web site hit counter The President's House: 1800 to the Present The Secrets and History of the World's Most Famous Home - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The President's House: 1800 to the Present The Secrets and History of the World's Most Famous Home

Availability: Ready to download

As Margaret Truman knows from firsthand experience, living in the White House can be exhilarating and maddening, alarming and exhausting–but it is certainly never dull. Part private residence, part goldfish bowl, and part national shrine, the White House is both the most important address in America and the most intensely scrutinized. In this splendid blend of the personal As Margaret Truman knows from firsthand experience, living in the White House can be exhilarating and maddening, alarming and exhausting–but it is certainly never dull. Part private residence, part goldfish bowl, and part national shrine, the White House is both the most important address in America and the most intensely scrutinized. In this splendid blend of the personal and historic, Margaret Truman offers an unforgettable tour of “the president’s house” across the span of two centuries. Opened (though not finished) in 1800 and originally dubbed a “palace,” the White House has been fascinating from day one. In Thomas Jefferson’s day, it was a reeking construction site where congressmen complained of the hazards of open rubbish pits. Andrew Jackson’s supporters, descending twenty thousand strong from the backwoods of Kentucky and Tennessee, nearly destroyed the place during his first inaugural. Teddy Roosevelt expanded it, Jackie Kennedy and Pat Nixon redecorated it. Through all the vicissitudes of its history, the White House has transformed the characters, and often the fates, of its powerful occupants. In The President’s House, Margaret Truman takes us behind the scenes, into the deepest recesses and onto the airiest balconies, as she reveals what it feels like to live in the White House. Here are hilarious stories of Teddy Roosevelt’s rambunctious children tossing spitballs at presidential portraits–as well as a heartbreaking account of the tragedy that befell President Coolidge’s young son, Calvin, Jr. Here, too, is the real story of the Lincoln Bedroom and the thrilling narrative of how first lady Dolley Madison rescued a priceless portrait of George Washington and a copy of the Declaration of Independence before British soldiers torched the White House in 1814. Today the 132-room White House operates as an exotic combination of first-class hotel and fortress, with 1,600 dedicated workers, an annual budget over $1 billion, and a kitchen that can handle anything from an intimate dinner for four to a reception for 2,400. But ghosts of the past still walk its august corridors–including a phantom whose visit President Harry S Truman described to his daughter in eerie detail. From the basement swarming with reporters to the Situation Room crammed with sophisticated technology to the Oval Office where the president receives the world’s leaders, the White House is a beehive of relentless activity, deal-making, intrigue, gossip, and of course history in the making. In this evocative and insightful book, Margaret Truman combines high-stakes drama with the unique perspective of an insider. The ultimate guided tour of the nation’s most famous dwelling, The President’s House is truly a national treasure.


Compare

As Margaret Truman knows from firsthand experience, living in the White House can be exhilarating and maddening, alarming and exhausting–but it is certainly never dull. Part private residence, part goldfish bowl, and part national shrine, the White House is both the most important address in America and the most intensely scrutinized. In this splendid blend of the personal As Margaret Truman knows from firsthand experience, living in the White House can be exhilarating and maddening, alarming and exhausting–but it is certainly never dull. Part private residence, part goldfish bowl, and part national shrine, the White House is both the most important address in America and the most intensely scrutinized. In this splendid blend of the personal and historic, Margaret Truman offers an unforgettable tour of “the president’s house” across the span of two centuries. Opened (though not finished) in 1800 and originally dubbed a “palace,” the White House has been fascinating from day one. In Thomas Jefferson’s day, it was a reeking construction site where congressmen complained of the hazards of open rubbish pits. Andrew Jackson’s supporters, descending twenty thousand strong from the backwoods of Kentucky and Tennessee, nearly destroyed the place during his first inaugural. Teddy Roosevelt expanded it, Jackie Kennedy and Pat Nixon redecorated it. Through all the vicissitudes of its history, the White House has transformed the characters, and often the fates, of its powerful occupants. In The President’s House, Margaret Truman takes us behind the scenes, into the deepest recesses and onto the airiest balconies, as she reveals what it feels like to live in the White House. Here are hilarious stories of Teddy Roosevelt’s rambunctious children tossing spitballs at presidential portraits–as well as a heartbreaking account of the tragedy that befell President Coolidge’s young son, Calvin, Jr. Here, too, is the real story of the Lincoln Bedroom and the thrilling narrative of how first lady Dolley Madison rescued a priceless portrait of George Washington and a copy of the Declaration of Independence before British soldiers torched the White House in 1814. Today the 132-room White House operates as an exotic combination of first-class hotel and fortress, with 1,600 dedicated workers, an annual budget over $1 billion, and a kitchen that can handle anything from an intimate dinner for four to a reception for 2,400. But ghosts of the past still walk its august corridors–including a phantom whose visit President Harry S Truman described to his daughter in eerie detail. From the basement swarming with reporters to the Situation Room crammed with sophisticated technology to the Oval Office where the president receives the world’s leaders, the White House is a beehive of relentless activity, deal-making, intrigue, gossip, and of course history in the making. In this evocative and insightful book, Margaret Truman combines high-stakes drama with the unique perspective of an insider. The ultimate guided tour of the nation’s most famous dwelling, The President’s House is truly a national treasure.

