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The War God's Own

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Bahzell Bahnakson of the Horse Stealer hradani never wanted to be a champion of the War God. Unfortunately, Tomanak had insisted. Even more unfortunately, Bahzell's own sense of responsibility hadn't let him say, "No." Which was how he found himself in the Empire of the Axe, where even people who didn't actively hate hradani regarded them with suspicion and fear. Of course Bahzell Bahnakson of the Horse Stealer hradani never wanted to be a champion of the War God. Unfortunately, Tomanak had insisted. Even more unfortunately, Bahzell's own sense of responsibility hadn't let him say, "No." Which was how he found himself in the Empire of the Axe, where even people who didn't actively hate hradani regarded them with suspicion and fear. Of course, that was only the start of his problems. Next, there was the Order of Tomanak, many of whom were horrified by the notion that their deity had chosen a hradani as a champion... and intended to do something about it. And assuming he survived that, he had to go home - across three hundred leagues of bitter winter snow - to face a Dark God who threatened to destroy all hradani.


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Bahzell Bahnakson of the Horse Stealer hradani never wanted to be a champion of the War God. Unfortunately, Tomanak had insisted. Even more unfortunately, Bahzell's own sense of responsibility hadn't let him say, "No." Which was how he found himself in the Empire of the Axe, where even people who didn't actively hate hradani regarded them with suspicion and fear. Of course Bahzell Bahnakson of the Horse Stealer hradani never wanted to be a champion of the War God. Unfortunately, Tomanak had insisted. Even more unfortunately, Bahzell's own sense of responsibility hadn't let him say, "No." Which was how he found himself in the Empire of the Axe, where even people who didn't actively hate hradani regarded them with suspicion and fear. Of course, that was only the start of his problems. Next, there was the Order of Tomanak, many of whom were horrified by the notion that their deity had chosen a hradani as a champion... and intended to do something about it. And assuming he survived that, he had to go home - across three hundred leagues of bitter winter snow - to face a Dark God who threatened to destroy all hradani.

30 review for The War God's Own

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I love the honor, courage, and depth these characters posses. Such a great series! 7/21/17 reread.

  2. 5 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    I began reading Sword in the South and realized it's been 15 years maybe since I've read the previous War God's series. So am having a bit of a fest or maybe a marathon as I read my way through the series once more. I do love the characters. And as ever Weber has added his own brand of wisdom, rhetoric and philosophic underpinning to the works. I began reading Sword in the South and realized it's been 15 years maybe since I've read the previous War God's series. So am having a bit of a fest or maybe a marathon as I read my way through the series once more. I do love the characters. And as ever Weber has added his own brand of wisdom, rhetoric and philosophic underpinning to the works.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Book 2 began where book 1 left off, aboard the halfling's ship. Evark Pitchallow's schooner docks in the Empire of the Ax, in Belhadan Bay, in the wintry north. Bahzell is greeted by a pompous wanna-be-knight named Vaijon, joins a chapter of the Order of Tomanak, and soon faces a world of prejudice (sadly, these offenses were only reported, not vividly portrayed, so this part was disappointing. It could have been so much more poignant). En route to Hurgrum (his Horse-Stealer hometown) Bahzell me Book 2 began where book 1 left off, aboard the halfling's ship. Evark Pitchallow's schooner docks in the Empire of the Ax, in Belhadan Bay, in the wintry north. Bahzell is greeted by a pompous wanna-be-knight named Vaijon, joins a chapter of the Order of Tomanak, and soon faces a world of prejudice (sadly, these offenses were only reported, not vividly portrayed, so this part was disappointing. It could have been so much more poignant). En route to Hurgrum (his Horse-Stealer hometown) Bahzell meets a female champion, the sword-handy Kaeritha. Vaijon journeys with Bahzell to Hurgrum, becoming more likable along the way. Brandark also comes along, with his books and his harp. They are joined for part of the journey by the wild wizard Wincet of Rum. Together, they fight bandits, Navahkan Scorpion worshippers (nasty stuff), demons, Sothoii Wind Riders, etc. Along with his scholarly friend Brandark, he learns more about the history of their people — how they were cursed with the berserker rage, their origins and traits before the Fall (calm, intelligent, beloved), and how the border wars with the Sothoii began. Sadly, another lost opportunity for vivid storytelling. I really wanted to hear more about how the Hradani FINALLY (after 1200 years) learned how to summon, master, and employ their berserker rage, but that was only reported, not portrayed at all. No lessons. No practicing. Just voila! -- they could control themselves. A fairly good book, but Weber gets wordy. He digresses, slowing the plot. Sometimes he digresses with too much internal rumination and reflection. Sometimes by too much description. For example, early in the book he stops mid-scene to describe the military formations employed by the Empire of the Axe. This went on for numerous pages, to great boring detail, yet never did Bahzell interact meaningfully with the Axemen infantry, or any other factor of the Empire's military. Not a keeper, but decent entertainment.

