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According to mythology mankind used to live in The Tranquiline Halls. Heaven. But then the Voidbringers assaulted and captured heaven, casting out God and men. Men took root on Roshar, the world of storms. And the Voidbringers followed ... They came against man ten thousand times. To help them cope, the Almighty gave men powerful suits of armor and mystical weapons, known a According to mythology mankind used to live in The Tranquiline Halls. Heaven. But then the Voidbringers assaulted and captured heaven, casting out God and men. Men took root on Roshar, the world of storms. And the Voidbringers followed ... They came against man ten thousand times. To help them cope, the Almighty gave men powerful suits of armor and mystical weapons, known as Shardblades. Led by ten angelic Heralds and ten orders of knights known as Radiants, mankind finally won. Or so the legends say. Today, the only remnants of those supposed battles are the Shardblades, the possession of which makes a man nearly invincible on the battlefield. The entire world is at war with itself - and has been for centuries since the Radiants turned against mankind. Kings strive to win more Shardblades, each secretly wishing to be the one who will finally unite all of mankind under a single throne. On a world scoured down to the rock by terrifying hurricanes that blow through every few days is a young spearman, forced into the army of a Shardbearer, led to war against an enemy he doesn't understand and doesn't really want to fight. What happened deep in mankind's past? Why did the Radiants turn against mankind, and what happened to the magic they used to wield?


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According to mythology mankind used to live in The Tranquiline Halls. Heaven. But then the Voidbringers assaulted and captured heaven, casting out God and men. Men took root on Roshar, the world of storms. And the Voidbringers followed ... They came against man ten thousand times. To help them cope, the Almighty gave men powerful suits of armor and mystical weapons, known a According to mythology mankind used to live in The Tranquiline Halls. Heaven. But then the Voidbringers assaulted and captured heaven, casting out God and men. Men took root on Roshar, the world of storms. And the Voidbringers followed ... They came against man ten thousand times. To help them cope, the Almighty gave men powerful suits of armor and mystical weapons, known as Shardblades. Led by ten angelic Heralds and ten orders of knights known as Radiants, mankind finally won. Or so the legends say. Today, the only remnants of those supposed battles are the Shardblades, the possession of which makes a man nearly invincible on the battlefield. The entire world is at war with itself - and has been for centuries since the Radiants turned against mankind. Kings strive to win more Shardblades, each secretly wishing to be the one who will finally unite all of mankind under a single throne. On a world scoured down to the rock by terrifying hurricanes that blow through every few days is a young spearman, forced into the army of a Shardbearer, led to war against an enemy he doesn't understand and doesn't really want to fight. What happened deep in mankind's past? Why did the Radiants turn against mankind, and what happened to the magic they used to wield?

30 review for The Way of Kings, Part 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan O'Neill

