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30 review for Flowers in the Rain and Other Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessika

    Rosamunde Pilcher has just become one of my new favorite authors. This is the first book of hers I've read, and not to use a cliche (I'm going to anyway), but her writing is so comfortable. It's cozy, like curling up in my favorite big comfy chair with a steaming cup of tea. She paints perfect pictures for her readers so they can envision the scenery she describes. She writes about everything that is familiar and welcoming about the different seasons and settings. "A Walk in the Snow" and "Skate Rosamunde Pilcher has just become one of my new favorite authors. This is the first book of hers I've read, and not to use a cliche (I'm going to anyway), but her writing is so comfortable. It's cozy, like curling up in my favorite big comfy chair with a steaming cup of tea. She paints perfect pictures for her readers so they can envision the scenery she describes. She writes about everything that is familiar and welcoming about the different seasons and settings. "A Walk in the Snow" and "Skates" had me longing for winter and Christmastime when summer (my favorite season) has hardly begun! Even her characters are wonderful. They're ordinary people, and I really got the feeling that I've met them before. Their lives and emotions are easy to relate to, and I ended up walking away with a favorite character or two. When I found out that she writes love stories, I was pretty hesitant about this book. But I have to say, I adore the kind of love story she writes.It isn't always necessarily between couples (sometimes mother-daughter, mother-son, sister-sister, parents-children, etc). And she doesn't write that mushy-gushy, harlequin crap. Everything is completely PG--I would hand this book to a 13-year-old with no qualms. Her stories are sometimes predictable yet heartwarming, and the endings always made me smile. Some stories have happy endings; others suggest a happy ending while ultimately leaving it up to the reader to decide. My favorite stories were "The Doll House," "The Blackberry Day," "The Red Dress," "A Girl I Used to Know," "A Walk in the Snow," "Cousin Dorothy," "Whistle for the Wind," and "Skates." I love short stories, but now I'm intrigued to read one of her novels. Personally, I can't figure out why she isn't more popular than she is. Her stories and characters are familiar and perfect for a rainy day. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys love stories or is looking for something nice and comfy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    1992, January 1 oddly, the only story I remember is not listed as being previously published, but I'm almost positive I read it in Good Housekeeping years ago. 2017, August 29 It is cool, and raining, and I really shouldn't start any of my fun monster, murder, or ghost reads for several days yet. So this is about the farthest I can go from my own shelves. That, and I just love reading about people living in big shabby houses and having a lot of dogs. 1992, January 1 oddly, the only story I remember is not listed as being previously published, but I'm almost positive I read it in Good Housekeeping years ago. 2017, August 29 It is cool, and raining, and I really shouldn't start any of my fun monster, murder, or ghost reads for several days yet. So this is about the farthest I can go from my own shelves. That, and I just love reading about people living in big shabby houses and having a lot of dogs.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I listened to an audio version of the book narrated by Davina Porter. I thought she was perfect. I just loved this collection of short stories. I’ll come back to this book from time to time over the years. It was absolutely delightful with the different settings between the Scottish and English countryside. It’s a set of sweet, heart warming little reads. Most are of a romantic nature but there are some other stories as well. It felt like being transported. It was a nice getaway and a good distr I listened to an audio version of the book narrated by Davina Porter. I thought she was perfect. I just loved this collection of short stories. I’ll come back to this book from time to time over the years. It was absolutely delightful with the different settings between the Scottish and English countryside. It’s a set of sweet, heart warming little reads. Most are of a romantic nature but there are some other stories as well. It felt like being transported. It was a nice getaway and a good distraction. Just lovely little stories, nice and PG, small village life for the most part. It’s a fairly full collection, but I wish there were more, I wished it wouldn’t end. Now I’m really envious of my GR friends who live over there. 😁😁

