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We're experiencing the biggest communication shift since the printing press. Millions have adopted Facebook, YouTube, blogs, and Twitter. What does this mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, teach, cultivate community, and change the world? Following Pope Benedict's call to evangelize the "digital continent," The Church and New Media We're experiencing the biggest communication shift since the printing press. Millions have adopted Facebook, YouTube, blogs, and Twitter. What does this mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, teach, cultivate community, and change the world? Following Pope Benedict's call to evangelize the "digital continent," The Church and New Media explores the power and risks of New Media, while guiding Christians through this new environment. Foreword by Cardinal Se


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We're experiencing the biggest communication shift since the printing press. Millions have adopted Facebook, YouTube, blogs, and Twitter. What does this mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, teach, cultivate community, and change the world? Following Pope Benedict's call to evangelize the "digital continent," The Church and New Media We're experiencing the biggest communication shift since the printing press. Millions have adopted Facebook, YouTube, blogs, and Twitter. What does this mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, teach, cultivate community, and change the world? Following Pope Benedict's call to evangelize the "digital continent," The Church and New Media explores the power and risks of New Media, while guiding Christians through this new environment. Foreword by Cardinal Se

30 review for The Church and New Media: Blogging Converts, Internet Activists, and Bishops Who Tweet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Miller

    This week I have completed nine years of blogging and so I can say that I have some perspective on the growth of the so-called Catholic “New Media.” Nine years ago I could pretty much read every post in the Catholic blogosphere during a short lunch. Catholic audio on the internet was extremely limited and podcasting was still a couple more years into the future. The growth of new media for Catholics has been quite an interesting thing to watch. Bearing that in mind I was quite happy to review the This week I have completed nine years of blogging and so I can say that I have some perspective on the growth of the so-called Catholic “New Media.” Nine years ago I could pretty much read every post in the Catholic blogosphere during a short lunch. Catholic audio on the internet was extremely limited and podcasting was still a couple more years into the future. The growth of new media for Catholics has been quite an interesting thing to watch. Bearing that in mind I was quite happy to review the new book by blogger Brandon Vogt The Church and New Media: Blogging Converts, Online Activists, and Bishops Who Tweet. This book is mostly a collection of essays on topics related to Catholic media by well known names within Catholic media. Each writer provides their expertise and perspective. Within these essays are other factoids providing related sources and other information. Brandon Vogt provides both the introduction and conclusion. The book has been positively endorsed by a who’s who of Catholics in America like Archbishop Dolan, Cardinal O’Malley, Cardinal Wuerl, Archbishop Chaput, Mike Aqulina, Amy Welborn, and on and on. Well let me add my own name to that list of positive endorsements. I found this to be a very good read that included things to chew on and other thoughts that agreed with my own experiences. The book starts out with Fr. Barron who like many accidentally entered into new media first by making his excellent homilies available on his site and then later podcasting them. Later he started to release short commentary addressing the issues of the day on YouTube and interacting with the YouTube commenters – not exactly a tame world. As you would expect Fr. Barron provides intelligent comments on his experience. Jennifer Fulwiler writes her conversion story from atheism from the perspective of interacting with Christians on her site. Like myself Jennifer Fulwiler was always an atheist from childhood on who had assumed that Christianity was simply a myth. Actually dialoging with Christians and have her assumptions overturned helped her to see the truth. While many complain about the atmosphere of commenting on blogs, her experience was largely positive. I can’t really do an essay by essay review since it would be longer than the book. But I need to at least list some of the other people who contributed. Marcel LeJeune, Mark Shea, Taylor Marshall, Fr. Longenecker, Scot Landry, Jeff Geerling, Matt Warner, Lisa M. Hendey, Thomas Peters & Shawn Carney. Almost all our people I have read and interacted with over the years and in some cases have met. I found Thomas Peters thoughts the closest to my own and extremely well said. I especially liked his focus on the foundation laid by prayer. But there was so much said by all of them I found spot on. For anybody looking into Catholic media this book is much more than just an introduction. When it comes down to it the new media is like all media in that it is a form of communication. For Catholics this communication is simply to spread the Gospel and while living the Gospel ourselves to help others to do the same. Catholic media and Catholic new media is effective when it spreads the good news and helps others to fully live their faith. I have certainly seen many examples of this over the years concerning conversion and how Catholic media helped to open a person up to the fulness of the faith. The Vatican has lagged behind when it came to new media, but the Vatican doesn’t need to do everything and us everyday Catholics can step in to take up the slack as our abilities direct. The only real complaint I had about this book is that it was a little too much blogger-centric. Yes a funny complaint coming from a blogger, but I am also a great promoter of Catholic podcasts. While Fr. Barron podcasts, he is not really a podcaster since only his homilies are podcasted and he doesn’t engage his audience directly via podcasting. Lisa Henley though does have experience podcasting, but it isn’t her main role. To be fair the book certainly does address podcasting throughout the book, but I would have liked to have seen a chapter from someone who was a weekly podcaster. This book would have been perfect with a chapter from somebody like Fr. Roderick of SQPN, Greg & Jennifer Willits, the crew of the Catholic Underground, or really the perspective from any of the many very good Catholic podcasts. One final thought is that I bet Brandon Vogt wishes that the Pope had used an iPad to make his first tweet and launch the new Vatican news site before this book was published. That episode would have fit right into h

