web site hit counter Don Quixote, U.S.A. - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Don Quixote, U.S.A.

Availability: Ready to download

Arthur Peabody Goodpasture is the descendant of an old and respected Boston family. He has, however, been a disappointment to his family in several ways: In appearance he is insignificant looking both in face and figure; he went to the University of Florida instead of Harvard where his forbears had been mainstays of the varsity crew for generations, and he studied agricult Arthur Peabody Goodpasture is the descendant of an old and respected Boston family. He has, however, been a disappointment to his family in several ways: In appearance he is insignificant looking both in face and figure; he went to the University of Florida instead of Harvard where his forbears had been mainstays of the varsity crew for generations, and he studied agriculture instead of pointing himself toward a career in banking, bonds, or law. To say the least he is not apparently the stuff from which heroes are fashioned. As an agricultural expert specializing in fruit farming, Arthur becomes a Peace Corps volunteer and is assigned to the Republic of San Marco in the Caribbean. This weak-chinned Don Quixote soon acquires his Sancho Panza in the person of a rascally eleven-year-old boy, Pepe, who makes a bargain to be paid 400 pesos each time he saves Arthur's life. (The payments mount alarmingly!) The island's dictator thinks he can use Arthur to obtain military supplies with which to wipe out the band of guerillas in the hills who oppose his corrupt dictatorship. Failing in this the dictator decides to murder Goodpasture and cause an international incident by blaming it on the guerillas. This, he reasons, will bring the U.S. in to help stamp out the rebels. This plan also backfires (with Pepe's help, of course) and Goodpasture is taken prisoner and when they see he is a harmless eccentric he is appointed chief cook for the guerillas. From then on Arthur's life becomes a series of misadventures through which he moves serenely and from which he generally emerges unscathed (again with Pepe's assistance) until he surprisingly finds himself the guerillas' leader. Following one of the funniest bloodless revolutions imaginable Arthur Peabody Goodpasture ends up as Arthur el Gavilan, the new dictator of San Marco. "His strength was as the strength of ten because his heart was pure."


Compare

Arthur Peabody Goodpasture is the descendant of an old and respected Boston family. He has, however, been a disappointment to his family in several ways: In appearance he is insignificant looking both in face and figure; he went to the University of Florida instead of Harvard where his forbears had been mainstays of the varsity crew for generations, and he studied agricult Arthur Peabody Goodpasture is the descendant of an old and respected Boston family. He has, however, been a disappointment to his family in several ways: In appearance he is insignificant looking both in face and figure; he went to the University of Florida instead of Harvard where his forbears had been mainstays of the varsity crew for generations, and he studied agriculture instead of pointing himself toward a career in banking, bonds, or law. To say the least he is not apparently the stuff from which heroes are fashioned. As an agricultural expert specializing in fruit farming, Arthur becomes a Peace Corps volunteer and is assigned to the Republic of San Marco in the Caribbean. This weak-chinned Don Quixote soon acquires his Sancho Panza in the person of a rascally eleven-year-old boy, Pepe, who makes a bargain to be paid 400 pesos each time he saves Arthur's life. (The payments mount alarmingly!) The island's dictator thinks he can use Arthur to obtain military supplies with which to wipe out the band of guerillas in the hills who oppose his corrupt dictatorship. Failing in this the dictator decides to murder Goodpasture and cause an international incident by blaming it on the guerillas. This, he reasons, will bring the U.S. in to help stamp out the rebels. This plan also backfires (with Pepe's help, of course) and Goodpasture is taken prisoner and when they see he is a harmless eccentric he is appointed chief cook for the guerillas. From then on Arthur's life becomes a series of misadventures through which he moves serenely and from which he generally emerges unscathed (again with Pepe's assistance) until he surprisingly finds himself the guerillas' leader. Following one of the funniest bloodless revolutions imaginable Arthur Peabody Goodpasture ends up as Arthur el Gavilan, the new dictator of San Marco. "His strength was as the strength of ten because his heart was pure."