  4. 5 out of 5

    T. K. Elliott (Tiffany)

    This book is the sequel to Oath Of Swords, which is the first book in the series. Although you can read War God's Own on its own, it's far better to read it after Oath of Swords, as you then will understand how the two main characters (Bahzell and Brandark) have ended up where they are. War God's Own is just as entertaining as Oath of Swords; I honestly don't know which of the two books I prefer. Of the two, Oath of Swords is funnier, but War God's Own is a little more complicated. Bahzell is now This book is the sequel to Oath Of Swords, which is the first book in the series. Although you can read War God's Own on its own, it's far better to read it after Oath of Swords, as you then will understand how the two main characters (Bahzell and Brandark) have ended up where they are. War God's Own is just as entertaining as Oath of Swords; I honestly don't know which of the two books I prefer. Of the two, Oath of Swords is funnier, but War God's Own is a little more complicated. Bahzell is now a Champion of Tomanak, the War God (having signed on after being nagged into it) and he's about to start having to deal with the reality of what this means. In Book One, Bahzell and Brandark were pretty much operating as free agents; now Bahzell has Responsibilities, and he's part of the Order of Tomanak, which comes as a bit of a nasty shock to him, and also to the Order. In fact, the only person who seems to be at all happy with the situation is Tomanak himself... So Bahzell has to deal with his new colleagues' reaction to having a hradani (Weber's sort of orc-equivalent, which is what Bahzell and Brandark are) Champion foisted on them by their deity, and he also has to deal with his own misgivings about being a part of a big organisation and his responsibilities and privileges in it. Once the initial bumps are dealt with, Bahzell and Co have to return to the hradani city states to deal with one of the Dark Gods who has set up a secret temple there, and this occupies the rest of the book. As side issues, we see a bit of unofficial diplomacy and trade negotiations; the hradani are poor and backward compared to the other Races of Man, but Bahzell's father (prince of one of the city-states) has a vision for the future and the drive and intelligence to make it work. How is this going to affect, or be affected by, Bahzell's sudden and unaccountable acquisition of Religion, especially since hradani in general (having been comprehensively used and betrayed by the gods in the past) have no use for gods either Light or Dark...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennavier

    Once upon a time I loved this book with the passionate and insane love that only a teenage girl could experience. As an adult I still think it's great, even if it has some problems.The first half of the book is mostly exposition, the second half a travel narrative, with a bit of twisty war stuff shoved in at the end. It's still a ton of fun and a great example of a fantasy novel from it's time. One thing it does well is tackle really dark issues in a way that feels fairly accurate for their fict Once upon a time I loved this book with the passionate and insane love that only a teenage girl could experience. As an adult I still think it's great, even if it has some problems.The first half of the book is mostly exposition, the second half a travel narrative, with a bit of twisty war stuff shoved in at the end. It's still a ton of fun and a great example of a fantasy novel from it's time. One thing it does well is tackle really dark issues in a way that feels fairly accurate for their fictional society (accurate for a given value that includes dwarves) without being dark or making me hate humanity. In this one a big emphasis is placed on race relations and how we might know the stereotype but that doesn't mean we know the person. I'd say this is still a great book for young teens.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Flanagan

