web site hit counter Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship

Availability: Ready to download

Since the 1990s, critics and curators have broadly accepted the notion that participatory art is the ultimate political art: that by encouraging an audience to take part an artist can promote new emancipatory social relations. Around the world, the champions of this form of expression are numerous, ranging from art historians such as Grant Kester, curators such as Nicolas Since the 1990s, critics and curators have broadly accepted the notion that participatory art is the ultimate political art: that by encouraging an audience to take part an artist can promote new emancipatory social relations. Around the world, the champions of this form of expression are numerous, ranging from art historians such as Grant Kester, curators such as Nicolas Bourriaud and Nato Thompson, to performance theorists such as Shannon Jackson. Artificial Hells is the first historical and theoretical overview of socially engaged participatory art, known in the US as “social practice.” Claire Bishop follows the trajectory of twentieth-century art and examines key moments in the development of a participatory aesthetic. This itinerary takes in Futurism and Dada; the Situationist International; Happenings in Eastern Europe, Argentina and Paris; the 1970s Community Arts Movement; and the Artists Placement Group. It concludes with a discussion of long-term educational projects by contemporary artists such as Thomas Hirschhorn, Tania Bruguera, Pawe? Althamer and Paul Chan. Since her controversial essay in Artforum in 2006, Claire Bishop has been one of the few to challenge the political and aesthetic ambitions of participatory art. In Artificial Hells, she not only scrutinizes the emancipatory claims made for these projects, but also provides an alternative to the ethical (rather than artistic) criteria invited by such artworks. Artificial Hells calls for a less prescriptive approach to art and politics, and for more compelling, troubling and bolder forms of participatory art and criticism.


Compare

Since the 1990s, critics and curators have broadly accepted the notion that participatory art is the ultimate political art: that by encouraging an audience to take part an artist can promote new emancipatory social relations. Around the world, the champions of this form of expression are numerous, ranging from art historians such as Grant Kester, curators such as Nicolas Since the 1990s, critics and curators have broadly accepted the notion that participatory art is the ultimate political art: that by encouraging an audience to take part an artist can promote new emancipatory social relations. Around the world, the champions of this form of expression are numerous, ranging from art historians such as Grant Kester, curators such as Nicolas Bourriaud and Nato Thompson, to performance theorists such as Shannon Jackson. Artificial Hells is the first historical and theoretical overview of socially engaged participatory art, known in the US as “social practice.” Claire Bishop follows the trajectory of twentieth-century art and examines key moments in the development of a participatory aesthetic. This itinerary takes in Futurism and Dada; the Situationist International; Happenings in Eastern Europe, Argentina and Paris; the 1970s Community Arts Movement; and the Artists Placement Group. It concludes with a discussion of long-term educational projects by contemporary artists such as Thomas Hirschhorn, Tania Bruguera, Pawe? Althamer and Paul Chan. Since her controversial essay in Artforum in 2006, Claire Bishop has been one of the few to challenge the political and aesthetic ambitions of participatory art. In Artificial Hells, she not only scrutinizes the emancipatory claims made for these projects, but also provides an alternative to the ethical (rather than artistic) criteria invited by such artworks. Artificial Hells calls for a less prescriptive approach to art and politics, and for more compelling, troubling and bolder forms of participatory art and criticism.

