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Victor Rios grew up in the ghetto of Oakland, California in the 1980s and 90s. A former gang member and juvenile delinquent, Rios managed to escape the bleak outcome of many of his friends and earned a PhD at Berkeley and returned to his hometown to study how inner city young Latino and African American boys develop their sense of self in the midst of crime and intense pol Victor Rios grew up in the ghetto of Oakland, California in the 1980s and 90s. A former gang member and juvenile delinquent, Rios managed to escape the bleak outcome of many of his friends and earned a PhD at Berkeley and returned to his hometown to study how inner city young Latino and African American boys develop their sense of self in the midst of crime and intense policing. Punished examines the difficult lives of these young men, who now face punitive policies in their schools, communities, and a world where they are constantly policed and stigmatized. Rios followed a group of forty delinquent Black and Latino boys for three years. These boys found themselves in a vicious cycle, caught in a spiral of punishment and incarceration as they were harassed, profiled, watched, and disciplined at young ages, even before they had committed any crimes, eventually leading many of them to fulfill the destiny expected of them. But beyond a fatalistic account of these marginalized young men, Rios finds that the very system that criminalizes them and limits their opportunities, sparks resistance and a raised consciousness that motivates some to transform their lives and become productive citizens. Ultimately, he argues that by understanding the lives of the young men who are criminalized and pipelined through the criminal justice system, we can begin to develop empathic solutions which support these young men in their development and to eliminate the culture of punishment that has become an overbearing part of their everyday lives.


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Victor Rios grew up in the ghetto of Oakland, California in the 1980s and 90s. A former gang member and juvenile delinquent, Rios managed to escape the bleak outcome of many of his friends and earned a PhD at Berkeley and returned to his hometown to study how inner city young Latino and African American boys develop their sense of self in the midst of crime and intense pol Victor Rios grew up in the ghetto of Oakland, California in the 1980s and 90s. A former gang member and juvenile delinquent, Rios managed to escape the bleak outcome of many of his friends and earned a PhD at Berkeley and returned to his hometown to study how inner city young Latino and African American boys develop their sense of self in the midst of crime and intense policing. Punished examines the difficult lives of these young men, who now face punitive policies in their schools, communities, and a world where they are constantly policed and stigmatized. Rios followed a group of forty delinquent Black and Latino boys for three years. These boys found themselves in a vicious cycle, caught in a spiral of punishment and incarceration as they were harassed, profiled, watched, and disciplined at young ages, even before they had committed any crimes, eventually leading many of them to fulfill the destiny expected of them. But beyond a fatalistic account of these marginalized young men, Rios finds that the very system that criminalizes them and limits their opportunities, sparks resistance and a raised consciousness that motivates some to transform their lives and become productive citizens. Ultimately, he argues that by understanding the lives of the young men who are criminalized and pipelined through the criminal justice system, we can begin to develop empathic solutions which support these young men in their development and to eliminate the culture of punishment that has become an overbearing part of their everyday lives.