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    In The Church and New Media, Brandon Vogt has collected some of the hot names in Catholic new media and tapped into their wisdom. The book explores blogging and podcasting, but also social media and parish applications of all of the above. There are conversion stories that were rooted in online searches and communities that have never met in person. It’s a fast read, but one that I’ll be revisiting. Though Brandon’s role was as editor, in the introduction and conclusion he ties things up nicely. I In The Church and New Media, Brandon Vogt has collected some of the hot names in Catholic new media and tapped into their wisdom. The book explores blogging and podcasting, but also social media and parish applications of all of the above. There are conversion stories that were rooted in online searches and communities that have never met in person. It’s a fast read, but one that I’ll be revisiting. Though Brandon’s role was as editor, in the introduction and conclusion he ties things up nicely. It’s so easy to discount this new-fangled technology, to look at it as either the obsession of gadget lovers or the downfall of civilization. It has its dangers, to be sure, but in this excellent resource, we have a great starting point a way to continue to grow. Sharing our faith has never been easier, though living it is just as hard as it ever was. I can’t help but wonder, after reading this book, visiting the website, and reading other reviews, what the sequel will look like!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    If you work in any type of ministry, you should read this book. Just as Paul went to the Areopagus because that's where the Greeks were, so the Church needs to reach into the digital sphere because that's where modern man is at. The greatest compliment I can give this book is that I have begun to put together thoughts about how I (and those I work with) need to evaluate how we're doing in this sphere and be bold enough to try new things. If you work in any type of ministry, you should read this book. Just as Paul went to the Areopagus because that's where the Greeks were, so the Church needs to reach into the digital sphere because that's where modern man is at. The greatest compliment I can give this book is that I have begun to put together thoughts about how I (and those I work with) need to evaluate how we're doing in this sphere and be bold enough to try new things.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura McAninch

    My poorer rating is based on the fact this book is aged significantly. I didn't quite realize when I picked this book up at the bookstore that it is ten years old, but it was still interesting to read this material with hindsight. I would like to see a book like this compiled for current times. The afterword had the most pertinent thought coming from the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church which says: "Among the obstacles that hinder the full exercise of the right to objectivity in inf My poorer rating is based on the fact this book is aged significantly. I didn't quite realize when I picked this book up at the bookstore that it is ten years old, but it was still interesting to read this material with hindsight. I would like to see a book like this compiled for current times. The afterword had the most pertinent thought coming from the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church which says: "Among the obstacles that hinder the full exercise of the right to objectivity in information, special attention must be given to the phenomenon of the news media being controlled by just a few people or groups. This has dangerous effects for the entire democratic system when this phenomenon is accompanied by ever-closer ties between government activity and the financial and information establishments." Wow, now that is ridiculously relevant TODAY, more so than ever before.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Reader

    This was a great read especially to see what they have to say on using social media within the Church. Some very interesting things I learned about and would love to see implemented in my parish.