    4.5⭐ ‘The Way of Kings – Part 1 and 2’ A gripping and immersive introduction to the vast world of Roshar and a stunning masterclass on the Art of Worldbuilding. A typically spellbinding final sequence as well as the prospect of what this world could become has had me dancing around the house like Van Damme from that bar scene in ‘Kickboxer’ for the best part of an hour (If you haven’t seen it, do yourself a favour). Browsing through Goodreads, it has come to my attention that there aren’t nearly e 4.5⭐ ‘The Way of Kings – Part 1 and 2’ A gripping and immersive introduction to the vast world of Roshar and a stunning masterclass on the Art of Worldbuilding. A typically spellbinding final sequence as well as the prospect of what this world could become has had me dancing around the house like Van Damme from that bar scene in ‘Kickboxer’ for the best part of an hour (If you haven’t seen it, do yourself a favour). Browsing through Goodreads, it has come to my attention that there aren’t nearly enough reviews of this underrated book for people to make an informed decision on whether to read it or not. So here it is, lucky review number 20,428… Seriously though, I’ll keep this as brief as possible. “Oh, and Elhokar? Your mother and I are now courting. You’ll want to start growing accustomed to that.” - Dalinar, The Ruthless The worldbuilding here is as immense as you could expect in the first book of a 10-part series. If Sanderson were a sculptor, I feel like ‘Way of Kings’ would be him just performing the initial “roughing-out”, just creating a general shape of what this series will become. Though we are only exposed to a “small” amount of the magic, lore, races, animals, plant-life, cities and environments in this world, we are given a glimpse behind the curtain at what to expect in coming novels and honestly, it’s game-changing. The world is alive! The different races all have unique quirks whether with regards to their physical appearance, their speech or their culture and philosophies. The animals and plant-life have evolved to suit the harsh, rocky, desolate landscape of Roshar which is regularly consumed by devastating highstorms. Most animals have rough carapace exteriors which they can envelope themselves within while plants and bushes can retreat back into the ground or retract their leaves and branches when in danger. There is a shamed religion, Vorinism, that we learn once tried to exact power on the Alethi people and is paying for it to this day. We learn of Heralds (Warriors and Servants of the Almighty) who rose from damnation once a millenia to fight in the ‘Desolation’ only to return to another Millenia of torture as well as the 10 Orders of the Knights Radiant who once fought an evil known as the Voidbringers but are believed, in this age, to have betrayed mankind on the ‘Day of Recreance’. We know little of this so far but if Epic Fantasy is your thing, I don’t think it gets more epic than this. There is both civil and interracial conflict on multiple levels, including the inevitable discrimination that comes with multicultural societies. In Alethi society, Bright eyes vie for power against other bright eyes, using the lesser dark-eyed Alethi along with individuals of other races such as the Parshmen as slave power to achieve their goal. Achieving power and glory within their own society sees them warring with the Parshendi, a race they know little about but who seem to be a distant relative of their docile slave Parshmen and at least partially seem to operate within some type of hive-mind. There is evidence to suggest that the Parshendi are highly intelligent beings but upon their land are highly coveted assets known as gemhearts and so the Alethi portray them as barbaric monsters in order to discredit their claim on land or possessions. Much like our own precious Europeans did to… Um, pretty much all indigenous people worldwide. I include all these details in order to show just a minute amount of the dynamic, vibrant and living world that Sanderson has created and hopefully give a sense of the general flavour of the novel. The magic system, SO FAR, doesn’t hold a candle to that of the ‘Mistborn’ Trilogy. It seems ridiculous to mention that, being the first book in such a large series this is bound to improve exponentially. In fact, Mistborn’s magic system is still expanding and evolving even in Era 2. The other factor is that this book already had so much to introduce, so much ground to cover that it would probably have been impossible to delve too deep into what I’m sure will be a very complex system. What we have seen so far has been pretty cool. Magical equipment such as shardblades/shardplates and purpose built fabrials as well as wind-running, lashings and soulcasting have so much potential. I really don’t even feel worthy of commenting on Sanderson’s magic systems to be honest (We’re not worthy, we’re not worthy) … *Ahem*, moving on. This tale is told from an abundance of perspectives but we are, more often than not, seeing things from the perspective of Kaladin Stormblessed, Dalinar Kholin or Shallan Davar. I said I’d keep this brief so I won’t go into their individual arcs but they are all fantastic. I didn’t really have a favourite but by the same token didn’t have a least favourite. If anything, I was probably drawn to Dalinar for his unyielding moral integrity in the face of so much resistance. But then, Kaladin’s sense of responsibility/duty to protect those around him and his battle and consequent rise from depression and self-doubt were admirable too. And Shallan’s perspective has Jasnah, whom I’d give my left nut to stand in the same room as, so you know, tough choices. I found the inclusion of a scholar’s perspective to be a really smart move by Sanderson as he could potentially flood us with info-dumps here if he wanted and be like, “Well, they are scholars!”. Thankfully, it never feels that way. I do have a couple of negatives to include, believe it or not. The first is a run of abysmally shit humour from Sanderson. Mainly from both Shallan and Wit during the first third of the book but also some real boooo inducing moments from Kal as well. I understand Sando’s not a comedian but wow, there were some real tumbleweed moments! “Each man has his place. Mine is to make insults. Yours is to be in-sluts.” - Wit (What??) Unfortunately, I felt like the large majority of the big revelatory moments in the final chapters were too obvious. Sanderson gives a lot of hints throughout the book and I just found that I was guessing most of what was going to happen with only a couple of exceptions. He still executes those moments well so it’s not a major issue. The character Kabsal. He said some real weirdo type shit when he was creepily trying to get in Shallan’s pants and I thought, “Hmm, that’s not like Sando, he’s probably being a creep for a reason, but it’s weird that Shallan is digging it”, but no, I genuinely think Sanderson thought the lines that he gave Kabsal were smooth pick up material… Well, fucking no my man! It was slimy and gross and I got the impression that Kabsal probably had some sort of wank altar decorated with pictures of Shallan so please… Work on that! There is a scene near the end of Part 1 where Lopen calls Dabbid a “Moolie”. I 100% expect that Sanderson is unaware of it being an old derogatory Sicilian word used to describe black people and he doesn’t use it in that way (Lopen says it’s because Dabbid doesn’t talk much) but how in the world does that get past all of the beta-reads and editing without being picked up. Finally, if anyone is discouraged by the length of this book, there is absolutely no need! I read this 1000+ page monster in about the same time I’d read a 500-600 page book and was really never bored. Strangely, the last 10 pages or so was hard to read as I was having some intense flashbacks of all the characters arcs going through my head, putting everything together which was making it hard to concentrate. But I think that’s just a symptom of the revelatory final sequence. It finishes with so many unanswered questions that I would’ve hated to have been one of the many people who had to wait for the next book. Luckily, I don’t have to! Happy reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ❄️BooksofRadiance❄️

    PURE. PERFECTION. In every way. I don’t know what else can be said...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    BRUH this book went from 0 to 100 so fucking quick. I thought there was a lot of stuff happening and I was really enjoying it and then near the end all the different plots went crazy and it was amazing. Loved it so much and can't wait to continue the series! BRUH this book went from 0 to 100 so fucking quick. I thought there was a lot of stuff happening and I was really enjoying it and then near the end all the different plots went crazy and it was amazing. Loved it so much and can't wait to continue the series!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Warda

