web site hit counter Liberation: The Unofficial and Unauthorised Guide to Blake's 7 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Liberation: The Unofficial and Unauthorised Guide to Blake's 7

Availability: Ready to download

From its first appearance in 1978 to its final episode in 1981, Blake's 7 was a series which pushed back the boundaries of what was possible in TV science fiction. Despite the attempts made by critics over the years to deride it for its low-budget special effects, sometimes-dubious costume design and overly middle-class casting, Blake's 7 continues to remain popular and to From its first appearance in 1978 to its final episode in 1981, Blake's 7 was a series which pushed back the boundaries of what was possible in TV science fiction. Despite the attempts made by critics over the years to deride it for its low-budget special effects, sometimes-dubious costume design and overly middle-class casting, Blake's 7 continues to remain popular and to gain new audiences, due to its intelligent treatment of powerful themes of human evil, rebellion, love and death. In this book, Alan Stevens and Fiona Moore go beyond the stereotypes and look at the background to and the writing of the stories. Including technical details, overviews of the production of the series and in-depth analyses of every episode, together with a number of previously-unpublished photographs, this book is the ideal companion for anyone interested in the development of TV science fiction during the late seventies. .,." a wealth of detail about the early development of the series." From the foreword by series producer David Maloney.


Compare

From its first appearance in 1978 to its final episode in 1981, Blake's 7 was a series which pushed back the boundaries of what was possible in TV science fiction. Despite the attempts made by critics over the years to deride it for its low-budget special effects, sometimes-dubious costume design and overly middle-class casting, Blake's 7 continues to remain popular and to From its first appearance in 1978 to its final episode in 1981, Blake's 7 was a series which pushed back the boundaries of what was possible in TV science fiction. Despite the attempts made by critics over the years to deride it for its low-budget special effects, sometimes-dubious costume design and overly middle-class casting, Blake's 7 continues to remain popular and to gain new audiences, due to its intelligent treatment of powerful themes of human evil, rebellion, love and death. In this book, Alan Stevens and Fiona Moore go beyond the stereotypes and look at the background to and the writing of the stories. Including technical details, overviews of the production of the series and in-depth analyses of every episode, together with a number of previously-unpublished photographs, this book is the ideal companion for anyone interested in the development of TV science fiction during the late seventies. .,." a wealth of detail about the early development of the series." From the foreword by series producer David Maloney.

30 review for Liberation: The Unofficial and Unauthorised Guide to Blake's 7

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    This is a hardcore fans-only blow by blow compendium of the Blake's 7 series and beyond, which benefits from insider recollections of the production. There's a lot of hard-to-find information here (more than I needed to know about post-B7 productions), and I don't find much to disagree with in their episode analysis. And they rightly posit that B7 is the progenitor of the showrunner/storyarc style of tv scifi that everyone has come to accept as standard. But two things struck me about it: one, it This is a hardcore fans-only blow by blow compendium of the Blake's 7 series and beyond, which benefits from insider recollections of the production. There's a lot of hard-to-find information here (more than I needed to know about post-B7 productions), and I don't find much to disagree with in their episode analysis. And they rightly posit that B7 is the progenitor of the showrunner/storyarc style of tv scifi that everyone has come to accept as standard. But two things struck me about it: one, its not fun. They may love the show, perhaps worship it, but they don't seem to be enjoying writing about it. The other is really quite odd: the amount of overlap with the Doctor Who production is immense but you won't hear too much about that from these fans. We get a lot of the politics between Terry Nation and the universe, but the great many shared props, actors, writers, and production staff with the Whoverse is passed over silently. It's odd to make constant reference to the poor budgets and production constraints without noting how they managed to get by ie pinch what they could from a friendly production. So I can't give it all the stars I'd like, despite being probably the best reference you'll find.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Lawrence

    An interesting read and a different perspective, but unless you are really into Blake's 7, this may not be for you. The authors have very odd bias, at times praising episodes I thought were terrible and shunning ones I liked, but overall it was interesting to read their analysis. I enjoyed hearing about trivia that I had not heard before. It seems odd that there is no mention of Firefly with their detailed discussion of things influenced by Blake's 7, but as I had to remind myself, Firefly may n An interesting read and a different perspective, but unless you are really into Blake's 7, this may not be for you. The authors have very odd bias, at times praising episodes I thought were terrible and shunning ones I liked, but overall it was interesting to read their analysis. I enjoyed hearing about trivia that I had not heard before. It seems odd that there is no mention of Firefly with their detailed discussion of things influenced by Blake's 7, but as I had to remind myself, Firefly may not have been released by the time of year this book was.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Pascoe

    A very handy guide to every Blake's 7 episode, with independant analysis of each episode, holding back few punches, and a guide to some of the spin-off post-show audio episodes. Unless by a bizarre co-incidence, co-author Alan Stevens also seems to be the producer of the Kaldor City series, expanding upon the Chris Boucher Doctor Who novel 'Corpse Marker' (which I have recently discovered and read), marking a cross-over between the two franchises. Stevens also wrote and produced the audio advent A very handy guide to every Blake's 7 episode, with independant analysis of each episode, holding back few punches, and a guide to some of the spin-off post-show audio episodes. Unless by a bizarre co-incidence, co-author Alan Stevens also seems to be the producer of the Kaldor City series, expanding upon the Chris Boucher Doctor Who novel 'Corpse Marker' (which I have recently discovered and read), marking a cross-over between the two franchises. Stevens also wrote and produced the audio adventure 'The Logic of Empire' which I listened to, and considered the best of the spin-offs for its very explosive ending. The synopsis of 'Afterlife' (which I read back in the day, and have pretty much forgotten), saved me a re-read, as it critically pans the Atwood sequel, pointing out its more obvious flaws and contradictions. Yay for synopses! The guide was a welcome revision of episodes of Blake's 7 (of which I am a huge fan), and pointed out a number of things going on in the series which I had missed on my numerous re-watches of random episodes. There are a number of behind-the-scenes explanations that sneak in, and the guide points out frankly the episodes that (in the opinion of the authors) work the best and the worst. I found myself largely in agreement with their assessment of each episode based on the nearly 40 years of watching that I have sunk into this brilliant series. I did object to the description of the special effect of Saymon in 'The Web', but I was 10 or so when I first watched that episode, and the concept of a corporate identity in a schrivelled body in a fish-tank was one of the more disturbing concepts I'd encountered at that age, and its impact had never quite left me, despite how 'risible' the 'special effects' may have seemed to an adult at the time. I was hoping for perhaps a few essays of general criticism and analysis of the series overall, or event elements of the series, which was absent, in favour of the episode guide. But all in all, a handy companion piece to the official episode guide, and the small shelf of Blake's 7 books available currently.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Grant Coulton

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dolores

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liam Copsey

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sue Bridgwater

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

  11. 5 out of 5

    Drama

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mr Stuart

  13. 4 out of 5

    S L Marshall

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ann Worrall

  15. 5 out of 5

    mike smith

  16. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Simon Bucher-Jones

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Clark

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  20. 5 out of 5

    aaron below

  21. 5 out of 5

    James Campbell

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mhorg

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve Traves

  24. 4 out of 5

    Craig Young

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Herron

  26. 4 out of 5

    Graham Muir

  27. 4 out of 5

    Garth Simmons

  28. 5 out of 5

    Walter

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judith

  30. 5 out of 5

    Judith Galloway

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.