30 review for Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys

  1. 4 out of 5

    audrey

    Tough book to review. The topic is incredibly promising: that Black and Latino boys in Oakland (and to a large extent more generally) are pipelined into juvenile justice and prisons by a complex matrix that assumes their criminality over their humanity. Everywhere they turn, they are treated like criminals, even when they've done nothing wrong, or even while actively trying to stay out of criminal activity. Their whole lives, their whole childhoods, are criminalized by police, schools, the media Tough book to review. The topic is incredibly promising: that Black and Latino boys in Oakland (and to a large extent more generally) are pipelined into juvenile justice and prisons by a complex matrix that assumes their criminality over their humanity. Everywhere they turn, they are treated like criminals, even when they've done nothing wrong, or even while actively trying to stay out of criminal activity. Their whole lives, their whole childhoods, are criminalized by police, schools, the media and their own neighborhood environment. To prove this thesis, the author spent three years doing fieldwork in Oakland, shadowing Black and Latino boys as they interacted with the elements of the matrix in question to determine how and how often the boys wound up being punished and criminalized. The results of that fieldwork seem to absolutely uphold the author's thesis, even as he acknowledges that he lacks a certain amount of objectivity in having grown up Chicano in Oakland. There's a great deal of well-explained theory in this book, about previous work in this field, academic studies of the area, organic capital as a resistance strategy, resistance identities, disreputability as resilience and subversion, the role/problem of the embedded sociologist as reporter, and I learned a ton. Where I struggled with the book is that it felt like easily 70% theory work and summaries, and 30% anecdotes from the fieldwork itself. I wanted to know more about these boys and their lives, and although so much of the included theory is very necessary in order to fully explore this "hypercriminalization" (author's term) matrix, I really wanted more story. Also, the chapter on hypercriminalization and toxic masculinity I found entirely confusing. I'm not a trained sociologist, but I felt like I could follow the rest of the theory and examples in the book, and then this chapter seemed to circle around and over itself and I didn't follow it at all. That said? Still a satisfying and eye-opening read. The sheer amount of police brutality and police harassment reported by the author during his fieldwork was astonishing. And I already know that that's an issue for people of color, especially Black people, in this country. But the author, a professor at the University of California, reported having been equally targeted by law enforcement for just hanging around the boys he was shadowing. Two officers emerged from the [Oakland Police Department] car and ordered us to sit on the curb: "Hands on your ass!" Slick looked down at his burrito, and I realized we were being asked to throw our meal away after only taking one bite. The officer yelled again. Our fresh burritos splattered on the chewing-gum-dotted concrete, and we sat on the curb with our hands under our thighs. An officer grabbed Slick's arms and handcuffed him. Another officer did the same to me. One of them lifted us up by the metal links holding the cuffs together, placing excruciating pressure on our shoulder joints. As they searched us, I asked the officers, "What's going on?" They provided no response. They took out a camera and took pictures of Slick and me. ...The officers had noticed me in the neighborhood and had asked many of the boys about me. ...One of them later told me that I was doing the boys no good by studying them and advocating for them. The officer told me that I was enabling them by harboring their criminality and that I should be arrested for conspiracy.This is not an isolated incident reported in the book. One of the other eye-opening aspects of the book is how hypercriminalization affects school discipline in Oakland. Not just in terms of how teachers, principals and school security officers threatened the boys with calls to law enforcement, but how often school infractions were followed up with law enforcement. "The other day one of the boys was arrested for talking back to the principal. He told her that the police could not go into his house without a warrant, after the principal threatened to call the cops on him. The principal dialed the school officer, and he arrested him for threatening his teacher." That's horrifying. That's not an environment where a student can do anything but comply and fear, not learn. Another student was arrested for talking back to his probation officer, and again for "intimidating a clerk at a Foot Locker shoe store." What are we doing with these types of charges? How are these allowable? And what are we going to do about it? So overall, a powerful and readable book that I'm only complaining about because I ultimately wanted more of it. These are issues that need more people talking about them and figuring out how to take action to dismantle the hypercriminalization complex.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kath ❅

