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WIKIPEDIA says: 'H.P. Lovecraft's reputation has grown tremendously over the decades, and he is now commonly regarded as one of the most important horror writers of the 20th century, exerting an influence that is widespread, though often indirect.' H.P. Lovecraft's tales of the tentacled Elder God Cthulhu and his pantheon of alien deities were initially written for the pulp WIKIPEDIA says: 'H.P. Lovecraft's reputation has grown tremendously over the decades, and he is now commonly regarded as one of the most important horror writers of the 20th century, exerting an influence that is widespread, though often indirect.' H.P. Lovecraft's tales of the tentacled Elder God Cthulhu and his pantheon of alien deities were initially written for the pulp magazines of the 1920s and '30s. These astonishing tales blend elements of horror, science fiction and cosmic terror that are as powerful today as they were when they were first published. This tome collects together the very best of Lovecraft's tales of terror, including the complete Cthulhu Mythos cycle, just the way they were originally published. It will introduce a whole new generation of readers to Lovecraft's fiction, as well as being a must-buy for those fans who want all his work in a single, definitive, highly attractive volume.


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WIKIPEDIA says: 'H.P. Lovecraft's reputation has grown tremendously over the decades, and he is now commonly regarded as one of the most important horror writers of the 20th century, exerting an influence that is widespread, though often indirect.' H.P. Lovecraft's tales of the tentacled Elder God Cthulhu and his pantheon of alien deities were initially written for the pulp WIKIPEDIA says: 'H.P. Lovecraft's reputation has grown tremendously over the decades, and he is now commonly regarded as one of the most important horror writers of the 20th century, exerting an influence that is widespread, though often indirect.' H.P. Lovecraft's tales of the tentacled Elder God Cthulhu and his pantheon of alien deities were initially written for the pulp magazines of the 1920s and '30s. These astonishing tales blend elements of horror, science fiction and cosmic terror that are as powerful today as they were when they were first published. This tome collects together the very best of Lovecraft's tales of terror, including the complete Cthulhu Mythos cycle, just the way they were originally published. It will introduce a whole new generation of readers to Lovecraft's fiction, as well as being a must-buy for those fans who want all his work in a single, definitive, highly attractive volume.

30 review for Necronomicon: The Best Weird Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Olivier Delaye

    All right, with this one under my belt, I think I can safely say that I’ve read everything Lovecraft has ever written in his life. I will then skip introducing the author––who doesn’t need any introduction, anyway––and go through a rundown of some of my most beloved horror stories of his, which you can find in this collection. THE OUTSIDER is my favorite Lovecraft story bar none. It is also one of his shortest. Written in the first-person narrative (as is often the case in his fiction), it tells All right, with this one under my belt, I think I can safely say that I’ve read everything Lovecraft has ever written in his life. I will then skip introducing the author––who doesn’t need any introduction, anyway––and go through a rundown of some of my most beloved horror stories of his, which you can find in this collection. THE OUTSIDER is my favorite Lovecraft story bar none. It is also one of his shortest. Written in the first-person narrative (as is often the case in his fiction), it tells of a man (or is it?) who, after having lived as a recluse for what seems like a very long time in his darkened and lifeless castle (or is it?), decides one day to go out into the world and explore. There ensues a series of discoveries––with a devastating although somewhat anticipated reveal––which will seal the narrator’s fate forever. As said, this story is super short but masterfully executed, woven around the themes of loneliness, abnormality and the afterlife. The prose is as it should given the genre––divinely gothic, deliciously verbose and darkly purple. All in all, a masterpiece. THE DREAMS IN THE WITCH-HOUSE is my second favorite and the only one that actually gave me goosebumps while reading it for the first time in bed at night. This story of a math student who decides to rent a room in a cursed house in which a witch and her hellish amalgam of a familiar are said to have lived is downright disturbing and creepy and just too well written for comfort. Which makes it yet another masterpiece in the Lovecraft canon. THE HAUNTER OF THE DARK is my third most beloved Lovecraft story and also the last one he ever wrote (that we know of). Eschewing the first person for the third limited, Lovecraft treats us to a chilling account of what the protagonist, Robert Blake, discovers when, driven by his penchant for the occult, he decides to go and explore a haunted church in the town of Providence, RI. Here again the writing is on point as Lovecraft knows better than anyone how to create an atmosphere of claustrophobia and paranoia, playing unashamedly with the fear of the unknown and impending doom. Deeply steeped in the Cthulhu mythos, this story is a prime example of how curiosity can kill a cat. THE CALL OF CTHULHU. Although not the first Lovecraft story to introduce an element of the Cthulhu mythos (that would be Dagon, also included in this collection), this one is the first to feature the foul-smelling, tentacle-wielding and potbellied deity in all its greasy and nasty glory. Written as an epistolary short story, it gives an account of the discovery of Cthulhu via a series of documents left behind by the great uncle of the narrator, Francis Wayland Thurston. Three words: groundbreaking, masterful, perfect. THE RATS IN THE WALLS is another gothic masterpiece recounting the tale of Delapore, an American who decides to cross the pond and move to England into his ancestral manor, the ill-fated Exham Priory. After restoring it, Delapore soon discovers that something isn’t quite right about the place and, prompted by scurrying noises in the walls, decides to investigate. Lovecraft juggles many balls in this one––the haunted house, genetic mutations, cannibalism, forbidden worships and eldritch (doesn’t Lovecraft just love this word?) cults, the inescapability of heredity, mental disorder, etc.––providing us with nail-biting scenes of exploration and horror, and tying it all together (albeit loosely) into his infamous Cthulhu mythos. Definitely a winner. THE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH is yet another effective horror story set waist-deep in the Cthulhu mythos, and from what I’ve heard, a favorite of many Lovecraft aficionados. Told once again in the first person, the story is about a student (whose name is never revealed) who goes to the ruined seaside town of Innsmouth, Mass., for what he thinks will be a one-day trip. Lovecraft spares no words in describing the cursed town, and we soon understand that the nature of the curse boils down to an invasion of Innsmouth many years ago by the Deep Ones, an ancient people that came ashore from the bottom of the sea. From the town drunk with whom the narrator has a long (perhaps overlong?) conversation, we learn that the Deep Ones used to practice human sacrifices in Innsmouth and also did not hesitate to mate with local women, hence the fishy appearance of many of the inhabitants. The whole thing ends up with a big reveal, which for once isn’t as bad as one might expect for a Lovecraft story, and the author even gives us a long, very-well-written action scene toward the end, which is something rare enough to be mentioned and relished. I guess I could go on like this forever, as there are many other stories in this collection that are worth reading and rereading, but I will stop here for now. It’s late, and I think I heard something scurrying in the walls. Wonder what it is… OLIVIER DELAYE Author of the SEBASTEN OF ATLANTIS series The Forgotten Goddess