    So, now that I've calmed down (not really!) I'm going to try and attempt to review this book. Don't get you hopes up though. I doubt I'll do it justice. The scope of this series is too massive for me to provide you with an adequate synopsis. It's going to become a 10 book series (thank God for that!), and we've probably just about scratched the surface with 2 books released so far out of 10. This book, which has been split into two parts, because of its enormity, follows a set of characters, com So, now that I've calmed down (not really!) I'm going to try and attempt to review this book. Don't get you hopes up though. I doubt I'll do it justice. The scope of this series is too massive for me to provide you with an adequate synopsis. It's going to become a 10 book series (thank God for that!), and we've probably just about scratched the surface with 2 books released so far out of 10. This book, which has been split into two parts, because of its enormity, follows a set of characters, coming from all different walks of life. A soldier turned slave, a lord that commands armies and protects the king, as well as an aspiring female scholar. However, there are many more side characters which add to the story as well as a bigger plot line, which is too difficult to summarise at this point. As the story progresses, the characters become more fleshed out and their lives begin to crossover in the best way possible! The character growth is insanely good! Complete individuals, their worldview and psyche shaped by their upbringing, you can't help but love and be invested in these characters. The development is drawn out, slow, pieces about them are put together, layer by layer. There's so many facets to them! And this 1000+ book doesn't even cover most of their lives! They're all struggling and trying to overcome their inner demons, fully infusing empathy into the reader. The grow organically, are flawed, you root for them, scream at them (or the book more like), want them to do better, but loving that they stick to what they firmly believe in, almost never wavering. It all makes them come very much alive. The foundation of Sanderson's world building in this first instalment is solid, wonderfully rich, and not to mention, just absolutely massive. Humongous. I was fully transported into this world that I couldn't get enough of. I was worried it was going to be overwhelming and too dense since everything about this planet has been created from scratch. From religions, cultures, social customs, laws, histories and even ecology. But I feel that Sanderson builds the world up in a steady manner. You get to a certain point where everything, or I should say majority of the world, will start making sense and it becomes more familiar as one reads on. I adored his attention to every little detail. It all added something valuable to the overall story arc. There's so much groundwork that he's laid bare in order for it to be built upon, brick by brick and I cannot, cannot wait to see where he goes with it. It wouldn't be a Sanderson novel without the avalanche that hits you towards the end of the book. Secrets were revealed. Deception. Lies. Plot twists. Moral ambiguity. You name it. The amount of times I audibly gasped or cursed out loud... too many times. But it was an absolute thrill to read. This book was consuming to say the least. I was so engrossed in the storyline and the characters, that I didn't want to do anything else but read this book. Though I put it off for a while, as it's size was intimidating, I feel stupid in even doing so. This book was greatness. [initial review] WHAT ON GODS EARTH DID I JUST READ?! There's no way Sanderson is human. That man!!! SHIT, THIS BOOK!! I feel delirious! :o Review to come when my mind decides to get itself together. My emotions are all over the place right now.

