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Hellboy, Vol. 11: The Bride of Hell and Others

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The world's greatest paranormal investigator takes on a carnivorous house, space aliens, a vampire luchador, a vengeful lion demon, and more in this collection featuring the work of comic greats Mike Mignola, Richard Corben, Kevin Nowlan, and Scott Hampton The world's greatest paranormal investigator takes on a carnivorous house, space aliens, a vampire luchador, a vengeful lion demon, and more in this collection featuring the work of comic greats Mike Mignola, Richard Corben, Kevin Nowlan, and Scott Hampton


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The world's greatest paranormal investigator takes on a carnivorous house, space aliens, a vampire luchador, a vengeful lion demon, and more in this collection featuring the work of comic greats Mike Mignola, Richard Corben, Kevin Nowlan, and Scott Hampton The world's greatest paranormal investigator takes on a carnivorous house, space aliens, a vampire luchador, a vengeful lion demon, and more in this collection featuring the work of comic greats Mike Mignola, Richard Corben, Kevin Nowlan, and Scott Hampton

30 review for Hellboy, Vol. 11: The Bride of Hell and Others

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Another fantastic short story collection. Buster Oakley Gets His Wish is a hilarious story of alien abduction and cattle mutilation done Hellboy style. Kevin Nowlan's art is phenomenal. The Hellboy in Mexico stories work quite well. Anytime Hellboy pals around with Lucha Libre is a good time. I also liked how Scott Hampton paints his vampire to look like Christopher Lee. Another fantastic short story collection. Buster Oakley Gets His Wish is a hilarious story of alien abduction and cattle mutilation done Hellboy style. Kevin Nowlan's art is phenomenal. The Hellboy in Mexico stories work quite well. Anytime Hellboy pals around with Lucha Libre is a good time. I also liked how Scott Hampton paints his vampire to look like Christopher Lee.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    The Birde of Hell and Others is a stand-alone collection of Hellboy short stories, and it’s a really good one! Most stories are really spooky, especially the ones illustrated by the brilliant Richard Corben. Still, there is enough humor and lighthearted silliness, like in the “Buster Oakley Gets His Wish”, a story about an alien abduction, of all things. Overall, it’s a great little collection, and especially fitting for the Halloween season. Its only downside is that, like volume 10, it’s place The Birde of Hell and Others is a stand-alone collection of Hellboy short stories, and it’s a really good one! Most stories are really spooky, especially the ones illustrated by the brilliant Richard Corben. Still, there is enough humor and lighthearted silliness, like in the “Buster Oakley Gets His Wish”, a story about an alien abduction, of all things. Overall, it’s a great little collection, and especially fitting for the Halloween season. Its only downside is that, like volume 10, it’s placed in between two really big and important volumes, 9 and 12, and thus disrupts the flow of the main story. Which is why I would recommend reading 10 and 11 either right after 7, or skipping them entirely until finishing the main storyline in 12. It’s a bit confusing, but this is how I’m reading them this time and it works really well! Either way, it’s a worthy read, and a great addition to Hellboy’s chronology. First read: October 30, 2015 Rating: ★★★★・ Second read: October 16, 2017 Rating: ★★★★・