30 review for The President's House: 1800 to the Present The Secrets and History of the World's Most Famous Home

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    There is very little historical value to this book. To me this was pure "fluff" history. Too much of Margaret Truman and not enough facts. Because she lived in the White House Margaret Truman must think that makes her a credible source and therefore she did not need to cite one source, make any notes or even include a bibliography. There were direct quotes but no clue as to where they came from. Truman would also occasionally mention a book that someone else has written, even quote from it but n There is very little historical value to this book. To me this was pure "fluff" history. Too much of Margaret Truman and not enough facts. Because she lived in the White House Margaret Truman must think that makes her a credible source and therefore she did not need to cite one source, make any notes or even include a bibliography. There were direct quotes but no clue as to where they came from. Truman would also occasionally mention a book that someone else has written, even quote from it but not give the title of the book. All of this really irked me and the book lost pretty much all credibility as far as I'm concerned because of it. I could have done with out many of Truman's personal observations and feelings as well as her little side comments like this one, "You might be surprised by this, I know I was." I guess this added a conversational tone to the book but I did not care for it. I also think that a good history of the White House should give us a little less of a partisan view than the one Truman gave us. Overall, I was not too impressed with this book but there were just enough interesting stories and little bits of trivia to make it worth the time I put into it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Readitnweep

    An interesting read but not as interesting, in terms of finding out White House tidbits I didn't already know, as J.B. West's memoir was. Much of what Ms. Truman writes has been published before, so if you're a history buff, don't look for much in the way of new ground. Nor was there a lot on her experiences as a president's daughter living in the White House. Mostly, she talks about how normal her life was. Perhaps this was because she was already a young adult when her father was elected. Still An interesting read but not as interesting, in terms of finding out White House tidbits I didn't already know, as J.B. West's memoir was. Much of what Ms. Truman writes has been published before, so if you're a history buff, don't look for much in the way of new ground. Nor was there a lot on her experiences as a president's daughter living in the White House. Mostly, she talks about how normal her life was. Perhaps this was because she was already a young adult when her father was elected. Still I'd hoped for more. There is information on all other presidents and their families and bits of history on the White House itself, though there again, I'd hoped for more detailed information about the total renovation of the White House during the Truman years. This was barely touched on. There are some photographs - lovely colorful ones. And there is some background on her parents, but not without the expected bent, given the relationship. If you're a history geek like me, you'll probably find it a fun read at the least but not very informative.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Interesting but so detailed. Slow reading. Back to it later.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    Very informative and enlightenig.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I realize that her father was the president and that Truman herself was a life-long Democrat (both big and small d, according to her), but this book couldn't be much more partisan if it tried. She has a hard time hiding her contempt for a lot of various historical characters (why does she hate the Tafts so much?) and is hopelessly in love with other ones. Years ago, I read her book about the first ladies and this book seems to echo the sentiments expressed there, that certain presidents were bas I realize that her father was the president and that Truman herself was a life-long Democrat (both big and small d, according to her), but this book couldn't be much more partisan if it tried. She has a hard time hiding her contempt for a lot of various historical characters (why does she hate the Tafts so much?) and is hopelessly in love with other ones. Years ago, I read her book about the first ladies and this book seems to echo the sentiments expressed there, that certain presidents were basically puppets controlled by their wives or their chiefs of staffs and other presidents were married to insane harpies who did nothing but try and undermine their husbands' terms. However, as before, all of her anecdotes come from the ether, because this book contains no bibliography. Naturally, her own parents seem to receive the best treatment of all the first families covered in the book. There's very little about the architecture and arrangement of the White House, and sadly no diagrams or maps (at least not in the e-book version). It's mainly a wide assortment of anecdotes about the people (and animals) who lived and worked in the White House.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Blair