  2. 5 out of 5

    David

    Lovecraft has to be broken down into his constituent parts in order to be comprehensible. 1. Man 2. Mythographer 3. Writer The man, by far, is easily the most reprehensible and unforgivable. This may take a little explanation for those unfamiliar with the man and the writer. Firstly, HPL believed in a crude Social Darwinism/Eugenics married to a virulent racism/xenophobia and a despicable classism. When reading Necronomicon or any of his works all of these elements become impossible to ignore and Lovecraft has to be broken down into his constituent parts in order to be comprehensible. 1. Man 2. Mythographer 3. Writer The man, by far, is easily the most reprehensible and unforgivable. This may take a little explanation for those unfamiliar with the man and the writer. Firstly, HPL believed in a crude Social Darwinism/Eugenics married to a virulent racism/xenophobia and a despicable classism. When reading Necronomicon or any of his works all of these elements become impossible to ignore and are, virtually, shouted from the pages/screens. It is popular to dismiss these beliefs as being a part of the society he was raised in. Of course, he was raised in a racist, classist, xenophobic time, as well as a time when Social Darwinism, and especially eugenics, were very popular...amongst intellectuals. Still, other writers came out of such belief systems and their work was not penetrated by hate in the manner that HPL's work is. There is something almost infantile about this, which raises the specter of a facile Freudian reading of the man's character. The latter would not be very useful because it is culturally limited and scientifically invalid. It is enough to say that hate drives much of HPL's work and it makes this of limited value. The writer is another level that needs to be looked at because it suggests the same infantile and superficial understanding of the world as well. Firstly, there is very limited character development; the attitude of HPL to women is at best ambivalent; exposition is shaky, and HPL had a tin ear for dialogue. The prose is almost exclusively purple--even for his creaky, gothic constructions. No writer or reader will find anything at this level to learn from HPL. The only element of HPL's writing worth the reader's attention is that he may be the first Horror/Science-Fantasy writer to leave the big-bad alive and well and man's position relative to this as tenuous. The last element of HPL that should be looked at is his myth. Here is the one place where HPL shines. His creation of an ante-diluvian world of races not human on earth and others that came from off of earth is fascinating and worthy of study. Given the amount of fiction and 'fan-fiction' which his 'Cthulian' mythos has generated HPL remains a significant presence in the world of genre fiction--and, yes, there is a difference between genre and literature. For this reason, and this reason alone, HPL remains a writer worth revisiting. However, the reader needs to be prepared for the moral vacuity and hate which they will encounter in the work of HPL. Not to mention, the horrific writing, which is often responsible for some of the worst published writing I have ever come across. Rating: 3 out of 5 stars Not recommended for morally sensitive readers...or aesthetically inclined ones either.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Fantasia

    I suppose the two best words to describe my feelings on the work of the 20th century's most prolific horror writer are "mostly disappointing". THE GOOD I wasn't disappointed with everything. A bunch of stories stood out for me as being genuine, page-turning excitement: The Colour Out of Space, The Dunwich Horror, The Whisperer in Darkness, Dreams in the Witch House, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward were all outstanding pieces of spookery that still managed to give me I suppose the two best words to describe my feelings on the work of the 20th century's most prolific horror writer are "mostly disappointing". THE GOOD I wasn't disappointed with everything. A bunch of stories stood out for me as being genuine, page-turning excitement: The Colour Out of Space, The Dunwich Horror, The Whisperer in Darkness, Dreams in the Witch House, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward were all outstanding pieces of spookery that still managed to give me chills nearly 100 years after the time of writing, and that is one heck of an accomplishment. THE BAD Maybe it's the generation gap, but I find it very hard to get accustomed to stories written with little or no dialogue. Wave after wave of endless paragraphs -broken only ever so slightly by the odd letter or telegram -is a tedious way to tell a story. This book contains 34 short stories, and by the end of the 4th one I was begging for some actual character work and dialogue, rather than: "And then I went here, and then this happened, and by the way here are some lovely descriptions of New England architecture for no particular reason". Every one of these stories -ESPECIALLY Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath -is less a work of prose and more of a steady ramble intermittently made all the more jarring when Lovecraft tosses in unwieldy words like "Shub-Niggurath" or "Ia Azathoth Ia Ia Yargoth Leng-Zok", because phrases like that add so much to the story. The horror itself works occasionally, and when it does it's friggin awesome! But 80% of the time it's a melodramatic mess. I totally understand the "Jaws" method of horror, wherein the less you see of the monster, the more effective it is. But in Lovecraft's case, not only do we barely ever glimpse his infamous creatures, but whenever we DO catch a fleeting glimpse our protagonists -who are narrating these encounters -faint. Every. Single. Time. Did people in the 1920s just...FAINT a lot? Was fainting a nation-wide epidemic back then, like polio, or selfies? People in these stories faint at the drop of a fucking hat. I saw a rat. Faint! I heard a scary noise. Faint! I think there might be a piece of carrot stuck between my teeth. Faint! As for the monsters themselves, like I said, they're barely, BARELY present. Lovecraft's imagination is strong enough to dream up so many fantastic terrors, yet he seems more keen on keeping them to himself. Even his protagonists are stingy with details; their accounts of the horrors they witnessed are usually along the lines of: "And then I saw something that was so frightening that I can't even describe how frightening it was because its frightening-quotient was utterly indescribable but trust me, it was really frightening, so you should totally faint now." Lovecraft is also wont to repeat himself. A LOT. Yes, Howard, I know Arkham has "gambrel roofs". I know Nyarlathotep is a "crawling chaos", and I know Abdul Al-Hazred was known to be a "Mad Arab". I know this because after the first several hundred times you brought it up, it happened to stick. In "At The Mountains of Madness", if I'd had a dollar for every time Lovecraft used the words "decadent" and"demoniac", I could have purchased a very big yacht, or a very small country. Considering that these stories are supposed to make up The Cthulu Mythos, I was a little miffed (to say the least) when I turned the final page and realized that I could only recall Cthulu's name popping up twice. TWICE, in 850 pages. And even then it was probably in some context like: "And I thought I saw Cthulu, but then I fainted." I guess I was just hoping for something grander. Maybe Arkham Horror spoiled me, but I bought this book expecting an intricate tapestry of characters scattered throughout the same town, slowly unravelling the ancient mysteries of some hitherto-unknown supernatural force encroaching upon them from beyond time & space, finally uniting in some epic conclusion that would pit man against monster. Kinda like the Marvel Cinematic Universe, except instead of robots & superheroes it would be cosmic octopus monsters & hard-boiled 1920s detectives, embarking on their own unique individual adventures before coming together Avengers-style for the final curtain. Unfortunately, neither the monsters nor the humans receive much characterization. As mentioned, the monsters exist not on the page but solely in Lovecraft's mind, and the humans are usually dull & interchangeable. A few of these heroes seemed like they were ABOUT to get interesting, but then a cool breeze blew through their windows, naturally causing them to faint. The cover of this book states that these are "the best weird tales of H.P. Lovecraft". Here's hoping I never have to read the worst.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael || TheNeverendingTBR