  4. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    So I read this one after the other collection of short stories by Pilcher. I wish I had waited. Maybe that is coloring my review. I just thought that the majority of the stories in this one didn't work for me at all. Also, I got really tired of reading stories about broken engagements. They could all be summed up as so and so chose this person as second best. I don't think I would run off with anyone that just broke up with someone, so maybe that's my personal bias working. "The Doll's House" (3 So I read this one after the other collection of short stories by Pilcher. I wish I had waited. Maybe that is coloring my review. I just thought that the majority of the stories in this one didn't work for me at all. Also, I got really tired of reading stories about broken engagements. They could all be summed up as so and so chose this person as second best. I don't think I would run off with anyone that just broke up with someone, so maybe that's my personal bias working. "The Doll's House" (3.5 stars)- A young boy missing his dead father, goes through with a promise to make a doll house for his younger sister. While that would be enough, he also has to deal with knowing that a local man is interested in his mother to marry and he hopes that she doesn't. Pilcher leaves us with enough to know how the story is going to end when we get finished with this story. "Endings and Beginnings" (3 stars)-This one read as the longest story in this collection. A man (Tom) goes home for his Aunt Mabel's 75th birthday. He tries to get his girlfriend to come along and she declines. While home, he makes the acquaintance of his cousin or I don't know cousin once removed Kitty. Kitty's life has been a bit of a mess and now Tom seems intrigued by it and her. "Flowers in the Rain" (1 star)-I really didn't like this one at all. A woman returns back to a place her family spent holidays at. She's there (supposedly) to say hello to Mrs. Farquhar, but really she wants to know about her grandson, Rory. I think it just bugged me since it read as if the main character had put her life on hold for Rory. And though I was reading him as saying goodbye (he won't see her again) I think she was deluding herself a bit thinking he would come back to Scotland. It just read as depressing. "Playing A Round With Love" (2 stars)-I see this married couple getting divorced eventually. A man who is married acts surprised that his wife would not want him to take a whole day off to go golfing on the weekends. "Christabel" (1 star)-Another common theme in Pilcher's short stories seems to be young women/men who realize that they shouldn't marry someone like days before their wedding. I didn't see why Christabel or her grandmother were so impressed/loved the character of Sam. He was not developed enough for a short story for me to care about a tall. "The Blackberry Day" (2 stars)- A woman (Claudia) travels to her childhood friend's home to get away from the fact that a man she has been in a long term relationship with for years does not seem to be any closer to proposing marriage. I hated how this one ended since it just seemed that Claudia was going to choose whatever as long as she wasn't alone. "The Red Dress" (1 star)-I was so confused by this story. I don't know if the main character was angling for an affair or what. She seemed way too intense/involved with the gardener who was married with kids. "A Girl I Used to Know" (3 stars)-An okay story. A woman finds out she can actually do things that she is scared to do. All of this winds up being about her being afraid her boyfriend will dump her if she doesn't ski. "The Watershed" (4 stars)-I liked this one. A married woman who is about to celebrate her pearl anniversary, is wondering if she and her husband should stay in their big home. She is thinking about downsizing and moving to something small since their children have homes and lives of their own. "Marigold Garden" (2 stars)-Another broken engagement story. "Weekend" (3 stars)- A young woman is afraid to get married thinking it could mean the end of her ability to be self-sufficient. Or at least that is what I took from this story. "A Walk in the Snow" (3 stars)- A young girl realizes that the young boy she's in love with has moved on from her. The story ends in such a way though you realize she's already thinking of someone else. "Cousin Dorothy" (5 stars)-My favorite in this collection. A widowed woman trying to do her best for her daughter on her wedding day. I would have maybe shaken my daughter since the girl acted like a brat pretty much the entire story. Her husband's cousin rides to the rescue. "Whistle for the Wind" (2 stars)-Another broken engagement story. "Last Morning" (4 stars)-A woman prepares for her son's wedding day. "Skates" (3 stars)- A young girl finally realizes that someone in her family sees her for who she is, not what she can be. It was a pretty weak story (IMHO) to end on in this collection.

  5. 5 out of 5

    magdalena dyjas

    If I ever need to wrap my mind and my heart in a warm blanket of comfort, I pick Rosamunde Pilcher's book, where the girl will always end up with the right man, and where all misfortunes swiftly turn into good luck and happiness. Unrealistic, but cosy and comforting. And with good psychological portraits of the characters. These stories are no different, each one of them could've been turned into a full blown novel, they are like little teasers of books that will never be written or that could'v If I ever need to wrap my mind and my heart in a warm blanket of comfort, I pick Rosamunde Pilcher's book, where the girl will always end up with the right man, and where all misfortunes swiftly turn into good luck and happiness. Unrealistic, but cosy and comforting. And with good psychological portraits of the characters. These stories are no different, each one of them could've been turned into a full blown novel, they are like little teasers of books that will never be written or that could've been written if Pilcher was still alive... 3.5*

  6. 5 out of 5

    Linda Palazzolo

    I adore Pilchers writing, however this collection of shorter stories did not hold my interest. I learned I prefer to sink down into her full length novels that take me away.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anna Illyashyk