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Volume 11 of the Hellboy series is another compilation of one shots just like “Volume 10: The Crooked Man” and “the Amazing Screw-on Head”, so we don’t get a continuation of the “Wild Hunt” storyline from Volume 9 – that said, this is still an excellent compilation of Hellboy stories! Included here is a story of Hellboy fighting vampires in Mexico with Lucha Libre wrestler sidekicks, a “double feature of evil” where Hellboy fights an evil house that eats people and in the second one deals with a Volume 11 of the Hellboy series is another compilation of one shots just like “Volume 10: The Crooked Man” and “the Amazing Screw-on Head”, so we don’t get a continuation of the “Wild Hunt” storyline from Volume 9 – that said, this is still an excellent compilation of Hellboy stories! Included here is a story of Hellboy fighting vampires in Mexico with Lucha Libre wrestler sidekicks, a “double feature of evil” where Hellboy fights an evil house that eats people and in the second one deals with a crazed museum gift shop worker who ends up praying to the wrong Egyptian God and pays the price, another vampire story set in the swinging 60s, a headless Crusader, the Bride of Hell, and finally an alien/cows story. I think the Hellboy in Mexico story was excellent and could’ve been a longer story than it was and I also loved the “Double Feature of Evil” stories. Richard Corben’s artwork is superb and his depiction of Sobek is truly terrifying. There’s always been a lot of humour in the Hellboy stories and “Buster Oakley Gets His Wish” continues that tradition starting with a kid trying to summon the Devil leading to all kinds of weird amalgamations of cows (cows cut in half, ghost cows, cows stuck to pigs, cows stuck to humans) and a showdown between Hellboy and some nutball aliens. The excellent Kevin Nowlan illustrates this story and does an amazing job. This guy used to work a lot in the 80s but for some unknown reason hasn’t worked as much recently which is ridiculous when you see the level of skill in drawing all those weird cows! Mignola provides a brief introduction to each of the stories that gives you some good background info on how the story came to be and where it was originally published. It would’ve been great to see Mignola pick up the thread of the main Hellboy story from Volume 9 in this book but this is a decent stopgap for fans while waiting for that book to appear. Lot of fun to read, some wonderfully spooky and daffy stories featuring everybody’s favourite red guy, and some fantastic art, “The Bride of Hell” is definitely worth a look.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    I've been waiting for this one, and I'm well rewarded, because it is massive. Literally six full-length issues and an eight-page short. Sadly, only the aforementioned short is drawn by Mignola, but with the news that he's going to be returning to regular art duties soon, I suppose we can persevere. Of the six stories contained herein, three are drawn by Richard Corben, one (as mentioned) by Mignola, one by Kevin Nowlan, and one (that's two issues long) by Scott Hampton. All are written by Mignola I've been waiting for this one, and I'm well rewarded, because it is massive. Literally six full-length issues and an eight-page short. Sadly, only the aforementioned short is drawn by Mignola, but with the news that he's going to be returning to regular art duties soon, I suppose we can persevere. Of the six stories contained herein, three are drawn by Richard Corben, one (as mentioned) by Mignola, one by Kevin Nowlan, and one (that's two issues long) by Scott Hampton. All are written by Mignola. More than half the collection's contents were new to me. Reading through this, I realized that I tend to think of the Hellboy stories that aren't drawn by Mignola as being somehow out of canon, even though I know better. I can sort of see how this impression would form, starting, as it did, with things like "Makoma," and this collection is definitely a weird one, featuring a story that changes up Hellboy's format, and another one that seems very unusual for canon. But canon they all are, and even the very weird "Buster Oakley Gets His Wish," has a nice moment where Hellboy refers to his adventure in the previous story. It's also nice to see a couple of stories set in my home state of Kansas! (Also, in The Crooked Man and Others Mignola established a thing where he drew a little frontispiece to each story featuring a spot illustration of some object from the story. This time he changes it up slightly, drawing a skull for every story, most of them relevant to the plot in some way. Pretty brilliant.) I'll take the stories one at a time: "Hellboy in Mexico" I'd already read the "Hellboy in Mexico" story when it was new, and it was then and has remained one of my very favorite Hellboy stories. Definitely my favorite Hellboy comic not drawn by Mignola, and probably a contender for my favorite Hellboy comic period. I'm not exactly sure what it is that makes it so great--the framing story, the perfect combination of ridiculousness and pathos--but apparently I'm not the only one who thought so, as there's several other Hellboy in Mexico stories coming out in the near future! "Double Feature of Evil" I was less of a fan of "Double Feature of Evil," which I also read as a single issue. The framing device is really good, and the nod to "The Shunned House" is spectacular, and Richard Corben draws great mummies, but, while fun, the story definitely didn't catch me quite the same way that, say, "Hellboy in Mexico" did. "The Sleeping and the Dead" The longest story in the book, and probably one of the best. Scott Hampton's art is very different from pretty much anyone else who's done Hellboy, and it's definitely a good addition to the roster of Hellboy artists. It's also perfect for the story, a quieter, spookier bit of classic vampire stuff, with a really nice ending. "The Bride of Hell" Man, Richard Corben can draw falling-down churches and zombie Templars (or whatever) like nobody's business. Also, Asmodeus is great, and we get to see some more about the Knights of St. Hagan, who were mentioned in "In the Chapel of Moloch." "The Whittier Legacy" In his author's notes, Mignola says that "there isn't much room for mood and atmosphere" in an eight-page story, but I think that "The Whittier Legacy" is some great work, and full of wonderful artistic touches, and at least one of Hellboy's trademark lines, "Cut it out. You're making the dead people nervous." "Buster Oakley Gets His Wish" This is a weird one, even for Hellboy. I'm less fond of it than the others, mostly because weird little aliens are less interesting to me than vampires and demons and junk. But it was kind of cool to see two of the things that people made a big deal about when I was a kid (Satanism and alien abductions) in one story together. Also, another story set in Kansas!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Oh single issues collections you can be really good or just ok. Alas this time you are the later. I like single issues I think that's one of the things that's missing from modern comics, everyone is writing for the trade and a 5-7 issue arc is the best format. So how does this collection fare? World: The art here is honestly a mixed bag, there are some stories which are moody and creepy like the Mexico and Vampire tale, then there is the boringness of the Alien story. The art is aight. The world Oh single issues collections you can be really good or just ok. Alas this time you are the later. I like single issues I think that's one of the things that's missing from modern comics, everyone is writing for the trade and a 5-7 issue arc is the best format. So how does this collection fare? World: The art here is honestly a mixed bag, there are some stories which are moody and creepy like the Mexico and Vampire tale, then there is the boringness of the Alien story. The art is aight. The world building here is pretty much for the issue, there are no huge call backs to the Mignolaverse and pieces put into place, all you have here are setting and themes that are there to serve the story, fairly standard stuff. I did enjoy some of the mythology though as that's what I love most about Mignola and HB. Good but not great. Story: I like single issue tales, they are focuses, precise and tells a single tale in as concentrated a form as possible, when they are done well. Here there are some great short arcs like the Mexican and the Vampire arc but the rest are fairly bland and forgettable. Now I know why they waited so long to collect these tales into a collection. As I said two tales stand out as wonderful with the rest being only ok. Characters: Not much character work found here and not much memorable new short 1 issue villains. The mythology was fine but most of the characters here only served their story as there is little emotionally impact on the story. Standard. Fairly disappointed in this trade, but given the fact that these tales have been around a while and they are only collecting them now is fairly telling. Onward to the next book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    [Name Redacted]

