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Piper in the Woods: A Collection of Science Fiction

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Philip Kindred Dick was an American novelist, short story writer, and essayist in the science fiction genre. Dick explored sociological, political and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states. In his later works, Dick's thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theolo Philip Kindred Dick was an American novelist, short story writer, and essayist in the science fiction genre. Dick explored sociological, political and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states. In his later works, Dick's thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology. He often drew upon his own life experiences and addressed the nature of drug abuse, paranoia and schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences in both his short fiction and novels. This collection brings together 11 rare short stories and novellas culled from premier editions of such classic magazines as "Amazing Stories," "If," "Galaxy" and "Planets." Piper in the Woods The Variable Man Beyond the Door The Crystal Crypt The Defenders The Gun The Skull The Eyes Have It Second Variety Beyond Lies the Wub Mr. Spaceship


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Philip Kindred Dick was an American novelist, short story writer, and essayist in the science fiction genre. Dick explored sociological, political and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states. In his later works, Dick's thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theolo Philip Kindred Dick was an American novelist, short story writer, and essayist in the science fiction genre. Dick explored sociological, political and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states. In his later works, Dick's thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology. He often drew upon his own life experiences and addressed the nature of drug abuse, paranoia and schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences in both his short fiction and novels. This collection brings together 11 rare short stories and novellas culled from premier editions of such classic magazines as "Amazing Stories," "If," "Galaxy" and "Planets." Piper in the Woods The Variable Man Beyond the Door The Crystal Crypt The Defenders The Gun The Skull The Eyes Have It Second Variety Beyond Lies the Wub Mr. Spaceship

30 review for Piper in the Woods: A Collection of Science Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Intriguing. This short science fiction story was so interesting, it kept me reading it to the end without interruption. It was eerie, well-written, and excellent. Recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Harding

    This was a most excellent tale from PKD, in one sense you had a feel of what was going to happen, and yet in another it was still leaving you in wonder, it guided you through a beautiful science fiction tale and like a good story left you wanting more. PKD #8

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peter J.

    PKD Piper in the Woods is a short story by master science fiction writer Philip K.Dick. Written early in his career, it possesses that “existence out of SYNCH” element that seems to be a hallmark of PkD’s story-telling.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Austin Wright

