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Teaching and Christian Practices: Reshaping Faith and Learning

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In Teaching and Christian Practices several university professors describe and reflect on their efforts to allow historic Christian practices to reshape and redirect their pedagogical strategies. Whether allowing spiritually formative reading to enhance a literature course, employing table fellowship and shared meals to reinforce concepts in a pre-nursing nutrition course, In Teaching and Christian Practices several university professors describe and reflect on their efforts to allow historic Christian practices to reshape and redirect their pedagogical strategies. Whether allowing spiritually formative reading to enhance a literature course, employing table fellowship and shared meals to reinforce concepts in a pre-nursing nutrition course, or using Christian hermeneutical practices to interpret data in an economics course, these teacher-authors envision ways of teaching and learning that are rooted in the rich tradition of Christian practices, as together they reconceive classrooms and laboratories as vital arenas for faith and spiritual growth.


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In Teaching and Christian Practices several university professors describe and reflect on their efforts to allow historic Christian practices to reshape and redirect their pedagogical strategies. Whether allowing spiritually formative reading to enhance a literature course, employing table fellowship and shared meals to reinforce concepts in a pre-nursing nutrition course, In Teaching and Christian Practices several university professors describe and reflect on their efforts to allow historic Christian practices to reshape and redirect their pedagogical strategies. Whether allowing spiritually formative reading to enhance a literature course, employing table fellowship and shared meals to reinforce concepts in a pre-nursing nutrition course, or using Christian hermeneutical practices to interpret data in an economics course, these teacher-authors envision ways of teaching and learning that are rooted in the rich tradition of Christian practices, as together they reconceive classrooms and laboratories as vital arenas for faith and spiritual growth.

30 review for Teaching and Christian Practices: Reshaping Faith and Learning

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Most often, the integration of faith and learning in my experience has taken the form of a cognitive exercise asking how Christian doctrine relates to the questions and practices of a particular field of inquiry. This volume, reflecting research funded by the Valparaiso Project on the Education and Formation of People in Faith, pursues the question of whether it is possible to weave into educational pedagogy Christian practices congruent with course material that form in the participants virtues Most often, the integration of faith and learning in my experience has taken the form of a cognitive exercise asking how Christian doctrine relates to the questions and practices of a particular field of inquiry. This volume, reflecting research funded by the Valparaiso Project on the Education and Formation of People in Faith, pursues the question of whether it is possible to weave into educational pedagogy Christian practices congruent with course material that form in the participants virtues and outlooks reflecting a Christian perspective on the discipline in question. The faculty contributing to this volume spanned the spectrum from nutrition to physics to philosophy to economics. Practices included such things as sharing meals together (nutrition), using the labyrinth as a backdrop for the progression of topics in physics, to charitable reading in literature to biblical interpretive practices as a lens for the interpretation of econometric data. One of the assumptions in all this is that we become what we practice. One challenge in this particular setting was creating sufficient opportunities for practice where the disciplines could work deeply into a person's life. When a form of examen was used in personal journalling, this can work. When mid-day prayers are incorporated into a class that only meets twice a week--this had less impact. One of the striking results was that the practices changed the teachers as well as the students. Equally, there were numerous instances of students making connections between practices and course material--as well as many failures to draw the connection. One factor that bears more study is the influence of prior experience--how deeply embedded are these practices and an understanding of their significance in the lives of students? I was reading this book while also reflecting on the significance of personal and communal disciplines of attentiveness to God and their shaping influence on the academic as well as spiritual formational experience of graduate students. Attentiveness to and humility before the biblical text, for example, seems connected to a similar attentiveness and humility before the object of one's study. All of this reinforced a deep and long-standing conviction that the love of God and the love of learning are deeply intertwined.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Richey