    A delightful mixture of the morbid and the absurd, this time containing a large number (seriously, one of the longer Hellboy volumes in recent memory!) of 1-shot stories from Hellboy's past, ranging from the early-to-mid 1950s down to the mid-to-late 1980s. Of particular interest are the encounters with: a family of demon-hunting Mexican wrestlers; the Knights of St. Hagan & a lonely demon in France; an incautious demonologist; and cattle mutilations in Kansas -- though one otherwise uninteresti A delightful mixture of the morbid and the absurd, this time containing a large number (seriously, one of the longer Hellboy volumes in recent memory!) of 1-shot stories from Hellboy's past, ranging from the early-to-mid 1950s down to the mid-to-late 1980s. Of particular interest are the encounters with: a family of demon-hunting Mexican wrestlers; the Knights of St. Hagan & a lonely demon in France; an incautious demonologist; and cattle mutilations in Kansas -- though one otherwise uninteresting story about English vampires cleverly ties in to the B.P.R.D: 1946/7 stories. And a few of these stories actually manage to be genuinely amusing, rather than just darkly comic! Corben's work here is exceptional, just as in Hellboy: The Crooked Man and Others, and I think he's probably replaced Guy Davis as my favorite non-Mignola artist for this series. Kevin Nowlan's art is perfect for the story for which Mignola drafted him -- Mignola is right, Nowlan REALLY knows how to draw barnyard animals -- but Scott Hampton's art was unremarkable and, at times, lifeless. He has potential, but he seems to focus on all the wrong things. Hampton's disappointing art is balanced out by the inclusion of the story about the incautious demonologist which sees the return of Mignola himself as artist!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melissa McShane

    Another good collection of stories, four stars because I'm almost never satisfied with anthologies and because Mexican wrestlers creep me out. I don't know why, they just do. Probably my favorite here is "The Sleeping and the Dead," which is a fantastic vampire story with some interesting twists. I also like "The Bride of Hell" for its ending--not at all what I think the history of such stories leads us to expect. This was a welcome break from the main Hellboy story, which has become extremely i Another good collection of stories, four stars because I'm almost never satisfied with anthologies and because Mexican wrestlers creep me out. I don't know why, they just do. Probably my favorite here is "The Sleeping and the Dead," which is a fantastic vampire story with some interesting twists. I also like "The Bride of Hell" for its ending--not at all what I think the history of such stories leads us to expect. This was a welcome break from the main Hellboy story, which has become extremely intense.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    3.5 stars. I especially enjoyed Hellboy in Mexico and Buster Oakley Gets His Wish.

  9. 4 out of 5

    A.j. Garner

    I am starting to get used to the fact these are just collections and not always telling a story arch. Having said that, I still like these stories. The first story is incredible. I enjoy the thought of Hellboy with some Luchadors killing things. The other stories were pretty interesting and fun, but I want the main course or more Lucha!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paz R.M.

