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Born Liars: Why We Can't Live without Deceit

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Our attitudes to lying are confused and contradictory - you might even say, self-deceiving. On the one hand we hate lies, and liars. On the other, we all indulge in fibs, tall tales and fantasies. If lying is wrong, why do we all do it - both to others, and to ourselves? In Born Liars, Ian Leslie argues that, far from being a bug in the human software, lying is central to Our attitudes to lying are confused and contradictory - you might even say, self-deceiving. On the one hand we hate lies, and liars. On the other, we all indulge in fibs, tall tales and fantasies. If lying is wrong, why do we all do it - both to others, and to ourselves? In Born Liars, Ian Leslie argues that, far from being a bug in the human software, lying is central to who we are; that we cannot understand ourselves without first understanding the dynamics of deceit. Using a vivid, panoramic style, he explores the role of deception and self-deception in our childhoods, our careers, and our health, and the part played by lies - both black and white - in art, advertising, sport, politics and war.


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Our attitudes to lying are confused and contradictory - you might even say, self-deceiving. On the one hand we hate lies, and liars. On the other, we all indulge in fibs, tall tales and fantasies. If lying is wrong, why do we all do it - both to others, and to ourselves? In Born Liars, Ian Leslie argues that, far from being a bug in the human software, lying is central to Our attitudes to lying are confused and contradictory - you might even say, self-deceiving. On the one hand we hate lies, and liars. On the other, we all indulge in fibs, tall tales and fantasies. If lying is wrong, why do we all do it - both to others, and to ourselves? In Born Liars, Ian Leslie argues that, far from being a bug in the human software, lying is central to who we are; that we cannot understand ourselves without first understanding the dynamics of deceit. Using a vivid, panoramic style, he explores the role of deception and self-deception in our childhoods, our careers, and our health, and the part played by lies - both black and white - in art, advertising, sport, politics and war.

30 review for Born Liars: Why We Can't Live without Deceit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tweedledum

    A fascinating and entertaining blend of ethics, sociology, politics, anthropology, religion, science.... ( To name but a few of the academic fields touched on in this book. )Having studied ethics... ( a long time ago) , gone into "theory of mind" and Simon Baron Cohen's thoughts on this ( Zero Degrees of Empathy: A New Theory of Human Cruelty in considerable depth, and having to daily grapple with the difficulties those with ASDs have with developing social understanding and the difficulties man A fascinating and entertaining blend of ethics, sociology, politics, anthropology, religion, science.... ( To name but a few of the academic fields touched on in this book. )Having studied ethics... ( a long time ago) , gone into "theory of mind" and Simon Baron Cohen's thoughts on this ( Zero Degrees of Empathy: A New Theory of Human Cruelty in considerable depth, and having to daily grapple with the difficulties those with ASDs have with developing social understanding and the difficulties many of them have discriminating between fantasy and reality, never mind social, media, or political deceptions intentional or otherwise and the very real distress this often causes , made this a very absorbing read for me. Leslie intersperses complex ideas with great illustrations both contemporary and historical and from different cultures which helps to keep the reader's interest while considering another subtle twist to the tale. I thought Leslie's conclusions .... that lying and deception are born out of the creativity of the human brain and are both necessary and intrinsic to the mind enabling us essentially to make decisions on how to act ....were well summarised. All in all the book really helped me think again about these complex ideas and clarify how to share some of them more effectively with some of the young people and their families that I work with.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Edmund