    This is excellent. It's difficult accessing books with multiple authors, not every chapter is of equal value or quality, but almost every chapter was thoughtful, helpful, insightful and inspiring. The chapters by David Smith, James K.A. Smith, Kurt Schaefer, and most of all Rebecca DeYoung were the highlights. The night I began reading this book I had an awful bout of insomnia as my imagination went into overdrive on how I can be a more "Christian" and "whole-personed" teacher. I was struck with This is excellent. It's difficult accessing books with multiple authors, not every chapter is of equal value or quality, but almost every chapter was thoughtful, helpful, insightful and inspiring. The chapters by David Smith, James K.A. Smith, Kurt Schaefer, and most of all Rebecca DeYoung were the highlights. The night I began reading this book I had an awful bout of insomnia as my imagination went into overdrive on how I can be a more "Christian" and "whole-personed" teacher. I was struck with a feeling of how far I fall short of what I can be, but empowered to imagine the potential richness of a Christian education. This book is, in a sense, not a finished project, but the beginning of an experiment and a conversation about what Christian conversation should look like. I will be returning to this over the summer as I think about the 2016-17 schoolyear with the intention to enter this project, and hopefully the conversation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I read Paul Griffiths's essay "From Curiosity to Studiousness: Catechizing the Appetite for Learning" (pp. 102-22) as part of the Conyers Scholars group at Baylor University. We were scheduled to have dinner with Dr. Griffiths on Nov. 2, 2013, but I had to go to a funeral in South Carolina. On Feb. 6, 2014, I read the Introduction ("Practices, Faith, and Pedagogy") by David I. Smith and James K.A. Smith, and David I. Smith's chapter titled "Reading Practices and Christian Pedagogy: Enacting Chari I read Paul Griffiths's essay "From Curiosity to Studiousness: Catechizing the Appetite for Learning" (pp. 102-22) as part of the Conyers Scholars group at Baylor University. We were scheduled to have dinner with Dr. Griffiths on Nov. 2, 2013, but I had to go to a funeral in South Carolina. On Feb. 6, 2014, I read the Introduction ("Practices, Faith, and Pedagogy") by David I. Smith and James K.A. Smith, and David I. Smith's chapter titled "Reading Practices and Christian Pedagogy: Enacting Charity with Texts." Our Conyers group discussed these chapters at dinner. I missed our March 6 meeting because of a conference, but we were assigned the essays by Rebecca DeYoung ("Pedagogical Rhythms: Practices and Reflections on Practice") and Carolyne Call ("The Rough Trail to Authentic Pedagogy: Incorporating Hospitality, Fellowship, and Testimony into the Classroom"). 26-27: 39-40: singing old hymns

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erin Oeth

    This book provides some practical examples of ways to integrate faith into pedagogy. Instead of focusing on content, it looks at ways faculty live out their faith and use their faith in structuring their courses. It spurred interesting conversation and new brainstorming about my courses - how can I encourage reading with charity, how can I demonstrate hospitality to my students, how does my faith influence the way I go about teaching and about building relationships with students.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mar

    A highly philosophical read, geared for teachers at a post-secondary level. It deals with integrating Christian practices and rhythms into classroom activities. It encourages a focus on spirituality and faith and moral character formation rather than strict pedagogy and content.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Sauskojus

    Super helpful, as I'm thinking about teaching next year. Particularly appreciated James K. A. Smith's intro, and David I Smith's chapter on teaching for re-reading thoughtfully. Super helpful, as I'm thinking about teaching next year. Particularly appreciated James K. A. Smith's intro, and David I Smith's chapter on teaching for re-reading thoughtfully.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    Read this for a “book study” at work. I really enjoyed most of the essays presented and there are some great ideas for integrating Christian practices into teaching.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Thoughtful approaches to Christian pedagogical methods. Naturally in an edited volume some chapters are stronger than others and that's certainly true here but each chapter has something useful in it. There is some repetition which becomes a little frustrating after a while but all in it's a very stimulating volume. Thoughtful approaches to Christian pedagogical methods. Naturally in an edited volume some chapters are stronger than others and that's certainly true here but each chapter has something useful in it. There is some repetition which becomes a little frustrating after a while but all in it's a very stimulating volume.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Patchin

    As with any composite work, this collection of essays on how to teach as a Christian is a mixed bag. The book's focus is an important area for development in Christian education but I only found about half of the essays productive. As with any composite work, this collection of essays on how to teach as a Christian is a mixed bag. The book's focus is an important area for development in Christian education but I only found about half of the essays productive.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy Bessin

    Like many books with chapters written by different individuals, I enjoyed some parts of this book more than others. Definitely provided good food for thought for curriculum design.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Himes

  12. 5 out of 5

    Victor Labenske

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim Belcher

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kris Rolls

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

  16. 4 out of 5

    Raphael Haeuser

  17. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Parkison

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dave McNeely

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Peifer

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robert Dean

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  22. 4 out of 5

    Trey Kennedy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Frans Nieuwenhuyzen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stockfish

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katie Stahl

  26. 5 out of 5

    Farris Johnson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Lake

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt G.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zach Hedges

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