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Living with the Dead: Twenty Years on the Bus with Garcia and the Grateful Dead

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As a manager for the Grateful Dead, Rock Scully was with the band from its early days in San Francisco to the years it spent touring the globe as one of the most enduring legends in music history. In Living with the Dead, Scully gives a complete account of his outrageous experiences with the band, during years that saw the Grateful Dead transform from a folksy revivalist b As a manager for the Grateful Dead, Rock Scully was with the band from its early days in San Francisco to the years it spent touring the globe as one of the most enduring legends in music history. In Living with the Dead, Scully gives a complete account of his outrageous experiences with the band, during years that saw the Grateful Dead transform from a folksy revivalist band to psychedelic explorers of outer space. In addition to close-up portraits of band members Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Pigpen, Phil Lesh, Micky Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, Scully brings into the story many of the people the Dead encountered in their journeys across America's musical landscape, including Ken Kesey, Janis Joplin, Etta James, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and the Jefferson Airplane. Scully tells the story of the band with genuine feeling; the tour disasters, acid trips, and burnouts, but most importantly the exaltation of delivering fantastic music.


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As a manager for the Grateful Dead, Rock Scully was with the band from its early days in San Francisco to the years it spent touring the globe as one of the most enduring legends in music history. In Living with the Dead, Scully gives a complete account of his outrageous experiences with the band, during years that saw the Grateful Dead transform from a folksy revivalist b As a manager for the Grateful Dead, Rock Scully was with the band from its early days in San Francisco to the years it spent touring the globe as one of the most enduring legends in music history. In Living with the Dead, Scully gives a complete account of his outrageous experiences with the band, during years that saw the Grateful Dead transform from a folksy revivalist band to psychedelic explorers of outer space. In addition to close-up portraits of band members Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Pigpen, Phil Lesh, Micky Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, Scully brings into the story many of the people the Dead encountered in their journeys across America's musical landscape, including Ken Kesey, Janis Joplin, Etta James, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and the Jefferson Airplane. Scully tells the story of the band with genuine feeling; the tour disasters, acid trips, and burnouts, but most importantly the exaltation of delivering fantastic music.

30 review for Living with the Dead: Twenty Years on the Bus with Garcia and the Grateful Dead

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nightfly

    This is without question the best book I've ever read about the Grateful Dead! I learned so many things about my favorite band (my favorite being the origin of Sage & Spirit). I just can't believe Rock could go into that much detail without having kept a journal of some sort. Amazing book! This is without question the best book I've ever read about the Grateful Dead! I learned so many things about my favorite band (my favorite being the origin of Sage & Spirit). I just can't believe Rock could go into that much detail without having kept a journal of some sort. Amazing book!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    This is my favorite book about the Dead. I have read several other accounts that tend to gloss over the flaws and warts of the band making the band members out as, ugh, heroes. That mythologizing and tidying up is really not what the Dead was about and always left me with a bad taste in my mouth. This account definitely shows the warts. It was written by Rock Scully who managed the band from the Acid Tests all the through the early 80's. Some people criticize the book as being factually incorrec This is my favorite book about the Dead. I have read several other accounts that tend to gloss over the flaws and warts of the band making the band members out as, ugh, heroes. That mythologizing and tidying up is really not what the Dead was about and always left me with a bad taste in my mouth. This account definitely shows the warts. It was written by Rock Scully who managed the band from the Acid Tests all the through the early 80's. Some people criticize the book as being factually incorrect and Scully for having an agenda. I don't view the book that way. I read it and picture Scully as a really good bs'er. Did you ever have a buddy that was so good at laying down the bs that they started bending the facts a little? That is Scully. He bends the facts and exaggerates, but the kernel of truth is there. Plus there is the fact that he obviously loved Jerry as a friend which tends to skew it some. The saddest part of the book is Jerry's descent into dope. He goes from cheerful Psychedelic prankster to a withdrawn junkie over the course of the years. It is truly sad that a lifestyle that probably attracted Garcia for its promise freedom ended up caging him. What kind of life is it when your only concerns are when to score and how to get high? The book is a little harsh on Bob Weir, but I kind of view it in the way a big brother messes with his younger brother. There is a hint of admiration and respect in the razzing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Duffy Pratt