  5. 4 out of 5

    William Gwynne

    My expanded review of The Way of Kings is now on Booknest.eu. http://booknest.eu/component/k2/william/1576-the-way-of-kings-the-stormlight-archive-1-by-brandon-sanderson “It is the journey that shapes us. Our callused feet, our backs strong from carrying the weight of our travels, our eyes open with the fresh delight of experience lived.” Way of Kings Part 2 continued the first addition of The Way of Kings in a fantastic manner, developing the plot at a quicker pace and becoming more and more tens My expanded review of The Way of Kings is now on Booknest.eu. http://booknest.eu/component/k2/william/1576-the-way-of-kings-the-stormlight-archive-1-by-brandon-sanderson “It is the journey that shapes us. Our callused feet, our backs strong from carrying the weight of our travels, our eyes open with the fresh delight of experience lived.” Way of Kings Part 2 continued the first addition of The Way of Kings in a fantastic manner, developing the plot at a quicker pace and becoming more and more tense as the story evolved. There are three main PoV’s in this book, and I loved two of them. Brightlord Dalinar with his honourable to a fault nature, always abiding to his promises. And Kaladin, the warrior that has been made a slave, with his conflicting emotions and overwhelming care for others. These two were my favourite aspects of the story as they were such unique characters. “At that moment, Kaladin knew he could kill, if he needed to. Some people - like a festering finger or a leg shattered beyond repair - just needed to be removed.” I enjoyed the scholar, Shallan, but found her plot line to be much slower, so I always just wished to be with the other characters. Her portion of the story contributed a lot to the plot with numerous revelations and a lot of world building with the history of the world being explained, so was still an enjoyable part of the novel. “Sometimes the prize is not worth the costs. The means by which we achieve victory are as important as the victory itself.” There were twists and turns and surprises at every corner that had me reeling in surprise and willing the protagonists to push through and somehow survive their dangerous encounters. These unexpected events immersed me into the story of these characters and constantly worry for their lives. The battles were large scale with high stakes and comprehensible tactics. It was vividly described in a realistic and gritty way. This was one of my favourite elements of the writing. “What you saw belongs to you. A story doesn’t live until it is imagined in someones mind.” So The Way of Kings was a great opening to the Starlight Archive and I look forward to continuing this complex and interesting story with Words of Radiance.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    Note Before reading the rest of this review I'd like to note that this is a two part review with notes from a first reading and a second reading. Like with any fantasy epic beginning this entire work starts out slowly but this second part becomes much faster and more readable. I encourage reading of this book, because as noted later it was my favourite book read in 2012 and I have been eagerly waiting for this novel almost as much as I awaited the finale of The Wheel of Time. In short I wanted to Note Before reading the rest of this review I'd like to note that this is a two part review with notes from a first reading and a second reading. Like with any fantasy epic beginning this entire work starts out slowly but this second part becomes much faster and more readable. I encourage reading of this book, because as noted later it was my favourite book read in 2012 and I have been eagerly waiting for this novel almost as much as I awaited the finale of The Wheel of Time. In short I wanted to clarify that on a first reading of any novel I can be very eager and excited about the novel if it thrills me. It is the second (and potentially third and so on) readings that inform one as to whether the book is one which has stuck with me as a great work of fiction. And my re-read of The Way of Kings (both parts) left me with such an impression. This is a fine fantasy novel, one that starts off slowly perhaps, but one with plenty of twists and turns. As mentioned elsewhere, Brandon Sanderson is easily now my favourite fantasy author for his ideas, pace, energy and all round readability. His prose is not the purple prose of other authors but he continues to improve and his ideas and themes shine through strongly no matter what. Review The First One of the positives of being a uni student is possessing the time on my hands to read books. Okay sure I have to do all the university texts and so forth but when travelling an hour to and from campus and in between lectures a remarkable amount of time is free to read. Well it certainly beats having to attend school where there was no time to read. How does that all relate? Oh simply on the odd coincidence that I managed to finish the last two hundred pages across the three hours I had free travelling and waiting for lectures/tutorials. And I was staggered when I finally finished book one of the Stormlight Archive. This could very well be one of the best epic fantasy series ever written. Not that I want to make claims before the series is finished... Let me break it down. The Plot This was superb. Revolving around three different main characters Sanderson plotted a whole course for his novel that I didn't see right at the beginning. Full of wonderful twists, turns, plots and sudden realisations Sanderson does a fine job of keeping his readers interested. I particularly loved how he would drop in a sudden bomb at the end of a chapter that left me going: "Hang on what! You mean Saldeas actually... You mean the visions are actually..." It was that kind of plot. I also loved the way in which Sanderson slowly provides a view into the background behind each of the character's motives. I feel that they were much more fleshed out in terms of providing me as a reader with a sense of how each character's morality worked than A Game of Thrones which I was unable to get into. That's not a cheap shot at A Game of Thrones which many have enjoyed but rather an indication that I really liked how Sanderson wrote his world. The Worldbuilding As in Mistborn the world is highly fleshed out. But this world is even deeper than the world of Mistborn. Religion again has its place alongside discussions of philosophy and morality. There are various native plants, creatures and people discussed which all fit neatly into a grand mythology of the Heralds and the Voidbringers. If you're looking for a Tolkienesque world with a grand level of attention to details then look at this for starters. The creatures introduced by Sanderson were fascinating. You had the chasmfiends, the Parshendii and parshmen, the chull, the axehounds and the sky eels for starters. Each of which were nicely depicted through images in the book. In fact the elaborate artwork was something else to behold for a book. The most intriguing creatures however were the spren. These are spirits which appear in different forms and flock to various events. For example windspren fly on the breeze, firespren appear around fires, painspren are attracted to pain, rotspren are attracted to rot and so on. The Magic You have the supernatural featuring strongly as in all of Sanderson's books to date. There are three types of main magic mentioned along with another which is hinted at. The fourth I won't delve into as it is simply called Old Magic and may feature more in later novels. I'll put a spoiler here as I provide some details which some readers may find spoiling. (view spoiler)[ Stormlight Lashings In Sanderson's world gems are powerful because they alone can collect the radiant energy of highstorms. This stormlight causes them to glow brightly. Some have the ability - like the Radiants of old - to absorb the stormlight from gems and use this to perform various lashings. These lashings bind objects together, prove gravitational pulls and change gravity. The stormlight also heals and strengthens the user Soulcasting Soulcasting again uses gems to change objects into other objects. For instance stone can become fog, blood can become ice, fire can become wood and so forth. The magic is done through the use of powerful objects called fabrials. Apart from that you can find out about the soulcasting more through reading. Shardplate and Shardblades These are weapons which turn men into unstoppable warriors. The plate strengthens a man and increases his speed and agility. The shardblade slices through any object and when it touches flesh it passes through deadening the soul. Basically if it touches your spine you will burn to death. Shardblades disappear when dropped and can be summoned by their wielder in ten heartbeats. While reading the book I kept imagining how awesome a film version would be to hear the heartbeats as the sword is summoned - and because of how much action envelopes the book. (hide spoiler)] The Characterisation I loved the characters of this world. They each had a strong and properly explained moral centre to their being that was observable from the start. Some may become annoyed at the lack of sexuality in the book but I disagree with it being absent. In fact I think Sanderson deserves credit for fitting a clever touch of romance during a massive war where most of the women are away from the front-lines. (view spoiler)[Oh and there is that time with the crazy priest dude and Shallan. (hide spoiler)] Because what the book is about is not romance or action or war although those elements are visible. This is in essence a book about the characters and how they struggle through conflict, how they wrestle with turmoil and danger and in the end triumph. This is a book about overcoming the odds. The best kind of book in my eyes. Of course naturally each character must be brought low to rise again and you feel pity for their failing. But then when they rise you cheer for their victory. So what now? Well obviously I suggest you go read the novel if you love fantasy in its epic glory. This is a grand novel and world that for me was addictive. I'm left desiring more despite the thousand pages I've just finished. And that's a good sign of an awesome book for me. If I loved it enough to hungrily devour it. Because what I can see is that Sanderson is just a good storyteller telling good stories. And no book of his I've yet read has been worth less than five. (There's always Warbreaker but I'm an optimist). Anyway do I need to present another reason for you to enjoy this book? Initial Update I'm going to put this out here right now since it is the middle of the year and say this is probably my favourite book read all year (2012). Then you can have Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell in second place. Tied third places go to The Hero of Ages and Warbreaker followed by 1984 and Brave New World. A Further Note Having completed my re-read for this book I am both apprehensive and excited about seeing the plot twists and turns of the second book. Almost everything I noted again in my re-read has been covered across the review for part 1 and part 2 already save for one small note. I would like to comment on a point many, many reviewers I know have made and this is in regards to Shallan's story. Some have suggested that she was far too annoying (I would agree with that in part) and not necessary to be featured in this first book (to which I disagree). I feel that her story was important in showing all the elements of what was going on across the world of Roshar - rather than focusing on one area - as well as providing a more feminine character presence. I would further add that it is in the second half of the book where, to me, Shallan becomes a more rounded out character as well as a more necessary character (for her connection to Jasnah if nothing else). The one other addition to this note that I can make would be to encourage you to read this book if you are into supernatural literature in any regard. There are themes of war, love, betrayal, necessary evil, honour and religion wrapped around a grand story that is fascinating. Again, it starts out slowly and the characters can at first seem unlikeable but one of the true joys about this novel is that none of the characters are really unlikeable for long in that you understand that even the villainous characters have fleshed out motives for their actions. And that is what truly makes compelling characters - not merely giving characters evil actions to undertake and calling them 'noble' despite it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hasham Rasool