    This book, along with the first in the series actually suprised me by surpassing my expectations by a mile. I would suggest this series to everyone, and it has me intrigued by his other books.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Debrac2014

    So good! New Champions! Brandark's song is so well known! lol So good! New Champions! Brandark's song is so well known! lol

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    I enjoyed this book more then the first one in the series. It didn't feel quite so long, or as slow. It does deal a fair amount with politics, but nicely spaced out. And I enjoyed the new characters. Especially Vaijon. I could sympathize with him in the beginning of the book. I think he is probably one of the more complex characters. He knows intellectually that he should not feel superior to non noble knights. And he knows intellectually that he shouldn't be prejudice against Bahzell just becau I enjoyed this book more then the first one in the series. It didn't feel quite so long, or as slow. It does deal a fair amount with politics, but nicely spaced out. And I enjoyed the new characters. Especially Vaijon. I could sympathize with him in the beginning of the book. I think he is probably one of the more complex characters. He knows intellectually that he should not feel superior to non noble knights. And he knows intellectually that he shouldn't be prejudice against Bahzell just because he is a hradani. But he is. I love how this is handled. I love how his emotions are described in the beginning and how the emotions are dealt with, and what he turns into. I don't want to say anymore because I don't want to spoil anything, lets just say he is awesome! I also liked the addition of an awesome fighting female. Kerry was pretty cool, and I like how she had scars from fighting. I thought the interplay between her and Bahzell was pretty cool. Anyways, this book also involes Bahzell's homecoming. I enjoyed seeing his family and the other hradani react to him being a champion of Tomanak when they feel the same way about the gods as Bahzell did. They are all a little less hardheaded then Bahzell though. Weber is also extremely good as creating detailed worlds that don't follow the standard tropes. Yes, the dwarves are the metal workes and miners, but they are also heavily involved in trade and they may live under a mountain, but so do humans! The half elves, while not the villians of the story are Definitly Not Nice, and elves isolate themselves as much as possible. The origin stories of the different races are also quite interesting and honestly I would love to read more about Wencit of Rum and his Past. He is a very interesting character, what with being over 12,000 years old and all. I admit, that I have started the third book in this series and I am not liking it nearly as much. But I think it might just be a bit of an overload having just finished the first and second ones. I might have to try reading something else in between. I wouldn't suggust reading these books all at once, but to space them out because Weber includes a ton of detail about the world and it's past. Maybe a little too much at times.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Old Skool sword and destiny fantasy from a writer who normally writes Space Opera/Military sci fi. Early going it felt very much like early Eddings with a nod to Tolkein, but by the time the book kicks into the later half, I hear some of Weber's voice coming through. This was fun what with Gods fighting it out through man and chosen champions etc. Bahzell makes for an easy protagonist to like and root for. Looking forward to the sequels. Old Skool sword and destiny fantasy from a writer who normally writes Space Opera/Military sci fi. Early going it felt very much like early Eddings with a nod to Tolkein, but by the time the book kicks into the later half, I hear some of Weber's voice coming through. This was fun what with Gods fighting it out through man and chosen champions etc. Bahzell makes for an easy protagonist to like and root for. Looking forward to the sequels.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Harless