    Margaret Truman gave us a true gift in writing this book. From historical information about the White House to interesting tales about the people who work in it. From amazing anecdotes about the Presidents, the First Ladies, the First Children and their playmates, and even their grandchildren, this book is fascinating from beginning to end. I highly recommend this historically informative and wonderfully entertaining book! Sandra Burr did an excellent job narrating Truman’s work. I thoroughly enj Margaret Truman gave us a true gift in writing this book. From historical information about the White House to interesting tales about the people who work in it. From amazing anecdotes about the Presidents, the First Ladies, the First Children and their playmates, and even their grandchildren, this book is fascinating from beginning to end. I highly recommend this historically informative and wonderfully entertaining book! Sandra Burr did an excellent job narrating Truman’s work. I thoroughly enjoyed her rendition and I have located other books she has read because I appreciated her reading of this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Interesting but the style of writing was really unappealing. I felt MS. Truman's style was overly formal and high-brow. I felt like I was reading something written by a socialite a the turn of the century. Anecdotes were not very substantive and often betrayed the sheltered life the author has appeared to have lived. Hard to pinpoint but the whole book felt... aristocratic, if that makes any sense. Interesting but the style of writing was really unappealing. I felt MS. Truman's style was overly formal and high-brow. I felt like I was reading something written by a socialite a the turn of the century. Anecdotes were not very substantive and often betrayed the sheltered life the author has appeared to have lived. Hard to pinpoint but the whole book felt... aristocratic, if that makes any sense.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I listened to the first 2 disks and that was enough. I can't imagine 10. If you really want to learn about The White House, get the PBS miniseries they did last year about it. It's similar information but much better with the visuals. This book felt too much like a publisher convinced Truman to gather as many anecdotes and historical facts as she could to make a book, but he was really only interested because her name would help it sell. I listened to the first 2 disks and that was enough. I can't imagine 10. If you really want to learn about The White House, get the PBS miniseries they did last year about it. It's similar information but much better with the visuals. This book felt too much like a publisher convinced Truman to gather as many anecdotes and historical facts as she could to make a book, but he was really only interested because her name would help it sell.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    I give 3 stars for content, but the anecdotes are choppy and there is no consistent timeline. So it can be a bit confusing. Ms. Truman obviously has her favorite residents of the White House (like her father), and those who are not favored(like the Clintons) may be insulted in a most personal manner, which I find boorish and unnecessary. Instead of just presenting facts and stories, she injects personal prejudices.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Monaghan

    Enjoyed Ms. Truman's book on the White House and the First Families. The history told from a different perspective, a member of the small group of people who lived there. I have read some of her other work, the mystery stories based in and around the Nation's Capital and admit I like the way she structures her stories. This book doesn't fit in the style she seems to be more comfortable with. There is no plot to build to, there are no protagonists/antagonists to pit against each other; it seems to Enjoyed Ms. Truman's book on the White House and the First Families. The history told from a different perspective, a member of the small group of people who lived there. I have read some of her other work, the mystery stories based in and around the Nation's Capital and admit I like the way she structures her stories. This book doesn't fit in the style she seems to be more comfortable with. There is no plot to build to, there are no protagonists/antagonists to pit against each other; it seems to be quite a bit harder for her to "thread" the stories together In this book she brings the various events together with the participants and let's us see the First Family, warts and all. What I really enjoyed are the anecdotes that demonstrate the frustrations that the various Presidents faced in dealing with every day issues (the staff, the press and being in the spotlight every moment of the day. Particularly the press and the contrasting styles of different Presidents in how they dealt with them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christy Baker

