across as a very interesting man and unlike most film biographies, avoids gossip and cheap-shots and self-praise, instead painting a highly readable and informative book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dean Anderson

    As of this posting the Goodreads information about the number of pages in this book is incorrect by a couple of hundred pages. The real count is 512 pages. Do Two Great Films Make a Life? One hand, holding a pair of glasses, covers the bottom half of his face. William Friedkin lets us with the picture that he won't reveal his whole self in this memoir. That’s okay. He can keep all the gossip on his failed marriages and his other non-cinematic to himself. The important thing is that he shares great As of this posting the Goodreads information about the number of pages in this book is incorrect by a couple of hundred pages. The real count is 512 pages. Do Two Great Films Make a Life? One hand, holding a pair of glasses, covers the bottom half of his face. William Friedkin lets us with the picture that he won't reveal his whole self in this memoir. That’s okay. He can keep all the gossip on his failed marriages and his other non-cinematic to himself. The important thing is that he shares great stories about his film making career. The cover also blurbs, “Legendary Director of The French Connection and The Exorcist”. Really, those are the two films that people will always associate with the director, his hugely commercial and critically acclaimed hits. And there are great stories about those. Friedkin admits he wasn’t thrilled with the selection of Gene Hackman as Popeye Doyle for “The French Connection” and that even through production he wasn’t sure if the performance that eventually won an Oscar would be adequate. He cops to breaking laws and endangering lives to film the famous car/train chase in the day before CGI. He recounts his battles and feuds with “Exorcist” William Blatty over the horror film’s content and with voice actress Mercedes McCambridge over the film’s credits. (There are also wonderful anecdotes about what the actress went through to achieve her demonic tone; after years in AA, and with council from clergy, she glutted on cigarettes, Jack Daniels and raw eggs.) But Friedkin’s less successful films provide good stories as well; his encounters with basketball legends in the making of “Blue Chips”, the production shut down over Al Pacino’s too short haircut for “Cruising”, Friedkin’s passing of counterfeit bills that were props for “To Live and Die in L.A.”, and many other fun tales from even lesser films. I also enjoyed his stories about his second career directing opera. Friedkin admits to his arrogance, temper and other personal failings. He gives some details about his struggles with health and even faith. He never gives his whole self, but refreshingly doesn’t claim to. Discussing near death experiences, he wonders whether he his life had meaning. In my mind, he isn’t one of the great directors. Film makers such as Akira Kurosawa, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and contemporaries like Woody Allen, Steven Spielberg and the Coen Brothers have made a number of masterpieces over decades of work. Friedkin has two masterpieces made over a couple of years in the early seventies. But that ain’t too shabby. (Though he is also responsible for the awful travesty entitled “Deal of the Century” with Chevy Chase and Gregory Hines, one of the films I most regretted paying to see. He does not discuss the making of this film.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bryce Wilson

    On the first page Friedkin quotes himself on his list of epigraphs, putting himself above Samuel Beckett, cause modesty. On the very next page he's throwing original Basquits in the trash. Things continue in this vein. On the first page Friedkin quotes himself on his list of epigraphs, putting himself above Samuel Beckett, cause modesty. On the very next page he's throwing original Basquits in the trash. Things continue in this vein.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kit Fox

    Hyperbolic and self-congratulatory? Sure. Immensely readable with great insights into the making of some of the best films of the 1970s? All the way. Not sure why, but I'm kinda inclined to believe Friedkin was telling the whole truth whenever he owned up to some illegal activity. Doing 90 through crowded city streets without permits? Strong-arming an adult bookshop that was screening illegal dupes of his films? Using real heroin for the sake of veracity? I believe all of that and more. Also lov Hyperbolic and self-congratulatory? Sure. Immensely readable with great insights into the making of some of the best films of the 1970s? All the way. Not sure why, but I'm kinda inclined to believe Friedkin was telling the whole truth whenever he owned up to some illegal activity. Doing 90 through crowded city streets without permits? Strong-arming an adult bookshop that was screening illegal dupes of his films? Using real heroin for the sake of veracity? I believe all of that and more. Also loved the idea of him being invited to meet a tribe of Kurdish devil-worshipers while filming in Iraq for >The Exorcist. Amazing stuff all around, especially his understandably philosophical musings on the ethos of what makes for a good cinematic chase sequence. Not for nothing, Friedkin quotes—and boasts a career that epitomizes—legendary producer Dan Brown's aphorism, "Those whom the gods wish to destroy, they first make successful in show business."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brian Joynt