  6. 4 out of 5

    D.A. Knight

    The Church and New Media The Church and the New Media: Blogging Converts, Online Activists, And Bishops Who Tweet (CNM) is an inspirational guide to the Catholic vanguard taking the Mission to the New Media. CNM is a map to the Catholic Online world. Brandon Vogt edited and contributed to this brilliant and exhilarating volume. From the first page, I just enjoyed reading The Church and the New Media. The writing is top-notch, and all of the contributors provide thoughtful comments. If you won The Church and New Media The Church and the New Media: Blogging Converts, Online Activists, And Bishops Who Tweet (CNM) is an inspirational guide to the Catholic vanguard taking the Mission to the New Media. CNM is a map to the Catholic Online world. Brandon Vogt edited and contributed to this brilliant and exhilarating volume. From the first page, I just enjoyed reading The Church and the New Media. The writing is top-notch, and all of the contributors provide thoughtful comments. If you wonder what twitter is - this is your book. It's also your book if you wonder how this technology can help spread the Faith and do battle against the Culture of Death. Fear not, this is not a technical manual. Composed of eleven essays written by Catholic blogging superstars circa 2011, this book is a fly-over map of Online Catholic bloggers. The book's mission is to inspire Catholics to use social media to spread the Faith. Additional contributors include Cardinal Sean O'Malley, who wrote the foreword and Archbishop Timothy Dolan, who provided the afterword. With firepower like that, who needs an Imprimatur? To borrow from Mel Brooks, ‘Did everybody get that?’ If the only Online media you use is a Bible on-line such as the New American Bible, Douay-Rheims Bible, the Catechism, the Vatican, the USCCB, the Boston Archdiocese Resource Links, or maybe EWTN, BUY The Church and the New Media! Need help finding a WiFi hotspot or connecting to a router as a guest? ... Or translating what he said? Buy The Church and the New Media now! If you have not done so, get the book, get an Iphone or a laptop, and get online now! Take it as a command, from on high, yeah. Word! You will not be disappointed. If you are Catholic, and you use a computer to surf the internet, I highly recommend this book. If you have any fire in your belly, Brandon's book is a great beginning. Brandon's map of the Online Catholic world gives you an instant guide to what Catholics are doing, and how to put your services to work in the service of the shining city on a hill. Check it out. Shortcomings? CNM may disappoint you if you need a primer on the technology, etiquette, protocols, costs, and other aspects of the blogging business. Then again, those may change dramatically at any moment, and likely have just in the year since the book was published. Having read the book, I don't think twitter primer was even contemplated within the scope of the author's mission. CNM is for beginners. It focuses on who, what, where, and especially why rather than how. It provides more depth on ethical and etiquette issues more than technical ones. I would love to see the brilliant contributors, especially the Catholic Aggies, put together a book on ‘getting started’ for beginners. In the meantime, while we’re waiting, there are plenty of resources out there. For those who need more information on how to actually use social media, I suggest searching for current eBooks on Amazon or Smashwords. One can also try such tomes as: Twitter for Dummies, Facebook for Dummies, and Blogging for Dummies. These are a good place to start for us timid souls who fear ‘getting it wrong’ and need a little hand-holding. Reviewed by: Review of the softcover edition. D A Knight Author of Cretaceous Clay & the Black Dwarf and Cretaceous Clay & the Ninth Ring

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rvincent324

    The Church and New Media, Blogging Converts, Online Activists, and Bishops who Tweet is one of my favorite books of 2012, at least so far. I have an interest in the use of social media, sometimes called new media, so the topic jumped out at me. Brandon Vogt, a relative youngster at 25 at the time of the book's publication, made a good decision when he chose to ask a variety of people to write a chapter each. He has people such as Fr. Robert Barron, Mark Shea, Lisa Hendey, and others take a speci The Church and New Media, Blogging Converts, Online Activists, and Bishops who Tweet is one of my favorite books of 2012, at least so far. I have an interest in the use of social media, sometimes called new media, so the topic jumped out at me. Brandon Vogt, a relative youngster at 25 at the time of the book's publication, made a good decision when he chose to ask a variety of people to write a chapter each. He has people such as Fr. Robert Barron, Mark Shea, Lisa Hendey, and others take a specific area of this survey book. What's good about it is each person is writing to their strength, where most anyone else would be good at one topic but not as good at others. The book surveys the various types of new media activities going on around the country in the Catholic community. There are blogs, where a writer engages their readers in a give an take of ideas. There are examples of how parishes and dioceses are using various kinds of new media, from web sites to tweeting to podcasting, to stay in touch with their flocks and to evangelize. Essentially new media is just a way of describing the shift in communication that is happening in our society. This book attempts to give the reader some idea of what is happening around us and makes us ask those inevitable questions about the use of new media our own Parish and Diocese. As I said, this is one of the better books I've read this year but I recognize it may not be for everyone. My recommendation is that if you have any interest at all in communication and our faith, this would be a good book for you. No previous knowledge is assumed by the various chapter authors so if you're just wondering what all the talk is about, this book is for you. In fact, this book is better for those of us just learning, and who isn't in that group, than for those who are well experienced in Catholic New Media.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chad Torgerson

