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In Postmodernity's Transcending: Devaluing God, Laurence Paul Hemming grapples with the philosophical weakness that characterizes postmodern theory, its privileging of the visual, and its reductive description of the self. He offers a profound challenge to many theologians and philosophers currently articulating questions concerning God, value, and the supposed "nihilism" In Postmodernity's Transcending: Devaluing God, Laurence Paul Hemming grapples with the philosophical weakness that characterizes postmodern theory, its privileging of the visual, and its reductive description of the self. He offers a profound challenge to many theologians and philosophers currently articulating questions concerning God, value, and the supposed "nihilism" of the postmodern situation. He does this by examining the origin and trajectory of the aesthetic sublime, beloved of postmodern theologians, philosophers, and theorists of art.   Hemming's work undertakes on one hand a history of the concept of the sublime; on the other, it explores the limits of theological thinking, where theology is understood either as a practice arising from faith or from thinking alone. By examining concepts like soul, experience, analogy, and truth, Hemming provokes contemporary Christian theology to a more serious engagement with philosophy.   Hemming gives an authoritative genealogy of the predominance of the visual, beginning with the Presocratics and ending in the present. He examines the confrontation with God and the gods to be found in Protagoras, Longinus, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Zizek, and Derrida, and, in the process, offers innovative readings of these thinkers. A highly original study, Postmodernity's Transcending: Devaluing God will stimulate considerable discussion about postmodernity, representation, and subjectivity and, in particular, philosophical and theological discussions of the sublime and transcendence.


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In Postmodernity's Transcending: Devaluing God, Laurence Paul Hemming grapples with the philosophical weakness that characterizes postmodern theory, its privileging of the visual, and its reductive description of the self. He offers a profound challenge to many theologians and philosophers currently articulating questions concerning God, value, and the supposed "nihilism" In Postmodernity's Transcending: Devaluing God, Laurence Paul Hemming grapples with the philosophical weakness that characterizes postmodern theory, its privileging of the visual, and its reductive description of the self. He offers a profound challenge to many theologians and philosophers currently articulating questions concerning God, value, and the supposed "nihilism" of the postmodern situation. He does this by examining the origin and trajectory of the aesthetic sublime, beloved of postmodern theologians, philosophers, and theorists of art.   Hemming's work undertakes on one hand a history of the concept of the sublime; on the other, it explores the limits of theological thinking, where theology is understood either as a practice arising from faith or from thinking alone. By examining concepts like soul, experience, analogy, and truth, Hemming provokes contemporary Christian theology to a more serious engagement with philosophy.   Hemming gives an authoritative genealogy of the predominance of the visual, beginning with the Presocratics and ending in the present. He examines the confrontation with God and the gods to be found in Protagoras, Longinus, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Zizek, and Derrida, and, in the process, offers innovative readings of these thinkers. A highly original study, Postmodernity's Transcending: Devaluing God will stimulate considerable discussion about postmodernity, representation, and subjectivity and, in particular, philosophical and theological discussions of the sublime and transcendence.

7 review for Postmodernity's Transcending: Devaluing God

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lukáš

    This was one of the most difficult pieces to read, even despite a great deal of stylistic clarity and a quite understandable argument. The thing with the book is - there is a lot in it - which both makes one (at least it certainly did with me after weeks of struggle) appreciate the erudition, and at the same time, forced to read back and forth in order to avoid the feeling of missing too much in here. Especially with regard to seeking out just a limited deal of connections. The good news is the b This was one of the most difficult pieces to read, even despite a great deal of stylistic clarity and a quite understandable argument. The thing with the book is - there is a lot in it - which both makes one (at least it certainly did with me after weeks of struggle) appreciate the erudition, and at the same time, forced to read back and forth in order to avoid the feeling of missing too much in here. Especially with regard to seeking out just a limited deal of connections. The good news is the book gives a set of detailed cuts into understanding the history of metaphysics / the sublime (Hemming prefers the term "upliftment") and in particular a very nuanced take throughout the minor, yet crucially important differences between the Ancients. Much here is, uhm, "valuable", so I feel confused about this richness not being perhaps more contested in the terms of political possibilities. But it's well worth it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This was by no means an easy book to get through, unless you just so happen to speak Greek, German, and French fluently. I appreciated his conversation on the process of devaluing God first requires us to admit that God had/has value. He argues the "willing I" is the basis for being, and with the collapse of being and divinity, WE are left "transcending", such that the appearance of God (as opposed to God) is what now theology thinks and reflects upon. This was by no means an easy book to get through, unless you just so happen to speak Greek, German, and French fluently. I appreciated his conversation on the process of devaluing God first requires us to admit that God had/has value. He argues the "willing I" is the basis for being, and with the collapse of being and divinity, WE are left "transcending", such that the appearance of God (as opposed to God) is what now theology thinks and reflects upon.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  5. 5 out of 5

    pplofgod

  6. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ian Packer

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