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The news media is in the middle of a revolution. Old certainties have been shoved aside by new entities such as WikiLeaks and Gawker, Politico and the Huffington Post. But where, in all this digital innovation, is the future of great journalism? Is there a difference between an opinion column and a blog, a reporter and a social networker? Who curates the news, or should it The news media is in the middle of a revolution. Old certainties have been shoved aside by new entities such as WikiLeaks and Gawker, Politico and the Huffington Post. But where, in all this digital innovation, is the future of great journalism? Is there a difference between an opinion column and a blog, a reporter and a social networker? Who curates the news, or should it be streamed unimpeded by editorial influence? Expanding on Andrew Rossi’s "riveting" film (Slate), David Folkenflik has convened some of the smartest media savants to talk about the present and the future of news. Behind all the debate is the presence of the New York Times, and the inside story of its attempt to navigate the new world, embracing the immediacy of the web without straying from a commitment to accurate reporting and analysis that provides the paper with its own definition of what it is there to showcase: all the news that’s fit to print.


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The news media is in the middle of a revolution. Old certainties have been shoved aside by new entities such as WikiLeaks and Gawker, Politico and the Huffington Post. But where, in all this digital innovation, is the future of great journalism? Is there a difference between an opinion column and a blog, a reporter and a social networker? Who curates the news, or should it The news media is in the middle of a revolution. Old certainties have been shoved aside by new entities such as WikiLeaks and Gawker, Politico and the Huffington Post. But where, in all this digital innovation, is the future of great journalism? Is there a difference between an opinion column and a blog, a reporter and a social networker? Who curates the news, or should it be streamed unimpeded by editorial influence? Expanding on Andrew Rossi’s "riveting" film (Slate), David Folkenflik has convened some of the smartest media savants to talk about the present and the future of news. Behind all the debate is the presence of the New York Times, and the inside story of its attempt to navigate the new world, embracing the immediacy of the web without straying from a commitment to accurate reporting and analysis that provides the paper with its own definition of what it is there to showcase: all the news that’s fit to print.

30 review for Page One: Inside the New York Times and the Future of Journalism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    I never gave much thought to news for 2 reasons: (A) I don't think Singaporeans are as concerned or critical about how the nature of news has evolved; (B) I took an interest in the news after the transition to digitalisation took place. It is interesting to hear concerns about a phenomenon I take for granted as my reality, as well as thoughts from distinguished people about the future of the industry. As always, books provide a cool perspective, but this was not necessarily thought provoking. I never gave much thought to news for 2 reasons: (A) I don't think Singaporeans are as concerned or critical about how the nature of news has evolved; (B) I took an interest in the news after the transition to digitalisation took place. It is interesting to hear concerns about a phenomenon I take for granted as my reality, as well as thoughts from distinguished people about the future of the industry. As always, books provide a cool perspective, but this was not necessarily thought provoking.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason Bailey

    Many of the challenges that journalism faces have intensified in the decade since Page One: Inside the New York Times and the Future of Journalism was published, and others emerged as cellphones became ubiquitous. And although it is not the authors' fault that I read their work in a different context, it's still a limitation that many of the observations feel rudimentary. The opening five chapters are strong, exploring the tension inside The New York Times as it tries to hold on to journalistic p Many of the challenges that journalism faces have intensified in the decade since Page One: Inside the New York Times and the Future of Journalism was published, and others emerged as cellphones became ubiquitous. And although it is not the authors' fault that I read their work in a different context, it's still a limitation that many of the observations feel rudimentary. The opening five chapters are strong, exploring the tension inside The New York Times as it tries to hold on to journalistic principles while embracing the speed and attitude that made blogs winsome. But the remainder of the book is bogged down in the academic observations of media dignitaries who (spoiler alert) have not been able to find satisfying answers for an evolving industry. (Two important caveats: I have not watched "Page One" and I work at The New York Times.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    James

    It is thought-provoking.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh McConnell

    The media landscape is changing and it is changing fast. Journalists everywhere are questioning their job stability, the relevancy of their work in the eyes of the public and the ability to perform effectively in this modern digital era. The documentary Page One gave us a one-year peek into one of the world's most respected media organizations, the New York Times. This fascinating documentary could not have been filmed at the most perfect time with the introduction of the iPad, WikiLeaks and oth The media landscape is changing and it is changing fast. Journalists everywhere are questioning their job stability, the relevancy of their work in the eyes of the public and the ability to perform effectively in this modern digital era. The documentary Page One gave us a one-year peek into one of the world's most respected media organizations, the New York Times. This fascinating documentary could not have been filmed at the most perfect time with the introduction of the iPad, WikiLeaks and other relevant aspects to the journalism debate in the time frame. Fast forward to 2011, where David Folkenflik has continued where the documentary left off by curating a collection of relevant essays that chimes in on the future of journalism. Split up into three sections the essays discuss the New York Times, the shift to today's journalism and finally gaining the audience in this new era. Authors of these essays include New York Timers, freelance journalists, academics and even Hilary Clinton. Though the essays are short, easy to read and provide an additional layer of dialog to a very important issue, they are most valuable if you have seen the Page One documentary beforehand. Whether you are a news junkie, a journalist, or simply a headline reader, this collection of essays is a must read. It doesn't matter if you have been following the issues of print vs digital and the evolution of journalism or if you are new to these topics, these essays are a perfect springboard for discourse. Hurry and watch the documentary then run to read this book. You won't be disappointed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Geri Spieler