    Gosh, I do not know where to begin. This was the book I judged by the cover and all the positive reviews. This book just did not sit well with me on so many levels. I feel like this book is for straight, white, family oriented people who watched too many of the old Disney movies as kids. Many of the short stories in the book were almost copies of each other so that is just another thing wrong with it. The writing itself is interesting but I cannot reconcile how one sided the stories are! There are Gosh, I do not know where to begin. This was the book I judged by the cover and all the positive reviews. This book just did not sit well with me on so many levels. I feel like this book is for straight, white, family oriented people who watched too many of the old Disney movies as kids. Many of the short stories in the book were almost copies of each other so that is just another thing wrong with it. The writing itself is interesting but I cannot reconcile how one sided the stories are! There are no LGBT people, which out of 16 stories you would think that not all of them would be so alike! Also it seems like all the women in the stories were very family oriented and wanted to have children. Really? I am a woman and I could not identify with this book not one bit. In fact it seemed to just follow all the stereotypes that make me cringe. Such as a man making a woman’s life complete. Really? The knight in shinning armor vibe? That’s just the kind of idea that makes people stay im toxic relationships. Whatever is wrong with someone’s life cannot be made responsibilty of someone else. I appreciate that some people might really like this book but I did not at the least. This book seems to aim for a heart warming and realistic depiction of life but only of the people that seem to be ‘convenient’ for the author. Way to keep the rest of us non traditional people in the shadows!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Quite a mixed bag here, or something for everyone. Although I didn't find all the stories interesting, Pilcher's writing is still wonderful, even in short stories, and lets you get right under the skin of some of her protagonists. Quite a mixed bag here, or something for everyone. Although I didn't find all the stories interesting, Pilcher's writing is still wonderful, even in short stories, and lets you get right under the skin of some of her protagonists.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Love her . I always feel like I have had a cup of tea and heard a good story from an old friend.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Annie Kate

    After rereading this book for the umpteenth time, I realized that if I ever write fiction, I want to write like this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mela

    A charming collection of lovely short stories. If I hadn't known her novels I would be compelled to try them now. The stories had much in common, but on the other hand, each one had something unique so I read one after another not feeling that I read the same story over again. Perhaps love is more of a constant emotion than I'd ever realised. It becomes a part of you. A heartbeat; a nerve-end. (...) It's like being with the other half of myself. Perfect, if you look for heartwarming stories about l A charming collection of lovely short stories. If I hadn't known her novels I would be compelled to try them now. The stories had much in common, but on the other hand, each one had something unique so I read one after another not feeling that I read the same story over again. Perhaps love is more of a constant emotion than I'd ever realised. It becomes a part of you. A heartbeat; a nerve-end. (...) It's like being with the other half of myself. Perfect, if you look for heartwarming stories about love, friendship, reunions. There is no way to read them and not feel hope and faith in humans. Perfect, if you want to feel cozy (no drama, action, alpha-heroes, etc.) reading short love stories (most of them are love stories).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Burkhart

    Rosamunde Pilcher was a very prolific romance writer who only died last year. I don't know how I missed not reading any of her books until now, although I am not generally a big fan of romance novels and short stories. I found this collection of short stories to be delightful. They felt very old fashioned, as if set in the first half of the twentieth century. Full of charm and delicacy the book was a nice change from most books that we come across nowadays. Light and lovely! Rosamunde Pilcher was a very prolific romance writer who only died last year. I don't know how I missed not reading any of her books until now, although I am not generally a big fan of romance novels and short stories. I found this collection of short stories to be delightful. They felt very old fashioned, as if set in the first half of the twentieth century. Full of charm and delicacy the book was a nice change from most books that we come across nowadays. Light and lovely!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Warren Hall