52 review for Don Quixote, U.S.A.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    El ratón that roared I struggled to get into this book, but about a quarter of the way in it clicked. The narrator's voice was an acquired taste. The protagonist, a naive Peace corps volunteer with a passion for for bananas, has the luck of Inspector Clouseau and a squadron of guardian angels that help him not just survive the perils of his island assignment, but transform into a Peace Corps Übermench. A good heart, an innocent mind, and the luck of Caesar can take you far. It's a funny, clever ta El ratón that roared I struggled to get into this book, but about a quarter of the way in it clicked. The narrator's voice was an acquired taste. The protagonist, a naive Peace corps volunteer with a passion for for bananas, has the luck of Inspector Clouseau and a squadron of guardian angels that help him not just survive the perils of his island assignment, but transform into a Peace Corps Übermench. A good heart, an innocent mind, and the luck of Caesar can take you far. It's a funny, clever tale, worth the investment.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Bunn

    Absolutely splendid book. Highly humorous. This is basically what you would get if Woody Allen was consistent with his wit. Actually, Allen loosely adapted this book for his Bananas film. Skip the film, read the book. Tropical dictators, insurrectionists, bananas, true love, scheming women, clueless men. This book has it all. I think, however, it's out of print, so copies can be rather expensive. Absolutely splendid book. Highly humorous. This is basically what you would get if Woody Allen was consistent with his wit. Actually, Allen loosely adapted this book for his Bananas film. Skip the film, read the book. Tropical dictators, insurrectionists, bananas, true love, scheming women, clueless men. This book has it all. I think, however, it's out of print, so copies can be rather expensive.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Another wonderful comic novel, which Woody Allen swiped much from to make "Bananas". Another wonderful comic novel, which Woody Allen swiped much from to make "Bananas".

  4. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    I first read this as a kid in the Reader's Digest Condensed Book form. The whole book is better. It's the story of Arthur Peabody Goodpasture, wimpy disappointment to his Puritan-derived parents, who joins the Peace Corps out of agricultural idealism and is sent to an island nation in the Caribbean. If you don't mind stereotypes about Latin America and want to read a funny adventure story this is it. Marked down only for ethnic/regional prejudices and "Great White Savior" elements - granted, the I first read this as a kid in the Reader's Digest Condensed Book form. The whole book is better. It's the story of Arthur Peabody Goodpasture, wimpy disappointment to his Puritan-derived parents, who joins the Peace Corps out of agricultural idealism and is sent to an island nation in the Caribbean. If you don't mind stereotypes about Latin America and want to read a funny adventure story this is it. Marked down only for ethnic/regional prejudices and "Great White Savior" elements - granted, the white savior is the most unlikely type imaginable. What Arthur really wants to do is promote the cultivation of Dwarf Cavendish bananas. The regime has in mind a different destiny for him. Los Descalzos, the guerrilla revolutionaries, have yet different plans for Arthur, as do the Russians. All the while he innocently wanders through these tangled webs promoting the blind eye corm form of banana culture.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Morefield

    This was a story of a comedy of errors. Very different, but I enjoyed it. It was fun and funny. Arthur Goodpasture goes to a foreign country to help as a peace corp worker and through hook and crook and luck ends up as president and saves the country and becomes its hero. It was a good story. Cute, different, and solidly interesting!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Still good I read this book many years ago when I was too young to follow all the sly humor in it, but it has stuck with me. I was glad to find it again as an adult and enjoy it again fully. The humor is quite timeless and I enjoyed it again enough that I finished it in two sittings . I will be looking now for other books by the same author.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Intre Ngowtrakul

    Interesting character, feel like watching a protagonist in the pink panther movie. I like how his optimistic thought and cleverness get through his hard time which seems like he never feel like it a hard time at all.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susa

    Highly entertaining and well written. Wide audience appeal.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Loretta