    I didn't actually finish this, but not because I wasn't enjoying it. I was reading it, in part, while on a stationary cycle at the gym and I am pretty sure I left it there. It didn't get turned into the gym lost and found. So either a deadhead picked it up, or perhaps someone who decided to make maybe a buck at Half Price Books. I've decided to review it anyway because I had just come to the end of the chapter that dealt with the making of Blues for Allah, and Scully had pronounced that the Pers I didn't actually finish this, but not because I wasn't enjoying it. I was reading it, in part, while on a stationary cycle at the gym and I am pretty sure I left it there. It didn't get turned into the gym lost and found. So either a deadhead picked it up, or perhaps someone who decided to make maybe a buck at Half Price Books. I've decided to review it anyway because I had just come to the end of the chapter that dealt with the making of Blues for Allah, and Scully had pronounced that the Persian heroin had just made a big reintroduction into the circle. That marks the beginning of the end, and knowing something about the decline of Garcia and Scully into addiction, I decided I didn't want to buy the book again just to read the depressing stuff. The beginning of the book, and even up to where I lost it, was a lot of fun. I've read that much of what Scully says is unreliable. Of course it is. It's a gonzo memoir. I wouldn't read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas for its factual content either. Gonzo uses exaggeration and distortion to (hopefully) reveal a larger truth. That said, Scully is no Hunter Thompson, and sometimes the attempts at overload tended instead to be overbearing or simply overdone. Scully's attitude toward the band members is troubling. Bobby is always an incompetent, spaced-out kid. There's not a good word to be said about Phil. Bill comes across as a mostly deranged wild man. There is some sympathy for Pigpen, who is drawn more fully than the others. Garcia, on the other hand, can basically do no wrong. And Keith and Mickey are pretty much cyphers. (Keith always comes across as a cypher, and it makes me wonder if that's just how he was.) The stories, however, are fun. And Scully is more forthcoming than any of the other books I've read. Of course, forthcoming and reliable are two separate issues. One of the things that surprised me, however, is how little of the book had to do with the business of the dead, considering that Scully managed the band for close to 20 years. With all of that, there is very little on the nuts and bolts on running the business. I would have liked it better if he had gone into some of the business dealings in the same sort of detail that he gave to many of the acid trips. If I see the book (and maybe this copy) in Half Price Books, I will pick it up and finish it. But for now I am counting it as a sign that I lost it where I did, and that I don't have to get angry and bummed out, yet again, over Jerry's self destruction.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Denis

    Rock Scully was the Grateful Dead's tour manager between 1965 until 1985. This was no simple task. No easy laid back sort of job. Especially during the late seventies when Garcia had fallen prey to serious heroin use. It was up to Scully to figure out how to supply Garcia with a particular variety of Afghan dope by having it smuggled through airport security by jamming it inside hollowed Christmas candles and such in order for the band to perform. And that is only one small part of the job. All Rock Scully was the Grateful Dead's tour manager between 1965 until 1985. This was no simple task. No easy laid back sort of job. Especially during the late seventies when Garcia had fallen prey to serious heroin use. It was up to Scully to figure out how to supply Garcia with a particular variety of Afghan dope by having it smuggled through airport security by jamming it inside hollowed Christmas candles and such in order for the band to perform. And that is only one small part of the job. All in all, this was extreme baby sitting. There were other members of this band that had eccentricities and special needs - Phil Lesh was a connoisseur of French wines... Why bother, you say? Because Scully really loved these guys and believed that they were the most important and talented musicians of their time. - And if you've been to a Dead show (and I have) you can't deny that there was really something there that had never existed before. Those who go, the "truly committed" as I refer to them, are a community. By the seventies and onward to the end of the millennium, following the Dead for a seventeen-year-old was either a twisted version of summer camp or, even, a summer job. (There is much entrepreneurship in the parking lot of a show.) For anyone older, a Dead show is a groovy nostalgic vaca. If you have seen the mock-doc "Spinal Tap", you'll know what I mean. The film was as much about managing a band as it was about being a band. I loved the informal way this book was written (by master pop culture biographer David Dalton, was not overly done, it felt very genuine. It was a great inside look at the band and how one manages to manage it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark Walker