    My review of this collection will change as I read more of it. The Doll's House: Initially, I thought this story was going to be rather feminist (or feminist-adjacent) because of the title's resemblance to A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. I was wrong. Instead, the tale is more akin to a genteel story about a child secretly building a doll house for his sister. In any case, that is a synopsis. I ultimately don't know how this story is supposed to be read, and, if I'm being honest, I don't care; we My review of this collection will change as I read more of it. The Doll's House: Initially, I thought this story was going to be rather feminist (or feminist-adjacent) because of the title's resemblance to A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. I was wrong. Instead, the tale is more akin to a genteel story about a child secretly building a doll house for his sister. In any case, that is a synopsis. I ultimately don't know how this story is supposed to be read, and, if I'm being honest, I don't care; we as readers do as much of the interpretation as the author, or no criticism could exist at all. That being said, I think my synopsis is rather... lacking. I find the tale to be about the psychological condition of a boy named William who, ten months before, had his father die. Let me explain. William's father's 'final' wish (rather: the only one we learn of) is to give a doll house to his daughter, Miranda. This links the doll house inextricably to this father figure. The problem of reacting to his father's death - of putting the loose ends back together - is thus the opening action of the work. But William just cannot do it. He wants to keep it a surprise, but his mother totally knows; however, his 7 year old sister does not - she can't even understand that she won't be getting a doll house because of her father's death. Anyway, William needs some help, but he has nobody to ask. This brings us to our second stage. Instead of just the will of the father we're dealing with, we now miss the father. His "clever fingers" now cannot help his son, and his work shed stands empty. The problem has been fully prepared. After William grieves over his dead father, he races out of his room, calls his dog Loden, and escapes into his neighbor's yard. A new neighbor, actually, and one which our child doesn't know yet. They meet, their dogs become friendly, and soon the two share lunch. William is given beer, and the man, Mr. Wray, is described as removing the gloom from out the dark house (a house which William has never really noticed before in all it's aged-ness) through his sheer energy. (One point of this is treating William as if he were an adult.) Eventually, Wray learns about the house, he asks if he could help, William agrees, and they both go over to Will's place to put together a doll house. It appears as though this new person helps extricate his father's death - who helps fight the pain of it. Wray, who markedly treats William as an adult (the learning of death is rather adult, isn't it?), and who near the end is hinted at being the next lover of his mother, could be this person. So, I guess I attempted to analyze the condition of William (a name I have said too much of by now), but one thing that might strike as puzzling is how we never really glimpse at his actual grief. He is preoccupied. "Most of the time William tried not to think too much about his father, but every now and then, memories would come surging back, like pictures, clean-cut, and with very sharp edges." He is at his last vestiges of this grief, and Wray, through helping fulfill the original father's final wishes, ends them. Rather, he makes the family happier again, gives them the warmth of companionship, as these final lines dictate: "He [Wray] pushed the door open with his foot. The room was filled with evening sunlight and there was something in the air, so tangible it almost could be touched. Companionship, maybe. Ease. But excitement, too. All the time in the world." The final words refer back to Wray's statement that he can fix up the old house he is moving into, and he has a long time to do it. One might think that he and his new friends have a long time together as well. Endings and Beginnings: This story was more clearly thematic than the previous one. It was also far more romantic, if still genteel, and probably a bit too hung up on the need for a man. One thing that struck me as odd was how much it resembled anime romance. Like, we have two childhood friends (also cousins) who, after a long period of time, meet once more. The woman of the bunch has issues to deal with, and it just so happens that the man interacts in just such a way as to help with them in a dramatic scene, where - of course - the woman cries. He even hugs her, surprising her with his affection (view spoiler)[ this love is characterized more as a pain at seeing his mental image of her change: she isn't as tough she is might appear (hide spoiler)] . It's all rather strange. There are two major female characters in the work, Mabel and Kitty, who can be compared and contrasted. Mabel is going to be 75, she has already married, and her husband is dead; now, she lives alone, with a number of dogs, in a castle quickly breaking down. It is through her indomitable spirit that she has been able to live within the cold claws of this edifice, but by the end of the story we learn that she's recently chosen to give it up. She doesn't want to be an anxiety upon those she loves when she gets old, and she believes that there are proper times to give things up. Kitty is much younger than Mabel. Unlike Mabel, the house in which she will eventually live will be remodeled by her, instead of previous owners; her marriage ended in divorce. Mabel is majorly accepted by the family in which she lives - her eccentricities causing people to think she will never marry, not disapproval - but Kitty is not; instead, Kitty gains the disapproval of her family, which causes many of her major story beats. (view spoiler)[ She marries Terrence because of rebellion, and when our protagonist comes along, she pushes back against him until he realizes that he must accept her ideas as well as say his own - he must not tell her what to do (hide spoiler)] Mabel and her are similar in spirit, if not in emotion, or in story-arch. I think that the story fails to convey a final theme. It is probably intentional. At the end, the title is re-stated, making the finale seem important, but how Tom (the protag) conceptualizes it seems strange. He thinks of Mabel leaving the castle for more comfort, and Kitty's son moving into a cottage rather than Kitty herself stubbornly sleeping on the battlements of the castle. This is framed as an ending and a beginning. The question here, to me, is how much agency Kitty has. Is it Kitty losing power over her life, or is she accepting something new and helpful in? I think that she has agency. Her position is that she doesn't want Tom to pity her, thus stay with her out of pity. "I wouldn't want you to feel that I wasn't able to be on my own... be independent." Tom replies that she is floundering, and to her saying he doesn't understand, that he does. To me, he is saying that her excuses aren't good enough now, that his avowal that he could only "admire, or be envious, or even be maddened" disprove them. Is this new beginning, then, the acceptance of companionship under her ordering? I hope it is. In any case, I thought it was interesting, and far better than the first story, at least in theory. (view spoiler)[ Strangely, the concept of marriage is largely unquestioned in this work. Sure, we have Mabel, who is now a widow, but her marriage was good. We have Kitty, whose marriage fails, but upon first meeting Tom she tells him he's getting along in age and needs to marry! Tom also feels this way. Some deviancy from this perspective is accepted - Mabel is originally characterized as not capable of marriage - but it is not concretely so (hide spoiler)] Flowers in the Rain: For whatever reason, this