    “We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.” Excellent collection of Lovecraft's stories, you've got most of his best ones in this collection; but it's such a big and somewhat cumbersome book. Took me years to get through it, bought it in 2014 (crazy I know) but obviously that wasn't continuous reading, I'd read a story from it and leave it for ages with the bookmark in; he can be difficult to read sometimes due t “We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.” Excellent collection of Lovecraft's stories, you've got most of his best ones in this collection; but it's such a big and somewhat cumbersome book. Took me years to get through it, bought it in 2014 (crazy I know) but obviously that wasn't continuous reading, I'd read a story from it and leave it for ages with the bookmark in; he can be difficult to read sometimes due to his writing style - it's slow-paced and sometimes difficult for me to interpret because sometimes it seems to me like he starts rambling and I'm like..what's going on? But I've been on a Lovecraft kick lately and I'm glad I finally finished most of his work, moving onto Eldritch Tales soon and that's me completed all of his fiction - as far as I know. My favourite stories in Necronomicon were.. 'The Rats in the Walls' 'The Tomb' 'The Dunwich Horror' 'The Shunned House' 'At the Mountains of Madness'

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear.” -H.P. Lovecraft This collection of weird fiction short stories and novellas is slightly inconsistent in terms of quality, but it contains so many genuinely original and thoroughly harrowing, sinister tales that, on the whole, I found it a highly enjoyable—and often exquisitely eerie—reading experience. That said, I’d really only recommend it for hardcore fans of Lovecraft; for everyone else, there are far better—by which I really mean far s “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear.” -H.P. Lovecraft This collection of weird fiction short stories and novellas is slightly inconsistent in terms of quality, but it contains so many genuinely original and thoroughly harrowing, sinister tales that, on the whole, I found it a highly enjoyable—and often exquisitely eerie—reading experience. That said, I’d really only recommend it for hardcore fans of Lovecraft; for everyone else, there are far better—by which I really mean far shorter—ways to get acquainted with him. At nearly 900 pages, this volume is better suited to those who’ve already explored his more famous stories, although you’ll find all of his most popular works here, too, and they are incredibly fun to revisit. If you’re also interested in delving deeper into his oeuvre, in dwelling amongst “all the snarling chaos and grinning fear that lurk behind life,” you will find much to savor here. Lovecraft was a very dark, very strange little monkey. List of Stories: Night-Gaunts Dagon The Statement of Randolph Carter The Doom The Came to Sarnath The Cats of Ulthar The Nameless City Herbert West - Reanimator* The Music of Erich Zann* The Lurking Fear* The Hound The Rats in the Walls* Under the Pyramids The Unnamable In the Vault* The Outsider The Horror at Red Hook The Colour Out of Space Pickman’s Model* The Call of Cthulhu* Cool Air The Shunned House The Silver Key The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness The Strange High House in the Mist The Dreams in the Witch-House From Beyond Through the Gates of the Silver Key At the Mountains of Madness The Shadow Over Innsmouth* The Shadow Out of Time The Haunter of the Dark The Thing on the Doorstep The Case of Charles Dexter Ward The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath To a Dreamer Afterword: A Gentleman of Providence by Stephen Jones * = personal favorite