    This is an interesting and introspective memoir written with conviction from one of the most underrated of the New Hollywood filmmakers. William Friedkin--in a candid yet thoughtful tone--examines his early endeavors as a camera operator with WGN in Chicago to his wide successes and failures in Hollywood. While a lot of these types of memoirs only serve as a podium for an actor or director to argue their side of a controversy associated with his or her personal life, Friedkin takes the high road This is an interesting and introspective memoir written with conviction from one of the most underrated of the New Hollywood filmmakers. William Friedkin--in a candid yet thoughtful tone--examines his early endeavors as a camera operator with WGN in Chicago to his wide successes and failures in Hollywood. While a lot of these types of memoirs only serve as a podium for an actor or director to argue their side of a controversy associated with his or her personal life, Friedkin takes the high road and truly delivers something special for the film fan--carefully detailed memories and anecdotes of his many inspiring and masterful films. He skips over a couple of flops--namely Deal of the Century and The Guardian--but otherwise regales the reader with a treasure trove of insightful information. He writes very little about his personal life, but that's not the kind of stuff I want to hear about. The recent Alec Baldwin memoir was nothing but filler surrounding the shocking incidents he's come to be known for; there were no stories about Glengarry Glen Ross, or Beetlejuice, or any of the films he's done that would make someone want to read a book about his career. This tome does not suffer that pitfall, and serves as both a fascinating memoir and a manual for the craft. Highly recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Excellent writer. And Honest. Exorcist is the scariest movie I ever saw. The French Connection one of the best crime movies ever. Live and die in LA one of the most under rated. Friedman directed all of them. His autobiography, very well, and not ghost , written tells how he made these films. Fascinating stuff and highly reccommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Curtis Brown

    Some wonderful tales of Hollywood and the author's (mis)adventures. Friedkin seems humble and humbled by many of his experiences but his reputation was even more extreme than this self-portrayal. Some wonderful tales of Hollywood and the author's (mis)adventures. Friedkin seems humble and humbled by many of his experiences but his reputation was even more extreme than this self-portrayal.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul Wilson

    Pretty good autobiography. I would have preferred more insights to "Sorcerer" and "Cruising," but "The Exorcist" is his most famous movie, so it makes sense that most of his film career would cover it more in-depth. Pretty good autobiography. I would have preferred more insights to "Sorcerer" and "Cruising," but "The Exorcist" is his most famous movie, so it makes sense that most of his film career would cover it more in-depth.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Reading Friedkin put his career into words, with his usual flair, attitude and honesty, is a refreshingly fun and energetic experience. He skips over failed relationships, soured friendships and destroyed colleagues, unlike Easy Riders & Raging Bulls, which baths in that. Instead he wants to talk about his process for each of his films, how they were made, the troubles they went through and his own mental state through each one. As you'd expect, he spends a good chunk of the book in the 70s - at Reading Friedkin put his career into words, with his usual flair, attitude and honesty, is a refreshingly fun and energetic experience. He skips over failed relationships, soured friendships and destroyed colleagues, unlike Easy Riders & Raging Bulls, which baths in that. Instead he wants to talk about his process for each of his films, how they were made, the troubles they went through and his own mental state through each one. As you'd expect, he spends a good chunk of the book in the 70s - at least half the book is spent discussing The French Connection, The Exorcist and Sorcerer. The French Connection is perhaps the most interesting segment, as he discusses how much he hated Hackman in that role, the bribing of officials to get things filmed, the problems with casting and how he got depression after winning his Oscar. He leaves nothing on the table in that chapter. I am bias, I love William Friedkin - he is one of my most respected directors. I wish more directors would summarise their career in this fashion, it was a lot of fun.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dan Lalande

    William Friedkin recounts, in acute detail, the professional stages of his improbable life: Chicago-based documentarian, A-list Hollywood director, middling indie-film talent, and, redemptively, international overseer of operas. It's straight ahead, has long, exciting episodes (especially the inside scoops on his one-two punch, The French Connection and The Exorcist)but on the whole, is bigger than its britches - a lot like a William Friedkin film. William Friedkin recounts, in acute detail, the professional stages of his improbable life: Chicago-based documentarian, A-list Hollywood director, middling indie-film talent, and, redemptively, international overseer of operas. It's straight ahead, has long, exciting episodes (especially the inside scoops on his one-two punch, The French Connection and The Exorcist)but on the whole, is bigger than its britches - a lot like a William Friedkin film.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Guzman