    Fine Fantasy Didn't want to put it down. A good job of worldbuilding, with strong well-developed characters. Excellent depiction of the conflicts & stresses when different cultures collide. Eagerly anticipate reading more of the series. Fine Fantasy Didn't want to put it down. A good job of worldbuilding, with strong well-developed characters. Excellent depiction of the conflicts & stresses when different cultures collide. Eagerly anticipate reading more of the series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    Yep, I am still loving this very traditional old-school fantasy series:) The main charterer is enchanting and the story is engaging... Nothing too extraordinary - just a sturdy, pleasant read:)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    Bahzell Bahnakson has reluctantly become a Champion of Tomanak, the War God. Having made a lot of people unhappy with him, he has taken ship with a bunch of halflings headed north to Belhaden, where he discovers that there is a whole order of knights of Tomanak. The knights are no more happy to have a hradani Champion in their midst than anybody else has been merely to have hradani around at all. His friend Brandark hasn't helped any by spreading his song The Lay of Bahzell Bloody-Hand around th Bahzell Bahnakson has reluctantly become a Champion of Tomanak, the War God. Having made a lot of people unhappy with him, he has taken ship with a bunch of halflings headed north to Belhaden, where he discovers that there is a whole order of knights of Tomanak. The knights are no more happy to have a hradani Champion in their midst than anybody else has been merely to have hradani around at all. His friend Brandark hasn't helped any by spreading his song The Lay of Bahzell Bloody-Hand around the taverns of the city, where it has come to the ears of the more orthodox of Tomanak's Order, and they aren't pleased to have such a ditty about a champion of their order being so well known. After he has shaken up the beliefs of the member of the Order, Bahzell feels the need to get back home to hradani territory because he has a feeling that something is going wrong there that he must fix. The Order sends along a troop to make things easier for the two hradani, but they add another Champion along the way: Kaeritha, being female, is almost as much an outsider as the hradani, but at least she's human. They also add a former acquaintance, the only living White Wizard, Wencit of Rūm. Both of them have errands in the same direction as Bahzell's destination, so they've joined the group to make travel easier. A few more adventures ensue en route, but then the real work starts. I love Bahzell and Brandark and all the other characters, except the villains of course. I really like the banter among the various friends.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This is the second book in the War God series by David Weber. In this one Bahzell Bahnakson is the new champion of the War God Tomanak. The only problem is that he is a hradani. Worse he is from the Horse Stealer clan. All the other races of man hate the hradani, especially the Horse Stealer clan. He must prove to the other races that the hradani are no longer their enemies while also trying to prevent a war and stop the Dark Gods from loosing demons upon the world. There is more action in this This is the second book in the War God series by David Weber. In this one Bahzell Bahnakson is the new champion of the War God Tomanak. The only problem is that he is a hradani. Worse he is from the Horse Stealer clan. All the other races of man hate the hradani, especially the Horse Stealer clan. He must prove to the other races that the hradani are no longer their enemies while also trying to prevent a war and stop the Dark Gods from loosing demons upon the world. There is more action in this one and a cast of new characters as well as the familiar ones from the first book. This is a good read in the fantasy genre and I recommend it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    3.5/5 The second installment in the War God series continues the adventures of Bahzell Bahnakson as he travels the land and adds more people to the Order of Tomanak. What I liked the most about this book is that it added two new characters, a badass woman warrior and a snarky apprentice who grows up throughout the novel. I think my favorite thing about this series so far is the characters as it feels as if each one is fully fleshed out and complex. I can't wait to see what new characters get adde 3.5/5 The second installment in the War God series continues the adventures of Bahzell Bahnakson as he travels the land and adds more people to the Order of Tomanak. What I liked the most about this book is that it added two new characters, a badass woman warrior and a snarky apprentice who grows up throughout the novel. I think my favorite thing about this series so far is the characters as it feels as if each one is fully fleshed out and complex. I can't wait to see what new characters get added to the ensemble in the next book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Pye Josephus Joestar

    Amazing book! every character is likeable (including the minor ones), the world building is so in depth and the writing is just phenomenal. everything in this book fully immerses you into the world and the main character is just awesome. the combat is so vividly written and the demon is so epic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Hull

    This is one of the best series I have read, re-read As the title says this series is one of my favorites, I bought it in hard bond when it was first published.The story is fun to read and keeps your attention from beginning to end..This is now my six time reading this series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rick Smith

    I love this series! Ended up reading them in reverse order, still cant get enough.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Scherer

    Good read Continues the story well and has interesting plot twists. I enjoy reading it every night before I go to bed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    LOGAN BRAMELL

    it was very interesting.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Good continuation, though felt the development arch slowed where the first book was too fast. Still good writing and entertaining