    In Born Liars Ian Leslie dissects deceit through the lens of law, psychology and culture. It's a fascinating ride, but I wouldn't recommend the central section which covers self-deception for anyone feeling squeamish about their own illusions. Leslie unpacks many of the cognitive biases we have towards viewing ourselves positively and reading this book may just remove those illusions. The first few chapters are recommended to all however, especially anyone enamoured with the idea of lie-detecting In Born Liars Ian Leslie dissects deceit through the lens of law, psychology and culture. It's a fascinating ride, but I wouldn't recommend the central section which covers self-deception for anyone feeling squeamish about their own illusions. Leslie unpacks many of the cognitive biases we have towards viewing ourselves positively and reading this book may just remove those illusions. The first few chapters are recommended to all however, especially anyone enamoured with the idea of lie-detecting, whether with machine or person (spoiler its really hard to detect lies) The last section on the culture of lying is eye-opening to say the least. The only flaw being a lack of depth and details. In short Born Liars is a great read. Leslie errs away from his own opinion and reasoning (and I would have liked to hear his thesis), and relies heavily on other's academic material, making this book a strong technical piece, but perhaps lacking a personal touch or point. Nonetheless recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week: Ian Leslie traces the line from the great apes - who are no mean liars themselves - to humans and documents studies which suggest that becoming human wasn't a simple evolutionary process of the best forager and builder surviving, but the building blocks came from our social contacts and our understanding of deceit. Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week: Ian Leslie traces the line from the great apes - who are no mean liars themselves - to humans and documents studies which suggest that becoming human wasn't a simple evolutionary process of the best forager and builder surviving, but the building blocks came from our social contacts and our understanding of deceit. Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidential election, was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian, the Times and the BBC. He also blogs about all these things at Marbury, named one of the fifty 'Most Powerful' blogs in the world by the Observer. 'Consistently startling and fascinating. Most popular psychology books follow a depressingly familiar path: there's some dodgy theorising at the beginning, then a raft of dubious statistics with a few anecdotes to back them up. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light.' - 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail Written by Ian Leslie Abridged by Pete Nichols http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b011zm18

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scotchneat

    Lying is a biological imperative and probably a part of our survival. Leslie looks at deceit - of others, of ourselves - through a variety of lenses, including science, psychology, anthropology, biology and sociology. What comes through is how much deceit plays into our ability to relate to each other, and to succeed. For example, studies show that achievers regularly build themselves to be better than they are, to themselves. And also, that "normal" people are overly positive in what they believ Lying is a biological imperative and probably a part of our survival. Leslie looks at deceit - of others, of ourselves - through a variety of lenses, including science, psychology, anthropology, biology and sociology. What comes through is how much deceit plays into our ability to relate to each other, and to succeed. For example, studies show that achievers regularly build themselves to be better than they are, to themselves. And also, that "normal" people are overly positive in what they believe about their own capacities and potential for good things, while the mildly depressed are the most realistic people on the planet. Growing up is fraught with discovering how and when to lie, even though we cover that over with a strong societal narrative that lying, under any circumstances, is wrong. Until the parents need a little social lubricant. We all lie. The anecdotes and pop culture references keep it a fun read as well as an educational one, and I think Leslie's background in journalism serves him well for this project.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Princessa

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist: The key message in this book: It’s time to change the way we think about lying. It isn’t some evil character flaw that bad people are infected with. It’s a very human trait that has served us throughout our existence and can continue to be a useful tool – especially when you don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings. Actionable advice: Be skeptical of your own knowledge. Part of being honest with yourself is admitting that you might be wrong about what you think you k I read this book thanks to Blinkist: The key message in this book: It’s time to change the way we think about lying. It isn’t some evil character flaw that bad people are infected with. It’s a very human trait that has served us throughout our existence and can continue to be a useful tool – especially when you don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings. Actionable advice: Be skeptical of your own knowledge. Part of being honest with yourself is admitting that you might be wrong about what you think you know. If you replace “I know” with “I think,” you’ll be more open to discussion and, in turn, better able to contribute to the progress of the human race.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Hockey