    "To become a director you must have ambition, luck, and grace. Talent counts, but without luck and ambition, opportunities won't occur" "To become a director you must have ambition, luck, and grace. Talent counts, but without luck and ambition, opportunities won't occur"

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Kinney

    Great storyteller but I still think he might be a bit full of shit.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paul Lyons

    Yes, he may not be a reliable narrator, especially about his own life. Yes, he may be an arrogant, amoral tyrant, willing to break the law, and resort to drink and manipulation an even violence in order to get what he wants. Yet, director William Friedkin also happens to be, was at one point, an excellent film director, and his autobiography "The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir" is downright entertaining. Front-loaded with stories from the author's childhood, early career, and rise to stardom as th Yes, he may not be a reliable narrator, especially about his own life. Yes, he may be an arrogant, amoral tyrant, willing to break the law, and resort to drink and manipulation an even violence in order to get what he wants. Yet, director William Friedkin also happens to be, was at one point, an excellent film director, and his autobiography "The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir" is downright entertaining. Front-loaded with stories from the author's childhood, early career, and rise to stardom as the director of the two huge hits from the 1970's, THE FRENCH CONNECTION and THE EXORCIST, as well as the hubris and movie that more or less cost William Friedkin his career (1977's SORCERER), "The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir" truly shines in the great detail the author devotes to each important step in his life. From humble beginnings in Chicago, to working his way up from the mailroom at a local television station, to floor manager, to director of live TV, to going off on his own to direct an hour-long documentary ("The People vs. Paul Crump") that unexpectantly served as his calling card in both New York and Los Angeles...leading towards William Friedkin's first-ever feature film, the Sonny and Cher romp from 1967, GOOD TIMES. Though one-sided, and probably self-serving, William Friedkin's stories and perspective about meeting this or that person, and the problems he had making the movies GOOD TIMES, THE NIGHT THEY RAIDED MINSKY'S, THE BIRTHDAY PARTY, THE BOYS IN THE BAND, THE FRENCH CONNECTION, THE EXORCIST and SORCERER are pretty fascinating, fantastic, and real fun to read. The author shys away from tales of his personal life during this period, and instead focuses on just his prolific career...and it works. "The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir" takes a slight dip, however, in detail and quality after he discusses the failure of SORCERER. The author writes only briefly about his experience making 1978's THE BRINK'S JOB, yet does divulge a fair amount of detail about the development and making of an even worse failure than SORCERER (at least people LIKED SORCERER): 1980's CRUISING, a film that bombed, and which nobody liked at all. Thankfully, the author takes at least some responsibility for the film's failure. Since the bulk of "The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir" focused on the director's movie career up until 1980, the rest of Friedkin's book (by comparison) slightly skims over the rest of his work. He does not mention at all his 1983 Chevy Chase comedy DEAL OF THE CENTURY, yet his does give at least some attention to 1985's TO LIVE AND DIE IN LA, and films like RAMPAGE, BLUE CHIPS, JADE, RULES OF ENGAGEMENT and THE HUNTED. Also of interest in Friedkin's depiction of his time in the world of independent cinema, which is where he made his final two feature films BUG and 2012's KILLER JOE. In the later half of the book, the author offers up the first glimpse of his private life, with stories involving his troubled health, heart attacks and heart surgeries, as well as tales revolving around his third wife, actress, producer and veteran studio chief Sherry Lansing. Friedkin's first two wives are never spoken of, and his two sons are barely mentioned at all. The author also discusses at length his unexpected entry into the world of opera. Directing opera has developed into a passion for Friedkin, and one in which he also has found success. Yet, as with all things in the director's life, Friedkin is not shy about ruffling a few feathers, and stirring up trouble. As a film lover, I could not help but enjoy most of "The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir." Say what you want about William Friedkin's taste, arrogance and bold stupidity, he DID direct two great film classics, as well as several good ones. The man has lead any interesting life, to say the least, and The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir" was certainly an interesting and entertaining book to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ram Pujar