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    It seriously took a publisher how much of a century to title a collection of Lovecraft's stories "Necronomicon"? Like seventy years? Did it really just not occur to anyone? Shouldn't the first collected volume of his stories have been called that? I blame August Derleth. Speaking of whom, I don't believe this edition features the re-edited versions of the texts available in the Library of America edition of Lovecraft. Necronomicon includes the older editions as published by Derleth's Arkham House It seriously took a publisher how much of a century to title a collection of Lovecraft's stories "Necronomicon"? Like seventy years? Did it really just not occur to anyone? Shouldn't the first collected volume of his stories have been called that? I blame August Derleth. Speaking of whom, I don't believe this edition features the re-edited versions of the texts available in the Library of America edition of Lovecraft. Necronomicon includes the older editions as published by Derleth's Arkham House, featuring Derleth's... let's call them "bold typographical choices", including italicizing the second half of the final sentence in many stories to heighten tension and irritate me. Oh also! There's a rather nice map of Arkham, Massachusetts printed on the front and back endpapers. Admittedly it's very similar to the map accompanying the Arkham entry in The Dictionary of Imaginary Places, but never mind that. Endpaper maps! Whooooo. At least it's rather better than Necronomicon's other illustrations, which are for some reason the same three pictures of a shifty-lookin' guy, a pile of old books and papers, and a megalith, repeated fairly randomly at the first and last pages of many stories. Why not? Also it's bound really poorly, basically a paperbound book with hard boards, but this is true of virtually all hardcover editions published these days, which is lamentable but hardly unique to this book. I sound like I'm being pretty hard on Necronomicon, but I was totally pleased with it. I like having a single-volume hardcover edition of most of Lovecraft's stories with the single most appropriate title possible. Not all stories are included--notable omissions include "Nyarlathotep" and "Beyond the Wall of Sleep"--but it includes most important works, such as "The Call of Cthulhu", "At the Mountains of Madness", "The Whisperer in Darkness", "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath", and so on. That's really all I ask of a Necronomicon. Also the italics are kinda like eldritch alien text, yeah? Sure. *Edit* - Ok, looking back, there are more than just those three repeating illustrations. There are also pictures of some houses.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    New life goal: to write a cult book about another book that doesn't exist. New life goal: to write a cult book about another book that doesn't exist.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    You know I picked this up because I'd been told it gathered the Cthulhu mythos stories. Actually we start off with some of his early horror work (Cool Air, The rats in the Walls, etc.). Later on we do get into the Cthulhu stories. These are (as always with Lovecraft) reliably horrific and very well written. Enjoy. You know I picked this up because I'd been told it gathered the Cthulhu mythos stories. Actually we start off with some of his early horror work (Cool Air, The rats in the Walls, etc.). Later on we do get into the Cthulhu stories. These are (as always with Lovecraft) reliably horrific and very well written. Enjoy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    The five star rating for this book is not because I think every story (or even most of them) were 5 stars, or because Lovecraft was a great writer (though I do think he was a better writer than he's often given credit for). It's because these stories are essential reading. Like him or hate him, Lovecraft casts a long, dark shadow over all of American fantasy and horror, and in fact, the stories are mostly pretty good, in a very dated way. Yes, Lovecraft wrote purple. Yes, his characterization is The five star rating for this book is not because I think every story (or even most of them) were 5 stars, or because Lovecraft was a great writer (though I do think he was a better writer than he's often given credit for). It's because these stories are essential reading. Like him or hate him, Lovecraft casts a long, dark shadow over all of American fantasy and horror, and in fact, the stories are mostly pretty good, in a very dated way. Yes, Lovecraft wrote purple. Yes, his characterization is usually pretty thin. And yes, he was a horrible racist and it shows in his writing. But no one who touched this genre after him has been untouched by it, and if you have ever been awed or frightened or scared by a tale of eldritch horrors, unfathomable beings from beyond time and space, bubbling squamous obscenities so horrible that the very sight of them will erode your sanity, or vast, alien, cosmic gods inimical to humans and regarding us the way we regard germs... well, that's all Lovecraftian influence. You also have Lovecraft to thank for a raft of awesome boardgames and RPGs, from the classic Call of Cthulhu to Eldritch Horror and Cthulhu Wars. While Lovecraft's stories are typically labeled fantasy (hence his likeness being the trophy for the World Fantasy Award), he was really a science fiction writer, or perhaps science fantasy. His Elder Gods and the inhuman things that served them were not "gods" in the sense of being truly divine, but rather vast cosmic powers who exist on a scale beyond human comprehension. The "magic" sometimes found in his stories, even spells read from books like the Necronomicon, are likewise means of bending reality in ways Man Was Not Meant to Know, but ultimately his creatures are aliens, not demons, and his supernatural horror stems from science perverted beyond recognition, not from arcane witchcraft. Whenever something in the way of a more "traditional" monster appears in a Lovecraft story, like a mere ghost or vampire or werewolf, it's probably something much, much worse. This collection contains most of Lovecraft's better known stories, focusing largely on his Cthulhu mythos cycle, so there is lots of squamous horror here. All the familiar names are here: Cthulhu, Hastur, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep, Yog-Sothoth, Dagon, etc. Monsters of all shapes and sizes, and degenerate inbred New England townsfolk who usually have nasty things in their barns, wells, attics, and woods. If you want a Lovecraft primer, this is a good start. I'd read all these stories before, but many of them I had not read for years, so I enjoyed going through the classics again even if they don't bring me quite the same feeling of existential horror they did when I was a teenager. Here is the complete list of stories in this audiobook: Dagon Herbert West, Reanimator The Lurking Fear The Rats in the Walls The Whisperer in the Darkness Cool Air In the Vault The Call of Cthulhu The Color Out of Space The Horror at Red Hook The Music of Eric Zahn The Shadow Out of Time The Dunwich Horror The Haunter of the Dark The Outsider The Shunned House The Unnameable The Thing on the Doorstep Under the Pyramids It's a fine collection of creepy and fantasy stories, and great inspiration before playing a game of Arkham Horror or Call of Cthulhu.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Necronomicon: the Best Weird Tales of H.P. Lovecraft was my first taste of true classic horror—I mean I’ve read Poe, Irving, Shelley, etc. but for some reason I don’t think about classic horror when I think of those author’s stories. Lovecraft is the epitome of classic horror in my book. I haven’t read any of Algernon Blackwood’s spooky tales but from what I just read no one can beat Lovecraft. I finished reading Jane Austen’s seven large novels not too long ago, and I was astounded by her writi Necronomicon: the Best Weird Tales of H.P. Lovecraft was my first taste of true classic horror—I mean I’ve read Poe, Irving, Shelley, etc. but for some reason I don’t think about classic horror when I think of those author’s stories. Lovecraft is the epitome of classic horror in my book. I haven’t read any of Algernon Blackwood’s spooky tales but from what I just read no one can beat Lovecraft. I finished reading Jane Austen’s seven large novels not too long ago, and I was astounded by her writing ability. I think I just read someone who can not only rival her but top her. Lovecraft’s writing prose is one of the best of the classic writers I’ve read this year. The way he describes his monsters and establishes a creepy scene is definitely something worth studying if you’re a writer. If you didn’t know, the Necronomicon is a collection of his best works. They aren’t all of his works. There were a few stories that took a while before getting to the “good stuff” but most immediately drew you into the story. My favorite is Herbert West—Reanimator. Not only did it have a necromancy-like feel to it like Frankenstein, but Lovecraft went into how West began his studies in bringing the dead to life and it completely drew my interest! It was not only creepy but cool as F%#K! I also liked the Doom that Came to Sarnath, The Colour out of Space, and the Call of Cthulhu (to name a few!). If you love spooky tales and haven’t read Lovecraft I totally recommend that you do. You will not be disappointed! I’ve enjoyed reading these tales this past month and I really looked forward to my lunch hour at work because I could read my next Lovecraft story. I haven’t loved reading this much in a long time. I also loved some of the audiobooks. If I forgot my book at home I would listen to one on youtube. The first youtube page I listened to was Horror Babble (with readings by Ian Gordan). What. A. Treat!! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIvp... The next youtube page I came across that was just as good, if not better, was Horror Readings by G.M. Danielson. His introduction to each of the books is a bit much. I don't like the modern demonic horror stuff, but his readings are AMAZE-Ballz! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBw8... I hope you enjoy these stories just as much as I did! Don’t let the shadows bite!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Irena