    I'm looking at the ratings and I'm surprised because this one is, for me, the weakest volume by far, if it wasn't for Hellboy in Mexico I would have rated it a 2. I didnt particularly enjoy any of the short stories (except for Hellboy in Mexico). It was disappointing given that this the second to last volume. Still, is nothing particularly bad, it's Hellboy, it's just that other stories have been better so these ones didnt live up to the expectations. I'm looking at the ratings and I'm surprised because this one is, for me, the weakest volume by far, if it wasn't for Hellboy in Mexico I would have rated it a 2. I didnt particularly enjoy any of the short stories (except for Hellboy in Mexico). It was disappointing given that this the second to last volume. Still, is nothing particularly bad, it's Hellboy, it's just that other stories have been better so these ones didnt live up to the expectations.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    More great art supported by decent stories. Nothing to write home about outside of the Mexican adventure, but that alone is worth the purchase. Inessential, but fans will have some fun.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    The first and the last of this story collection are some of my favourite Hellboy shorts. The stuff in the middle is a little more so-so, but still far from terrible.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    But the single shot Hellboy in Mexico was a full blown 5 star joy!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cassie-la

    REVIEW ALSO ON: http://www.dailyblam.com/news/2011/10... In this volume detailing the adventures of Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense (BPRD) agent, Hellboy, big red goes on the hunt for cursed houses, crazed Egyptian pharaohs, devious vampires, and probing aliens. This collection of one shots and mini-series tackles every paranormal beastie a demon could hope for. This volume opens with a hilarious tale of Hellboy and five lost months spent drinking Tequila, wrestling, and hanging out wit REVIEW ALSO ON: http://www.dailyblam.com/news/2011/10... In this volume detailing the adventures of Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense (BPRD) agent, Hellboy, big red goes on the hunt for cursed houses, crazed Egyptian pharaohs, devious vampires, and probing aliens. This collection of one shots and mini-series tackles every paranormal beastie a demon could hope for. This volume opens with a hilarious tale of Hellboy and five lost months spent drinking Tequila, wrestling, and hanging out with luchadores in Mexico. In this story he ends up fighting Mayan bat-god turned wrestler Camazotz (which roughly translates to death bat) who legend has it loves playing Tlachtli with human heads. Certainly a worthy adversary for everyone’s favorite investigator. Highlights include seeing Hellboy passed out in sombrero and poncho and struggling to see how much Spanish you remember from High School. Mike Mignola keeps up the pace with “Double Feature of Evil”, the premise being that an undead audience is watching a double feature of Hellboy tales in a run down theatre. The first story is “Sullivan’s Reward”, where an alcoholic replaces his love of alcohol for a desire to kill. For once being a lush is preferable to being anything else, specifically a serial killer. In the second tale, entitled “The House of Sebek”, Hellboy encounters a crazed gift shop worker who is convinced he is Thesh, Pharoah of Egypt. The only problem is he kind of sucks at it. “The Sleeping and the Dead” takes on one of my favorite paranormal monsters: vampires (or vahampires depending on your pronunciation). It’s amazing it took this long for Hellboy to encounter the fanged undead, but he finally does and it’s nothing short of spectacular, with a crazed plot by vampire kind to take over humanity and an ethereal child who may be the most terrifying creature Hellboy has ever encountered. Her propensity to sing nursery rhymes while simultaneously morphing into a corpse and clutching dead kittens is nothing short of terrifying. Finally, the star in this collection (which really does have everything) completes this volume. In “Buster Oakley Gets His Wish”, Hellboy is called out to investigate cattle mutilations, which may be connected to the teenage witchcraft being committed around the cows at night. From ghost cows to paganism, aliens and anal probes, this tale is off the wall insanity, and everything I love about this series. Another plus is the amazing artwork from powerhouse Kevin Nowlan, who draws some creepy, extremely detailed cow-faces that will have you shivering. Hellboy is an amazing comic for so many reasons. Hellboy himself is abrasive, funny, and never seems to run short of amazing adventures. In addition to this, anyone can pick up a volume or a one-shot and immediately fall in love with the world of the BPRD. There are no tricky mythologies, or characters being killed and resurrected on a regular basis, rather there is a strong collection of stories from the mind of Mike Mignola and illustrated by some amazingly talented artists. This trade is no exception.