    Read for school but it was really good. Academic but I would recommend this to anyone who’s interested.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    This book is "...a snapshot of the complicated world of some boys growing up in Oakland, California, in the midst of a system of punishment which, from their perspective, maintains an ironclad grip on their everyday lives." Victor Rios follows forty Black and Latino teenage boys in Oakland for a few years, in the process getting searched by police, arrested, and being subject to interrogation by police officers many times, simply for hanging out with them in public, on the streets of Oakland, do This book is "...a snapshot of the complicated world of some boys growing up in Oakland, California, in the midst of a system of punishment which, from their perspective, maintains an ironclad grip on their everyday lives." Victor Rios follows forty Black and Latino teenage boys in Oakland for a few years, in the process getting searched by police, arrested, and being subject to interrogation by police officers many times, simply for hanging out with them in public, on the streets of Oakland, doing stuff like sitting on the curb eating tacos by a taco truck. It's heartbreaking, as when one of the boys tries to get a job as a server in a restaurant and unknowingly is turned down for the job because he wears sneakers and doesn't shake hands with the interviewer as he leaves. He doesn't shake hands because of the dominant narrative he's subject to - don't touch a white woman, it will make people think you're dangerous. He thinks he's being respectful. It's heartbreaking when the teenage boys can't buy candy at the store without carefully going directly to the candy aisle and choosing a candy with outstretched arms, arching their bodies away from the racks to try to show the store clerk they're not shoplifting. And it's heartbreaking when they can't hang out without being stopped, searched, entered into the police's gang member database if they're simply around a friend who's in the database. And, anyway, it made me think a lot about public institutions and the way we ally ourselves with police and seem dominant and punitive to outsiders. At the library, when we ask for ID, when we show how we're part of the system, when we aren't nice, when we are harsh to teenagers for how they express themselves. "In my college courses, I read books that discussed the government's neglect of the poor. While insightful, these books missed a key process that I had personally experienced: the state had not abandoned the poor; it had reorganized itself, placing priority on its punitive institutions, such as police, and embedding crime-control discourses into welfare institutions, such as schools." "As the boys came of age, and were almost always treated like criminals, they believed, and were often correct, that they were being systematically punished for being poor, young, Black or Latino, and male. In the era of mass incarceration, when punitive social control has become a dominant form of governance, some young people are systematically targeted as criminal risks."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sharlyn

    This book provides such terrific insight into hypercriminalization for those who have not experienced it personally. Rios is incredibly skilled at explaining in accessible ways the social processes by which young men's identities and characteristics (black or brown, poor; certain styles of dress or speech; living in a certain neighborhood or housing development) create stigmas and labels that limit their opportunities in concrete and harsh ways. Before even arrest or direct juvenile justice inte This book provides such terrific insight into hypercriminalization for those who have not experienced it personally. Rios is incredibly skilled at explaining in accessible ways the social processes by which young men's identities and characteristics (black or brown, poor; certain styles of dress or speech; living in a certain neighborhood or housing development) create stigmas and labels that limit their opportunities in concrete and harsh ways. Before even arrest or direct juvenile justice intervention, there is the threat of jail (a self-fulfilling prophecy), the side-eye of the shop clerk, and the harsh police questioning or physical invasions. Specifically, some of the most important insights I got from the book were about the ways community spaces that are supposed to assist and provide resources to young people have adopted the logic of punishment and incarceration--how schools, community centers, after-school programs, and other "resources" have become sites of punishment which push out young people instead of bringing them in---And how such ubiquity of distrust and fear can lead young people looking for care and dignity further into criminalized behaviors and acts of resistance. Whether they were or weren't, the young men in the study were all treated as gang members bound for bad and not good. Rios's empathetic descriptions and summaries of conversations make sure readers understand that young people's decisions and behaviors happen under these constraints, and that we bear collective responsibility for these conditions. Though Rios studied African American and Latino boys in Oakland, there are many lessons here for all of us in the U.S. The book is also a fast and pleasant read, and it does contain reasons for optimism about the politicizing effects of criminalization on young men in the study. Highly, highly recommend this book!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brad Kent