    It started reasonable, a few insights, but it soon became too much a case of apologism for the usual left wing political agenda: Don't trust your own intution, trust social norms and social pressures and values. I.e. question yourself but not what the government, media and scientific experts tell you. He barely gets into the insidiousness of lying in the media, in government etc, instead focusing it all on being something wrong with us in our nature. And so we need social values and guidelines t It started reasonable, a few insights, but it soon became too much a case of apologism for the usual left wing political agenda: Don't trust your own intution, trust social norms and social pressures and values. I.e. question yourself but not what the government, media and scientific experts tell you. He barely gets into the insidiousness of lying in the media, in government etc, instead focusing it all on being something wrong with us in our nature. And so we need social values and guidelines to whip us into shape. You can filter a lot of his biases out, but even with that, he still makes a naive distinction between stories and narratives we make about our world, and the world itself. As if we can talk of a reality neutral from our stories, and is if that is the only truth, and all the stories we tell about reality are just lies. It's a completely fallacious interpretation relying on, and motivated by, a moral bias of his own that he refuses to see. This is the problem when anyone claims to be an authority on what is a lie and what isn't in a generic way, rather than sticking to individual cases. You presume you have access to some higher arbiter of truth than everyone else who you are criticising, and it so often simply isn't the case. And it certainly isn't the case in this book. He says at the end of the book the lessons we should take from it are 1) Share the work 2) Distrust your own certainty 3) Accept a margin of illusion. Where by this last he means pretend to others something is true, when you don't think it is true yourself. So basically combine the three and you have a perfect excuse for institutional compartmentalisation of knowledge. Social collectives are to be arbiters of truth, and we are merely cogs in that system doing its bidding who should distrust our own intutions and ignore inconsistencies in the actions of the institutions and just lie to people and pretend it is consistent! Well, there you go, Ian Leslie is a born liar and he is practising deceit on you all, its more an autobiography than an investigation into human nature in general! And this illustrates another problem with this kind of pseudo science investigation into something. Generic claims about human nature in social and cultural domains are very difficult to make. You will never disentangle all the narratives we create for ourselves, here, because the narratives are all there is. There is no neutral truth hiding behind social reality, the only arbiter is having integrity in your own perspective. It is tied up with morality and narratives through and through. Better to embrace this than to pretend we are capable of a kind of understanding of social reality that we simply are not able to reach.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

    As an autistic, I have long been fascinated about why people lie. Of course, I have lied (yes, I love your hat), but as a skill, it’s only come to me later in life, and I find it uncomfortable – an approach to be avoided whenever possible. So I was curious to explore the reasons why other seem able to lie pretty much all the time, and with such ease. What I learned is that most people are hardwired to lie, and that deceit – on a varying scale of untruthfulness – is a vital part of surviving socia As an autistic, I have long been fascinated about why people lie. Of course, I have lied (yes, I love your hat), but as a skill, it’s only come to me later in life, and I find it uncomfortable – an approach to be avoided whenever possible. So I was curious to explore the reasons why other seem able to lie pretty much all the time, and with such ease. What I learned is that most people are hardwired to lie, and that deceit – on a varying scale of untruthfulness – is a vital part of surviving social interactions. It seems the ability to lie goes back a long way in evolutionary terms (Ian Leslie shows us how good apes are at deceit), suggesting the fittest were also the best liars, passing on their ability to their descendents: us. (And it’s not just primates; in Corvus: a life with birds, Esther Woolfson describes two of her pet corvids, a magpie and a crow, also displaying clearly duplicitous behaviour.) Leslie explores lying in many areas of life, including (not surprisingly) relationships, politics, work, and advertising. He looks in more detail at conmen, the “tell”, the lie-detector, self-deception, lying as a comfort blanket (my words), and the ethical boundaries around deception – concluding it all with an afterword about honesty. I really had my eyes opened by this book. It has helped me understand neurotypical people much better (and stop being so confused and frustrated by deceitful behaviour). it has also helped me better understand where my own vulnerabilities are, so I can better protect myself in the future.

  8. 5 out of 5

    زينب

    I loved this book. But I hate how it makes you suspect everything...