  21. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    This was another fun read. I didn't like it quite as much as the book that preceded it, but I would still highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys old school sword and sorcery. This was another fun read. I didn't like it quite as much as the book that preceded it, but I would still highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys old school sword and sorcery.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    Saving us the details of a potentially tedious voyage, this book takes up the saga of Bahzell and Brandark again as they arrive at the port of Belhadan. They are greeted at the port by a knight probationer of the Order of Tomanak, Vaijon Amerhas of Amerhas, a remarkably conceited young nobleman, though he is a well-trained and formidable fighter. Vaijon has a difficult time believing that any hradani has been made a Champion of Tomanak, and expresses his displeasure through most of the pair's st Saving us the details of a potentially tedious voyage, this book takes up the saga of Bahzell and Brandark again as they arrive at the port of Belhadan. They are greeted at the port by a knight probationer of the Order of Tomanak, Vaijon Amerhas of Amerhas, a remarkably conceited young nobleman, though he is a well-trained and formidable fighter. Vaijon has a difficult time believing that any hradani has been made a Champion of Tomanak, and expresses his displeasure through most of the pair's stay at the chapterhouse in Belhadan. Sir Charrow, head of the order, does not have a problem with Bahzell's elevation to Champion, though some others within the house to, but Bahzell squelches that problem at just the right time, and those who disagree with the War God's change of policy are roundly chastised. Tomanak also bears somewhat more personal tidings for Bahzell, telling him that at long last the Rage that has plagued his people has undergone a genetic change, and that those hradani who chose to control it, rather than to be controlled by it, will be able to do so.Bahzell also benefits from his visit by getting a thorough grounding on the background of the Order (as do we) from Sir Charrow. When his task there is done, Bahzell and Brandark journey to the dwarven city of Axe Hallo, taking Vaijon along with them as the logical next step in his training as a knight. Upon arriving in Axe Hallow, they are greeting by their old acquaintance, Wencit of Rum, who escorts them to the Temple of Tomanak in the city, where they are introduced to the Knight-General of the Order, Sir Terrian, and also to Bahzell's fellow Champion, Lady Kaeritha, a human whose induction into the ranks of champions probably caused as much consternation as the hradani's own. While in underground metropolis of the dwarves, Bahzell once again meets up with the merchant, Kilthandarknarthas, who escorts him one day to an impressive weapons and armor manufacturing plant. There he explains that the Empire of the Axe has determined to support his father's bid to unite the clans of hradani under one rule, and that he will supply Bahnak's men with the best equipment, at a reasonable cost, with the expectation that the peace he will impose will be good for trade and prosperity. Bahzell agrees to take the message back to Hurgrum to deliver to his father. After arriving in Hurgrum, it becomes obvious to Bahzell and his companions that something must be done to root out and destroy the worship of Sharna in Navahk. They mount a dangerous expedition in the dead of winter to attack the temple in that land and kill or capture the Scorpion God's followers. They run into more of a battle than planned when a centipede demon is raised against them, but together the two Champions and the young knight, Vaijon, are able to prevail. A huge diplomatic furor arises upon their return, and in the resolution of that affair, Tomanak creates the first chapter of his order that has ever existed on the Wind Plains. The Order's troops remain behind to guard the women and children when Bahnak finally departs to force a reckoning with Churnazh. A foolish young warden of the Sothoii, horse lords from the upper plains who have a traditional emnity with the hradani (Bahzell's clan is called the Horse Stealers, after all), decides this is the perfect time to invade, and the handful of Order troops are called on to stop the incursion. The cavalry arrives in the nick of time, and it appears that Bahzell will be off to visit Balthar, home city of Baron Tellian of the Sothoii, probably to build even more alliances for his father. Looking forward to Wind Rider's Oath to find out what happens next.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rena McGee