    A hard truth about success in cinema career. “Those whom the gods would destroy, they first make successful in show business.” God! last few lines are just riveting.. "I used to ride my three-wheeler bike as fast as I could along Sheridan Road past the furniture outlet, the little grocery store, the movie theater, a scarf wrapped around my nose and mouth, faces blurring past, legs pumping, scattering pigeons. My world always ended at the shore of the frozen Great Lake, watching the ice floes, jagg A hard truth about success in cinema career. “Those whom the gods would destroy, they first make successful in show business.” God! last few lines are just riveting.. "I used to ride my three-wheeler bike as fast as I could along Sheridan Road past the furniture outlet, the little grocery store, the movie theater, a scarf wrapped around my nose and mouth, faces blurring past, legs pumping, scattering pigeons. My world always ended at the shore of the frozen Great Lake, watching the ice floes, jagged pieces of a big white puzzle breaking in the sun. No worries then about what lay ahead. Everything would be fine. And soon I’d be in the warmth of our one-room apartment, drinking thehot chocolate my mother made, listening to one of my favorite radio programs, waiting for my father to come home from work. Before long I wasn’t scared of the movies anymore. I couldn’t wait to enter the safe darkness of a theater and become lost in another world. The films I once loved are still old friends. I visit them often and discover something new about them each time. Occasionally a film moves me in the same way as those that inspired me and this gives me hope there will be others. Someone will surely come along and use the new technology in as innovative a way as Orson Welles did with what was available to him in 1940. I don’t fall into the misguided trap of thinking that my generation made masterpieces, and today’s filmmakers are making garbage. That’s what old Hollywood said about the films of my generation." It's friedkin career I have read and also part of history of American Cinema I believe I have read. Maybe a tiny part. Still it's good hard edged part. Thanks so much for all your work

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gary Fowles

    Enjoyable charge through Friedkin's films and to a lesser degree his personal life. Lots of interesting stories, lots of detail and of course lots of opinions. Drags a little once Friedkin drops the ball in the late '80s and finds himself sliding down the pole somewhat. The period from The French Connection through to Sorcerer is understandably given the biggest page count. There are some omissions though, his interview with Fritz Lang isn't even mentioned, the same understandably goes for Deal Enjoyable charge through Friedkin's films and to a lesser degree his personal life. Lots of interesting stories, lots of detail and of course lots of opinions. Drags a little once Friedkin drops the ball in the late '80s and finds himself sliding down the pole somewhat. The period from The French Connection through to Sorcerer is understandably given the biggest page count. There are some omissions though, his interview with Fritz Lang isn't even mentioned, the same understandably goes for Deal of the Century. As with all good Hollywood memoirs this has had me raiding my shelves and dusting off films that I haven't watched for a while.

  17. 5 out of 5

    I.D.

    This started off really great, with a detailed look at his life and career up to The Exorcist but after that point it was like he had a deadline or something and just breezes through/glossed over everything else. He touched on Sorcerer and To Live and Die in LA but most of his other work got the shaft. Now it’s not like he’s done a ton of other amazing stuff but I would have liked to have heard something about The Guardian, Deal of the Century, his TV movies, Tales from the Crypt, etc. Some inte This started off really great, with a detailed look at his life and career up to The Exorcist but after that point it was like he had a deadline or something and just breezes through/glossed over everything else. He touched on Sorcerer and To Live and Die in LA but most of his other work got the shaft. Now it’s not like he’s done a ton of other amazing stuff but I would have liked to have heard something about The Guardian, Deal of the Century, his TV movies, Tales from the Crypt, etc. Some interesting revelations early on, but the final third of this book was a real disappointment.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Serdar

    Jazzy first-person tour of the career of the guy what brung youse "The Exorcist", "The French Connection", "Sorcerer" (IMO better than the original "Wages Of Fear"), "To Live And Die In L.A." (hello, WRONG-WAY CHASE UP A CALIFORNIA FREEWAY!), et many ceteras. More anecdotally entertaining than insightful, but I've been wanting to hear some of these anecdotes in the first person for decades, so surely that counts for something. Jazzy first-person tour of the career of the guy what brung youse "The Exorcist", "The French Connection", "Sorcerer" (IMO better than the original "Wages Of Fear"), "To Live And Die In L.A." (hello, WRONG-WAY CHASE UP A CALIFORNIA FREEWAY!), et many ceteras. More anecdotally entertaining than insightful, but I've been wanting to hear some of these anecdotes in the first person for decades, so surely that counts for something.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Boberg