  9. 4 out of 5

    YHC

    Another easy reading book for me, i will share my notes. Human intelligence starts from manipulation, deceive, and tricking cooperation. Lying made our species thrive and it's a very important part from evolution to develop our brains, because it was involved creation. In order to lie to others , we need to learn to be able to distinguish if others are lying to us. so back and forth, it stimulates brain development. like in Chinese old saying: 爾虞我詐. However, those who can not stop lying and enjoy Another easy reading book for me, i will share my notes. Human intelligence starts from manipulation, deceive, and tricking cooperation. Lying made our species thrive and it's a very important part from evolution to develop our brains, because it was involved creation. In order to lie to others , we need to learn to be able to distinguish if others are lying to us. so back and forth, it stimulates brain development. like in Chinese old saying: 爾虞我詐. However, those who can not stop lying and enjoy manipulation on his or her own creations actually got some mental disorder. The best way to see through the liar's lies is to let the liar continue lying without revealing the truth. if you pierce the bubbles, lair got pissed off and you never know what damage could come after. The best way is just walk away and don't need to teach this person lessons. -EEG and fMRI have been used to detect the lies from the criminals and suspects, however, we humans are also capable to implant false memories into our own brains. It has been shown from many criminal cases that some people who could make up stories of killing people just by remodeling the plots with each confessions they made. Therefore "remember" is not a pure memories recall or replay, it's mixed with creation and reconstruction of memories when that person has anxiety, desire, and imagination. -Our brain got a function called : controlled fantasy, means it eliminates the messages it doesn't like, and keeps the ones it like to strengthen. This is a self protect mechanism. -Positive illusion( also called bias blind spot): we tend to believe that we are better than others and should deserve better than others, we are so unique. Those who see the reality of themselves actually suffer mild to severe anxiety. -The best liar is the one who could lie to oneself and even convince oneself the lie is the reality. We often say that you might be able to detect a liar who lie to others, but to those who even lie to themselves and feel no shame or guilty...you just can not do anything about that. -Placebo effect. Best and efficient lying way existing in medical field. The color of pills could play a role on better healing. Yellow for depression, blue for sleeplessness, green for anxiety, white for stomach ulcer. - Murderer at door. The example about why white lies are important. (Justice and morality struggling)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Layden

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a lot different, thought provoking and comprehensive than I was expecting. It is a book by a polymath which dips into a wide range of topics including neuroscience, anthropology, behavioural psychology in discussing why we are wired for deception and how it drove our brain development. Particularly interesting was the discussion of how children's ability and skill in deception develops also fascinating seeing the discussion of deception in other species. The impa I really enjoyed this book. It is a lot different, thought provoking and comprehensive than I was expecting. It is a book by a polymath which dips into a wide range of topics including neuroscience, anthropology, behavioural psychology in discussing why we are wired for deception and how it drove our brain development. Particularly interesting was the discussion of how children's ability and skill in deception develops also fascinating seeing the discussion of deception in other species. The impact of advertising, culture etc on how we see and taste things. I particularly liked the discussion of St Augustine, Kant and Thomas Aquinas. I hadn't come accross the whole concept of "mental reservation" before but it explains a lot. The discussion of the placebo effect and the general discussion of healing was interesting. The book is well written and topics are well thought out with stimulating anecdotes. As is the case with many good books i've a list of about five books which I will have to read and hopefully return and reread this book afterwards.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katrina H

    Fascinating and worrying in equal measure. Couldn't put it down. Ok, that's a lie. I did put it down when sufficiently motivated by nature (the need to sleep and attend to bodily functions). I found the breadth of the book wonderful. Everything from lies to make life interesting, grandiose lies both conscious and unconscious, medical lies (placebos), examinations on what constitutes a lie and how different cultures believe they should/shouldn't be used. This one is a keeper - and will be rereadi Fascinating and worrying in equal measure. Couldn't put it down. Ok, that's a lie. I did put it down when sufficiently motivated by nature (the need to sleep and attend to bodily functions). I found the breadth of the book wonderful. Everything from lies to make life interesting, grandiose lies both conscious and unconscious, medical lies (placebos), examinations on what constitutes a lie and how different cultures believe they should/shouldn't be used. This one is a keeper - and will be rereading in the future. That isn't a lie.