    In the beginning of part two was a lot faster and the readers already know the basic background story of each character. Jasnah does intrigued me. Shallan is a very good character. I love the way Sanderson created Roshar, write this book and development each character. I have noticed that the mother and the daughter Navani and Jasnah are quite different but some ways they are similar. The chemistry between Dalinar and Navani are quite good. If Navani wasn't the wife of the late king Gavilar then Da In the beginning of part two was a lot faster and the readers already know the basic background story of each character. Jasnah does intrigued me. Shallan is a very good character. I love the way Sanderson created Roshar, write this book and development each character. I have noticed that the mother and the daughter Navani and Jasnah are quite different but some ways they are similar. The chemistry between Dalinar and Navani are quite good. If Navani wasn't the wife of the late king Gavilar then Dalinar and Navani would become the husband and wife. Dalinar and Navani act like they are the parents of Adolin. I like the bonding of the father and the son Dalinar and Adolin. I think these three females characters, who are very good characters development are Navani, Jasnah and Shallan. There are only two males characters, who are very good characters development are Dalinar and Kaladin. We haven't seen females characters very much. I love 'The Way of Kings'! Alhamdulillah! I am looking forward to reading 'Words of Radiance' and I am looking forward to reading all of Sanderson's books. Inshallah.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    Updated review (August 2020) What is there to say about The Way of Kings other than that it’s a masterpiece of fantasy writing? I certainly wouldn’t recommend starting your Sanderson journey with The Stormlight Archive, but once you get here you’ll understand. This is my first time rereading The Way of Kings and I’m glad I did. I first read it three years ago and have since forgotten a lot of the details. One of the most interesting aspects I noticed during my reread was my reaction to the novel Updated review (August 2020) What is there to say about The Way of Kings other than that it’s a masterpiece of fantasy writing? I certainly wouldn’t recommend starting your Sanderson journey with The Stormlight Archive, but once you get here you’ll understand. This is my first time rereading The Way of Kings and I’m glad I did. I first read it three years ago and have since forgotten a lot of the details. One of the most interesting aspects I noticed during my reread was my reaction to the novel itself. The first time around, I was so invested in Kaladin and the Shattered Plains. I could not get enough of Kaladin and every chapter spent away from him and his journey was time lost. However, this time around I was screaming for more Shallan and Jasnah chapters. There are far to few of them, but they serve the larger plot of the Cosmere. Every line of each of these chapters feels as if they have been written carefully and precisely. To the people who dislike Shallan, why? Apart from the incredible character development, intricate world building, and the spectacular pacing (did I use enough adjectives?), I think Sanderson’s best accomplishment in The Way of Kings is his foreshadowing. Every revelation and reveal feels earned. If you’re paying attention, none of this should come out of left field. The Sanderson Avalanche is real, especially at the end of The Way of Kings. Everything is moving along at a fairly quick pace when all of a sudden the plot explodes and readers are racing to the end with not enough pages left in the best possible way. To the people who read this when it was first published in 2011 then had to wait until 2014 for the sequel, hats off to you. You’re the real MVP. I guess I know the feeling now that I’ve waited 3 years for Rhythm of War after Oathbringer. Overall, The Way of Kings is one of the most incredible opening fantasy novels I’ve ever read. Come to think of it, the only other novel of comparable calibre is A Game of Thrones. Strap in, buckle up, and throw your hands in the air because Sanderson will bring you on the ride of your life with realistic characters and a world so vast and intricate you won’t know your way around. ______ Sanderson! Ma man! Doing it again and again. I cannot get enough of his writing. His plotting, characters, world building, and dialogue are ALWAYS on point. The Way of Kings Part One is a phenomenal introduction with multiple characters that are multidimensional and in depth world building. Kaladin was by far my favourite of the bunch introduced in Part One. He's inspiring and resourceful with considerable influence despite is lack of awareness of his own qualities. His journey through this first half of the story is emotionally and physically draining and I loved every second of it. Shallan spoke to me more than any other character. She has endless wit that comes out most often at inappropriate moments. Her thirst for knowledge is unquenchable, which made reading her chapters interesting because the reader learns much about the world. Danilar and Adolin took me a bit to warm up to. Their chapters were the most confusing at the beginning because of all of the names and relationships to each other. Once I got a handle on who everyone was, I found myself thoroughly enjoying their interactions. I cannot wait to see what happens next with Danilar. Also, HOID! Overall, The Way of Kings Part One is great introduction to an impressively massive world with a complicated history. The characters are all or mostly fleshed out with complex personalities and conflicting ideologies. The Way of Kings is best consumed knowing little about the story, hence my vague review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    I feel like every single book by Brandon Sanderson that I read is better than the previous one... How is that even possible?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melissa | melisthereader

    *Overall rating 4.75* I want to give this all the stars, but since it took so long to get into, I'm giving it a 4.75. I just don't understand how Brandon Sanderson can create such awesome, vast worlds. Absolutely mind-boggling. I loved it, so much. The characters, the plot, the build-up. Yes to all! It was so good. So. Good. *Overall rating 4.75* I want to give this all the stars, but since it took so long to get into, I'm giving it a 4.75. I just don't understand how Brandon Sanderson can create such awesome, vast worlds. Absolutely mind-boggling. I loved it, so much. The characters, the plot, the build-up. Yes to all! It was so good. So. Good.