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In this sequel to the Oath of Swords, Bahzell discovers there is more to being a champion of Tomanāk than just wandering around being an paladin. It turns out that champions of Tomanāk are also the commanding officers of the Order of Tomanāk, a fact that the deity in question failed to mention somehow. (Most likely, because it would have been about a million times harder to get Bahzell to join up in the first place.) Bahzell’s first encounter with the Order is when he meets the probationary knig In this sequel to the Oath of Swords, Bahzell discovers there is more to being a champion of Tomanāk than just wandering around being an paladin. It turns out that champions of Tomanāk are also the commanding officers of the Order of Tomanāk, a fact that the deity in question failed to mention somehow. (Most likely, because it would have been about a million times harder to get Bahzell to join up in the first place.) Bahzell’s first encounter with the Order is when he meets the probationary knight who had been sent to escort him. Bahzell is less than impressed by the young knight, an arrogant young man named Vaijon Almerhas. Vaijon is similarly not to copacetic about Bahzell and spends a good portion of the book being a bigoted twit. (Vaijon is eventually cured of his massive ignorant stupidity by the power of getting his tail kicked by Bahzell, and a stern talking to from Tomanāk.) After spending some time with the Order and meeting up with a fellow paladin named Kaeritha, Bahzell and company set off for Hurgrum with an escort from the Order in tow. The journey takes Bahzell and Brandark into dwarven territory where they learn a great deal about dwarves and their abilities. (Weber takes the opportunity to do a lot of information dumping.) Bahzell meets up with the dwarven merchant who had hired him briefly in Oath of Swords and Bahzell discovers that the dwarves are willing to provide the Horse Stealers some assistance. (But they do not want to make it look like they’re helping because that would cause even more problems.) Once arriving in Hurgrum, Bahzell’s father is more or less supportive of Bahzell having become a champion, though he is not very happy about the political mess. (He would have preferred a little extra time before having to go to war.) Bahzell manages to create a hradani chapter of the Order of Tomanāk which turns out to be a good thing since a Sothoii noble has decided to take advantage of the war to attack Hurgrum. David Weber has a habit of dumping his world building notes into the story. This tends to create a great deal of “filler” that I think gets in the way of the plot because the information is not really integrated into the story, it is just there as a separate chunk of information. Even with the information dumping, The War God’s Own manages to be fun and entertaining with some great action scenes and interactions between the characters.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Amazon.com Review David Weber is best known for his Honor Harrington series of science fiction books, but with Oath of Swords he began a lighthearted fantasy saga centered around Bahzell Bahnakson. Bahzell is the reluctant champion of the War God Tomanak (a.k.a. the Sword of Light, the God of Justice, and Captain-General of the Gods of Light) and a member of the Horse Stealer clan hradani. Being a hradani puts Bahzell on a rung of the social ladder somewhere south of deplorable and just w Amazon.com Review David Weber is best known for his Honor Harrington series of science fiction books, but with Oath of Swords he began a lighthearted fantasy saga centered around Bahzell Bahnakson. Bahzell is the reluctant champion of the War God Tomanak (a.k.a. the Sword of Light, the God of Justice, and Captain-General of the Gods of Light) and a member of the Horse Stealer clan hradani. Being a hradani puts Bahzell on a rung of the social ladder somewhere south of deplorable and just west of offensive, making him an unlikely champion for any god, much less Tomanak. Although this relationship can be trying at the best of times, it's stretched perilously thin in The War God's Own, where Bahzell is called upon by Tomanak to fight the minions of Sharna, the Dark God. This is a fun, swashbuckling story that moves along nicely, managing to be both entertaining and unassuming at the same time. --Craig Engler From Booklist With the sequel to Oath of Swords (1995), the new series by the creator of the popular Honor Harrington yarns has been promoted to hardcover. In it, Bahzell Bahnakson and Brandark, two hradani (i.e., humanoid giants with foxlike ears), take several more steps in their venture to advance Bahzell's father's plans for uniting and civilizing the hradani and the war god Tomanak's plans for opposing the grim, dark god Shama. Along the way, the pair acquire several companions, including a young knight who has to be forcibly cured of prejudice against hradani, and give readers what amounts to a guided tour of a well-realized fantasy world, most of whose elements are genre staples. Still, Weber deftly fleshes out such concepts as the underground cities of the tale's dwarves, the immortality of its elves, the power of its demons to destroy those who summon them (and name-spelling errors be damned), and so on. Even the Scots flavor of hradani speech patterns charms more often than not. Roland Green