  12. 5 out of 5

    K.L. Wicks

    This was an engaging, fascinating read which helped to explain many people I had known in my life. A great look at the concept of self and illusion as well as dillusion, proving there is so much we can learn about how the human mind and environment co-exist.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Robeson

    Goes into everything you would want to know about lying. I found the physiological aspect of why we lie hugely fascinating. The line of nature verses nurture. Don’t be mislead by the cover with the illustration of Donald Trump as a baby. I don’t remember him featuring much or at all in the book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Don Pollock

    A thought provoking book on honesty.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Very interesting, learned quite a lot.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mengqi

    We don't really know ourselves, do we? We don't really know ourselves, do we?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Doron

    Easy read and interesting. Great way to pass the time and learn some interesting things during.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jody Nicholson

    Really interesting and surprising in parts.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Binny

    As a person who dislike the act of lying and judgemental towards liars, this book has given me a new perspective.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ian Leslie traces the line from the great apes - who are no mean liars themselves - to humans and documents studies which suggest that becoming human wasn't a simple evolutionary process of the best forager and builder surviving, but the building blocks came from our social contacts and our understanding of deceit. Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidenti Ian Leslie traces the line from the great apes - who are no mean liars themselves - to humans and documents studies which suggest that becoming human wasn't a simple evolutionary process of the best forager and builder surviving, but the building blocks came from our social contacts and our understanding of deceit. Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidential election, was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian, the Times and the BBC. He also blogs about all these things at Marbury, named one of the fifty 'Most Powerful' blogs in the world by the Observer. 'Consistently startling and fascinating. Most popular psychology books follow a depressingly familiar path: there's some dodgy theorising at the beginning, then a raft of dubious statistics with a few anecdotes to back them up. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light.' - 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail Written by Ian Leslie Abridged by Pete Nichols Reader: Tim McInnerny Producer: Rosalynd Ward A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4. ------------------------ Okay then, in a nutshell: Every behaviour has its impact so it is good to keep your deceits on the clever side if you want to get ahead. Don't Machiavellians already have this covered?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tariq Mahmood

    This book resolved a personal dilemma for me, someone raised in a traditional predominately Muslim culture where lying and deceit are very black and dark attributes of any human being's core nature which this particular book seems to agree with. It is truth which is an acquired trait which we all struggle to achieve during our existence on earth. As an eastern expat striving in the West, I have always struggled with the notion of whether to trust first or distrust upon initial contact, as I tend This book resolved a personal dilemma for me, someone raised in a traditional predominately Muslim culture where lying and deceit are very black and dark attributes of any human being's core nature which this particular book seems to agree with. It is truth which is an acquired trait which we all struggle to achieve during our existence on earth. As an eastern expat striving in the West, I have always struggled with the notion of whether to trust first or distrust upon initial contact, as I tend to be the trusting type personally which means that I must have been influenced by my religious background somehow somewhere. And as truth seems to be abundant in a generally trusting culture I am well disposed to my present conditions. I enjoyed this book immensely at as it very clearly outlines the various philosophies influencing truth and lies over centuries of human existence. For instance the difference between lying in the West as opposed to the East was very nicely explained. And lastly the book is very nicely presented for the lay-person instead of being directed to the academics, in my opinion.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ain Romeli

    A lot of bubbles popped as I read the book. This is an excellent read in understanding the relationship between physiology/psychology as well as anthropology with the condition on how human conduct their brain in regards of lying on daily basis. This book also covers the delineation of macro-lying segments and attempt in answering the abstract question of the murderer at the door and many more! I personally love the discussion on the placebo effect. I am in awe of this book for not only it has a A lot of bubbles popped as I read the book. This is an excellent read in understanding the relationship between physiology/psychology as well as anthropology with the condition on how human conduct their brain in regards of lying on daily basis. This book also covers the delineation of macro-lying segments and attempt in answering the abstract question of the murderer at the door and many more! I personally love the discussion on the placebo effect. I am in awe of this book for not only it has a thorough discussion on the concept that is dear to our daily lives but also it pulls you out of the overwhelming abstract conception that we have to deal with everyday and implore you to rearrange your thoughts when it comes to the evaluation of lying. You will never view people (even yourself) the same way ever again once you understand the science of lying /breaking glasses/

