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Death at the Old Hotel

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Tensions are high and the dangers multiply as New York City bartender and man-about-the-mean-streets Brian McNulty---always a sucker for the plight of the little guy---joins forces with a motley crew of workers from the old Savoy Hotel.   McNulty has once more run afoul of the powers that be in the New York City hotel and restaurant industry and finds himself exiled to a dow Tensions are high and the dangers multiply as New York City bartender and man-about-the-mean-streets Brian McNulty---always a sucker for the plight of the little guy---joins forces with a motley crew of workers from the old Savoy Hotel.   McNulty has once more run afoul of the powers that be in the New York City hotel and restaurant industry and finds himself exiled to a down-at-the heels hotel in, for him, the far reaches of civilization---Manhattan, west of Eighth Avenue. Not long into his tenure, a vicious attack on one of his fellow bartenders raises the stakes and puts everyone on edge, and it doesn't take much for the hotel manager to provoke the outraged workers into a strike. Once they hit the bricks, all hell breaks loose, and it isn't long until the bodies start to fall.   The cops focus in on two of McNulty's pals, a renegade Irishman and a pretty, young waitress from Brooklyn, both with closets full of secrets and buckets full of problems of their own. McNulty thinks the cops, as usual, are barking up the wrong tree, but that's the least of his problems. The hits in this particular instance have angered the gods of gangsterland, and someone has determined that McNulty is a problem.


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Tensions are high and the dangers multiply as New York City bartender and man-about-the-mean-streets Brian McNulty---always a sucker for the plight of the little guy---joins forces with a motley crew of workers from the old Savoy Hotel.   McNulty has once more run afoul of the powers that be in the New York City hotel and restaurant industry and finds himself exiled to a dow Tensions are high and the dangers multiply as New York City bartender and man-about-the-mean-streets Brian McNulty---always a sucker for the plight of the little guy---joins forces with a motley crew of workers from the old Savoy Hotel.   McNulty has once more run afoul of the powers that be in the New York City hotel and restaurant industry and finds himself exiled to a down-at-the heels hotel in, for him, the far reaches of civilization---Manhattan, west of Eighth Avenue. Not long into his tenure, a vicious attack on one of his fellow bartenders raises the stakes and puts everyone on edge, and it doesn't take much for the hotel manager to provoke the outraged workers into a strike. Once they hit the bricks, all hell breaks loose, and it isn't long until the bodies start to fall.   The cops focus in on two of McNulty's pals, a renegade Irishman and a pretty, young waitress from Brooklyn, both with closets full of secrets and buckets full of problems of their own. McNulty thinks the cops, as usual, are barking up the wrong tree, but that's the least of his problems. The hits in this particular instance have angered the gods of gangsterland, and someone has determined that McNulty is a problem.

40 review for Death at the Old Hotel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I am likely not the target audience for this book, but I was willing to give it a try to fulfill a prompt for Stina's Challenge 2018, because of the setting in a hotel. Definitely more of a hard-boiled, masculine vibe than I go for. Brian McNulty is an Irish bartender in the big city, as well as a divorced father of a teenager, and a bit of a lost soul. He is willing to believe in his friends, sometimes knowing that it may be more than they deserve, and willing to lend a helping hand doing who k I am likely not the target audience for this book, but I was willing to give it a try to fulfill a prompt for Stina's Challenge 2018, because of the setting in a hotel. Definitely more of a hard-boiled, masculine vibe than I go for. Brian McNulty is an Irish bartender in the big city, as well as a divorced father of a teenager, and a bit of a lost soul. He is willing to believe in his friends, sometimes knowing that it may be more than they deserve, and willing to lend a helping hand doing who knows what. When a strike at the hotel is followed by the murder of the manager, Brian as strike leader and his friends and fellow strikers are the suspects. The mob is backing the union leaders and the union leaders are screwing the employees and the cops and the mob are willing to get violent if it gets things done. There is profanity and random brutality and drug use and lechery. I suppose the mystery aspect of the story was decent, although I was distracted by the other elements. The characters weren't unlikeable, but they also weren't anyone I'd want to hang out with, except perhaps the stray cat. All of which explains why it took me so long to read such a relatively-short book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carol Turner

    Not as good and the 42nd street library series.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christine Ingles