story is the title one. It is short, and contains an atmosphere I like (dark and wet), which seems to be the intent. Lavinia appears to be a flower in the rain, waiting for "warmth," so I believe I understand the title. Others, too, might be flowers in this context: Rory Farquhar seems most likely. What is the rain, though? On one level, it is probably the dying Mrs. Farquhar. On another, almost certainly higher one, this rain is the separation between the two lovers. Lavinia is hinted throughout the opening paragraphs as going to the Big House for motives different from simply seeing a friend - motives apparently confirmed when she spends nigh on all the time there with Rory (only going to see Mrs. Farquhar after they've completely finished talking for the day). I didn't really like this story. The literary technique (the motif of recognition, sharp attention to setting) are good; it is not poorly written in these aspects. But I think that the continuance of a need for a man, or rather love or companionship, is becoming stale. Remarks such as "masculine" feet somehow denoting a person as a non-nurse are dated or poorly worded, as well. I find the commentary on Mrs. Bellows and her husband under-developed at best and bigoted at worst. Mr. Bellows being mocked for saying "tight lines" is absurd; he is a "manic fisherman," and this personality trait showing itself here is fine. Why do they care? Mrs. Bellows is a tougher subject. We're probably not meant to hate her. When we meet her, she tries to convince Lavinia to visit her instead of Mrs. Farquhar. She might be jealous, or she might actually believe what she says; this is something we don't know - Rory has one opinion, Lavinia another - so that, instead, we are probably meant to see her as annoying. In both cases she values social interaction above mourning (for jealousy: she wants that attention/control; for real concern: she really thinks "its a waste of time [to visit]" but still genuinely cares about Mrs. Farquhar), which is constrasted with Lavinia's position when she gives her statement about simply wanting to say goodbye. It isn't bad writing, but I'd like to know more about Mrs. Bellows. This was the weakest one so far. Playing a Round With Love: I think this story is about marriage. Specifically, it is about a monogamous couple, one of which has integrated herself, the other not so much. Amanda does have her own traits, but she has given up her job to become a housewife, and it isn't through a wish to have independence that she balks. She wants to be with him more often, and she lies and evades because she wants to be sure about her pregnancy.The two have fights, and she can act coldly; however, to me, the story frames her as a flawed moral good. Julian, after all, eventually succumbs to her wishes fully. His friend, Tommy, appears to be a snake in the bushes under this framework. He wants Julian to keep to his old ways and put his foot down, as it were; to be independent as well as married. Importantly, in the beginning, Amanda does not care about Julian golfing - it is only after he fails to prioritize their marriage do things fail. I didn't really like this story. I felt some of it was unbelievable. Julian's suspicion of Amanda is hilarious in how sudden it comes about, the humor only dulled by the rage he feels through it, and his wish to own or feel entitled to another set in stone. Homicide might be the end of this marriage, their only hope divorce; however, the story differs from my interpretation in this respect, instead giving us the happier ending, symbolized by him putting away his golf bag (safely, for the story only says the first couple of years of marriage need be so strict). I don't like the strictness of marriage portrayed here, although I'm sure it can happen this way, or that people might wish to totally prioritize it. For me, though, I value independence more than the marriage itself, and would hope my partner thinks the same. Christabel: This story is similar to the last one in that it vindicates it. Marriage is to be trapped, and the choice of who to marry is choosing the one you wish to be trapped with; that sounds pretty similar to the strict view on marriage I explained above. Marriage itself is almost assumed a given here, too. Alongside this, the story heavily implies that a wife is similar to a domestic (Mrs. Lowyer says that Sam, in need of domestic help, should hire a housekeeper or marry, for instance). Lowyer's daughter-in-law is also "in her element" in making house and decoration, and in this framework, Christabel saying that she'd make Sam's house comfortable implies it as well. At one point, Lowyer jokes that women should only marry older men, then tells us it's a joke, but it corresponds to many of the pairings within this whole book. Sam is characterized as hard working to the point of bodily deterioration, yet he is still amiable; he also wants the best for Christabel, which I find a welcome change compared to Julian. His fault is not asking or telling, and he could benefit from the proverb: "all anyone can do is say no." I found this story to be particularly conservative in wording. For instance, in describing a disco scene, the dancers are "grotesque in their whirling, flashing lights," differentiated from Christabel and Sam as not being coupled; there is a certain dislike of modernness that appeared in the subtext of a lot of what occurred. I found it better than the last one. The Blackberry Day: I was excited for this one. It came out the year of the book's release, and thus would reflect the up-to-date author's opinions (well, at the time of publication, anyway). It didn't disappoint. It does have all the common bits and pieces of the many preceding it. Claudia differentiates herself from others - well, others being men - by being incapable of living without her partner; she wants that type of marriage. Her need of this companionship is emphasized in many choice scenes. When she gets off her train, she feels sad for not having a person to meet her; and when she skips going to Spain, it is because she doesn't feel it work it without her lover Giles. Yet he is a cheater, and he cheats. She feels nothing but relief from this, and defends Giles by noting that someone had to end their relationship; that she only wishes he had enough courage to tell her. And, unlike other stories herein, she is given a kiss by her friend, but it ends rather romantically, without any nods to future events, aside from finishing off the day splendidly. I like that ending; Claudia is free, and she can do what she wants with her freedom. It is the dawn of the rest of her life.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I've read this collection of short stories several times. I would love to live in one of Rosamunde Pilcher's Scottish or Cornish villages. The stories explore universal themes like love and marriage, friendship, birth, death, and dreams coming true. She writes about all types of characters, children, young women, bachelors, newlyweds, older gentlemen and mothers and fathers. All of the characters are likeable and full of life. My favorite story is "The Blackberry Day." Claudia, who has been enta I've read this collection of short stories several times. I would love to live in one of Rosamunde Pilcher's Scottish or Cornish villages. The stories explore universal themes like love and marriage, friendship, birth, death, and dreams coming true. She writes about all types of characters, children, young women, bachelors, newlyweds, older gentlemen and mothers and fathers. All of the characters are likeable and full of life. My favorite story is "The Blackberry Day." Claudia, who has been entangled with the elusive Giles for years, retreats to the Scottish highlands after he cancels their planned vacation to Spain. Returning to the village where she spent many happy childhood summers, she reevaluates her love life and reconnects with a charming bachelor she had known as a young girl.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jane Eyre Rochester