    In his book, The Church and New Media: Blogging Converts, Online Activists, and Bishops Who Tweet, Brandon Vogt has compiled writings from a who’s who in the Catholic word of new media, including Fr. Robert Barron, Jennifer Fulwiler, Mark Shea, Fr. Dwight Longenecker, Matt Warner, Lisa Hendey, and many others. The book has received rave reviews from the likes of Archbishops Dolan and Chaput. The foreword was written by Cardinal Sean O’Malley, O.F.M., and the afterword was written by Archbishop Ti In his book, The Church and New Media: Blogging Converts, Online Activists, and Bishops Who Tweet, Brandon Vogt has compiled writings from a who’s who in the Catholic word of new media, including Fr. Robert Barron, Jennifer Fulwiler, Mark Shea, Fr. Dwight Longenecker, Matt Warner, Lisa Hendey, and many others. The book has received rave reviews from the likes of Archbishops Dolan and Chaput. The foreword was written by Cardinal Sean O’Malley, O.F.M., and the afterword was written by Archbishop Timothy Dolan. I cannot hold a candle to these men, but let me add to those rave reviews. This book highlights the Church’s next avenue of evangelization: the world of new media. You might be thinking that this book is simply a “how-to” manual for using the Internet, but it is so much more than that. Yes, it covers some of the basics of blogging, social media, and other new technologies, but it also covers their importance. If you want to become an expert at New Media, this is not your book, but if you’re looking to learn why you should become an expert, then The Church and New Media is a must-read. What I enjoyed the most about this book is the different perspectives from experts in new media. Instead of trying to write expertly himself, Vogt finds the best and brightest in a variety of fields. At the same time, Vogt shows his own prowess for new media in the concluding chapter. The Catholic Church has a great opportunity to reach souls all over the world through the use of new media, and The Church and New Media: Blogging Converts, Online Activists, and Bishops Who Tweet will help to serve as a guide as we explore the expansive world of new media.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This is such an incredible book that is a must read for clergy and lay people. I was so inspired by all the contributors to the book. Not only does this book invite us to reconsider how we use our personal New Media avenues as building up the Church and the Gospel, but also reminds us of our call to evangelize through the use of New Media. This book covers everything. I am not the most tech saavy person, and this book answered many questions and concerns I had about venturing into the New Media This is such an incredible book that is a must read for clergy and lay people. I was so inspired by all the contributors to the book. Not only does this book invite us to reconsider how we use our personal New Media avenues as building up the Church and the Gospel, but also reminds us of our call to evangelize through the use of New Media. This book covers everything. I am not the most tech saavy person, and this book answered many questions and concerns I had about venturing into the New Media world. It covers the pros and cons, inspires with stories of incredible impacts on society and conversions, different ways to step into the New Media network, what to look out for and be aware of, different websites and tools to help get you plugged in. This book is definitely "New Media for Dummies," as it holds you hand through your walk on discovering the language of the Internet and the overwhelming amount of websites. It gives many starting off points for many different areas of interest. This book is perfect not only for those who are wary of jumping on the New Media bandwagon, but also for those to need to get out of their comfort zones and try different New Media approaches when reaching out to different audiences. I don't see how this book can't inspire even those who don't know how to use the remote for their television.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    This book is a must-read for anyone who is interested in sharing the faith. The saying used to be that if you couldn't share your business proposal on the back of a napkin or during an elevator ride then you might not have a winning plan. Something similar holds true with the Church and New Media, we have to be guides on the social and new media byways; more importantly we have to be able to use the tools and comnunicate the faith authentically. Brandon has done a great job editing this book and This book is a must-read for anyone who is interested in sharing the faith. The saying used to be that if you couldn't share your business proposal on the back of a napkin or during an elevator ride then you might not have a winning plan. Something similar holds true with the Church and New Media, we have to be guides on the social and new media byways; more importantly we have to be able to use the tools and comnunicate the faith authentically. Brandon has done a great job editing this book and sharing insights on the effective use of new and social media. Here is an interview with editor, Brandon Vogt on CatholicTV's ClearVoice program: http://www.catholictv.com/videos/vide...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    If you are involved in any kind of parish ministry, this is a must read. We overlook using new media like texting, Facebook pages, blogging, and Twitter as ways to get out messages about our ministries. One example given, a college based parish had a hard time getting parishioners to register so they invited everyone to bring their cell phones to Mass one Sunday. On that Sunday, the priest announced for everyone to pull out their cell phones and text a certain number. The parish was then able to If you are involved in any kind of parish ministry, this is a must read. We overlook using new media like texting, Facebook pages, blogging, and Twitter as ways to get out messages about our ministries. One example given, a college based parish had a hard time getting parishioners to register so they invited everyone to bring their cell phones to Mass one Sunday. On that Sunday, the priest announced for everyone to pull out their cell phones and text a certain number. The parish was then able to follow up with a link to an online registration that captured name, phone numbers and emails. The parishioners could then follow up with a more in-depth registration if they wanted. Genius!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Schawn schoepke