    “. . . thorough, thoughtful, and exceptionally well written. . . . Page One is a most encompassing volume on the issue of the future of journalism and newspapers. . . . Highly recommended.” Can print journalists be objective about the future of news? Page One attempts to answer this question in 17 essays and interviews with respected and well-known writers from various positions in newspaper and public affairs worldwide. David Folkenflik, NPR’s award-winning media correspondent based in New York C “. . . thorough, thoughtful, and exceptionally well written. . . . Page One is a most encompassing volume on the issue of the future of journalism and newspapers. . . . Highly recommended.” Can print journalists be objective about the future of news? Page One attempts to answer this question in 17 essays and interviews with respected and well-known writers from various positions in newspaper and public affairs worldwide. David Folkenflik, NPR’s award-winning media correspondent based in New York City, edits the book. The project was originally a documentary film shown at Sundance in January 2011. At the core of the film is a story told by journalists in the business representing different generations. David Carr, a former drug addict, is out of central casting as an eccentric, old school, gravely voiced reporter. On the other side of the proverbial desk is Brian Stelter who epitomizes the model of a fresh faced, new media journalist. The essays contained in the book cover the global challenge of how will newspapers and professional journalism survive in the age of the digital demon Websites like WikiLeaks, Gawker, Politico, and the Huffington Post.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    The central thesis of this book is that journalism is a changing landscape. It is reiterated time and time again. The problem is that it never offers any advice going forwards besides that one should "keep an open mind" to new advances in communications. The "future of journalism" described in the title is often confined to vague generalities. That being said, the book is thought-provoking and examines a number of facets in the industry that I'd have never thought about previously. The central thesis of this book is that journalism is a changing landscape. It is reiterated time and time again. The problem is that it never offers any advice going forwards besides that one should "keep an open mind" to new advances in communications. The "future of journalism" described in the title is often confined to vague generalities. That being said, the book is thought-provoking and examines a number of facets in the industry that I'd have never thought about previously.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John Jaksich

    I chose to read the book because of my interests in becoming a writer. The book helped to allay my worries about the future of journalism. Although the internet has displaced traditional news, there are certain bright spots in the journalism business. The traditional news outlets that were quick to react and didn't beg their readers to stay, they kept and expanded their readership.The outlets made their changes exciting to their readership. I recommend the book. I chose to read the book because of my interests in becoming a writer. The book helped to allay my worries about the future of journalism. Although the internet has displaced traditional news, there are certain bright spots in the journalism business. The traditional news outlets that were quick to react and didn't beg their readers to stay, they kept and expanded their readership.The outlets made their changes exciting to their readership. I recommend the book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Glendora

    Some really great essays. I was expecting just a hastily compiled companion piece to the documentary, but this complements the film with completely fresh material from superb writers. A pleasure to flip through (and a great source of quotes if you happen to be writing a paper for, say, a journalism class).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin Cook

    this is good but it's p old now so it's like THE INTERNET IS HERE TO STAY and WIKILEAKS CHANGES THE GAME which is a bit ho hum but it also had some real interesting things about news literacy and a great bit from MY GAL HRC so yeah im glad i read it I GUESS this is good but it's p old now so it's like THE INTERNET IS HERE TO STAY and WIKILEAKS CHANGES THE GAME which is a bit ho hum but it also had some real interesting things about news literacy and a great bit from MY GAL HRC so yeah im glad i read it I GUESS

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    For Grad School project.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Some of the essays repeat the same information, but near the end, the essays get more entertaining, and give us a lot of great ideas on the future of journalism.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    As a journalist, I found this book interesting. However, I was expecting more solutions and hope for the future than mere storytelling of what has happened over the last few years.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rock Angel

    A bunch of "Page One" over the years per lib-sf A bunch of "Page One" over the years per lib-sf

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kevin McAllister

    Reading The New York Times is always intersecting so it only follows that reading about The New York Times would also be interesting.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tobin Tullis

    wanting to be in jourslism this was a very informative read. this is the first time one should see the movie first. the book only takes it further

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Hodgson

    for a media-junky like me, this is cool insider stuff from NYT

  17. 5 out of 5

    Myles

    (0.8/5.0) We get it, The New York Times is determined to not go out of business. It doesn't deserve to, but it also doesn't deserve to glad-hand itself for hours on end. (0.8/5.0) We get it, The New York Times is determined to not go out of business. It doesn't deserve to, but it also doesn't deserve to glad-hand itself for hours on end.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Utami

  19. 4 out of 5

    Junjie Huang

  20. 5 out of 5

    Camilla

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saskia Reijmer

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

  23. 5 out of 5

    Warren Acoose

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Arkin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wafa

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mishkat TH

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Ballinger

  29. 4 out of 5

    Federico

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

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