30 review for Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Fairweather

    I am not really up on participatory art and have always looked at these works with a weary eye—a lot of it just seems, well, “silly.” So, it was a challenge for me to pick up ‘Artificial Hell’s and stick with it, and I must admit that not all expositions of the book received my full attention. That said, the book was successful in that I feel now that I have a much better understanding of what participatory art seeks to accomplish and what makes a successful piece. Particularly, I like Bishop’s p I am not really up on participatory art and have always looked at these works with a weary eye—a lot of it just seems, well, “silly.” So, it was a challenge for me to pick up ‘Artificial Hell’s and stick with it, and I must admit that not all expositions of the book received my full attention. That said, the book was successful in that I feel now that I have a much better understanding of what participatory art seeks to accomplish and what makes a successful piece. Particularly, I like Bishop’s position on participatory art in that she suggests that we need not choose between art which is either social *or* solipsistic, collective *or* individual, interior/affect *or* some sort of steel trap of moral procedure. A successful work must organize the inner life just as much as outer life, or it suffers as a limp intellectual exercise. Bishop avoids the simpler Marxist critiques of participatory art (which have in the past been my own), essentially a politically correct standpoint that asserts that performance pieces are strictly a reification of larger social, economic and cultural phenomena. Instead, Bishop insists on a privileged position for art as a unique arena of “norm-suspension” that makes these processes objective to ourselves in ways that straight social practice can’t. In general terms, I grow more sympathetic to this argument as I get older. But what separates participatory art from a mere “stunt?” Participation as an artistic device is paradoxical in that “[…] from opening up a work to manipulation and alteration by the viewer, it rapidly becomes a highly ideologized convention in its own right, one by which the viewer in turn is manipulated in order to complete the work ‘correctly’.” Within this definition there are variations—there were groups like Situationist International who questioned the category of art itself in order to infuse poetics into everyday life, as opposed to groups like GRAV and the happenings of Kaprow who brought the everyday into the work of art. For both standpoints, even in SI’s refused of art as-such, art itself lurks as a privileged zone that bears the promise of breaking through limitations on what one might consider valid forms of participation. Funnily enough SI was very good at expelling people from invalid expressions of participation. Bishop here seems to prefer the Happenings of Lebel above all from the ’68 period. Participatory art responded to different urgencies throughout the 20th century and was by no means alike from period to period. I am miles away from being able to wrap my head around all of the examples Bishop uses to outline the trajectory of participatory art, but broadly speaking if early theatrical experiments (Futurists and Dada) were deliberately provocative and dealt with participants via the logic of “the crowd”, the ’68 series of participatory art was focused on producing cultural alternatives to the wearing grip of full-frontal imperialism and what the artists saw to be the “late stages (always too late, aren’t we?) of capitalism—the 70s saw increasingly class and media focused work in Latin American (specifically Argentina), collapsing in the face of the more identitarian work of the 1980s, to the 90s where collaboration itself (the project, so to speak) becomes the good itself rather than some definable goal or outcome. “Project” is a term Bishop uses to distinguish process-based participatory work from art whose aim is to give us the legacy of an art object. Furthermore, geography often defines the sort of participatory work being make. Work in the democratic West tended to make claim to more authentic public deliberation—participation in or isolation from the group meant to efface the logics that mounted to create the individual. In Communist countries participatory art was very different. Instead, participatory art here sought to create, “a space of privatized experience, liberal democratic indecision, and a plurality of hermeneutical speculation at a time when the dominant discourse and spectatorial regime was marshaled towards a rigidly schematized apparatus of meaning.” Do I *like* participatory art more now that I’ve read Bishop’s book? Whatever the worth of such statements may be, I cannot say that I have any more enthusiasm for participatory work after reading the book than I did beforehand. Still, I have a better understanding of it. And I am encouraged that the pressure points surrounding participatory art aren’t all that different from art itself. Crucial argument surrounding participatory art and its more broad responsibility to art itself came to the fore immediately after the Russian revolution through stupid and blunt intellectuals like Bogdanov who insisted that art be deliberately collective and didactic—such figures have “an innate lack of sympathy for the arts” in the results-focused orientation. Lenin, interestingly enough, felt that for Soviet artistic achievement to build a worthy world, it must “assimilate and refashion everyone of value in the more than 2000 years of the development of human culture.” Apparently Lenin didn’t write much on art, but this is a great statement, I think. Art isn’t just about challenging the past, but redeeming it through changing our orientation towards it. ‘Artificial Hells’ has been an interesting journey and I’m grateful for this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Berger