    Cyclopean. p. 454: Carter now spoke with the leaders int he soft language of cats, and learned that his ancient friendship with the species was well known and often spoken of in the places where cats congregate. He had not been unmarked in Ulthar when he passed through, and the sleek old cats had remembered how he petted them after they had attended to the hungry zoogs who looked evilly at a small black kitten. And they recalled, too, how he had welcomed the very little kitten who came to see hi Cyclopean. p. 454: Carter now spoke with the leaders int he soft language of cats, and learned that his ancient friendship with the species was well known and often spoken of in the places where cats congregate. He had not been unmarked in Ulthar when he passed through, and the sleek old cats had remembered how he petted them after they had attended to the hungry zoogs who looked evilly at a small black kitten. And they recalled, too, how he had welcomed the very little kitten who came to see him at the inn, and how he had given it a saucer of rich cream in the morning before he left. The grandfather of that very little kitten was the leader of the army now assembled, for he had seen the evil procession from a far hill and recognized the prisoner as a sworn friend of his kind on earth and in the land of dream. [The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath] What can I say, I've become a Lovecraft fan. While most Lovecraftian stories can be summed up to: "something unspeakably terrifying happened but it was so horrible that I cannot actually describe it", his ideas, weird universes and the beings within are unique. What seems cliche to us now is largely thanks to him (except maybe Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!). I stole the following from /r/lovecraft: "One time, this guy went to a place, and it was SO spooky. But, being a man of science, and of an inquisitive mind, he continued going to the spooky place, and damn was it spooky. Eventually, he became obsessed with the spooky place, and the locals, who know about but don't speak of spooky things, shunned him. Then he died under mysterious circumstances that everybody knew was because of the spooky thing, but nobody would admit." :'D Before Lovecraft, horror was about killers, kidnappers, ghosts - human faults and sins and divine (or other) punishment in the sense of you reap what you sow. Lovecraft instead creates a vision of a vast cosmos completely indifferent to humans, and their earthly bullsh*t, filled with forces before which we are helpless, which we cannot hope to understand, and which would destroy our minds if we only saw or knew. We could categorize him as a writer of cosmic horror. Obviously, he wrote a lot so not all stories fall under this category, but the best ones do. I recommend The Cats of Ulthar, The Shadow over Innsmouth, The Call of Cthulhu, The Outsider, The Thing on the Doorstep, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath and the Whisperer In Darkness. P.S. I listened to many of these stories on youtube, there's a fantastic channel who does readings of various horror writers: horrorbabble

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Monroe

    H.P. Lovecraft has been on my list for years now. Horror fiction isn't usually my genre of choice, but I've heard people cite Lovecraft for so long that I felt a duty to read him and see what all the fuss is about. To be clear, after reading him I still don't understand what all the fuss is about. As far as Lovecraft's obvious (let's not kid ourselves) racism, it's my belief that it is possible to separate the art from the artist. I still watch Roman Polanski films decades after Polanski was accu H.P. Lovecraft has been on my list for years now. Horror fiction isn't usually my genre of choice, but I've heard people cite Lovecraft for so long that I felt a duty to read him and see what all the fuss is about. To be clear, after reading him I still don't understand what all the fuss is about. As far as Lovecraft's obvious (let's not kid ourselves) racism, it's my belief that it is possible to separate the art from the artist. I still watch Roman Polanski films decades after Polanski was accused and pled guilty to rape, I don't avoid Tom Cruise films because he's the foremost member of a psychotic cult (just because the films are usually supposed to be good), and the same with regard to other unsavory figures like Woody Allen and Mel Gibson. However, I do believe that with Lovecraft it's different. The man's racism is clearly evident in his stories. I wouldn't watch a Roman Polanski film in which the protagonist raped a 13-year-old, and the protagonists here often serve as mouthpieces for Lovecraft's racist views (and no, "he was a product of a racist society" does not and should not excuse him). There is no purpose, as far as I could tell, for any of the racism present in these stories. They don't advance the plots in any way and the overtly racist characters - like one who calls his dog "niggerman" - are not portrayed as villains. No, they're the good guys. Don't get me wrong, taking a stand against an obvious racist is much easier when you don't like any of his stories, and I don't like any of these stories. Not one - even though they're all so similar there might as well just be one. If someone could explain to me what literary merit H.P. Lovecraft has - other than merely serving to inspire Stephen King and other genre writers - I would be grateful. There is nothing the tiniest bit scary here (other than the aforementioned racism). When Lovecraft isn't ripping off better writers, like Mary Shelley - whose "Frankenstein" obviously served as inspiration for tales like "Herbert West: Reanimator" - Lovecraft is just writing about the same alien-like creatures who are rarely if ever seen but who cause the male protagonists to faint all the same. Once I'd gotten halfway through I just started skimming the remaining stories. I'm confident I didn't miss anything because I read them all in the first half. Overrated, repetitive, and boring are the three words that I'll associate with "Lovecraft" from here on. Oh, and racist. Don't waste your time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christian Giovanni

    I could not give this book five stars in good conscious, and I will explain why. It's no secret that Lovecraft was a deeply racist individual. Because children also browse Goodreads, I want parents to know that this compilation contains overt racist slurs and connotations. Of course, one can argue that this is just a product of the author's imagination. I respectfully disagree. Although, Lovecraft was a brilliant writer, the writer's overt hatred of other races sometimes poured out into his writ I could not give this book five stars in good conscious, and I will explain why. It's no secret that Lovecraft was a deeply racist individual. Because children also browse Goodreads, I want parents to know that this compilation contains overt racist slurs and connotations. Of course, one can argue that this is just a product of the author's imagination. I respectfully disagree. Although, Lovecraft was a brilliant writer, the writer's overt hatred of other races sometimes poured out into his writing. He was simply a product of the era he lived in. If you're like me and this doesn't really detract from the genius of Lovecraft's writing, then I strongly recommend this compilation.

