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All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 8

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World War II continues to rage throughout Europe and the Pacific leaving virtually nothing untouched by its wake, including American comic books and the JSA... Represented here are the adventures of the Justice Society of America from the pages of All Star Comics of 1944 through the first half of 1945, perhaps the most grim of the war years, which may explain the time-trav World War II continues to rage throughout Europe and the Pacific leaving virtually nothing untouched by its wake, including American comic books and the JSA... Represented here are the adventures of the Justice Society of America from the pages of All Star Comics of 1944 through the first half of 1945, perhaps the most grim of the war years, which may explain the time-travel story containing a strident saber-rattling indictment of the entire country of Germany (something almost uncomfortable to look at with today's sensibilities). Also we have a sympathetic, yet exciting adventure revolving around the plight of the "physically handicapped," a twenty-year-old murder mystery, an alien robot invasion, and a world-spanning tale of (shudder) living paint! Add to all this the "mystery of issue 24," as delineated by historian Roy Thomas in his foreword, and you've got a collection of nothing but the best of comics' Golden Age!


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World War II continues to rage throughout Europe and the Pacific leaving virtually nothing untouched by its wake, including American comic books and the JSA... Represented here are the adventures of the Justice Society of America from the pages of All Star Comics of 1944 through the first half of 1945, perhaps the most grim of the war years, which may explain the time-trav World War II continues to rage throughout Europe and the Pacific leaving virtually nothing untouched by its wake, including American comic books and the JSA... Represented here are the adventures of the Justice Society of America from the pages of All Star Comics of 1944 through the first half of 1945, perhaps the most grim of the war years, which may explain the time-travel story containing a strident saber-rattling indictment of the entire country of Germany (something almost uncomfortable to look at with today's sensibilities). Also we have a sympathetic, yet exciting adventure revolving around the plight of the "physically handicapped," a twenty-year-old murder mystery, an alien robot invasion, and a world-spanning tale of (shudder) living paint! Add to all this the "mystery of issue 24," as delineated by historian Roy Thomas in his foreword, and you've got a collection of nothing but the best of comics' Golden Age!

30 review for All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 8

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    Dumb silly stories with campy and cheesy villains, cringy dialogue and whatever script with a few exceptions on the idea of the plot but poor execution because, well, 40s. What's stuck to me for 20 issues or so now, ever since Wonder Woman joined the team, they have her just being there doing pretty much NOTHING.. and all the while having right next to her name written "Secretary" so she's basically there throwing a line or two and doing nothing else. And she's Wonder Woman, I mean you got a guy Dumb silly stories with campy and cheesy villains, cringy dialogue and whatever script with a few exceptions on the idea of the plot but poor execution because, well, 40s. What's stuck to me for 20 issues or so now, ever since Wonder Woman joined the team, they have her just being there doing pretty much NOTHING.. and all the while having right next to her name written "Secretary" so she's basically there throwing a line or two and doing nothing else. And she's Wonder Woman, I mean you got a guy named Johnny Thunder for fucks sake, who's got no powers pretty much, unless you count stating the obvious every now and then a power. Oh well... the 40s. I have to excuse everything on that. Whatever I guess... wouldn't recommend. Better off reading some Garfield. PS. There's an issue here which we get Supe and Bats guests, but of course it's 40s Supe and Bats, and that means it's like a 4 year old wrote them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects Issues 34-38 of All Star Comics. There are several big changes that occurr. First, Johnny Thunder is benched, so no adventure is saved by him saying, "Say you." Issue 34 sees the Introduction of the Wizard, a villain who believes the Justice Society must be pretending to be heroes for some reason but really trying to make money on the side. Issue 35 features the villain Per Degaton in time travel tale that was a bit advanced for the Golden Age and also a bit confusing. Issue 3 This book collects Issues 34-38 of All Star Comics. There are several big changes that occurr. First, Johnny Thunder is benched, so no adventure is saved by him saying, "Say you." Issue 34 sees the Introduction of the Wizard, a villain who believes the Justice Society must be pretending to be heroes for some reason but really trying to make money on the side. Issue 35 features the villain Per Degaton in time travel tale that was a bit advanced for the Golden Age and also a bit confusing. Issue 36 is a tale of men corrupted by drowning in a body of water that turns them evil. Superman and Batman appear in this one and actually take part in a JSA golden age adventure for the first and only time. Issue 37 sees the introduction of the Injustice Society and our heroes face a grim battle. Disappointment in this one is that Johnny Thunder are captured off-panel. Issue 38 sees a big shake-up as all the male JSAers are apparently killed in the first pages and Wonder Woman has to revive them with the help of Black Canary (who makes her first JSA appearance.) and we get a long adventure without individual chapters which is a first for All Star Comics. The book features an enthusiastic introduction from comics legend Roy Thomas. Whether you agree with Thomas that this was the JSA at its best, this is certainly one of the best volumes and showed that even though the golden age was nearing an end, this book wasn't running out of steam at all. My complaints are mostly minor. This book is a classic must-read if you're a fan of Golden Age comics.