    So Claire Bishop is one of my favorite art critics right now. She won me over from almost the beginning. She's critical, and likes to rewrite history from different perspectives. There was her Installation book that i read and loved, and now she's moved onto participatory art. Here again she is looking for criteria to judge this work while also reconstructing art history from the perspective of this discipline. There's a lot of leg work put into this book, since she started writing it in 2005. An So Claire Bishop is one of my favorite art critics right now. She won me over from almost the beginning. She's critical, and likes to rewrite history from different perspectives. There was her Installation book that i read and loved, and now she's moved onto participatory art. Here again she is looking for criteria to judge this work while also reconstructing art history from the perspective of this discipline. There's a lot of leg work put into this book, since she started writing it in 2005. And the discipline doesn't do her any favors since you have to talk to participants and many of the works no longer even exist. But she plows through it all anyway. Bishop seriously buys into the idea of art having political and sociology undertones. The academic and art jargon is thick in this book. Bring a machette and have google open. This isn't high on my priority list to read, because I'm not that interested in participatory art. I am a bit, but right now i'm comfortable with my view of history and I don't need Bishop to give me affirmation like i did my senior year. I read the introduction which psyched me up, but after rereading the beginning of chapter one several times I put the book back on the shelf. We'll see when I come back to it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    B. Jean

    When you don't understand something, or don't like something and you can't articulate why, it's good to read up on it to get a more informed opinion. And after slogging through this jargon-heavy book, I can say that I'm still not entirely sure if I appreciate performance art, or understand it. There were some chapters so dull I could barely get through them, and there were some that I moved through quickly. The Russian art chapter I thought was particularly good. Especially the piece where the art When you don't understand something, or don't like something and you can't articulate why, it's good to read up on it to get a more informed opinion. And after slogging through this jargon-heavy book, I can say that I'm still not entirely sure if I appreciate performance art, or understand it. There were some chapters so dull I could barely get through them, and there were some that I moved through quickly. The Russian art chapter I thought was particularly good. Especially the piece where the artists appeared on the horizon and handed out pictures to the waiting spectators / participants. Before I say anything else, I want to congratulate one paragraph in particular that made me put my head down on my desk and laugh helplessly into my arms. Here it is in all its shining glory: "After this, Oleg Kulik, who was naked and chained to a kennel, executing one of his well-known dog performances, also became increasingly hostile. Soft nibbles turned into bites and assaults. Trying to push Kulik back inside his kennel, Jan Åman kicked the artist in the face, which provoked the artist to become yet more violent; the police were called in and Kulik was arrested, charged and later released with a fine." Amazing. I got the...general sense that artists engaged in this sort of work rely heavily on shock factor and making others uncomfortable. Which is... not my arena, I will say. It cheapens it somewhat, especially when they're trying to articulate grand ideals. All in all, I think I should reread this book when I'm a little more versed on the subject as this was definitely not for people who have a superficial understanding of performance art. (Also, the Europe focus was boring. Research Gutai, you cowards.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amalie

    very entertaining. it helped me, to figure out the wrong assumptions I had about peformance art in general, giving me a more detailed perspective on a field I only work with indirectly. Maybe I should read more from her.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Finally read this. It's a good history of participatory art. I was surprised, I had expected it to be more argumentative after reading her article in October. Here, she keeps gesturing towards the question of evaluation and judgment but the issue isn't really addressed. Finally read this. It's a good history of participatory art. I was surprised, I had expected it to be more argumentative after reading her article in October. Here, she keeps gesturing towards the question of evaluation and judgment but the issue isn't really addressed.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Saelan

    See my full review, forthcoming in the Winter issue of C magazine.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Riar