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    Fascinating book about lying - why it's regarded as morally wrong and when it's socially more acceptable to lie than to tell the truth. The scope of the book covers self-deception and the effects of it (both positive and negative) - for example: why placebos work and why those who are successful are often good at self-deception (to make them think they're above average). It covers scientific research, philosophy, observation, film, tv, literature and anything else that seems relevant. Truly inte Fascinating book about lying - why it's regarded as morally wrong and when it's socially more acceptable to lie than to tell the truth. The scope of the book covers self-deception and the effects of it (both positive and negative) - for example: why placebos work and why those who are successful are often good at self-deception (to make them think they're above average). It covers scientific research, philosophy, observation, film, tv, literature and anything else that seems relevant. Truly interesting.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gill

    Born Liars was thought-provoking, fascinating and entertaining. I didn’t think it would be as enjoyable as it was. I was hooked from the first chapter. Ian Leslie talks about how deceit is part of every encounter we have and how important it is. It’s packed full of interesting anecdotes and touches on philosophy, psychology, anthropology...I think it has something for everyone and well worth reading. And that’s the whole truth!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lor Du frent

    This is a broad book touching on everything from the possible role deceit played in the development of the brain to the use of self-deceit as a tool for making sense of the world. The history of lie detection also gets a mention, as well as the philosophy of the well-intentioned lie. Given how little of what we know can be definitively proven as "true", what we do with falsehoods is something worth knowing. This is a broad book touching on everything from the possible role deceit played in the development of the brain to the use of self-deceit as a tool for making sense of the world. The history of lie detection also gets a mention, as well as the philosophy of the well-intentioned lie. Given how little of what we know can be definitively proven as "true", what we do with falsehoods is something worth knowing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peter O'Brien

    "Our need to keep in touch with reality exists in tension with an equally strong need to make up stories that arn't true - and to believe in them. Without the former, we couldn't get on for long with our environment or with each other. Without the latter we wouldn't have the imaginative reach that has driven all of human progress." Without a doubt, a very important book to read, the story it tells will turn you into a much more effective human being, no lie! "Our need to keep in touch with reality exists in tension with an equally strong need to make up stories that arn't true - and to believe in them. Without the former, we couldn't get on for long with our environment or with each other. Without the latter we wouldn't have the imaginative reach that has driven all of human progress." Without a doubt, a very important book to read, the story it tells will turn you into a much more effective human being, no lie!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nia

    I liked this book a great deal, it skimmed over some of the topics which could have benefitted from more depth and discussion but had particularly interesting insights into the placebo effect in medicine and the nature of self-deception. This book has sparked my interest in the nature of lying and I will be reading more about the topic, so a definite win for this book in my opinion.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ian McNeish

    A very well put together account of why lying is needed to function as a human being with Case studies to show why lying can actually be beneficial, think of a placebo in medicine, and also the power of believing in lies can have on the brain. A different book from what I would normally read, but I am glad I had a look! Very interesting book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mack Flavelle

    "We lie because otherwise we'd never get along." This book is a 200 page explanation of the above. It's a fairly interesting explanation, and really fleshes out the details obviously, but I accept the above as self evident, so the whole thing felt a little redundant. Redundant but not boring. I also read this book in a very disjointed way, possibly ruining the joy of the narrative. "We lie because otherwise we'd never get along." This book is a 200 page explanation of the above. It's a fairly interesting explanation, and really fleshes out the details obviously, but I accept the above as self evident, so the whole thing felt a little redundant. Redundant but not boring. I also read this book in a very disjointed way, possibly ruining the joy of the narrative.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    This is an interesting book. It takes a very broad look at the telling of lies, from a scientific and cultural perspective. Some parts are more interesting than others, and I would like sources for some of the claims, but definitely worth reading.

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