  14. 5 out of 5

    11811 (Eleven)

    This is the best audio edition I've come across for Lovecraft. The quality is excellent but I'm dropping a star because there are no chapter titles. How can you have a short story collection without chapter titles? This is the best audio edition I've come across for Lovecraft. The quality is excellent but I'm dropping a star because there are no chapter titles. How can you have a short story collection without chapter titles?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jon Kevin Melhus

    If i was stranded on a little island with just one book, this would be it. The best horror stories ever written. Could also be used as a chair or a little table in this scenario. It's huge. If i was stranded on a little island with just one book, this would be it. The best horror stories ever written. Could also be used as a chair or a little table in this scenario. It's huge.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kat Hooper

    There are sacraments of evil as well as of good about us, and we live and move to my belief in an unknown world, a place where there are caves and shadows and dwellers in twilight. It is possible that man may sometimes return on the track of evolution, and it is my belief that an awful lore is not yet dead. —Arthur Machen (quoted as an introduction to “The Horror at Red Hook”) Everyone must read a little Lovecraft and Blackstone Audio’s recently published edition of Necronomicon: The Best Weird Ta There are sacraments of evil as well as of good about us, and we live and move to my belief in an unknown world, a place where there are caves and shadows and dwellers in twilight. It is possible that man may sometimes return on the track of evolution, and it is my belief that an awful lore is not yet dead. —Arthur Machen (quoted as an introduction to “The Horror at Red Hook”) Everyone must read a little Lovecraft and Blackstone Audio’s recently published edition of Necronomicon: The Best Weird Tales of H.P. Lovecraft is, in my opinion, the perfect way to do that. Like re-animated corpses, Lovecraft’s most popular stories from the 1920s and 1930s pulp magazines are brought back to life by some of the best readers in the business: Paul Michael Garcia, Bronson Pinchot, Stephen R. Thorne, Keith Szarabajka, Adam ... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Tombstone Lives!

    NOTES ON THE STORIES The Colour Out Of Space = WIN. And it's a stand-alone story. You don't need to know anything about the mythos for this one. Pickman's Model = WIN. Another stand-alone story, without reference to the mythos. Actually very creepy. The Shadow Over Innsmouth = WIN. A good introduction to the mythos, and a great introduction Lovecraft's story-telling. A perfectly crafted, perfectly creepy tale. NOTES ON THE STORIES The Colour Out Of Space = WIN. And it's a stand-alone story. You don't need to know anything about the mythos for this one. Pickman's Model = WIN. Another stand-alone story, without reference to the mythos. Actually very creepy. The Shadow Over Innsmouth = WIN. A good introduction to the mythos, and a great introduction Lovecraft's story-telling. A perfectly crafted, perfectly creepy tale.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mizuki

    This is my H P. Lovecraft's Dream Book! The book design is grand, it also contents most of Lovecraft's major short novels. I borrowed the book from library but I still totally want to own it! This is my H P. Lovecraft's Dream Book! The book design is grand, it also contents most of Lovecraft's major short novels. I borrowed the book from library but I still totally want to own it!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Well that wasn’t worth the hype. Didn’t really enjoy the casual racism or misogyny. The white guy investigates a haunted looking building story was done to death.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bogdan

    This is my kind of horror! Lovecraft was a giant genius of this field! He had a lot of groundbreaking ideeas. The audio version was also astounding well made.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Man I love this guy. Man I wish he wasn't such a rampant xenophobic, anti semitic, racist, douchebag. Man does he have a weirdly shaped head or what? Also does Cthulu remind anyone else of the Flying Spaghetti Monster? This is a fantastic collection of amazing narrators kicking ass on some truly classic tales of giant cosmic sea monsters and abominations from beyond the stars that are simply to terrible for our poor, puny little brains to even begin to comprehend. It never ceases to amaze me how H. Man I love this guy. Man I wish he wasn't such a rampant xenophobic, anti semitic, racist, douchebag. Man does he have a weirdly shaped head or what? Also does Cthulu remind anyone else of the Flying Spaghetti Monster? This is a fantastic collection of amazing narrators kicking ass on some truly classic tales of giant cosmic sea monsters and abominations from beyond the stars that are simply to terrible for our poor, puny little brains to even begin to comprehend. It never ceases to amaze me how H.P. can achieve truly mind boggling levels of cheese soaked melodrama one second only to blow my mind with the depth of his understanding of the human psyche the next. I don't if that's skill or a really crazy person managing to be rational for five minutes. I imagine H.P was absolutely insufferable to be around and the tiny amount of research I've done into the man himself reveals a dude with a staggering amount of personal/mental issues and appalling views on everyone who wasn't male and white but darned if he doesn't spin a great story. I get lost in this man's world's which I think is what is supposed to happen. I start falling and I don't know where I'll end up but I can't do anything to stop it and I'm frightened but ecstatic at the same time. It feels amazing and horrifying and I get those little frissons of fear running up my spine and sometimes I laugh out loud because it's all so totally ridiculous and then I'm gasping because I've suddenly seen where a hundred other authors got their ideas from. He's like the ultimate origin story author. It takes no time at all to see why so many people keep rewriting his stories or using them as the jumping off point for even more macabre, mind blowing monsters and worlds. This is 100% worth listening to. My personal favorite is "The Whisperer in the Dark" a truly edge of your seat thriller that gave me, of all things, an entirely new perspective on Stephen King's "IT." I'm also a total sucker for any of his "ancient city" stories where some hapless adventurer realizes giant lizard men once ruled the world (and might still be around). This is a perfect recording to sip from as you're driving home from work or lying in bed at night. Just a touch of drama filled darkness to send you off to sleep at night. Or keep you awake till dawn. Whichever.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David