    This is a readable but dense ethnography, and reads like the author's dissertation - so be forewarned if you were hoping for an easy read. That said, this is really good. One major point from this book that was new for me: the enforcement/corrections apparatus has invaded the education system. If young people (accurately) think of school as part of the carceral state, how do we move forward? This isn't the most prominent point of the book, but it made the biggest impression on me. This is a readable but dense ethnography, and reads like the author's dissertation - so be forewarned if you were hoping for an easy read. That said, this is really good. One major point from this book that was new for me: the enforcement/corrections apparatus has invaded the education system. If young people (accurately) think of school as part of the carceral state, how do we move forward? This isn't the most prominent point of the book, but it made the biggest impression on me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    Fascinating and heartbreaking, this is a good examination of how the school to prison pipeline plays out, though that pipeline includes the neighborhood and has a strong race factor. There are many eye-opening anecdotes, especially related to job-seeking, but the opening anecdote of police harassment that requires the dropping of newly-purchased food to comply, when there is no crime and no charges... it makes you want to sing NWA songs, though that really isn't the answer. I find it to be an int Fascinating and heartbreaking, this is a good examination of how the school to prison pipeline plays out, though that pipeline includes the neighborhood and has a strong race factor. There are many eye-opening anecdotes, especially related to job-seeking, but the opening anecdote of police harassment that requires the dropping of newly-purchased food to comply, when there is no crime and no charges... it makes you want to sing NWA songs, though that really isn't the answer. I find it to be an interesting companion piece to Jay McLeod's Ain't No Makin' It. There, the youth were divided into a group that believed that hard work would help them win, and another that understood how the system was rigged. The second group got some benefits and avoided some heartbreak from their cynicism, but it still wasn't satisfying. Rios points to some other possibilities. While the best option would be strong support and decriminalization of youth, strategizing around the corrupt system, especially in terms of activism, does provide a third way.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Megi Diasamidze

    Wonderful book! Rios demonstrates how punitive social control, criminalization and stigmatization affect lives of many young people in Oakland, California. This book made me think of sociological imagination and how realizing that our personal issues require structural changes might help us unveil the reality of mass incarceration.

  8. 5 out of 5

    KC

    P good. Eye opening, made me think about stuff.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lance Eaton

    Rios's dissertation work-turned-book is a fantastic and powerful read that feels like a perfect counterpart to The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Over several years, Rios situates himself among a group of Latino and Black young men in Oakland, California to learn from their vantage what life is like when society deems you a problem or menace. From his observations, interviews, and analysis, Rios highlights the many ways in which young people of color are stuck bet Rios's dissertation work-turned-book is a fantastic and powerful read that feels like a perfect counterpart to The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Over several years, Rios situates himself among a group of Latino and Black young men in Oakland, California to learn from their vantage what life is like when society deems you a problem or menace. From his observations, interviews, and analysis, Rios highlights the many ways in which young people of color are stuck between living in challenging spaces that demand one kind of conformity while a predominantly white (and racist) culture demands conformity in another. These two demands are at odds with one another, leaving youth men determining what is the rational choice to pursue based on their situation (rather than the "rational" assumptions people not in their position believe is "right"). Rios doesn't ignore that, at times, harmful ways the young men act but he doesn't chalk it up to lazy thinking by labeling them innately bad or "super-criminals" and the like. Instead, he situates their actions and reactions in a complex web where one is often needed to perform hyper-masculinity in the hopes of a larger strategy of self-protection. In doing so, he illustrates that the youths at times know they are crossing lines but do so, at times, with some awareness (and inner turmoil) about doing so. Beyond learning about the young men through Rios, he also captures the complex systems that actively monitor, police, and limit their decisions from the time they are young children until they are legal-aged adults. The antagonistic relationship the community has towards youth becomes its of self-perpetuating production line of troubled youth and leave them with little options for growth and development in productive ways. With little social supports and programs besides those that are punitive or problem-based (e.g. drug abuse), many of the youths interviewed have little resources to draw upon to avoid the punishment that lies in waiting for them throughout their childhood.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    A very well-written book on how approaches by law enforcement, the criminal justice system and current legislation socialize our children and youth of color to believe there's not a place for them to be successful citizens within society, as well as stigmatizes them as criminals, especially the impoverished. A must read. The first time that I've read the term "hypermasculinity" and it makes perfect sense. I've taught and worked for a community reentry program with incarcerated men from impoveris A very well-written book on how approaches by law enforcement, the criminal justice system and current legislation socialize our children and youth of color to believe there's not a place for them to be successful citizens within society, as well as stigmatizes them as criminals, especially the impoverished. A must read. The first time that I've read the term "hypermasculinity" and it makes perfect sense. I've taught and worked for a community reentry program with incarcerated men from impoverished communities and society just beats them up. So proud of my students and clients who keep their chin up and persevere. This book tells it just like it is.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Wren