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This is the most mixed bag, for me, out of all of the Hellboy short story compilations. Some of the stories, such as "Hellboy in Mexico", "The Sleeping and the Dead", and "The Whittier Legacy", are enjoyable entries into Hellboy's personal history roaming the world and ridding various places of evil supernatural threats. I even like "Double Feature of Evil", which is exactly what it sounds like, a double story entry with art by Richard Corben (who also did the Mexico story), featuring some very This is the most mixed bag, for me, out of all of the Hellboy short story compilations. Some of the stories, such as "Hellboy in Mexico", "The Sleeping and the Dead", and "The Whittier Legacy", are enjoyable entries into Hellboy's personal history roaming the world and ridding various places of evil supernatural threats. I even like "Double Feature of Evil", which is exactly what it sounds like, a double story entry with art by Richard Corben (who also did the Mexico story), featuring some very bizarre situations. On the other hand, the title story and "Buster Oakley Gets His Wish" feel...off somehow, as if they each broke a rule of some sorts of the Hellboy universe. They just don't seem to fit. The latter because, while we do have aliens in Hellboy stories before this point, they aren't the stereotypical, cliched, livestock-abducting and anal-probing creatures we get here. And I'm still unsure exactly how Buster Oakley got his wish. His wish was to be a deformed monster? As for the title story, I liked the historical and folkloric vibes it gave off, but the demon's interaction with Israeli politics, even though it occurs in ancient times, seemed a bit too central stage to me. When we see supernatural creatures interfering with human society like that in Hellboy stories, it's either in very secretive ways, or took place in prehistoric times, such as with the Hyperboreans. Probably the best story in this volume is the first one, which, ironically, is the most extraneous story here. It relates one of the incidents from Hellboy's five month "drunken blur" in Mexico, in which he fights luchador monsters while drunk on tequila; an intriguing conceit, especially since it opens the door for many more stories set in Mexico in that five month period. Like I said, though, this strength is exactly what makes it redundant here, since Dark Horse just published an entire volume called Hellboy in Mexico, which tells the rest of these stories, and also reprints this very story as well. So it doesn't even need to be here. Again, this volume feels like the weakest one, but Hellboy stories are still usually better reads than most comics out there, even at their lowest points. And the dip in quality here is mitigated by the fact that the very next volume — also the last in the main Hellboy series — is the earth-shattering, world changing The Storm and the Fury. If this volume represents a series low, then the very next gives us some of the most memorable and heartbreaking events in the series, as well as the culmination (or the beginning of it, at least) of the mythological promises made in the very first story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    One more, I'm having trouble getting into Corben's art. Some of it is great, and I love the EC vibe, but it's making me nostalgic in the wrong way: instead of thinking 'this is a great homage to the EC classics' I start feeling like I should just put Hellboy down and read the real thing. Some of Corben's character and backgrounds are great: expressive, detailed, idiomatic. But there are also a lot of little details that throw me off. Some of the exaggeration on the characters lacks a sense of sh One more, I'm having trouble getting into Corben's art. Some of it is great, and I love the EC vibe, but it's making me nostalgic in the wrong way: instead of thinking 'this is a great homage to the EC classics' I start feeling like I should just put Hellboy down and read the real thing. Some of Corben's character and backgrounds are great: expressive, detailed, idiomatic. But there are also a lot of little details that throw me off. Some of the exaggeration on the characters lacks a sense of shape and form, so there are a lot of oddly flat faces and problems with proportion, particularly when we're looking at the characters from a distance. Then there's the fact that every woman who shows up has huge, pendulous breasts which are barely contained by a plunging neckline--and I mean all the women: old crones and young ingenues alike. The style is more Harry Crumb perversity than busty superheroine exploitation, but it still strikes me as an odd and tonally inappropriate choice. There are also various perspective issues, such as tables and the rooms they are in having vanishing points that simply don't match. As for the stories themselves, they are less remarkable and less expansive than earlier volumes. There are some truly odd moments, but they tend to the goofy rather than the mythic. Otherwise the stories we're getting are rather straightforward examples of classic British and American horror. They're not badly written or stupid or anything, they just aren't particularly impressive. Earlier collections constantly enlarged Hellboy's world and character, changing tone, culture, and time period frenetically, building by implication a much larger world in the vast space between all those disparate points. These stories, being more tonally and culturally similar lack that implication of depth. My Suggested Reading In Comics