    Technically, as I averaged out each specific story, the rating turned out to be a 3.5, but given Lovecraft's literary impact and some genuinely great tales of horror, I decided to boost it up to a four instead of downgrading it to a three. It was difficult to continue at certain times as Lovecraft's tales are often formulaic, following the same basic storytelling structure, but fortunately as it progressed the style became more varied. My favorites were: The Statement of Randolph Carter, The Cat Technically, as I averaged out each specific story, the rating turned out to be a 3.5, but given Lovecraft's literary impact and some genuinely great tales of horror, I decided to boost it up to a four instead of downgrading it to a three. It was difficult to continue at certain times as Lovecraft's tales are often formulaic, following the same basic storytelling structure, but fortunately as it progressed the style became more varied. My favorites were: The Statement of Randolph Carter, The Cats of Ulthar, The Nameless City, Herbert West - Reanimator, The Lurking Fear, The Hound, The Outsider, The Color Out Of Space, Cool Air, The Dunwich Horror, The Whisperer in Darkness, The Strange High House in the Mist, From Beyond, At the Mountains of Madness, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, The Shadow Out of Time, and finally, the Thing on the Doorstep. The others were in my opinion either mediocre, or in some cases just plain awful. I'm still glad I read this collection, however, as I've always wanted to read Lovecraft's body of work.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    A collection of Lovecraft, and what better collection is there? To reiterate and reflect the thoughts of countless individuals: this is essential supernatural horror. But, to put forward my own commentary, I shall endeavour: The tales laid-out here are a trove of flawless narrative, impeccable originality and are told with such flair for language and charm; stories interweave, threads unravel and sanity is wholly drained throughout. Such keen attention to the progression of the stories, the hint A collection of Lovecraft, and what better collection is there? To reiterate and reflect the thoughts of countless individuals: this is essential supernatural horror. But, to put forward my own commentary, I shall endeavour: The tales laid-out here are a trove of flawless narrative, impeccable originality and are told with such flair for language and charm; stories interweave, threads unravel and sanity is wholly drained throughout. Such keen attention to the progression of the stories, the hints of the grotesque therein and the pacing is paid that never is the sense of foreboding lost and never does the tentative withdrawal of information subtract from the unfolding hideousness. Lovecraft leads the imagination to places of grandiose terror that none other can parallel, of classic horror there is simply no better. There's a reason why Lovecraft is often cited as the master of the macabre, and this is it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chrysten Lofton

    No specific spoilers, but general descriptions of style and content ahead. Read at your own risk. Reasons I didn't like Necronomicon that had nothing to do with the book itself: Not a big fan of classic literature, I have to work very hard to enjoy it, if I even can. The entire pace of Necro was dull to me. I remained bored 89% of the time. The audiobook readers did their best, and sometimes they sounded good, but I found their voices calm, soothing, and mildly dull. I like heavy dialogue and charac No specific spoilers, but general descriptions of style and content ahead. Read at your own risk. Reasons I didn't like Necronomicon that had nothing to do with the book itself: Not a big fan of classic literature, I have to work very hard to enjoy it, if I even can. The entire pace of Necro was dull to me. I remained bored 89% of the time. The audiobook readers did their best, and sometimes they sounded good, but I found their voices calm, soothing, and mildly dull. I like heavy dialogue and characterization and I feel like this book starved me of both. That may be a HPL style choice and may be the problem with classics, not sure. Reasons I didn't like Necronomicon that had everything to do with the book itself: Lovecraft constantly describes things as: Indescribable, unnameable, unmentionable, unspeakable, unutterable. If this were infrequent, I could get over it, but it was every. single. story. I realize he's long gone and unavailable for criticism from the year 2016, but you're a writer HPL. Do your job. If you can't describe it, for the love all things, let some other writer do it. Racism. Yes, I realize it was like the 1930s. No, that did not make it any less annoying to read. I stomached it because I wanted to hear the stories, and I'm not in favor or censorship or the plug-your-ears-and-it-will-go-away method of reading old stuff. Racism was more rampant in that time. Still a huge distraction trying to read this in 2016. Repetitive short horror story algorithm: My husband and I share an audible account and sometimes I wasn't sure if my audiobook had backtracked, because the next story would sound so much like the last story. It was a HUGE annoyance, easily my number one complaint, and made me want to stop reading. I realize lots of authors do this, but I guess the difference is, some pull it off. He didn't. There was not enough definition or uniqueness between stories to just shrug off the repetitiveness. This was such a problem, that I would often times end up tuning out part of the story, and when I came back in, I still knew where I was because the set-ups were so damn close. Never once came out of zoning out and thought, "Oh man, better rewind." [ Let the record also show that I don't normally zone out of any book. ] Positives: My favorite stories (And despite the redundancy and problems, I would give them 5 stars) were Whisperer in Darkness and The Thing On The Doorstep. WiD just flat out scared the shit out of me. I have a big alien fear, but it was just so believable and so interesting and uncomfortable. The second story was just creepy rad. I liked the body-switching. The monsters, cults, otherworldliness, and thinness of reality is the real bread-and-butter of a Lovecraft tale. It's a normal person who ends up standing face to face with Gods and Monsters, with their comfortable and safe fabric of reality slipping out of their fingers like sand, replaced only with blatant offence. There's a message to his writing, and I think that message is, 'Your comfortable and polite reality can and will be interrupted by things bigger than you.' While I had almost no fun reading Lovecraft, I can see hugely where Stephen King was influenced by his work--(It's mainly the slow build of clues leading to a huge manifestation of terror. IT was a great nod to Lovecraft, with the entire town of Derry having such a rich and dreadful History with the creature before the protags even face it)--that was rewarding. Lovecraft also connects his worlds, both human and hellish (another thing King/Hill borrowed). Towns, colleges, families, and literature often come back in reference from story to story, and it gave the feeling that every fate was bound. I loved how characters could teeter on the edge of madness for a while, before they went one way or another. I loved how he made the nightmare real by giving it evidence before letting us see the thing in all its hideous glory. I feel like Lovecraft fanfiction could be the bomb, or postmodern adaptations. If not steeped in adverbs and unnecessarily verbose language, Lovecraft may not have been such a bitter cup of tea. I feel like its also fair to note that i went into this book completely free of influence (except knowing HPL influenced King). I never read HPL in school, he was never recommended to me, and I was never briefed on what to expect. If you have issues already with classic lit, read at your own risk. If you love classics and horror, and feel like you can deal with the redundancy, these worlds are simply terrifying, and they will make your skin crawl.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Seán Downey