    With the term 'community-based practice' roaming around the art world recently and the influx of residency program that focuses on the collectivity, Artificial Hells is a timely book for the current trend of global contemporary art. Some of the historical examples provided in this book by Bishop is fun to read, however, many of them are tedious and—in my opinion—insignificant. Nevertheless, the trajectory of the art movements critically discussed in this book shown that the evolution of direct p With the term 'community-based practice' roaming around the art world recently and the influx of residency program that focuses on the collectivity, Artificial Hells is a timely book for the current trend of global contemporary art. Some of the historical examples provided in this book by Bishop is fun to read, however, many of them are tedious and—in my opinion—insignificant. Nevertheless, the trajectory of the art movements critically discussed in this book shown that the evolution of direct participation in art is actually interesting to follow; from the early stage of avant-garde bifurcated to both left and right-leaning politics to the art that functioned as pedagogy—which is also is the current trend of many art collectives to implemented pedagogical approach in their artistic practice. In participatory art, the distinction between life and art is vaguer it's actually become exciting. The aestheticisation of everyday life.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vitorino Lombada

    Um livro bastante interessante e o primeiro que li que, ao debruçar-se sobre a história da "Arte Participada"*, a relaciona também com factores políticos e económicos. Bishop não só faz descrições apaixonadas de projetos nos quais participou como também é capaz de fazer algumas reflexões bastante críticas da Arte como catalizador de mudança social. Bem investigado, bem escrito, simultaneamente literário e informativo. Recomendo a investigadores ou a leitores casuais. * Não sei bem que termo usar Um livro bastante interessante e o primeiro que li que, ao debruçar-se sobre a história da "Arte Participada"*, a relaciona também com factores políticos e económicos. Bishop não só faz descrições apaixonadas de projetos nos quais participou como também é capaz de fazer algumas reflexões bastante críticas da Arte como catalizador de mudança social. Bem investigado, bem escrito, simultaneamente literário e informativo. Recomendo a investigadores ou a leitores casuais. * Não sei bem que termo usar na tradução

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    Claire Bishop's writing is so clear-cut and rigorous. Her astute ability to communicate vague and difficult concepts around participatory art is absolutely admirable. A very needed book that definitely sets the scene for more attention around collaborative art projects in the contemporary context. Claire Bishop's writing is so clear-cut and rigorous. Her astute ability to communicate vague and difficult concepts around participatory art is absolutely admirable. A very needed book that definitely sets the scene for more attention around collaborative art projects in the contemporary context.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Labayne

    daming bilin para sa mga babalaking pampublikong intervention for 2018:

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eline

    Very good examples to illustrate the argument!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wanshu Lu

    2017年讀畢已經有種long-overdue的感覺,當代藝術的變動--好快呀,但無差別的是俐落的文字描繪似乎是可以橫跨時間的;當代形式表現看似不同,其性質的變異卻走的緩慢。如果你常看展覽,想必能在章節中找到相似的歸納。作為1990年代以前的參考:也讓人多了個理由重讀關係美學、拉康、德勒茲!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julio César

    An illuminating book about different forms of art that are currently redefining how to relate to the observer-spectator. The historical analysis is brilliant; Bishop relies more on the tradition of theatre and performance than the more established, visual-arts one. Part of this book was researched in Buenos Aires, while she was at the CIA.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rita Tomás

    Bishop was one of the major staples of my academic reading while doing my MA. Not only she draws an interesting sight on the evolution of participatory art practices, but also she never looses her critical viewpoint.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Egor Sofronov

    1) Brilliant, undoubtedly a best-seller book--standard reference from now on 2) Bishop is present-day's more acute critic 3) Bring back some Lacan, the forgotten guy! 1) Brilliant, undoubtedly a best-seller book--standard reference from now on 2) Bishop is present-day's more acute critic 3) Bring back some Lacan, the forgotten guy!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fransien Van Der Putt

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jolocoxan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jude Brigley

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Baran

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sofia Van Laer

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  22. 4 out of 5

    Veronika

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Ziebell

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Pesco

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annie Lafrance

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Ryan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Schembri

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vika Kirchenbauer

  30. 4 out of 5

    Micheal Hooker

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.