    Oh boy this is a wild and hair-raising trip of a book. Scully, who was one of the Dead's managers for almost 20 years, engages the reader with his witty, self-deprecating prose (co-authored with rock journalist Dalton) as he relates an almost unending stream of hilarious and/or terrifying anecdotes about a likeable group of hippies and misfits who are frequently so stoned they have no idea where or even who they are. Quite how a band even vaguely coherent emerged from the chaos, let alone one of Oh boy this is a wild and hair-raising trip of a book. Scully, who was one of the Dead's managers for almost 20 years, engages the reader with his witty, self-deprecating prose (co-authored with rock journalist Dalton) as he relates an almost unending stream of hilarious and/or terrifying anecdotes about a likeable group of hippies and misfits who are frequently so stoned they have no idea where or even who they are. Quite how a band even vaguely coherent emerged from the chaos, let alone one of the most creative and inspiring bands of the 20th century, is astonishing. The final chapters, which deal with his and Garcia's appalling out-of-control drug use threaten to get depressing, especially as we all know what the end of the story is. But overall it's an affectionate warts-and-all insider portrait of what seems now like a long-vanished Golden Age when people really could have free love and consequence-free drug use, or so they thought. Definitely not for Deadheads only. Anyone curious about what the Sixties and the hippie movement were like will find lots to enjoy here.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marcia Kreutzmann

    Even though Scully was their manager, this book is written as if he was an outsider. Fast-paced and exciting, non-stop thrills and chills. It sense of chaos that Scully is trying to contain, really comes across to the reader I thought. Of the many, many books written about the Grateful Dead, I feel this one hit the mark. Five musicians doing drugs and acting out in outrageous ways, with the manager trying his best to get them all on the same stage at the right time, over and over again. night af Even though Scully was their manager, this book is written as if he was an outsider. Fast-paced and exciting, non-stop thrills and chills. It sense of chaos that Scully is trying to contain, really comes across to the reader I thought. Of the many, many books written about the Grateful Dead, I feel this one hit the mark. Five musicians doing drugs and acting out in outrageous ways, with the manager trying his best to get them all on the same stage at the right time, over and over again. night after night. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to know more about these musicians.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Diego González

    Don't get me wrong, there are some great stories in this book. Rock was there early on and was there for most of the best stuff. Unfortunately, this book is a self serving piece of work that glorifies Jerry, glosses over his (and Rock's) drug use at best and glorifies it at worst, all the while disparaging every other member of the Dead along the way. I'd recommend it for the deep head looking to get all the angles, but definitely avoid it if you are seeking a good balanced history of the Dead.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rin

    This book was way better than the other one I read. Didin't gloss over the storms, the heroin, the fights, the women and most importantly, the music. Still a smidge heavy handed from the first-person perspective, but hey - what else do I want? Perfection? This book taught me a lot about the dead and garcia etc... and how today isn't all that much different then 'back in the day' I liked this book a lot better. I liked Rocks' storytelling a lot better.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    Sex, drugs, drugs, drugs and drugs again ... and rock and roll. One of the funniest book ever written. I didn't go to bed smarter for reading it but I enjoyed it a whole lot even if I didn't know much about the Dead.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alix Bryan