    I thoroughly enjoyed this collection of short stories. Rosamunde Piltcher has the unique ability to transfer the reader in her lovely world in such a magical way! Even though her stories are no big deal, they are so sweet and well-written featuring sensitive people, descriptions of nature and her basic virtue is the love that is spread throughout her entire work. I simply loved those stories. The descriptions of picturesque sights, of emotions, of everyday people is so vivid like looking at a pe I thoroughly enjoyed this collection of short stories. Rosamunde Piltcher has the unique ability to transfer the reader in her lovely world in such a magical way! Even though her stories are no big deal, they are so sweet and well-written featuring sensitive people, descriptions of nature and her basic virtue is the love that is spread throughout her entire work. I simply loved those stories. The descriptions of picturesque sights, of emotions, of everyday people is so vivid like looking at a peaceful painting hanging on the wall of your living room, simply mesmerasing!!!!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Janis

    Rosamunde Pilcher's books just plain make me feel good. Perhaps they're sentimental, even sappy, but I feel like being a better person when I read them. This collection of short stories may not have been as good as some of her novels, but a number of the stories brought a tear to my eye. Guess I'm just a sentimental fool. Rosamunde Pilcher's books just plain make me feel good. Perhaps they're sentimental, even sappy, but I feel like being a better person when I read them. This collection of short stories may not have been as good as some of her novels, but a number of the stories brought a tear to my eye. Guess I'm just a sentimental fool.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    A compilation of short stories, many of which Rosamunde wrote for Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1950's. They take you back to a time where true love could be found in a look or holding of hands. This is so Brittish in writing that a cuppa tea and a biscuit should accompany the reader to a pretty garden to read. Abosolutely loved it refreshing for a change. A compilation of short stories, many of which Rosamunde wrote for Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1950's. They take you back to a time where true love could be found in a look or holding of hands. This is so Brittish in writing that a cuppa tea and a biscuit should accompany the reader to a pretty garden to read. Abosolutely loved it refreshing for a change.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    A wide range of relationships are tackled in this collection of lovely short-stories: friendship, love, marriage. Happily ever after endings make them an enjoyable reading. Sentimental and deep, they gave me a pleasant feeling, stirring the romantic in me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christina Desalvo