    I recently started reading this and realized I'd read it years ago; likely when it first came out, which is what I'm marking it as though I can't recall precisely. I had loved Margaret Truman's murder mysteries and think I read this after I'd read that series of books. This is a very interesting history, fairly apolitical book given the subject matter. It is written as short vignette pieces on a variety of topics from state dinners and dining chairs and menus to secret service history to first f I recently started reading this and realized I'd read it years ago; likely when it first came out, which is what I'm marking it as though I can't recall precisely. I had loved Margaret Truman's murder mysteries and think I read this after I'd read that series of books. This is a very interesting history, fairly apolitical book given the subject matter. It is written as short vignette pieces on a variety of topics from state dinners and dining chairs and menus to secret service history to first families and weddings in the white house. I enjoyed the behind the scenes glimpse of staff and space and objects by one who has lived there and had to deal with the challenges as well as pleasure of such. An entertaining and well researched piece of light history.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Roland F

    This is a great read very informative from a unique point of view since the author has in fact lived in the Whitehouse making the book very credible and adding a personal touch. Overall this book is a great if your looking for facts, trivia, and etc about the Whitehouse I can assure you that you won't be able to find a book that will tell you more in such a unique way. This is a great read very informative from a unique point of view since the author has in fact lived in the Whitehouse making the book very credible and adding a personal touch. Overall this book is a great if your looking for facts, trivia, and etc about the Whitehouse I can assure you that you won't be able to find a book that will tell you more in such a unique way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Al Lock

    Easily readable light history and tales of a wide variety of things about the White House, from its history, building and rebuilding, to takes of housekeepers, pets, Secret Service and so on. Written by a woman who lived in the White House as a young adult, she brings a unique point of view to the subject.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    The book was interesting though it got a bit tedious at times; too much on the pets, for instance. The editor could have done a bit better job - Clinton would not have been impeached by the Senate. The Senate can convict after the House impeaches.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    Fun and easy read about various aspects of the White House and it's inhabitants. Fun and easy read about various aspects of the White House and it's inhabitants.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michell Karnes

    Truman does a great job retelling the wonderful personal stories of the people who have lived in the President's House. Truman does a great job retelling the wonderful personal stories of the people who have lived in the President's House.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Very interesting! Enjoyable read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    An odd mix of history, memoir, and political commentary A unique, though jumbled, look at America's most famous house (claiming it is the world's most famous house is a little much for me, unless she's not counting castles, palaces, etc, as "houses"). Each chapter deals with a different aspect or topic of the White House (womanpower, pets, children, etc), but the timeline within each chapter is largely non-existent. She may start the chapter by talking about JFK, then jump back to Jefferson, then An odd mix of history, memoir, and political commentary A unique, though jumbled, look at America's most famous house (claiming it is the world's most famous house is a little much for me, unless she's not counting castles, palaces, etc, as "houses"). Each chapter deals with a different aspect or topic of the White House (womanpower, pets, children, etc), but the timeline within each chapter is largely non-existent. She may start the chapter by talking about JFK, then jump back to Jefferson, then forward to Garfield, and then to Clinton. Unless you are already familiar with all the president's names and general time period then it will be very easy to loose your sense of direction. As it was, I have this general knowledge and sometimes I still had to think about it to put people in their correct context. Margaret covers both familiar history such as Dolley Madison saving White House valuable during the War of 1812, and the less familiar, such as details about the weddings to take place there. In fact, most of the history she covers falls under "less familiar history"...and most of that falls into the 1900s and after. Apparently there just isn't much to document a lot of the aspects of the house she covers early in American history, and it seems a lot of her more recent stories come straight from the horses mouth. At least, that's the impression she gives. She obviously did research for the book, and even makes comments about doing research, but there isn't a bibliography or a place for further sources. I think a lot of her stories come from the people who lived or worked in the White House (some of whom are credited in the text) but a lot of facts are just put out there with no reference. It's understandable that Margaret would share stories about her father (Harry S. Truman) from her own perspective, even calling him "dad" in the text, but this was sometimes distracting. Yes, it served to remind the reader that she was an "authority" having lived in the White House for 7-and-a-half (or 7-and-three-quarters, depending on the story) years, but it broke the narrative flow. For its history and memoir natures, this book was definitely not solely focused on facts and memories. Margaret liberally sprinkles in her political commentary. She makes no question that she is a Democrat, but sometimes she goes a little far in characterizing her opposition ("just like a Republican!", except obviously you can't make blanket statements like that). I'm an Independent so being unfair to her political opponents rubbed me the wrong way. The good news, though, is that she had no issue noting when someone in her party was out of line (Hillary's attempt at Health Care Reform while first lady is one such example). The subtitle of the book should have been specific, instead of saying "1800s to Present" it should say "1800s to name-the-year" or "John Adams to Bill Clinton" W. Bush was in office at at the time of her writing this book, and while he gets a couple comments, she notes that during the administration is not the time to get the "insider" stories, you have to wait till his staff starts talking when he's no longer in office. Overall, the book contains some interesting tidbits, but it's time-hopping nature along with the commentary don't make this a particularly memorable read. It is very easy to put down and forget to pick back up.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elijah Lucas