  11. 5 out of 5

    daisy

    I'm definitely going to have a review up for it at some point, but it's late and I'm tired af. What I will say: I think this is probably one of my new all-time favourite novels. Brandon Sanderson and his damn crafty endings, at it again. I'd planned to read another book entirely after finishing this one, but I think I'm just gonna dive straight into Words of Radiance tbqh!! I'm definitely going to have a review up for it at some point, but it's late and I'm tired af. What I will say: I think this is probably one of my new all-time favourite novels. Brandon Sanderson and his damn crafty endings, at it again. I'd planned to read another book entirely after finishing this one, but I think I'm just gonna dive straight into Words of Radiance tbqh!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I know I said I’d write a full review, buuuuuuuut I’m in Italy and not back until Sunday evening. However that was incredible. I love Kaladin. Bridge Four are my Boys. Dalinar and Adolin grew on me very very much Sadeas... snip snip from my friendship group Jasnah and Shallan. Some unexpected things! Szeth... I need more!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Sanderson did it AGAIN! A slow burn and then BOOM - the ending. His endings are always a surprise, but I love that it‘s never something you couldn‘t have figuered out - I always have that satisfying Aha-moment, sometimes I figure it out just a second before he explains it. Sanderson‘s endings are responsible for some of the best reading expieriences I had. I‘m happy that I read this first installment in the Stormlight Archive in two parts - otherwise it would have been too long for me and that wo Sanderson did it AGAIN! A slow burn and then BOOM - the ending. His endings are always a surprise, but I love that it‘s never something you couldn‘t have figuered out - I always have that satisfying Aha-moment, sometimes I figure it out just a second before he explains it. Sanderson‘s endings are responsible for some of the best reading expieriences I had. I‘m happy that I read this first installment in the Stormlight Archive in two parts - otherwise it would have been too long for me and that would‘ve reduced my enjoyment of the story. But in this format I enjoyed it immensly. I switched between audio and physical book and it was great that way. Another thing I really like about this book is that it‘s epic fantasy and while there are quite a few characters, there‘s not that huge cast of characters you have in other epic fantasy, where you have trouble following who‘s who and what‘s going on. My favourite thing is probably the world building. It‘s an immersive world, incredibly interesting and so well built up. I was quite intimidated by this series and its size, but I‘m glad I picked it up and had the chance to get to know these characters and this world.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Roberta Jayne

    Part 2 of my Way Of Kings review There was not one moment in this book that I did NOT believe that everything that was happening was absolutely real and important to the story. I thought that, perhaps somewhere in the 1000 pages of this book, I might get bored or frustrated - or even find completing the story a bit daunting - but I feel like I need to stop under-estimating Brandon Sanderson and stop worrying about if his books are going to be incredible. Because they always are. He knows what he' Part 2 of my Way Of Kings review There was not one moment in this book that I did NOT believe that everything that was happening was absolutely real and important to the story. I thought that, perhaps somewhere in the 1000 pages of this book, I might get bored or frustrated - or even find completing the story a bit daunting - but I feel like I need to stop under-estimating Brandon Sanderson and stop worrying about if his books are going to be incredible. Because they always are. He knows what he's doing. The characters in this book went through SO MUCH. I went through so much. Kaladin, of course, is my favourite out of them all but, aah, I can't wait to read Words of Radiance to see who the story focusses on and what new characters are brought in. I also LOVE THE SPREN. THE SPREN ARE SO GOOD. Reading the blurbs and reviews of Sanderson's books don't do them any justice, really. I think you just have to read them to appreciate them. Oh, also, it's worth mentioning that the illustrations in this book are just beautiful! I really admire Sanderson's decision to include them in this series, because it's something I haven't seen before and they're all just wonderful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    charlotte, (½ of readsrainbow)

    Rep: mc with depression, bi mc, autistic gay side character

  16. 5 out of 5

    milou ☕️

    “Death is the destination. But the journey, that is life. That is what matters.” I'm going to flat out admit that I read this book last October and then my long and agonizing reading slump knocked me out of the game, so I cannot remember every detail about this book to write a valid book review that it deserves. I can recall that this books left me shaken up once I've finished it and that I wanted to read the rest of the series when I'm granted the opportunity. Books in the series: “Death is the destination. But the journey, that is life. That is what matters.” I'm going to flat out admit that I read this book last October and then my long and agonizing reading slump knocked me out of the game, so I cannot remember every detail about this book to write a valid book review that it deserves. I can recall that this books left me shaken up once I've finished it and that I wanted to read the rest of the series when I'm granted the opportunity. Books in the series: 1.) The Way of Kings Part 1 ★★★★ ↠ Genre: High Fantasy ↠ Pov: Third Person - Various ↠ Type: Book 1 out of ? in The Stormlight Archive Series ↠ Rating: 100%