    Maybe the best audiobook memoir currently available. Friedkin reads his own story with such zeal at times it has your adrenaline running, next you're fighting alongside him during some insane power struggle, followed by several chapters of vicarious dread over personal mistakes and artistic sabotage. You really feel you're getting the whole story and then some. Nearly mandatory listening for anyone who dreams of becoming a Filmmaker. Maybe the best audiobook memoir currently available. Friedkin reads his own story with such zeal at times it has your adrenaline running, next you're fighting alongside him during some insane power struggle, followed by several chapters of vicarious dread over personal mistakes and artistic sabotage. You really feel you're getting the whole story and then some. Nearly mandatory listening for anyone who dreams of becoming a Filmmaker.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Krause

    Friedkin takes readers back into his past to watch his rise to one of the great directors of all time, then his unlikely fall from Hollywood grace and finding peace with his place in the world. Obviously Friedkin has had many successes in his movie career, but i found the most interesting parts of the memoir to be where he looks inwards at his failures and what lead him to those places.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Axel Matfin

    Stunning. One of the best books about art that I've ever read. Friedkin's obsessive pursuit of purity in his art made him and broke him, only for him to rise from the ashes. Would absolutely recommend to anyone interested in film. Come for his account of The French Connection and The Exorcist, stay for the trials of Sorcerer and the genius of To Live and Die in LA. Stunning. One of the best books about art that I've ever read. Friedkin's obsessive pursuit of purity in his art made him and broke him, only for him to rise from the ashes. Would absolutely recommend to anyone interested in film. Come for his account of The French Connection and The Exorcist, stay for the trials of Sorcerer and the genius of To Live and Die in LA.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

    Certainly engaging and entertaining. It is heavily focused on The French Connection, The Exorcist and Sorcerer (perhaps understandably). But even then the section on the middle of these films felt like there was a lot missing - contains the slapping anecdote, but not much else on set (no gun firing, no Burstyn (or her injury), no masterbation scene chat). There's a lot absent in here, I felt. Certainly engaging and entertaining. It is heavily focused on The French Connection, The Exorcist and Sorcerer (perhaps understandably). But even then the section on the middle of these films felt like there was a lot missing - contains the slapping anecdote, but not much else on set (no gun firing, no Burstyn (or her injury), no masterbation scene chat). There's a lot absent in here, I felt.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Josh Lloyd

    Wonderful biography from Billy. If you have any interest in his films (specifically from The French Connection to To Live and Die in L.A.), then this book is for you. A majority of the book is based on his life during his highest creative point, despite the box office bombs. This man created some of the greatest moments of film ever committed to celluloid and this book was a joy to read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cara Blakeslee

    A great insight into his films. I haven't seen a lot of them so that's why I could on;y give it a 3-star review. I thoroughly enjoyed the section on the Exorcist, since it's my favorite movie. He has a very interesting take on directing. A great insight into his films. I haven't seen a lot of them so that's why I could on;y give it a 3-star review. I thoroughly enjoyed the section on the Exorcist, since it's my favorite movie. He has a very interesting take on directing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Mazerall

    I loved the shit out of this book. Makes me realize Friedkin should probably be in jail for some of the shit he did to make a film, but also makes me realize just how exceptional a filmmaker Friedkin was even though he's had some real duds. I'm a sucker for these types of memoirs. I loved the shit out of this book. Makes me realize Friedkin should probably be in jail for some of the shit he did to make a film, but also makes me realize just how exceptional a filmmaker Friedkin was even though he's had some real duds. I'm a sucker for these types of memoirs.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Will Hines

    A lovely book of great stories. But the main attraction is Friedkin's reading. He's passionate, deliberately outrageous and funny. This will grab you. A lovely book of great stories. But the main attraction is Friedkin's reading. He's passionate, deliberately outrageous and funny. This will grab you.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Martin Mcsweeney

    Outstanding memoir for anyone interested in films and filmmaking.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Yarull

    Page turner. Couldnt set it down. The ups and downs of exposing yourself in a creative medium. I could totally relate to passages, felt his pain as well as mine.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    A definite read for film lovers or biography buffs!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shubham Tiwari

    Grandpa Friedkin is the coolest filmmaker of all time.

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