    Any PKD short-story collection is worth reading.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Henry Harris, an army doctor on Earth, receive a patient who, after returning from a mission on asteroid Y-3, claims to be a plant. Harris’ diagnosis of post-traumatic stress syndrome was dispelled when a several more soldiers returning from asteroid Y-3 exhibit the same symptoms—the soldiers claim they are plants, they sit in basking in the sun during daylight hours, remain in a catatonic state at nighttime hours, and refuse to perform any kind of work. Harris travels to asteroid Y-3 and investi Henry Harris, an army doctor on Earth, receive a patient who, after returning from a mission on asteroid Y-3, claims to be a plant. Harris’ diagnosis of post-traumatic stress syndrome was dispelled when a several more soldiers returning from asteroid Y-3 exhibit the same symptoms—the soldiers claim they are plants, they sit in basking in the sun during daylight hours, remain in a catatonic state at nighttime hours, and refuse to perform any kind of work. Harris travels to asteroid Y-3 and investigates for a cause of the soldier’s conditions and learns from the soldiers of an indigenous people living in the woods called “Pipers”, and that it was the “Pipers” who made the soldiers realize they were plants. Harris ventures out to the woods and meets an indigene woman. The woman seems gracefully beautiful yet mysterious. She leads him deeper into the wood with promise of a meeting with the Piper. Harris returns to earth and decides that the “Pipers” were created by the soldiers to cope with their high-pressured military jobs; allowing them to simply “tune out” and relax by turning into plants. Harris contemplates all the work that lies ahead of him as he unpacks his suitcases, which, rather than contain clothes, contain soil from Asteroid Y-3. Harris spreads the soil on the floor, sat squarely in the middle like a plant, and goes to sleep. This science fiction short story seems fairly straight forward. The characters were relatively well developed given the number of pages. I can see this story as a basis of a Twilight Zone or Outer Limits television episode. I surely would recommend adding this to your reading list of short stories. My rating: ★★★★☆ (4 out of 5 stars) http://shortbookreview.blogspot.com/2... Here is a link to the full story: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Piper_i...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I've always liked Dick's books. He crafts a simple story, but with enough detail to draw you in and keep you engaged. His stories are edgy sci-fi that typically have a twist. Often, at the conclusion there is an unknown factor of what happens next, leaving the rest of the story to the reader's imagination. His shorter stories are especially nice because they set up and resolve so quickly with all of the creativity of his longer works. Piper in the Woods is no different. A base on an asteroid is I've always liked Dick's books. He crafts a simple story, but with enough detail to draw you in and keep you engaged. His stories are edgy sci-fi that typically have a twist. Often, at the conclusion there is an unknown factor of what happens next, leaving the rest of the story to the reader's imagination. His shorter stories are especially nice because they set up and resolve so quickly with all of the creativity of his longer works. Piper in the Woods is no different. A base on an asteroid is having trouble with people believing they are plants. It is an interesting twist as you never really find out what is causing it, but the ending is still really good. Definitely worth a quick read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I've recently read a bunch of Philip K. Dick's short stories and love how, although they are all dealing with similar situations (cold war turned into hot war, terra uninhabitable due to radiation, underground factories, robot wars, humans forced to live underground; OR interstellar wars (Terra-Centauri)/other interstellar situations), they still can't be compared to each other, they still differ enough to be enjoyed one after another (without getting bored by repetition). Sparks ideas about war I've recently read a bunch of Philip K. Dick's short stories and love how, although they are all dealing with similar situations (cold war turned into hot war, terra uninhabitable due to radiation, underground factories, robot wars, humans forced to live underground; OR interstellar wars (Terra-Centauri)/other interstellar situations), they still can't be compared to each other, they still differ enough to be enjoyed one after another (without getting bored by repetition). Sparks ideas about war, modern warfare, is war an innate reaction in man or is it learned behaviour?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Imagine an asteroid (near Jupiter in this part of its orbit around the sun), with a heavy core and therefore an earth-like gravity, atmosphere, water, and even biology. Vines, ferns, eucalyptus-like trees, and native (aborigines) of humanoid form. It may be classic science fiction, but it wasn't very plausible.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Olive

    Good read, and more accessible than some of PKD's other works. I imagine the "shocking twist" was a bit more shocking years ago, but I always it coming. Such are the perils of reading derivative works for years and then finally reading the source material. Overall, a quick and fun read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott Harris

    This short story is an intriguing read and bears some surprising similarities to the movie Avatar . The premise is not fully developed here but the insinuation is of an alien race capable of transforming the nature of humanity, through some connection to living forces.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A story of a mysterious asteroid turning all the soldiers into plants psychologically. ultimately the ending was predictable but then again PKD is always a good read regardless.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Demetra

    Not bad ,although easy to guess the end:The self-confident scientist who thought he could handle the mysterious disorder,is finally defeated by the unknown

  13. 4 out of 5

    TheWhistler

    An interesting and perplexing storyline, humans who believe they are plants. A satisfying read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Hall

    Piper is a fun ironic read. Like all of Philip Rock's books it would be a great Twilight Zone episode. Well worth your time to read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Good stuff.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cristobal

    A very intriguing start to the story is defeated in the end by a vague ending.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    So what if someone suddenly told you that they no longer needed to live an average life because they now believed (and insisted) that they were a plant.....

  18. 5 out of 5

    Manuel

    Not one of Phillip K Dick's best stories, but still amusing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tig

    Great idea for a short story - would have been interesting as a longer book which explored the idea further.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zachariah Council

    Bland and predictable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott Hancock

    Enjoyable read Yes it's short, yes it's slightly prodictable, but it's still a fun read. If your into sci-fi give it a shot.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mrk555

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan Fox

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erik Dryden

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alastair

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt Chapman

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christine A. Clark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan James

  30. 5 out of 5

    RáczAttila

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