    I wish I had read this book before I taught in Title I high schools. There were so many different points this book made about race, poverty, and the effects it has on my students. This knowledge would have been really beneficial to help me navigate supporting my students well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Cook

    I would recommend this for anyone who wants to understand the almost complete breakdown that exists in much of America between the police and communities of color. Rios is a scholar with a PhD from one of the most prestigious universities in the world (UC Berkley). He also grew up poor in Oakland, dropped out of school at one point, and spent time in a juvenile correction facility when he was 15. This is a book informed by the fieldwork he did when he returned to Oakland as a PhD student, to sha I would recommend this for anyone who wants to understand the almost complete breakdown that exists in much of America between the police and communities of color. Rios is a scholar with a PhD from one of the most prestigious universities in the world (UC Berkley). He also grew up poor in Oakland, dropped out of school at one point, and spent time in a juvenile correction facility when he was 15. This is a book informed by the fieldwork he did when he returned to Oakland as a PhD student, to shadow and get to know 40 teenage boys (20 Latino, 20 Black, all poor and all with a history of run-ins with the police). At one point, Rios tells the story of a teenage boy who was first arrested and hand-cuffed for talking back to his teacher at the age of 8. Other stories are equally horrifying. The resulting book that is lucid, humane, unsentimental and devastatingly convincing. Rios is particularly good at demonstrating that his subjects are neither irredeemable "super-predators," nor totally passive victims of their circumstances. Instead, he shows how their decisions (even the most maladaptive) are based on universal psychological needs to feel secure and respected in a society that so often denies them both security and respect. At one point, Rios paraphrases Karl Marx to say that "people make history, but not in circumstances of their own choosing." Rios convincingly demonstrates that these teenagers are growing up in circumstances where society assumes they are either already criminals or about to become criminals. He shows how they each boy is able to make decisions along the way that can confirm or challenge this assumption. But he also shows that every choice has its consequences, which are often dire. A teenager who tries to comply with what teachers and police claim is "good behavior" will reduce his chance of ending up in prison, but also risks alienating peers or appearing an easy target for violence. Rios demonstrates the the communities he studies are both over- and under-policed. Police regularly harass and intimidate teenagers on dubious pretexts and make numerous arrests for minor offenses, but seem unable to protect them from actual violent crime. But any humane reader will realize that the greater fault lies with society that created the circumstances in which children, not yet fully developed, are challenged daily to make these life or death decisions, and then so often penalized for whichever choice they make.

  13. 5 out of 5

    CTEP

    I first read about Sudhir Venkatesh and his ethnographic endeavors into inner-city Chicago and it's low-income housing developments in Stephen J. Dubner’s work “Freakonomics”. Dubner covered a brief part of Venkatesh’s work and explained the hierarchies of gang life and the economic model of drug dealing. At the time I was a senior in college and reading a book called “Punished: Policing The Lives of Black and Latino Boys” by Victor Rios, a professor of Sociology at UC Santa Barbara. In this wor I first read about Sudhir Venkatesh and his ethnographic endeavors into inner-city Chicago and it's low-income housing developments in Stephen J. Dubner’s work “Freakonomics”. Dubner covered a brief part of Venkatesh’s work and explained the hierarchies of gang life and the economic model of drug dealing. At the time I was a senior in college and reading a book called “Punished: Policing The Lives of Black and Latino Boys” by Victor Rios, a professor of Sociology at UC Santa Barbara. In this work Rios writes about Venkatesh suggesting that he employs a “jungle book trope” of sociology that is a voyeuristic depiction of the lives of Black men. Victor Rios came to my school to speak and I got the chance to ask him about this claim. Rios had a very well reasoned answer to my question as he suggested that a sociologist must do his or her due diligence to justify the narrative they create. Rios, a community activist, organizer, and advocate for young Black and Latino males in Oakland, finds Venkatesh’s work to be self-promoting and aggrandizing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Schoen