  3. 4 out of 5

    The other John

    In this volume, the JSA takes on the Wizard, Per Degaton, the Injustice Gang of the World, five men under the influence of the "Stream of Ruthlessness" and wax figures of History's greatest villains come to life. Roy Thomas claims in his introduction that these tales are from the JSA's "golden age". They are good stories, but I'm more inclined to think that the JSA were at there best at the beginning of their run. Of course, maybe that's because one of my favorite JSA members happens to be Johnn In this volume, the JSA takes on the Wizard, Per Degaton, the Injustice Gang of the World, five men under the influence of the "Stream of Ruthlessness" and wax figures of History's greatest villains come to life. Roy Thomas claims in his introduction that these tales are from the JSA's "golden age". They are good stories, but I'm more inclined to think that the JSA were at there best at the beginning of their run. Of course, maybe that's because one of my favorite JSA members happens to be Johnny Thunder and in this volume he's quietly being phased out. (sniff) The series' regular writer, Gardner Fox, also received his walking papers during this sequence. Him, I don't miss as much. But I did appreciate the ride he gave not only to the kids of the 1940s but also to us geezers in 1990s who got to experience these reprints for the first time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rich Meyer

    A truly excellent volume in this series! First you've got classic artists galore: Joe Kubert, Harry Lampert, Lee Elias, Irwin Hasen, Carmine Infantino, Alex Toth, Stan Aschmeier. Then you've got some of the truly legendary Justice Society adventures: "The Day That Dropped Out of Time" introducing Per Degaton, the second appearance of the Wizard, and the first meeting of the Injustice Society. And Superman and Batman stop by to fill in for Johnny Thunder and the Atom. This is the way comics used A truly excellent volume in this series! First you've got classic artists galore: Joe Kubert, Harry Lampert, Lee Elias, Irwin Hasen, Carmine Infantino, Alex Toth, Stan Aschmeier. Then you've got some of the truly legendary Justice Society adventures: "The Day That Dropped Out of Time" introducing Per Degaton, the second appearance of the Wizard, and the first meeting of the Injustice Society. And Superman and Batman stop by to fill in for Johnny Thunder and the Atom. This is the way comics used to be made. Classic tales. Definitely worth any comic fan searching out.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul Dellinger

    This was great fun, because I'd read some of these comics as a kid. A good old wallow in nostalgia. This was great fun, because I'd read some of these comics as a kid. A good old wallow in nostalgia.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  9. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rex

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kirk Domenico

  15. 4 out of 5

    John Desmarais

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tanu

  17. 5 out of 5

    Siddhant Nath

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jack Holt

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Dotson

  20. 5 out of 5

    B Hawley

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  22. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

  25. 5 out of 5

    Damon Williams

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam Nerby

  27. 4 out of 5

    Xaanua

  28. 5 out of 5

    Travis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steven Heywood

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jwebster1985

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