    Fantastic, eye-opening insights about the bands connections to music, musicians and a pivotal time in history. An intimate look at the band over 20 years. The last 1/3 of the book was fairly depressing. It was all drugs, addiction, no adventuring and no inspiration. Heartbreaking stuff.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    One-and-a-half stars. I've read other drug-filled music biographies/memoirs, but they held my interest a lot more than this author did. (view spoiler)[ Notes: Pigpenonly drinks,no drugs 710 Ashbury is the Grateful Dead house where they all lived for years until the Haight got to be too much of a famous spot. Jefferson Airplane wanted to credit Jerry Garcia as producer for the tunes "White Rabbit" and "Somebody to Love" because he tinkered with the guitar parts and arranged the songs when they were st One-and-a-half stars. I've read other drug-filled music biographies/memoirs, but they held my interest a lot more than this author did. (view spoiler)[ Notes: Pigpenonly drinks,no drugs 710 Ashbury is the Grateful Dead house where they all lived for years until the Haight got to be too much of a famous spot. Jefferson Airplane wanted to credit Jerry Garcia as producer for the tunes "White Rabbit" and "Somebody to Love" because he tinkered with the guitar parts and arranged the songs when they were struggling with them in the studio. (87) After first album,Bob Weir goes straight, too, which last through the 60's. (87) One time in LA, they meet the Maharishi who says, "'You must not call yourselves "Grateful Dead." You must call yourselves "Eternal Living"!'" (124) Publishing rights have to do with number of tracks, so on Anthem of the Sun they add some silence and add some arbitrary song titles, best seen in the different "sections" of "Cryptical Envelopment." (138-139) Before recording Workingman's Dead and American Beauty, David Crosby told the band that they needed to return to their roots, specifically in the sound of voices in harmony. (187-188) Jerry Garcia played pedal steel on Crosby, Still & Nash's "Teach Your Children." (188) Jerry Garcia's songwriting: "He usually starts by putting a sequence of chord changes together. Then he'll begin sketching a melody over the top of it. Once the basic melody is floating there, he'll just let it sit for a few weeks and let it ruminate. Gradually, he'll flesh out this backbone by attaching a few melodic phrases here and there and at this point he'll walk around the house humming it to himself. When it's got some shape to it he'll start playing it on guitar to whoever's around and then get together with Hunter who will write some lyrics to the tune. "If Hunter shows up with a finished lyric Jerry will scratch around for loose melodic phrases from three or four different songs he's been playing with until something fits. This is pretty much what happened with 'Casey Jones.'" (189) "Workingman's Dead and American Beauty are twins. The essential difference is that songs were in finished shape at the time went onWorkingman's Dead and the ones the band hadn't played yet in front of an audience went on American Beauty." (190) The title the Dead pitched for their self-titled live album was SkullFuck. (209) "Now, believe it or not, Jerry is very squeamish about anything to do with skulls and skeletons in connection with the Grateful Dead.He is very anti-bones of any kind. Jerry's idea of the name had more to do with the death of the ego,Lao Tzu, and letting go of the self under psychedelics." (210) March 8, 1973 - Pigpen dies after a long illness at age 27. (230) The Dead met Salvador Dali and when they explained the drug-taking at the Kool-Aid Acid Tests, Dali responded"I do not take drugs. I am drugs!" (294-295) When Francis Ford Coppola was working on Apocalypse Now, he came to a Grateful Dead concert and realized during the drum break what he needed for jungle music for the up-the-river sequence. "The soundtrack for Apocalypse is done with Hart and Kreutzmann and a panoply of other musicians...Garcia basically does the engineering himself" (309) During this time Coppola would sometimes sleep at 20 Front Street. Jerry Garcia bought the movie rights to Kurt Vonnegut's The Sirens of Titan. Francis Ford Coppola tells him there's no way a movie could be made of that particular book. (321) Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi buy a bar in Manhattan. After Grateful Dead gigs, there are jam sessions at the bar, Belushi singing. "He gets Garcia to teach him Otis Redding licks. A lot of the Blues Brothers schtick came out of Jerry's little tutorials." (322) (hide spoiler)]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Howard

    I liked this book. Like Bill Kreutzmann’s book, this one does not spend a lot of time trying to figure out The Dead’s sociological place in the counterculture or draw lessons about the cosmos as interpreted through the chord changes in Dark Star. It’s just stories that when told together become the story of the Grateful Dead told by someone who was there from the start. The story is well written, enlightening, sometimes poignant, sometimes sad, and quite often funny. The episodes about the Germa I liked this book. Like Bill Kreutzmann’s book, this one does not spend a lot of time trying to figure out The Dead’s sociological place in the counterculture or draw lessons about the cosmos as interpreted through the chord changes in Dark Star. It’s just stories that when told together become the story of the Grateful Dead told by someone who was there from the start. The story is well written, enlightening, sometimes poignant, sometimes sad, and quite often funny. The episodes about the German fire department and Keith Moon at the Navarro Hotel stand out in particular. If you've never read a book about the Grateful Dead this is a good place to start. If you've ready many books about the band and it's members, this is a nice light refreshment.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matt Deets

    Very fun read. Who better than the members themselves to tell these stories than Rock Skully. Skully perfectly describes in great detail and often times hilarity some amazing stories of what life was like on the road with the Dead. Easy read and also easy to put down and come back to if you are also reading something else. The story of visiting the playboy mansion is one of the funniest stories you will ever hear.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Wikstrom

    read it before – just needed something I knew I’d like. Lots of good stories but in the end really a tragic tale. I still miss Jerry. 4****