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dani Shuping

    ARC provided by netGalley “Hellboy Volume 11: The Bride of Hell and Others” is a collection of short one off comics that give the Hellboy cannon more depth and introduce us to some...interesting aspects of Hellboy’s past. For example we discover that Hellboy spent some time in Mexico, in “Hellboy in Mexico.” We also get a double feature (just like the classic horror movies) when a man calls the BRPD and says he’s been killing people, but he’s convinced its the house making him (which frankly is m ARC provided by netGalley “Hellboy Volume 11: The Bride of Hell and Others” is a collection of short one off comics that give the Hellboy cannon more depth and introduce us to some...interesting aspects of Hellboy’s past. For example we discover that Hellboy spent some time in Mexico, in “Hellboy in Mexico.” We also get a double feature (just like the classic horror movies) when a man calls the BRPD and says he’s been killing people, but he’s convinced its the house making him (which frankly is my favorite story out of this series.) Hellboy is forced to match wits with an evil house...and a somewhat stupid and greedy human. Who do you think survives? We also get “The Bride of Hell,” “The Sleeping and the Dead,” “The Whittier Legacy” (originally serialized on USAtoday.com to give new readers a chance to discover the Hellboy universe,) and finally “Hellboy: Buster Oakley Gets His Wish” where Hellboy meets some farmers, cows, and...aliens? This is a fantastic collection of short Hellboy comics and it’s nice just to see the different styles of artwork that are introduced in this volume. It ranges from the classic Hellboy style, to one done in watercolors---which adds some really unique mystical quality to the story, to a more modern style that fits for Hellboy meeting some aliens. Each artist seems to bring his own style to the Hellboy mythos and really adds to the story and makes the artwork come alive in a new way. The stories themselves, with the exception of the second half of the double feature, are entertaining, interesting, and give us greater understanding of Hellboy. I recommend this to new or old fans of Hellboy.

  18. 4 out of 5

    kaelan

    Hellboy has always had a pulpy dimension—you only need to look at Lobster Johnson or Herman von Klempt to detect Mignola's affinity for retro-inspired camp. Usually, however, this fails to detract from the sense of mythos and horror that makes the series so engaging. That is, until now. Sadly, The Bride of Hell and Others finds Mignola breaching the line between campiness and kitsch. Whether it's Hellboy duking it out with a demonic lucha libre wrestler, or defending himself against an extraterr Hellboy has always had a pulpy dimension—you only need to look at Lobster Johnson or Herman von Klempt to detect Mignola's affinity for retro-inspired camp. Usually, however, this fails to detract from the sense of mythos and horror that makes the series so engaging. That is, until now. Sadly, The Bride of Hell and Others finds Mignola breaching the line between campiness and kitsch. Whether it's Hellboy duking it out with a demonic lucha libre wrestler, or defending himself against an extraterrestrial-inflicted anal-probe, it's hard to consolidate these tales within the larger scope of the comic's universe. Yes, Hellboy can often be pretty funny—at times, even downright silly (see, for instance, "The Mole" from The Crooked Man and Others ). But this isn't humour; it's banality. Neither was I taken by the artwork. Despite his excellent work on "The Crooked Man," Richard Corben can't quite pull-off the atmosphere of dread that these tales seem to require. As for Kevin Nowlan and Scott Hapton, both are too conventionally "comic-y" for my tastes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Sometimes I like the Hellboy collections that are short stories instead of the ones that into the larger story arc. The shorts let writer/creator Mike Mignola team up with different artists and explore other fables and horror mythologies. Mignola also gets to jump around to different time periods in Hellboy's career. We see Hellboy join Mexican masked wrestlers to battle monsters and vampires in 1950s Mexico. Another tale dips into horror and alien abductions, and Mgnola manages a very sympathet Sometimes I like the Hellboy collections that are short stories instead of the ones that into the larger story arc. The shorts let writer/creator Mike Mignola team up with different artists and explore other fables and horror mythologies. Mignola also gets to jump around to different time periods in Hellboy's career. We see Hellboy join Mexican masked wrestlers to battle monsters and vampires in 1950s Mexico. Another tale dips into horror and alien abductions, and Mgnola manages a very sympathetic portrayal of Asmodeus.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    I do like how Hellboy has moved away from simple fight stories into all sorts of folklore. There are some punch ups, but overall things don't simply get solved with fist fights any more. While this as a collection of short stories rather than one long continuous tale I really enjoyed it. There was Hellboy and Mexican wrestlers in what was quite a sad tale, there were vampire children and worse, everything had a wonderful reinvention of folklore tale, down to the very modern idea of cattle mutila I do like how Hellboy has moved away from simple fight stories into all sorts of folklore. There are some punch ups, but overall things don't simply get solved with fist fights any more. While this as a collection of short stories rather than one long continuous tale I really enjoyed it. There was Hellboy and Mexican wrestlers in what was quite a sad tale, there were vampire children and worse, everything had a wonderful reinvention of folklore tale, down to the very modern idea of cattle mutilation and UFOs. This was definitely one of my favourite Hellboy collections.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    Nice set of one-shot stories again, I didn't enjoy it as much as I enjoyed Hellboy: The Crooked Man and Others. I'm definitely a short-story fan, but Hellboy seems to have more one-offs than any other comic book series that I follow. I'm not even sure that I can remember what was going on the last time there was a main story-arc volume. Nice set of one-shot stories again, I didn't enjoy it as much as I enjoyed Hellboy: The Crooked Man and Others. I'm definitely a short-story fan, but Hellboy seems to have more one-offs than any other comic book series that I follow. I'm not even sure that I can remember what was going on the last time there was a main story-arc volume.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    I've come to appreciate the laid-back structure of Hellboy collections. It used to throw me off that some issues were just blips of his life and didn't have long story arcs. Now, I realize it's just Hellboy showing up random years and doing rad shit. Fighting monsters with Mexican wrestlers? Fighting a beloved bride of the underworld? FIGHTING AN ENTIRE EVIL HOUSE? Fuck yeah. Keep killin' it, Hellboy. I've come to appreciate the laid-back structure of Hellboy collections. It used to throw me off that some issues were just blips of his life and didn't have long story arcs. Now, I realize it's just Hellboy showing up random years and doing rad shit. Fighting monsters with Mexican wrestlers? Fighting a beloved bride of the underworld? FIGHTING AN ENTIRE EVIL HOUSE? Fuck yeah. Keep killin' it, Hellboy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    SE Panoply