    I feel the book simply backed up a belief I have always held that if the apostles here today some of them would blog and obviously use the resources we have at hand today. Yet I strongly believe some, and Jesus included in this would not, it goes to that precise word of god thing, which can be used incorrectly I think sometimes. But I also wonder if Jesus would "Tweet", I think he would of given us the beatitudes in a manner like that but not his parables. The new media doesnt really answer the I feel the book simply backed up a belief I have always held that if the apostles here today some of them would blog and obviously use the resources we have at hand today. Yet I strongly believe some, and Jesus included in this would not, it goes to that precise word of god thing, which can be used incorrectly I think sometimes. But I also wonder if Jesus would "Tweet", I think he would of given us the beatitudes in a manner like that but not his parables. The new media doesnt really answer these questions but jumps more into how technology is used today by the church and its leaders and converts. Interesting but sometimes dry.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fr. Kyle

    Brandon Vogt has compiled a great group of essay with regard to the New Evangelization's moving into the digital continent. It covers a great many topics from the who's who of the American contribution of the digital revolution in the Church. Anyone looking for insights about the Church's understanding of New Media and the Internet should look no further. Brandon Vogt has compiled a great group of essay with regard to the New Evangelization's moving into the digital continent. It covers a great many topics from the who's who of the American contribution of the digital revolution in the Church. Anyone looking for insights about the Church's understanding of New Media and the Internet should look no further.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Moore

    Vogt brings together a very knowledgeable group of people to talk about the Church and New Media. I love the fact that each writer is an expert on the area that he/she is talking about. These writers are "in the trenches" so to speak and they bring their experience to bear here. It's a very informative read. Vogt brings together a very knowledgeable group of people to talk about the Church and New Media. I love the fact that each writer is an expert on the area that he/she is talking about. These writers are "in the trenches" so to speak and they bring their experience to bear here. It's a very informative read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    The first chapter by Fr. Robert Barron makes the book worth a read. There are other good stories throughout, but for the most part it's a very good reference book for anyone curious how the internet and technology is used in the Catholic faith. The first chapter by Fr. Robert Barron makes the book worth a read. There are other good stories throughout, but for the most part it's a very good reference book for anyone curious how the internet and technology is used in the Catholic faith.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Wilcox

    Read my full review at Austin CNM. Read my full review at Austin CNM.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joey

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anne Roat

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nedra Hains

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Etzel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  23. 4 out of 5

    Don Gonzalez

  24. 5 out of 5

    Agustin Estrada

  25. 4 out of 5

    Peggy Haslar

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sam Mauck

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan O'rourke

  28. 5 out of 5

    Molly

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adriel

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

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