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Csongei

    I miss Jerry :(

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    What did I think of Living with the Dead: Twenty Years on the Bus with Garcia and the Grateful Dead? Let me start by saying that if I was the author Rock Scully, the co-writer David Dalton or the publisher Cooper Square Press I would be embarrassed to have my name associated with this ebook. The number of misspellings within the four hundred plus pages of this book is ridiculous. Words are spelled correctly in one sentence than in the very next sentence the same word is spelled wrong. Names of p What did I think of Living with the Dead: Twenty Years on the Bus with Garcia and the Grateful Dead? Let me start by saying that if I was the author Rock Scully, the co-writer David Dalton or the publisher Cooper Square Press I would be embarrassed to have my name associated with this ebook. The number of misspellings within the four hundred plus pages of this book is ridiculous. Words are spelled correctly in one sentence than in the very next sentence the same word is spelled wrong. Names of people and places are spelled wrong. Sometimes the letters are so jumbled that is hard to determine what the word is that the author wanted to use. The spelling nightmare aside this was an entertaining book. Scully gives a great look into the world that was Jerry Garcia the Grateful Dead. Some of the ideas that I had of the Dead, such as they were a democracy, were shot down with this book. Garcia was in-charge and everyone else followed his lead. This book really takes the reader from the early days of the Kool-Aid Acid Test shows through the Woodstock into the seventies when the group was trying to become more main stream onto the eighties where the band was just going through the motions to earn money to keep the members on top of their bills. There were some chapters of this book where the text is written more in a journal entry style. I found these sections a lot more enjoyable to read. They were quick hits with information about the band and touring. I would assume that these journal entries were taken from touring journals kept by Scully and that he, for the most part,didn't keep a journal when off the road. It is amazing that with all the drug use that he claims in the book that he could remember much that happened in his world. At the end of Living with the Dead Scully notes that if nothing else this book was written as a love note to Garcia. Unfortunately, for Scully, Garcia passed away before he could read it. The reader can tell that there was more than a boss/employee relationship or even friendship between these two. Scully realizes the talent that Garcia has and is in awe of what he can do with a guitar, when writing song lyrics, when producing the band's music, while he is painting and just how he can control a room when he is speaking. I would recommend this book, even with the misspellings, to anyone that is a fan of the Grateful Dead. It gives a good look at the inner workings of the band that I have not found in many other books. There is some flowery writing for the first few chapter to get through but the stories are very interesting. Also anyone that is interested in reading about sixties music in general. The Dead were involved with some of the biggest acts of the time and stories fill this book of not only sixties artists, but also groups of the seventies that looked up to the group. There is a even a chapter dedicated to time spent with Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi in New York City at their bar.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steve Johgart

    The third in a triumvirate of Grateful Dead histories I've read this year (along with the Phil Lesh autobiography "Searching for the Sound" and the more traditional cultural history "Aces Back to Back"), this book goes far further into the depths of depths of depravity than the other two (though Phil's book has its moments). This book is full-on flat-out gonzo journalism, and thus one has to consider that perhaps some of the tales have been factually embellished to more fully capture the feel of The third in a triumvirate of Grateful Dead histories I've read this year (along with the Phil Lesh autobiography "Searching for the Sound" and the more traditional cultural history "Aces Back to Back"), this book goes far further into the depths of depths of depravity than the other two (though Phil's book has its moments). This book is full-on flat-out gonzo journalism, and thus one has to consider that perhaps some of the tales have been factually embellished to more fully capture the feel of the moment. What starts out as a really fun read, albeit delving into a scene beyond any I'd choose to live in, devolves into a relentlessly drug-addled breakneck dirge with all the fun sucked out of the crazy. Eventually it all becomes a too long too strange trip. But perhaps a full reflection of the whole requires this. If you want a good ol' crazy-ass story well told, read the first few chapters and stop. If you're willing to be disillusioned and saddened, but at the same gain a richer understanding of how far astray acute immoderation can lead, keep reading. The book does go astray of some of its gonzo momentum for a while in the middle.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    I rate this book highly not because it is a great work of literature but because it is the best - by far - of the memoir accounts of the Grateful Dead experience. Scully and his writing partner achieve something rare - a lyricism that captures the ethos and vibe of the Dead in ways that others, however detailed, cannot (I'm looking at you, Cutler and McNally). All such books have value, of course, but Scully manages to not only present a set of fascinating episodes in the history of the Dead, he I rate this book highly not because it is a great work of literature but because it is the best - by far - of the memoir accounts of the Grateful Dead experience. Scully and his writing partner achieve something rare - a lyricism that captures the ethos and vibe of the Dead in ways that others, however detailed, cannot (I'm looking at you, Cutler and McNally). All such books have value, of course, but Scully manages to not only present a set of fascinating episodes in the history of the Dead, he also does so with a surprising degree of (as I've already said) lyricism and, well, beauty. I count myself a bit surprised at how much I liked this book. Kudos!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Niklas

