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The Mystery of the Lost Village

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Someone steals artifacts from a Navajo reservation.


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Someone steals artifacts from a Navajo reservation.

30 review for The Mystery of the Lost Village

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I always liked reading these books when I was younger and this was an enjoyable story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. They don’t need to announce in every single book that the Aldens were found in a boxcar and their grandad took them in. We know!! ‘He remembered how their lives had changed since the days when they were living in a boxcar. Grandfather Alden had found them and given them a real gone with lots of love.’ The colors and designs have special meanings. The eagle symbolizes honor, wavy lines mean mountains, hawks are for swiftness, the deer means love, and the title means wisdom. Navajo women would shear They don’t need to announce in every single book that the Aldens were found in a boxcar and their grandad took them in. We know!! ‘He remembered how their lives had changed since the days when they were living in a boxcar. Grandfather Alden had found them and given them a real gone with lots of love.’ The colors and designs have special meanings. The eagle symbolizes honor, wavy lines mean mountains, hawks are for swiftness, the deer means love, and the title means wisdom. Navajo women would shear their own sheep for wool, and used berries to dye the wool. The women always made a tiny mistake on purpose when making blankets so it didn’t offend the gods by being too perfect. You can tell by deer tracks if it’s male or female. Females have sharper hooves and narrower feet and the male has a rounded top to the hooves. If the toes are spread apart they were running around playing, if the toes are tight together it’s running for its life. It’s cool that Kinowok can tell which tribe the arrowheads are from. Two tents put together making a diamond represents the four directions. Turquoise is very important to the Navajo. They have a tale of a woman who found turquoise, and took it to the top of a mountain where it turned into a goddess. They call their traditional Navajo dress regalia. To make a leather belt, they draw it first on graph paper. They made a homemade loom to string together the beads on the belt. They cut out a dress pattern for the bucks in dress. Navajo girls would sew on beadwork too. They cooked over vampires with stoneware pots. Clay pots would break if put over the fire so they heated stones over the fire and put water in the pots and then they’d put the stone in the water so it would make the water hot. The Navajos believed thunderbirds made thunder by flapping their wings and by opening and closing his eyes he created lightning. Some tribes use stones to mark buried treasure. It’s pretty annoying, it takes white people to find the buried city, when the natives knew about the city for a long time,& couldn’t find it. Benny was annoying, blabbing about them excavating when it’s supposed to be a secret. I liked the names of the horses, Thunder and Skywalker. The coyote is respected for its wisdom, pipes represent peace. They had baking stones. Fires were built under the stone, under the rounded part and on top the bread would bake. Butterfly stones are used for jewelry. They were polished to bring out their true colors. Batons, carved and decorated wooden sticks with beads, were wands used by chiefs and elders. Navajos also used teeth for decoration, thinking them as beautiful as beads. Putting pitch in baskets made them watertight, and they’d add water and heated stones so you could cook food in them. Snakes are important to the Navajo because they live close to the ground. When the soil is dry, they can send a message to the gods. Everything is easy. All the kids get along great, there’s no drama. Jessie easily learns the swan dance, Amy proclaims she’s like a Navajo girl. And Kinowok declares she should be an honorary member of the tribe. Kinowok warned Rita, but it wasn’t much of a warning and didn’t seem like something an elder would have done. He wrote ‘Stay away from the forest. There is danger in the shadows.’ Which sounded cool btw...and I suppose should have warned them away, but still. The elders end up thanking the Aldens for their help and how they “added much to our lives.” I liked the names. Lightfeather, Michael Running Deer, Bobbie Redbird. It was nice how Michael quit his job with the developer, realizing he wants to go back to his dream of archeology and study his ancestry, since he’s full-blooded Navajo like Joe and Amy. I was shocked when their granddad dropped them off and left them with strangers for two weeks. I couldn’t remember where he was going or why he couldn’t take them with him. Everything was so easy and convenient, and unrealistic. This wasn’t the mystery I was expecting either. I love in her bio how the kids show independence and resourcefulness and New England devotion of making do. They have very little adult supervision on their adventures, which young people love to read. It’s true; on the same hand, sometimes they need help from adults or just to let them know what they’re involved in.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christi

    Really a three star book for plot and writing and all, and the audiobook was pretty awful (the kids voices were so silly), but it gets an extra star for teaching my kids about Navajo culture without it feeling forced and holding their attention well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Roseanne Urbanc

    Kids loved it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    ABC

    The Alden kids visit a Navajo family and dig for Indian artifacts. This book told surprisingly a lot about Navajo culture. One thing I did not like: A blond man shows up and says he is a genealogist and is part Navajo. The kids doubt this because he knows nothing about Indian culture and he is from the Northeast. In reality, it could be a distant relative of his who is Navajo, although the book never says this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Y

    Nice that it touches upon Navajo culture, as even though almost every BCC book tries to teach its young readers about something new, it's usually less clearly anthropological and more just about *things*. The mystery is the usual ho-hum type, however. Nice that it touches upon Navajo culture, as even though almost every BCC book tries to teach its young readers about something new, it's usually less clearly anthropological and more just about *things*. The mystery is the usual ho-hum type, however.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kaetlyn

    I like when a man tells the Aldens he thinks they found the lost of their tribe. And I like when they find dishes and pots and they find the village.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn Montalvo Cullum

    I registered a book at BookCrossing.com! http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/14138279 I registered a book at BookCrossing.com! http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/14138279

  9. 4 out of 5

    Partridge Public

    Warner, Gertrude C. PB

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca (whenallotherlightsgoout)

    One of my favorite childhood series. I read over a hundred of them. The first 50 or so were in order; after that I read whatever book I could get my hands on :)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    great when ur little

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    One of the Boxcar Children's most important missions. They visit a reservation and here about a lost tribal village, together they stop the bad adults and help preserve a civilization. One of the Boxcar Children's most important missions. They visit a reservation and here about a lost tribal village, together they stop the bad adults and help preserve a civilization.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Haidyn

    I liked this book.I did not like that people stole the indian bowl Violet found.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    i think i read this one?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gallimaufry

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  17. 5 out of 5

    DeLynn

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Wisdom

  21. 5 out of 5

    Addie Stoddard

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dave Fischer

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

  26. 4 out of 5

    Siva Sengottuvelappan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Kheng

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steven Crosby

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nic

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

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