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carbonbased Bookworm

    what an epic ride 🙌 an it has only just started ❤️

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dawnie

    Death is the destination. But the journey, that is life. This second half of this huge first book in an even bigger fantasy series certainly picked up the pacing compared to the first half. This book had a lot more going in -in character development, in plot development, in general story development and on top of that was packed up with action moments. The writing was great, i enjoyed where most of the characters and their different plot points went... but i also have to say that some parts Death is the destination. But the journey, that is life. This second half of this huge first book in an even bigger fantasy series certainly picked up the pacing compared to the first half. This book had a lot more going in -in character development, in plot development, in general story development and on top of that was packed up with action moments. The writing was great, i enjoyed where most of the characters and their different plot points went... but i also have to say that some parts dragged on a little and i kind of wished this book would have been at least a hundred pages shorter. I KNOW! I am on the minority here in the biggest way possible, but while i really enjoyed reading this book and actually started to like most if not all of the characters and respected their different roles in this book i also sometimes felt a bit bored because sometimes it just felt a bit dragged out. When once again something was explained that wasn't needed (while other things where not explained at all... still after all those pages!) or a character got into a monolog that i really had no interested at all in. Yes those pages where only in between the clearly important moments, and they only where around two or three pages at the most at one time. But add those pages together in the size of this book and you get a good amount together! This book was brilliant -don't get me wrong! I enjoyed this more than i thought would be possible since i am still a newly to high/epic Fantasy so i always go into it expecting it to be a bit over my head. I didn't really feel that way with this book so that is great and clearly showcasing Sanderson's craftsmanship! But the problem with a book that has over 1000 (if you take the "original version" or add the two way of king parts together yourself) is that sometimes you feel those pages. So while this was great and defiantly worth a read no matter what kind of fantasy reader "level" you are at -do be prepared that every now and again you will notice the amount of pages and the "epicness" of the story while reading it. With that in mind - GO READ THIS BOOK! Its pretty freaking amazing!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    The end of the first half of The Way of Kings left me hanging and very keen to progress to the second half. Where part 1 was very much building the story and introducing us to Roshar, part 2 became explosive very quickly, just like Sanderson’s later chapters in his other series such as Mistborn. My opinion of the central protagonists has not changed much except towards the end I started to warm to Shallan a little more, which is a good thing considering it is her flashbacks I will be reading in W The end of the first half of The Way of Kings left me hanging and very keen to progress to the second half. Where part 1 was very much building the story and introducing us to Roshar, part 2 became explosive very quickly, just like Sanderson’s later chapters in his other series such as Mistborn. My opinion of the central protagonists has not changed much except towards the end I started to warm to Shallan a little more, which is a good thing considering it is her flashbacks I will be reading in Words of Radiance. I wish we got to see Dalinar’s past a little sooner, but I’m sure the wait will be worth it when I come to read Oathbringer. Mr Sanderson is a master of twists and turns, and there was no shortage of these throughout the second half. I find he is one the greatest fantasy authors for being able to weave a complex plot and resolve it in tidy manner whilst at same setting the stage for a much larger story to evolve and this was very much the case with The Way of Kings. One aspect of the novel I have a small quibble about is that Sanderson only focused on a small part of Roshar. I can understand this is only the start of the series though and I have 9 more books to read before I finish it. A tremendous novel, incredibly well crafted and fully meriting 5 stars. I really hope the Stormlight Archive continues to deliver the same if not better quality in years to come and while Mr Sanderson is at its helm, I have no doubt of this. I think I will have a rest from this series before reading Words of Radiance though, perhaps starting Mistborn Era 2 beforehand.

  20. 5 out of 5

    ☙ nemo ❧ (pagesandprozac)

    i know brandon sanderson is the master of absolute fucking bombshells of twists, but those last 40 pages were STRAIGHT UP INSANITY. the first twist i was like, oh, that's a pretty good twist, yeah, didn't see that coming. second twist was like, whoa, yeah, that's also pretty good. and then the third made me physically actually scream and beat my fists on my knees like a fucking insane gorilla and then the FOURTH AND FIFTH I'M GOING TO FUCKING EXPLODE. i can't believe i DNF'd this book at page 100 f i know brandon sanderson is the master of absolute fucking bombshells of twists, but those last 40 pages were STRAIGHT UP INSANITY. the first twist i was like, oh, that's a pretty good twist, yeah, didn't see that coming. second twist was like, whoa, yeah, that's also pretty good. and then the third made me physically actually scream and beat my fists on my knees like a fucking insane gorilla and then the FOURTH AND FIFTH I'M GOING TO FUCKING EXPLODE. i can't believe i DNF'd this book at page 100 five years ago. sixteen year old me had absolutely no taste whatsoever. what a loser. also, the parshmen remind me of (view spoiler)[the Ood from Doctor Who, like a lot. i'm pretty sure branderson got the idea from there, either that or great minds really do think alike. but i don't think it's a rip-off or anything, it's an inspiration and it works SO. FUCKING WELL. but i'm obsessed with the Ood and gestalt races in general. (hide spoiler)] i'm not doing a review, just this disjointed collection of my immediate thoughts, because my brain is exploding.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Literary Han

    No words can do this epic first novel justice. I am dumbfounded

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I'm probably being a bit mean giving this less than 5-stars, 4.5/5 for me. Shallan is a very interesting character, though she hasn't captured my imagination in the same way that Kaladin has, yet. There's still plenty of time for my opinion to change over the 1000's of pages of this series I still have to read. I said in my pre-review notes that I liked this more than The Way of Kings book 1. That is partly to do with plot-progression and partly to do with the section at the end where Sanderson's I'm probably being a bit mean giving this less than 5-stars, 4.5/5 for me. Shallan is a very interesting character, though she hasn't captured my imagination in the same way that Kaladin has, yet. There's still plenty of time for my opinion to change over the 1000's of pages of this series I still have to read. I said in my pre-review notes that I liked this more than The Way of Kings book 1. That is partly to do with plot-progression and partly to do with the section at the end where Sanderson's unique magic-system is explained. That helped me immensely. I had been struggling a little to picture how it all worked in my mind. (Small brain syndrome again) lol. So, if, like me, you hadn't read a Sanderson book before I would start with the Mistborn series. (I haven't read those yet, though I believe they might help with understanding the whole 'Lashings' concept). My favourite character is Kaladin (as you have likely gathered) but Dalinar comes a close 2nd. I love the way Sanderson has shaped and nurtured the relationships between his characters in this book. I got a real sense of the betrayal and the feelings of those concerned. (He even had me close to tears by the end of this one)! Chivalry and honour are very important to me, they make me care about characters that display those qualities. Sanderson uses those qualities in few characters in this book, which sets the stage for many a scheme and side-plot involving the many villainous people who lack those credentials. I won't go on-and-on, I think you can tell that I liked the story. The only thing that concerns me about this series is that it is unfinished. I am glad I haven't had the cash to buy the other books yet, it means Sanderson may be closer to completing it by the time I do. Lol. Oh, one last suggestion. I bought these as two books because I struggle a little with reading books that go beyond 500 pages. It has to be damn good to keep my interest beyond 500 pages. (Hence the reason why I don't usually go straight through a series back-to-back. I prefer to take a break and read something else). For those of you who love your tomes, the 1000+page doorstop of this book all in one will be ideal. I look forward to continuing with the series in the future. Thank you to all of you who take the time to read my sometimes rambling reviews!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Firstly, I have to say I'm going to treat Part One and Part Two as the same book, because they are! Therefore my review for each will be the same. I ate this book! About halfway through Part One I ordered Part Two, but I finished Part One so fast that I had to wait for Part Two to arrive and that was painful! So my advice is - if, after the first chapter of Part One, you are enjoying it order Part Two right then! I haven't finished such a large book so quickly for a long time. This is the kind of Firstly, I have to say I'm going to treat Part One and Part Two as the same book, because they are! Therefore my review for each will be the same. I ate this book! About halfway through Part One I ordered Part Two, but I finished Part One so fast that I had to wait for Part Two to arrive and that was painful! So my advice is - if, after the first chapter of Part One, you are enjoying it order Part Two right then! I haven't finished such a large book so quickly for a long time. This is the kind of book that you find yourself carrying around in order to sneakily read it whenever you can. I was reading it ALL the time, I became unresponsive and dazed...It was great! The characters are involving and three-dimensional, the plot is intricate and original, the world feels complete and complex. I loved Kaladin in particular all the way through, I found myself getting bored with Dalinar in places (mainly because I wanted the action to get back to Kaladin), but in hindsight the sections with Dalinar are just as important and I can see why they are as they are. The pace of the action speeds up about three quarters of the way through the book and then there is a mad race for the finish which left me breathless. As the first book in what is probably going to be a large series I think this stands up very well on it's own, which is quite a feat. If this first book is a small section of the jigsaw which is the series then we get enough of the picture for it to be exciting and logical, but we never lose sight of the fact that the whole jigsaw is much larger than the section we're working on. Can't wait for the next book!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pauline Fireheart