    Rosamunde Pilcher is my comfort food. When I am feeling down, I read her stories and feel better. They are not complex adventures in far off places. They are just regular people living their lives and dealing with everyday problems we can all relate to.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    Sweet, romantic short stories. Pilcher is a good writer and and can really draw you into her storylines in a short amount of time. Nice read on a lazy day.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I think I am just not that in to short stories. Cute, but too short for any real development

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    This is a very enjoyable series of short stories. One theme that runs through them - the women tend to marry men who are at least 15 years older than themselves. Curious.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tiffiny

    A whole bunch of teaser stories! I would love to see at least half of them expanded into novels!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle's Book Club Review

    Flowers in the Rain is a short story and the name of the book of 16 short stories by British author, Rosamunde Pilcher. This short review is for the short story, Flowers in the Rain. Dark and sad, Lavinia Hunter briefly returns to Lachlan for a quick visit to see an old friend who is sick. Her emotions are reminiscent of days gone by and not unrequited love, but unexplored love, what might have been, what could have been had circumstances been different. This story and some of the other short sto Flowers in the Rain is a short story and the name of the book of 16 short stories by British author, Rosamunde Pilcher. This short review is for the short story, Flowers in the Rain. Dark and sad, Lavinia Hunter briefly returns to Lachlan for a quick visit to see an old friend who is sick. Her emotions are reminiscent of days gone by and not unrequited love, but unexplored love, what might have been, what could have been had circumstances been different. This story and some of the other short stories in this book seem to be moments pulled out of larger stories. There was no real ending or maybe I just wanted more. Maybe that’s the point: the point of open ended possibilities. Short stories might work for those who don’t have the time to read through a long book. I’m a fan of Rosamunde Pilcher, and more Pilcher is better for me. It’s missing Pilcher’s descriptions of the sea and far off lands, since there is no room for them. Normally, I wouldn’t go out of my way for short story books, but this is one of the few Pilcher books that came to my collection when my mother died. Had this not happened, I might never have discovered this author. I have not read every short story in this book, but knowing Pilcher’s style, they are women’s fiction of romance, nostalgia and emotion. If this moves you, find your quiet place and start reading or listening.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Oh dear. Where to start. I wanted to read some of Pilcher's work, following my reading of her obituary after her recent death. My local library did not have her best-known work, The Shell Seekers, so I checked out this volume of short stories along with one of her later novels [Winter Solstice]. I started this book of stories after having finished Winter Solstice and I put it aside, as it bore too many similarities to the novel. Then I got the flu and wanted some light reading, so I picked up th Oh dear. Where to start. I wanted to read some of Pilcher's work, following my reading of her obituary after her recent death. My local library did not have her best-known work, The Shell Seekers, so I checked out this volume of short stories along with one of her later novels [Winter Solstice]. I started this book of stories after having finished Winter Solstice and I put it aside, as it bore too many similarities to the novel. Then I got the flu and wanted some light reading, so I picked up the book of stories again. First off, these are cookie-cutter stories that were first published in woman's magazines during the 1980s. If you have read one, you have literally read them all. In fact, if you have read one, you have probably, functionally, read all of her novels. She has only one story to tell, and she tells it over and over again. I do have great admiration for those who write good short stories - it is a challenging genre and not all will succeed at this. F. Scott Fitzgerald, to my mind, was the best. What never ceases to amaze me is that this type of writing is what Sylvia Plath aspired to - her dream was to write short stories for the slick women's magazines. So glad she did not succeed at this, and instead gave us her incendiary poetry.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kerith