    New york bartender cun detective... Actually kinda different but worth it

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maddy

    RATING: 3.5 Brian McNulty is a bartender who's been exiled to the nondescript Savoy Hotel in New York City after a run-in with one of the union organizers at a classier spot. It seems like everyone associated with the bars and the union is on the take. When one of the union honchos embarrasses a cocktail waitress, the entire working staff go out on strike. His fellow bartender and friend Barney is savagely attacked as a result of his flirtation with a waitress named Betsy whose abusive husband is RATING: 3.5 Brian McNulty is a bartender who's been exiled to the nondescript Savoy Hotel in New York City after a run-in with one of the union organizers at a classier spot. It seems like everyone associated with the bars and the union is on the take. When one of the union honchos embarrasses a cocktail waitress, the entire working staff go out on strike. His fellow bartender and friend Barney is savagely attacked as a result of his flirtation with a waitress named Betsy whose abusive husband is a cop. It falls on McNulty to organize the strikers and keep the picket line going. And now he's in a world where everything is against him. The union chiefs have a vested interest in keeping their enterprise going, so McNulty is a target for them. Then there's the garden variety gangsters who are also involved and who threaten him as well. When the cop is murdered, the prime suspect is the wife and Brian's bartender friend. He tries his best to prove that neither of them committed the murder, no matter how justifiable. But nobody wants to believe a bartender over the law enforcement authorities. In spite of the violence around him, McNulty manages to retain a core of sweetness that makes him a very sympathetic character. He takes in the cop's wife and child because he is worried about what will happen to them, not to make any romantic advances. He has a marked lack of confidence in his own abilities, both as a union organizer and as a father. Some of the best scenes in the book are the ones where he is interacting with his son, sometimes failing miserably at the whole fatherhood gig. But his heart is in the right place, and that makes it work. As a bartender, he has a heightened sense of what makes people tick and an innate sympathy for others. Given that, it was hard for me to understand why McNulty mulishly clung to the idea that one of the union chiefs was the genesis of all the troubles in the book. It seemed pretty obvious that this character was just a cog in the bigger machine. All of the suspicions that Brian had about him were very unconvincing. Lehane has done a great job of depicting the Irish community and the inner workings of the union. The fact that Brian McNulty is not the typical Knight in Shining Armor makes him an appealing protagonist.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Valance

    Trouble is brewing at Brian McNulty's new gig at the Savoy Hotel. Fellow barman and union rabble-rouser Barney Saunders suspects the hotel's new manager is cashing in on corruption between union bigwigs and organized crime. An all-out strike turns violent when flirty waitress Betsy Tierney rushes to commiserate with Barney on the picket line, and her jealous husband, one of New York's finest, attacks Barney, who's then loyally defended by Brian. That evening, the hotel manager and Betsy's cop hu Trouble is brewing at Brian McNulty's new gig at the Savoy Hotel. Fellow barman and union rabble-rouser Barney Saunders suspects the hotel's new manager is cashing in on corruption between union bigwigs and organized crime. An all-out strike turns violent when flirty waitress Betsy Tierney rushes to commiserate with Barney on the picket line, and her jealous husband, one of New York's finest, attacks Barney, who's then loyally defended by Brian. That evening, the hotel manager and Betsy's cop husband are both murdered, and Barney becomes the prime suspect. McNulty investigates, suspecting a union middleman of both murders. One of the 14 best mysteries I read in 2007.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

    If you don't mind a little Irish brogue, then try Death at the Old Hotel. McNulty is a bartender at the Savoy Hotel. His friend Barney does the same until someone cuts off the tips of his fingers - luckily the wrong hand. Then the hotel workers go on strike and a murder occurs. So follow McNulty as he tries to figure it all out. If you don't mind a little Irish brogue, then try Death at the Old Hotel. McNulty is a bartender at the Savoy Hotel. His friend Barney does the same until someone cuts off the tips of his fingers - luckily the wrong hand. Then the hotel workers go on strike and a murder occurs. So follow McNulty as he tries to figure it all out.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    I enjoyed this book. It was well-written, well-plotted with some beautiful imagery. That said, books with political backgrounds (for example, union wersus management, Orange versus Green, etc.) don't hold my interest as well as a good whodunit can. The real draw for me was the main character. I enjoyed this book. It was well-written, well-plotted with some beautiful imagery. That said, books with political backgrounds (for example, union wersus management, Orange versus Green, etc.) don't hold my interest as well as a good whodunit can. The real draw for me was the main character.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is the last in the Brian McNulty series. Probably my least favorite of the three. Too many characters and at times convoluted. Still enjoy Brian though. Would love to see more in the series, but I think he stopped with this one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laurence

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cyber

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bec

  13. 4 out of 5

    Drachechen Templin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  15. 5 out of 5

    Molly

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kamini Madansingh

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joshua J.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Curt Buchmeier

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christy

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Whelan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather Paxton

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marianne Minnich

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elinor

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jean

  32. 5 out of 5

    Beiza

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

  34. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  36. 5 out of 5

    Danny Rentz

  37. 5 out of 5

    J

  38. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  39. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

  40. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

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