    https://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/20... Mignola uses a Mayan god in an impromptu fleshing out of a drawing of HB hanging out with Mexican wrestlers, not having planned to turn it into a story. Mexico ’82, HB and Abe are stranded and waiting to be picked up by BPRD, currently in the outskirts of a deserted building, inside of which has old posters of Mexican wrestlers. Abe points out a photo with HB in it, he telling of when he’d been there in ’56, and was hearing about a hole periodically putting https://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/20... Mignola uses a Mayan god in an impromptu fleshing out of a drawing of HB hanging out with Mexican wrestlers, not having planned to turn it into a story. Mexico ’82, HB and Abe are stranded and waiting to be picked up by BPRD, currently in the outskirts of a deserted building, inside of which has old posters of Mexican wrestlers. Abe points out a photo with HB in it, he telling of when he’d been there in ’56, and was hearing about a hole periodically putting up a terrible stench which people would go to perform bad things on each other, thinking the smell was from the debil, and he’d come out. When HB’s been scouting the place, he meets the wrestling bros, who tell of finding the dead priest in the church, and whilst praying was told to prepare to fight monsters, becoming quite good at it. So, HB joins up with them, and they work hard and party at night. HB gets to know the younger bros more than the older, they all getting along working and partying for a month, before a tragic disappearance of Esteban changing the group’s dynamic. They begin q’ing vamps and monster which devolve into dispatching them in a way which HB felt some guilt, esp. since they learned nothing for their effort. HB discovers a clue from a poster, and he goes to the old temple int he woods. Inside, he sees what he thinks is Esteban in a wrestling ring, Esteban immediately throwing HB around. When he hears an inner voice blaming him for what had occurred to Esteban, he shows his bat face. HB does the mercy of staking him, Esteban thanking him before he dies. The bros and he bury him in a churchyard, then HB and they split up, HB getting found in a bar a few mos later. HB feigns memory loss when Abe asks what he’d been doing, but a photo shows he’d been wrestling, little kid fans loving him. Parts of the next story has Lovecraftian themes. 1960 Kansas, HB meets a Mr. Sullivan whom wishes to get help for a house making him kill people. Sullivan goes over how he’s an alchie recoverer and has fucked his life up when he’d spoken to a man he thought was a lawyer and had gifted him a house with enough cash to clean himself up in Kansas. When he’d gone to the house, he’d discovered a skeleton and 3 gold coins, chucking the skeleton in the yard. In the morning, he gets cravings for alchie again, so he lures a lady into the house, takes the coins and disposes of her body after the house takes her. Sullivan shows HB the room then ofc shoots HB and locks him in the room. After praying to the dark creature for what he’d give him for a prize like HB, he’s smooshed by a huge brick of gold coins falling downstairs. HB escapes and the dead owner tells him to biff off, but HB destroys the house’s evil corpse-bodied heart before obliging. MA, 1960 HB is helping a lady escape a crazy gift shop worker whom thought he is a priest of Horus. Before HB can handle him though, the lady explains the idiot is praying to the wrong god of the temple he is in, this god having its alligator statue head, bite the idiot’s head off. A successful conclusion! The next is a vamper story. England 1966, HB chases a lady vamp from a house, warns an old fella to stay away, but then finds the both in an old house, and the fella schools HB on Euro-vamps, as opposed to Ameri-vamps. The man shares the Euro vamps tactic for laying low, literally The 1 HB’d been after is 1 of his sis’, the other a girl the vamps had also used. The 1 the fella warns against would be awake, and wondering where Kate is by now. The old fella tricks HB into falling into the basement where he then phones him, and tells HB of having to feed the younger sis, Mary. HB finds her singing to a dead cat before turning into a scary skeleton. Meanwhile, the fella whom’d called BPRD into back up arrive, and they calculate the odds of HB already having finished the job. They’re soon stuck outside as corpses reanimate and unbury themselves. Mary takes care of the bad vamp which kills the zombies again, and releases Mary. The group ends the night at the bar. CT 1985, a missing 18 yr old Amer. girl, Teresa has caught the attention of BPRD. HB saves the girl as she’s being sacrificed, running her to sacred ground where a monk sits nearby telling him about the statue standing there for St. Hagan. He explains of the girl being safe til he finishes off the vamp creature. So, HB goes in search of him during the day, finding him, and hearing his story, acknowledging his judgement for justice, but how he’d gone too far. Regardless of this, HB doesn’t succeed in saving Teresa, for being a willing bride, so she dies. A quickly put together story follows. 1985 MA, HB is sent to investigate a series of missing bodies, and a person, as well as a skull, all connected to the family Whittier. He’s in time to attempt to stop an old fella from finishing a spell, but he gets put to dust easily enough, HB having a smoke with a skelly. KS 1985, Buster and some kids around town perform a ceremony in the woods calling up evil gods. Fwd 18 hrs, HB has comes to check out half of a missing cow, attended by an angry farmer, blaming the kids for his missing cows, HB taking it seriously when seeing a left guidebook for spells and a skull with candle. When the farmer and his hubby host him in the evening, she thinks she hears a noise outside, HB walking out and being abducted by aliens. He floats through monster-filled space, then sees a half human cow before getting held down by a bunch of alien creatures. HB next succeeds in getting the be-boxer’d half cow to help fight them off, the to getting dropped back on erf and HB almost getting ambushed by some fellas, scaring cow boy off, and he staying in Nebraska as another kid attempts the same evil god spell using his head as a candle holder as he sits there. Hilarious good fun!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jani