    The Necronomicon is pretty much the complete works of H.P Lovecraft. I cannot go into depth on all of his stories so I'll try to cover his stories as a hole if I can, but first. His writing style! Lovecraft's style is complex, when it comes to him there are two types of people, those who will hate the way he writes horror and those who will love the way he writes horror. Most of the time when he describes creatures he will give the basics of what it looks like, i.e, "Something very big, loud an The Necronomicon is pretty much the complete works of H.P Lovecraft. I cannot go into depth on all of his stories so I'll try to cover his stories as a hole if I can, but first. His writing style! Lovecraft's style is complex, when it comes to him there are two types of people, those who will hate the way he writes horror and those who will love the way he writes horror. Most of the time when he describes creatures he will give the basics of what it looks like, i.e, "Something very big, loud and terrifying" so that the reader will be able to picture their own version of the creature. Now I will talk about a number of stories: STORIES Famous for such names as, "Cthulhu, Dagon and The Old Ones" Lovecraft is responsible for some of the most terrifying creatures created in Horror literature and as such some of the most famous stories, mostly great but some really bad because Lovecraft can sometimes tend to not know what he want's to write about and how to write about what he wants to write about. If you enjoy Classic Horror and a dark gothic setting you will love This collection, but be warned, some stories should be left alone, I will not say which ones because its different for everyone. For me I despised one of his critically acclaimed stories while liking some of his lesser known work. So by all means buy this, it fits right into any horror readers book collection.

  26. 5 out of 5

    msleighm

    I wanted to read this because I am a Steampunk fan: octipi, Lovecraft, and Cthulhu... Audiobook with two narrators. This is a short story collection. Like most, there are some I liked better than others. The peculiarity is, I want the shorter stories to be longer and the longer stories, shorter. Overall, I'm glad I got through it. I wanted to read this because I am a Steampunk fan: octipi, Lovecraft, and Cthulhu... Audiobook with two narrators. This is a short story collection. Like most, there are some I liked better than others. The peculiarity is, I want the shorter stories to be longer and the longer stories, shorter. Overall, I'm glad I got through it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Overhaul

    Excellent and weird. This is the best edition I've come across for Lovecraft, beautiful illustrations. A true fan must have. Excellent and weird. This is the best edition I've come across for Lovecraft, beautiful illustrations. A true fan must have.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crowinator

    Finally, Hoopla has something I want to check out (aside from comics, GNs).

  29. 4 out of 5

    Coco.V

    🎁 FREE on Amazon today (3/3/2020)! 🎁

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beth The Vampire

    Stories in this collection that I read: Night-Gaunts Dagon The Statement of Randolf Carter The Doom that Came to Sarnath The Cats of Ulthar The Nameless City Herbert West - Reanimator The Music of Erich Zann The Lurking Fear The Hound The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwhich Horror At the Mountains of Madness The Shadow over Innsmouth In his house at R'lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming. H.P Lovecraft. The creator of what later became known as the Lovecraftian genre. This isn't your normal ghosts, bloody bodies, possesse Stories in this collection that I read: Night-Gaunts Dagon The Statement of Randolf Carter The Doom that Came to Sarnath The Cats of Ulthar The Nameless City Herbert West - Reanimator The Music of Erich Zann The Lurking Fear The Hound The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwhich Horror At the Mountains of Madness The Shadow over Innsmouth In his house at R'lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming. H.P Lovecraft. The creator of what later became known as the Lovecraftian genre. This isn't your normal ghosts, bloody bodies, possessed dolls kind of stuff, this is true cosmic horror. The terror of being faced with things beyond mortal comprehension. Of Old Ones, and dark books, and the god sleeping beneath the water under our very feet. And H.P is the master of this stuff. The main stories that I'm going to focus on are, arguably, his most famous, and are all linked in terms of their ideas and focus around the Old Ones and the monster that is Cthulhu: The The Call of Cthulhu, The Dunwhich Horror, At the Mountains of Madness, The Shadow over Innsmouth. In the whole spectacle there was a persistent, pervasive hint of stupendous secrecy and potential revelation. It was as if these stark, nightmare spires marked the pylons of a frightful gateway into forbidden spheres of dream, and complex gulfs of remote time, space, and ultradimensionality. I could not help feeling that they were evil things - mountains of madness whose farther slopes looked out over some accursed ultimate abyss. Each of these stories, while set in entirely different places, with entirely different characters, all focus on the Old Ones, the beings that came before, the Shoggoths, the dreaded book written by a madman called the Necronomicon, and the dreaded Cthulhu. The stand out was the the tale of Cthulhu itself and The Shadow over Innsmouth, the latter managing to make you feel claustrophobic even out in the open in a small town. Each story contains an element of cosmic terror, horror of the unknown, and realisation of how small we are in the universe that there are things we cannot and do not want to understand. At the Mountains of Madness takes you into the Antarctic, to the hidden city that lies beyond the mountains, of the alien beings who built atop the Earth before humans who have retreated underground, and who wait to be revived once more. The longest story in this collection, and the most difficult to get through just because of all the damn exposition. The Dunwhich Horror focuses on a being who is not of this world, and a family trying to release the Old Ones upon the town. This actually uses some common horror tropes familiar to modern horror, but added in some of that cosmic universe altering stuff as well. Innsmouth, a town most ignores and which is almost wiped off the map contains horrors from the sea. Which I felt was the most character driven piece of all the stories I read in this collection. And The The Call of Cthulhu shows the beast itself emerge from its tomb, opened by accident by sailors, and worshiped by people though-out the world. This is horror at its best. Lovecraft loves description and seems to hate dialogue, but also has such a knowledge of things that seem so strange; like geology and archaeology, with these activities often explicitly detailed. What Lovecraft did have was an extremely hyperactive imagination. He questioned human's understanding of science and the universe, was a heavily superstitious person, and believed that people were not able to escape their ultimate fate. All of this is reflected in his stories. He was a deeply interesting man, and his stories reflect a great mind. Now, Lovecraft is not for everyone. These stories were written in the 1930s mostly, which means the language is truely something else. Often overwritten to the point where I felt like I was going to be driven mad by that alone, what stands out here is the world that Lovecraft created that even permeates through to today's popular culture. Metallica have a song about Cthulhu, the same beast itself was featured on an episode of South Park, and there are video games and board games and other novels written in the same world. I even have a god damn little Cthulhu stuffed toy! (And it's so adorable with all it's little tentacles!) Lovecraft would be rolling in his gave. It's sad that the absolutely mad bastard died before his works became popular. And he was completely mad. You would have to be to write stories like this.

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