    Criminalization of deviant behavior and style among marginalized youth across many social institutions and relations has helped create the youth control complex of today. Mass Incarceration has been a catalyst and supporter of this dehumanizing process. The young men in this ethnography and within our society are willing to fight for both their dignity and their freedom, however, the powers that be must provide the positive resources, chances, and opportunities to do so. The solution, unfortunat Criminalization of deviant behavior and style among marginalized youth across many social institutions and relations has helped create the youth control complex of today. Mass Incarceration has been a catalyst and supporter of this dehumanizing process. The young men in this ethnography and within our society are willing to fight for both their dignity and their freedom, however, the powers that be must provide the positive resources, chances, and opportunities to do so. The solution, unfortunately, may have to be fought from below, as I remain skeptical of the current systems ability to take off the blindfold of profit and help it's citizens that it eats.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nadine

    Great book for advanced undergrad or graduate level students. Rio does a great job of focusing on social processes and not relying on sensationalist stories. The problems here are complex and you could use any chapter as a meaningful learning opportunity on its own, but taken together this is a great example of grounded theory in action. Rios incorporates seminal scholars (past and present) but also offers fresh insight into the over policing - and under valuing - or urban adolescent boys. Worth Great book for advanced undergrad or graduate level students. Rio does a great job of focusing on social processes and not relying on sensationalist stories. The problems here are complex and you could use any chapter as a meaningful learning opportunity on its own, but taken together this is a great example of grounded theory in action. Rios incorporates seminal scholars (past and present) but also offers fresh insight into the over policing - and under valuing - or urban adolescent boys. Worthy read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Dineen

    I started reading this book after joining a BLM Book Club through my employer. This book was very eye-opening for me working with black and brown children from a variety of different backgrounds. It was especially insightful to read a book from the perspective of someone who was raised in Oakland, CA and was directly impacted by the way of life there and the over policing and hyper-criminalization of Black and Latino boys within that area. Highly recommend for any educator to read as we learn ot I started reading this book after joining a BLM Book Club through my employer. This book was very eye-opening for me working with black and brown children from a variety of different backgrounds. It was especially insightful to read a book from the perspective of someone who was raised in Oakland, CA and was directly impacted by the way of life there and the over policing and hyper-criminalization of Black and Latino boys within that area. Highly recommend for any educator to read as we learn others perspectives by hearing their stories and understanding where they come from. I will take away a lot of insightful and resourceful information from this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Osmara Rico

    This books was wrote by Victor R. He was a gang member, but after a few years he could leave it. He finished high school, and went to college. Besides that now he has a PhD. He wanted to do a study on the relationship of blacks and Latinos boys with the police, so he returned to his old neighborhood, to talk with several gang members, and thus be able to understand why most gang members do not study, and do not work. This is a great reading for high school students. Audio book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sage Kampitsis

    Victor Rios is one of those scholars I want to be like when I grow up. His analysis in Punished is well put together, and the section on labeling stuck with me so much that I cited it numerous times in my undergraduate thesis. I've also listened to interviews with him about the book and was blown away by those as well. This book is a must-read for anyone teaching or considering teaching urban education. Victor Rios is one of those scholars I want to be like when I grow up. His analysis in Punished is well put together, and the section on labeling stuck with me so much that I cited it numerous times in my undergraduate thesis. I've also listened to interviews with him about the book and was blown away by those as well. This book is a must-read for anyone teaching or considering teaching urban education.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Denise Lauron