    I read this book years ago and loved it then. That hasn't changed. Arthur Peabody Goodpasture enters the country of San Marcos as a member of the Peace Corps. He is an expert on the Dwarf Canvadish banana. He runs into the revolutionary El Gavalian. By sheer luck, he becomes someone he never dreamed he would. I read this book years ago and loved it then. That hasn't changed. Arthur Peabody Goodpasture enters the country of San Marcos as a member of the Peace Corps. He is an expert on the Dwarf Canvadish banana. He runs into the revolutionary El Gavalian. By sheer luck, he becomes someone he never dreamed he would.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Ha ha! I've never read the full version (it's out of print), but my family collects all the Reader's Digest condensed volumes with this in it that they can find. It's just a hilarious little book that is great fun to read and leaves you laughing. I'd recommend it to anyone who wants something fun to read. Ha ha! I've never read the full version (it's out of print), but my family collects all the Reader's Digest condensed volumes with this in it that they can find. It's just a hilarious little book that is great fun to read and leaves you laughing. I'd recommend it to anyone who wants something fun to read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Atta Sun

    หนังสือของริชาร์ด พาวล์เรื่องแรกเลยที่อ่าน จากนั้นก็ตามหางานเขียนของเค้ามาอ่านเกือบจะครบทุกเล่ม เนื้อเรื่องของฟ้าใหม่ที่ซานมาโก้ (ในชื่อไทย) เกี่ยวกับอาสาสมัครพีซคอร์ฺปที่จับพลัดจับผลูได้ผจญภัยในแบบที่คนอื่นไม่เคยเจอ อ่่านแล้วสนุกและตลกในแบบยุคสงครามเย็น เดี็๋ยวนี้จะหาอารมณ์ขันแบบนี้ในหนังสือได้ยากมากแล้ว

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Kulyarit

    First book of Richard Powell i read. The story made my day. So far i have read this book for 4 times least. The place in the fiction seems dangerous to stay that i think about what if i am there? My life would end up different. Many times the main character is incredibly safe by luck which is terrifying but hilarious.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    Love this book!!!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Valissa

    "Go with God, my friend, and keep looking over your shoulder." "Go with God, my friend, and keep looking over your shoulder."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Diego

    Fun, entertaining, and I can't get enough of it. Totally a "read-again" book! Fun, entertaining, and I can't get enough of it. Totally a "read-again" book!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I read the Reader's Digest Condensed version. This was a fun, quick read. I read the Reader's Digest Condensed version. This was a fun, quick read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    CherylRob

    It's called Don Quixote, USA...not Dom. It's called Don Quixote, USA...not Dom.

  18. 4 out of 5

    PeaR L

    อ่านแผ่นดินนี้เราจองก็ชอบมากแล้ว อ่านเล่มนี้ยิ่งชอบขึ้นไปอีก ถ้าให้หกดาวได้ก็ให้ไปแล้ว

  19. 4 out of 5

    Frank W. Jackson

    Great satire Very funny. The story line is timeless. Politics has not changed. Let us hope that our leaders manage to muddle through as did Goodpasture

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lunair

    This was so much fun! Along the same lines as the man who knew too little, but funnier.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Blaine Morrow

    Puff pastry as literature: not too filling, but tasty and pleasant. Don't expect great revelations and definitely don't look too closely: this is meant to be fun and, as dessert, it works. Puff pastry as literature: not too filling, but tasty and pleasant. Don't expect great revelations and definitely don't look too closely: this is meant to be fun and, as dessert, it works.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    The clothes and organizations are dated, but the people are the same. This gives the story a universal quality that had me cheering, laughing and shaking my head...sometimes at once.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael M. Byram

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

  25. 5 out of 5

    Inmylife Ididitmyway

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert Andersson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tony Manicka

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  31. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

  32. 4 out of 5

    Gail

  33. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  34. 5 out of 5

    Inook

  35. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  36. 4 out of 5

    Mitchy

  37. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  38. 4 out of 5

    Donia

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  40. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Farlow

  41. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

  43. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  44. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  45. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

  46. 5 out of 5

    Zjourney

  47. 4 out of 5

    Herb

  48. 5 out of 5

    Gabriela

  49. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  50. 4 out of 5

    Teaberry

  51. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

  52. 5 out of 5

    Laura

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.