    Hellboy is always a delight and this collection was no exception. Book is colection of short stories written by Mike Mignola drawn by different artists. Even with multiple styles of working the mood of Hellboy is captured rather nicely in each of the stories. Guaranteed entertainment for fans of MM and HB.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I was expecting a little bit more in the way of plot advancement for this one, but it was another collection of random shorts. Not to say that these were not fabulous random pieces, because they were all awesome. It was especially nice to see a segment that Mignola drew, because I've missed his art. I also really liked Scott Hampton's art for "The Sleeping and the Dead". Really lovely work. I was expecting a little bit more in the way of plot advancement for this one, but it was another collection of random shorts. Not to say that these were not fabulous random pieces, because they were all awesome. It was especially nice to see a segment that Mignola drew, because I've missed his art. I also really liked Scott Hampton's art for "The Sleeping and the Dead". Really lovely work.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    These short stories are a lot of fun, but I'll be happy to get back to the main storyline last seen a few volumes ago. I might be annoyed, if the stories weren't so good. They're pulpy, in a good way, and very fun to read. I wasn't particularly taken by the last story, but I loved everything else in this collection. These short stories are a lot of fun, but I'll be happy to get back to the main storyline last seen a few volumes ago. I might be annoyed, if the stories weren't so good. They're pulpy, in a good way, and very fun to read. I wasn't particularly taken by the last story, but I loved everything else in this collection.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Picked this up while helping our kids look for books at a local library and was immediately drawn in. Good mix of darkness and camp although some of the humor felt clunky. I had heard about the Hellboy franchise so was curious; also knew that Mignola was influenced by Lovecraft. Will definitely read others. Probably would help to read in chronological order but such is library reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    Another mixed novel that served the core storyline, I really enjoyed the storylines here and was amazed by the depth. I'm not eager to end the series so I'm kicking of with a few of the spinoffs while finishing Fables too. This is up in my favorites Y the last man is there and Watchmen of course. This lays some of the ground work for an epic conclusion. Another mixed novel that served the core storyline, I really enjoyed the storylines here and was amazed by the depth. I'm not eager to end the series so I'm kicking of with a few of the spinoffs while finishing Fables too. This is up in my favorites Y the last man is there and Watchmen of course. This lays some of the ground work for an epic conclusion.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I always love the Hellboy short story collections, and this one's no exception. I especially loved the titular story, The Bride of Hell, along with the luchador story and the Double Feature of Evil (mummies!!!!!). Good stuff. I always love the Hellboy short story collections, and this one's no exception. I especially loved the titular story, The Bride of Hell, along with the luchador story and the Double Feature of Evil (mummies!!!!!). Good stuff.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Every story here is top-notch, with fun twists, great artwork, and a perfect mix of humor, scares, and interesting morality plays. The level of consistency and quality control that Mignola has established in this series and its spin-offs is completely staggering to me.

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