    I had to read this for class. It had a lot of good information, but the audiobook version was awful! No one coached the narrator on how to pronounce certain things like the names of cities or the local public transportation system. Bart and San Ramon and San Leandro are not difficult! It bothered me the whole time I was listening. I would recommend it to explain some of the things that are going on in the world right now, but definitely not the audiobook version.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna Bowser

    As someone who works with youth in the system, the stories in this book felt familiar and also pushed the boundaries of my understanding of the problems in the juvenile justice system. I imagine this is because Rios writes from the intersection of personal experience, field study, and sociological theories. This led to chunky writing that was, at times, less than compelling, even while the topics and his analysis remained fresh and important.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elsa

    I was a fan of this one--Rios's examination of the flatlands of Oakland paints an accurate picture of how black and latinx youth are criminalized from birth and portrayed as dangerous consistently. Transforming society's understanding of "at-risk" teens to those "at-promise" is essential to our unpacking of race, and I appreciated his heavily race-conscious approaches to changing education and policing. I was a fan of this one--Rios's examination of the flatlands of Oakland paints an accurate picture of how black and latinx youth are criminalized from birth and portrayed as dangerous consistently. Transforming society's understanding of "at-risk" teens to those "at-promise" is essential to our unpacking of race, and I appreciated his heavily race-conscious approaches to changing education and policing.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sten Leinasaar

    It offered an insightful perspective into the lives of Black and Latino Boys. It also offered reasons why these boys end up in such situations and how institutions around us are not to help the boys, rather criminalize them. I would recommend watching a documentary, Feminist in the Cellblock Y, to further enhance your understanding and experience in this topic.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    An academic analysis can be engaging as is Dr. Rios' study of the criminalization of black and brown young men in 2010s Oakland. This book can provide insights for educators, social workers, and parents into the importance of seeking nurturing alternatives to our punitive systems of control. Deep, rigorous but much needed reading An academic analysis can be engaging as is Dr. Rios' study of the criminalization of black and brown young men in 2010s Oakland. This book can provide insights for educators, social workers, and parents into the importance of seeking nurturing alternatives to our punitive systems of control. Deep, rigorous but much needed reading

  24. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Read this book for my college criminology course. It is a really great look into the overpolicing and criminalization of black and hispanic inner-city youth. Highly upsetting but also extremely important. Lots of sociological theories but everything is well explained (and repeated). Also a good balance between theory and the stories of the youth that Rios studied.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kelli Rushek

    This book offered an excellent intersection between Foucault and my teaching experience as a resource for the paper I'm writing. For those who do not understand the shit that goes down, read it. For those that do, it's nothing we don't know, but it's an excellently worded reference. This book offered an excellent intersection between Foucault and my teaching experience as a resource for the paper I'm writing. For those who do not understand the shit that goes down, read it. For those that do, it's nothing we don't know, but it's an excellently worded reference.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Collin Whalen

    Had to read for my sociology class, for a book I'm supposed to read it was good and provides a glimpse in the life of youth struggling in essentially a ghetto. Made me think about how I am lucky to grow up in a middle class area. Had to read for my sociology class, for a book I'm supposed to read it was good and provides a glimpse in the life of youth struggling in essentially a ghetto. Made me think about how I am lucky to grow up in a middle class area.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joselyn Smith

    An amazing story of the pains poc face! I had to read this book for class and all I have to say is wow! This book follows a handful of Latino and black youths and how society, policing, and school force them to conform to being criminals. It's truly an eye opener. An amazing story of the pains poc face! I had to read this book for class and all I have to say is wow! This book follows a handful of Latino and black youths and how society, policing, and school force them to conform to being criminals. It's truly an eye opener.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    Great Very insightful book, as it gives a glimpse of the structural forces that shape the lives of these young men.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Beavers

    Yet another read for RC&J that was ok

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Fulton

    This ethnography gives an intimate view of the process of overcriminalization and how it impacts kids. It is well worth reading.

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