    Reading Rosamunde Pilcher's short stories is like going on a trip to a happy beautiful place that you know will always be there waiting for you. She has the knack of taking the quotidian and turning it into beauty - no, showing you that the quotidian IS beauty. Just the very description of getting up in the morning, opening your curtains to see the sun and drinking a cup of coffee - a jeweled moment. She writes about death and birth, families, home, and love with great wisdom and simplicity. In Reading Rosamunde Pilcher's short stories is like going on a trip to a happy beautiful place that you know will always be there waiting for you. She has the knack of taking the quotidian and turning it into beauty - no, showing you that the quotidian IS beauty. Just the very description of getting up in the morning, opening your curtains to see the sun and drinking a cup of coffee - a jeweled moment. She writes about death and birth, families, home, and love with great wisdom and simplicity. In this compilation - the first and last stories really stand out. "The Doll's House" and "Skates" - read it just for these stories of children dealing with loss or the trials of growing up, and finding allies to help them do so. But don't forget the ones in between.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kea4

    I’ve had a few Rosamunde Pilcher books sitting around and ‘Flowers In the Rain & Other Stories’ happen to be the first one I grabbed off the bookshelf. Is it the best introduction to Rosamunde Pilcher? Hard to say but this is a charming collection of short stories that were originally published for ‘Good housekeeping’ back in the day (or so the introduction told me). All the stories end on a positive note with some stories being far better than others. Most deal with finding lost loves, new roman I’ve had a few Rosamunde Pilcher books sitting around and ‘Flowers In the Rain & Other Stories’ happen to be the first one I grabbed off the bookshelf. Is it the best introduction to Rosamunde Pilcher? Hard to say but this is a charming collection of short stories that were originally published for ‘Good housekeeping’ back in the day (or so the introduction told me). All the stories end on a positive note with some stories being far better than others. Most deal with finding lost loves, new romance aka clean romance, garden settings, weddings etc. Are they predictable? Most of the time they are but if your looking for an easy read on a hot summer day give this book a try. https://theworldisabookandiamitsreade...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Susan Schimmel

    Such a simply marvelous book, my darlings! OK, admittedly tongue in cheek comment, but I really did enjoy Flowers in the Rain. In the light of all that’s going on in the world, it was lovely to escape into some of Rosamund Pilcher’s delightful stories and enter a universe where everyone has a slightly upper class British accent (to my ears anyway) and is either fairly wealthy or once was and now owns a crumbling mansion. A universe where young women of 20, with no apparent education, are able to Such a simply marvelous book, my darlings! OK, admittedly tongue in cheek comment, but I really did enjoy Flowers in the Rain. In the light of all that’s going on in the world, it was lovely to escape into some of Rosamund Pilcher’s delightful stories and enter a universe where everyone has a slightly upper class British accent (to my ears anyway) and is either fairly wealthy or once was and now owns a crumbling mansion. A universe where young women of 20, with no apparent education, are able to obtain interesting jobs and routinely marry men a good 15 - 20 years their senior.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Payne

    I think I might have read this book years ago, but during this Covid-19 'house arrest' I was getting desperate for a good book. Pilcher never disappoints! As my English neighbor would say, 'this was the bits and pieces on the editor's floor that they swept up into a book!' Were the 'short stories' or were they beginnings of a book that the story line didn't have enough to make it. No matter what, it was fun to read something that took me away from mandatory face masks in public and obsessive han I think I might have read this book years ago, but during this Covid-19 'house arrest' I was getting desperate for a good book. Pilcher never disappoints! As my English neighbor would say, 'this was the bits and pieces on the editor's floor that they swept up into a book!' Were the 'short stories' or were they beginnings of a book that the story line didn't have enough to make it. No matter what, it was fun to read something that took me away from mandatory face masks in public and obsessive hand washing!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Yen Lian

    First time reading Rosamunde's work, wonderful writing of lush British scenery. It's a sorts of stories about laid back countryside, home living and small town people. An unforgettable beautiful prose: Blinks of golden light lit the trees, and cloud shadows raced across the face of the hills, chasing each other out to the distant blue line of the sea. And "We'll need to whistle for the wind." I didn't know this old adage exists too in Western countries and was documented down in this book. I thoug First time reading Rosamunde's work, wonderful writing of lush British scenery. It's a sorts of stories about laid back countryside, home living and small town people. An unforgettable beautiful prose: Blinks of golden light lit the trees, and cloud shadows raced across the face of the hills, chasing each other out to the distant blue line of the sea. And "We'll need to whistle for the wind." I didn't know this old adage exists too in Western countries and was documented down in this book. I thought it was something my grandparents taught me! This is a great book!

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