    Edit: THIS REREAD WAS AMAZING Rating of the first part of the book: 5/5 stars Rating of the second part of the book: 5/5 stars Global rating: 5/5 stars To be human is to want that which we cannot have. This is hands down the most complex book I have ever read but oh man it was good. I won’t lie, the story was hard to get into. They are a lot of points of view (granted, they are 3 main protagonists) and the world is really vast. But once I got a grip on what was going on, I become really invested i Edit: THIS REREAD WAS AMAZING Rating of the first part of the book: 5/5 stars Rating of the second part of the book: 5/5 stars Global rating: 5/5 stars To be human is to want that which we cannot have. This is hands down the most complex book I have ever read but oh man it was good. I won’t lie, the story was hard to get into. They are a lot of points of view (granted, they are 3 main protagonists) and the world is really vast. But once I got a grip on what was going on, I become really invested in the story and couldn’t put the book down. There is no denying it, Sanderson is the master of world-building. If I should die, then I would do so having lived my life right. It is not the destination that matters but how one arrives there. Dalinar and Kaladin are such amazing characters to read from. They both suffer from inner struggles and are driven by the will to do the right thing. I loved learning about Kaladin's story and I can’t wait to read the next book to dive into Dalinar’s background. I will protect those who cannot protect themselves.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stars

    For a 1000+ page book to be split into two, there are hardly moments where nothing is happening. The majority of it is either significantly important to the character and/or to the plot. Brandon Sanderson is really out here doing the most! So after the end of part 1 which ends in such a tense point, you get to start part 2 with even more momentum and drive to get through and see the aftermath of part 1. I can't praise it enough, it doesn't give you a chance to predict anything, even if you do, i For a 1000+ page book to be split into two, there are hardly moments where nothing is happening. The majority of it is either significantly important to the character and/or to the plot. Brandon Sanderson is really out here doing the most! So after the end of part 1 which ends in such a tense point, you get to start part 2 with even more momentum and drive to get through and see the aftermath of part 1. I can't praise it enough, it doesn't give you a chance to predict anything, even if you do, it isn't accurate. Not say that these plot points are contrived but they are set up in a way where the outcome isn't clear. I had to start book 2 immediately, the end is so surprising, I needed to know what happened!! I mean this series is really testing my limits with big books, yet it's flying by. I'm tempted to reread it all immediately after I finish the series! 💛

  26. 4 out of 5

    Di

    Wow wow wow...I have to say the last 200 pages I just could not breathe anymore. I almost felt like I had read 1400 pages for those amazing 200 pages lol! Not quite haha - overall this was a great book and I 100% recommend it. I only realised in that second part how much some of the characters had grown on me. I mean I went from wanting to laugh out loud to cry my eyes out at some point in these last pages. Absolutely worth the previous 1400 pages. Great story overall and I look forward to readi Wow wow wow...I have to say the last 200 pages I just could not breathe anymore. I almost felt like I had read 1400 pages for those amazing 200 pages lol! Not quite haha - overall this was a great book and I 100% recommend it. I only realised in that second part how much some of the characters had grown on me. I mean I went from wanting to laugh out loud to cry my eyes out at some point in these last pages. Absolutely worth the previous 1400 pages. Great story overall and I look forward to reading the second part !

  27. 4 out of 5

    Courtney (bookplaces)

    Brandon Sanderson is brilliant. I LOVED this😍 The story flowed so smoothly that I hardly noticed the incredibly intricate world building, yet felt that I understood the world, structure, dynamics, and political situation/conflicts. The character development was superb. And HOLY ENDINGS BATMAN! Sanderson is King of Endings and I need to continue the series immediately.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Well the ending blew my mind. This might just be my favourite by Brandon Sanderson so far!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Reem Ghabbany

    THIS BOOK IS SO FREAKING GOOD! OMG OMG IT’S GOOD I’M SO THANKFUL FOR BRANDON SANDERSON’S EXISTENCE

  30. 5 out of 5

    PipReads

    Love a good Sanderson twist.

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