    What a long strange trip. The Dead's manager for twenty plus years tells all and no one is spared not even himself. Funny, poignant look at the rise of the Grateful Dead--in his own word "the Ugliest rock-n-roll band that ever lived. The author seems to have a bit of a bone to pick with Bob weir, but otherwise comes off pretty even handed. This is the book the band didn't want you to read. Well written in the spirit of a "Merry Prankster," with many interesting snapshots of "living with the Dead What a long strange trip. The Dead's manager for twenty plus years tells all and no one is spared not even himself. Funny, poignant look at the rise of the Grateful Dead--in his own word "the Ugliest rock-n-roll band that ever lived. The author seems to have a bit of a bone to pick with Bob weir, but otherwise comes off pretty even handed. This is the book the band didn't want you to read. Well written in the spirit of a "Merry Prankster," with many interesting snapshots of "living with the Dead."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This book give the reader the WHOLE story of how Grateful Dead formed, their music, lives, loves, everything in a way that you feel part of the family, in a way. You learn about each and every band member, but most of all Jerry Garcia, the "heart" of the band, the unofficial leader. The book takes you through until Garcia's death.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Langdon

    This book is fine if you like the Grateful Dead as it has some interesting facts. This guy has an ax to grind with several of the people in the band and sometimes this gets in the way of the story. I liked it okay as I had been to many Dead shows in the late 70's and 80's but fine literature it is not. If your a fan read it if not don't.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barron Dalton

    Book was somewhat enjoyable, barely. I was in hopes that this book would go into more detail about the artistic development of the Dead, more info about their creative processes and inspirations. The book was essentially, "Hey let's party and then after that let's party again". For those that have outgrown the college spring break, party till you puke mentality, the book becomes a bit silly.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tim Pafundi

    I read this and was immediately struck by the thought "Why does this guy have an axe to grind?" I think this was his way to do a cash grab after being dumped from the bands management and he needed a way to earn some money. Hard to take anything he says too seriously as you can tell it's written with bitterness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    David Striepe

    Written with the bitter tone of someone fired...from the Grateful Dead...for being a bad influence. Still, really great stories about the band and particularly Garcia and Rock still has a tone of reverence for the guy. They were covered in LSD powder for a year!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    of course, there's no way to vouch for the accuracy of the stories in this book, but it is an enjoyable read for anyone into the grateful dead, their habits, and what in the hell that music came to be.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    One of the best books I have ever read about the Grateful Dead. Chalked full of wild adventures and turly strange trips, from the acid production house of owsley to the underground bars of New York City snorting giant lines of coke with on duty police officers and hells angels.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Franklin

    This was a gift, from Fred I think. Has some amusing parts, and is at the same time very sad because, like many great artists, Garcia had a big self-destructive streak. Pathetic at the end. All in all, I'd probably rather listen to his music than read about Garcia.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Ward

    Living With the Dead: Twenty Years on the Bus With Garcia and the Grateful Dead by Rock Scully with David Dalton (Little, Brown & Co. 1996) (780.92). This is interesting input from one who was with the band for much of the fun. Great story! My rating: 7/10, finished February 2010. Living With the Dead: Twenty Years on the Bus With Garcia and the Grateful Dead by Rock Scully with David Dalton (Little, Brown & Co. 1996) (780.92). This is interesting input from one who was with the band for much of the fun. Great story! My rating: 7/10, finished February 2010.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Melbie

    If I remember this book correctly, it is a brutal portrait of Garcia's addiction. Scully lays it out for what it was; Garcia was a slave to his addictions. Anyway, this was fun to read, as most books about these types are for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carlos Escobedo

    absolutely fascinating and woderfully written account of true rock stars, with all the benefits and drawbacks that talent and fame can bring a superstar. Love the honesty, and the poetry of this book. Has gonzo style segments that are a joy to read and there's great energy to each page.

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