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dave Rhoden

    Great fun and NOW we have a super heroine added to the cast.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    A good sequel to Oath of Swords. Plenty of action and characters who continue to grow into their responsibilities.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    The War God’s Own is book 2 in the series, and continues the story from Oath of Swords. This book is just as enjoyable as the first. Although there does not seem to be as much action in this book, the story is strong. We are introduced to many new characters in this book that are just as interesting as the original players. Our hero, Bazhell Bahnakson, has finally embraced his calling and is following it wholeheartedly. Joining him are new brothers and sisters in the Order of Tomanāk, as well as The War God’s Own is book 2 in the series, and continues the story from Oath of Swords. This book is just as enjoyable as the first. Although there does not seem to be as much action in this book, the story is strong. We are introduced to many new characters in this book that are just as interesting as the original players. Our hero, Bazhell Bahnakson, has finally embraced his calling and is following it wholeheartedly. Joining him are new brothers and sisters in the Order of Tomanāk, as well as his feisty accomplice Brandark. As they head off on a quest to root out evil, they receive assistance along the way from both human and dwarf alike. And let’s not forget the wizard, Wencit of Rūm (one of my favorite characters)… he always adds an interesting twist. Again, this book may not have quite as much action as the first. However, I do recommend it. It is definitely a great continuation of the story. Am looking forward to the next one….

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    As with the first, and probably more so, I really liked this book. There are a few rough points, but Bahzell seems to have himself more under control. This time, he is having to deal with a lot of outside problems rather than his inner landscape. My particular favorite part is the growing friendships among the core group in this. There is a scene just as they're about to arrive in his homeland that I loved just for that. My biggest complaint about the book is that my copy has such freaking small As with the first, and probably more so, I really liked this book. There are a few rough points, but Bahzell seems to have himself more under control. This time, he is having to deal with a lot of outside problems rather than his inner landscape. My particular favorite part is the growing friendships among the core group in this. There is a scene just as they're about to arrive in his homeland that I loved just for that. My biggest complaint about the book is that my copy has such freaking small font. I would rather have a thicker book with normal font, thank you very much. As always in places, Weber can get tedious in his explanations, but never fear, there is plenty of action and a nice body count to help things along.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    A fun high fantasy series told from the point of view of a warrior of a hradani tribe, viewed by humans as, essentially, ogres--not really intelligent, certainly not civilized, best to raid them annually to keep the population down. The fallout when a hradani is chosen as a champion of the War God is interesting. Its fun to read a fantasy novel narrated from such a different perspective, and there is enough description of the cultures and civilizations that they encounter over the course of the A fun high fantasy series told from the point of view of a warrior of a hradani tribe, viewed by humans as, essentially, ogres--not really intelligent, certainly not civilized, best to raid them annually to keep the population down. The fallout when a hradani is chosen as a champion of the War God is interesting. Its fun to read a fantasy novel narrated from such a different perspective, and there is enough description of the cultures and civilizations that they encounter over the course of the trilogy to make the world feel real. Also, its great to read a fantasy novel where the hero interacts with, and even argues with, the god they have been chosen to represent.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ottox

    I like the good old-fashioned set-up with wizards, gods, different races etc. But the writing is not the best, characters have little depth or personality, and there is little tension or action - much less than in the first volume of the series. (view spoiler)[ How could there be tension, by the way, when the hero struts around being worshiped and pontificating or bantering (awkwardly) most of the time, and is guaranteed to easily overcome every adversity he encounters (not that there is much) beca I like the good old-fashioned set-up with wizards, gods, different races etc. But the writing is not the best, characters have little depth or personality, and there is little tension or action - much less than in the first volume of the series. (view spoiler)[ How could there be tension, by the way, when the hero struts around being worshiped and pontificating or bantering (awkwardly) most of the time, and is guaranteed to easily overcome every adversity he encounters (not that there is much) because he has a god at his beck and call? (hide spoiler)]

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