    The book “President House” is an informal book that talk about secrets places and things you didn't know about the president's house. It rate this book and ⅘ because it had my interest up but didn't help me or make myself a better person. Did you know that the president house has an tunnel underground that escorts the president during times of emergency. Margaret truman wrote this book. She is also the daughter of President S Truman. She knows the firsthand experience,living in the White House c The book “President House” is an informal book that talk about secrets places and things you didn't know about the president's house. It rate this book and ⅘ because it had my interest up but didn't help me or make myself a better person. Did you know that the president house has an tunnel underground that escorts the president during times of emergency. Margaret truman wrote this book. She is also the daughter of President S Truman. She knows the firsthand experience,living in the White House can be exhilarating and maddening but it is certainly never dull. Truman reveals the splendid history of this famous dwelling through the lives of its many residents,including Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Teddy Roosevelt,Calvin Coolidge and etc. The best moment of the book was when President Obama was playing basketball on his first day of office. As you read this you will also understand that the president are real people and they are humans. Some presidents make mistake but they learn about them.”Change” President Obama slogan was to change and challenge the world. It explains in detail how he did that. If you want to know about the white house and things about the president I recommend this book to you. This easy and quick book review that won't take that long.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    This book should have been called “Gossiping with Margaret Truman” or perhaps, “The White House: TMZ Edition.” The word ‘history’ is used loosely in its title. I can’t argue there are interesting little tidbits here and there, but most of what she talked about, I was familiar with. There wasn’t much new information presented. She spent far too long on the history of the press in D.C.- it barely pertained to the WH. The landscaping section droned on and on. There was absolutely ZERO order to this b This book should have been called “Gossiping with Margaret Truman” or perhaps, “The White House: TMZ Edition.” The word ‘history’ is used loosely in its title. I can’t argue there are interesting little tidbits here and there, but most of what she talked about, I was familiar with. There wasn’t much new information presented. She spent far too long on the history of the press in D.C.- it barely pertained to the WH. The landscaping section droned on and on. There was absolutely ZERO order to this book. In a single chapter she would jump back and forth between the decades without any reason. There was also a lot of detail applied when speaking of Harry Truman. It’s a shame the other presidents didn’t the same treatment as her father. There were many presidents not even mentioned. Additionally, she never once mentioned (with the exception of when Truman was in office) the state of the WH and its need of repairs. Not.One.Single.Word. Which was supremely disappointing.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Megan Nielsen

    If you like random American trivia, than this book is a must! Very interesting presentation of White House history. This book includes tidbits of everythig from the actual building and its few times it was almost demolished to the White House weddings and which presidential family members actually got married there. Interesting to note - Thomas Jefferson was adamantly against women doing anything than entertaining in the White House. (Maybe we would be better off as a country if we took some of If you like random American trivia, than this book is a must! Very interesting presentation of White House history. This book includes tidbits of everythig from the actual building and its few times it was almost demolished to the White House weddings and which presidential family members actually got married there. Interesting to note - Thomas Jefferson was adamantly against women doing anything than entertaining in the White House. (Maybe we would be better off as a country if we took some of that advice. Also, the development of the secret service is included in this book. The author can write from a unique perspective because she actually lived in the White House. She tells a story of having some friends over for a dinner party. A couple decided to go exploring. In another room was a great big chandelier. The girl asked the guy to lift her up to it so she could see it. When she was close enough, she held on to the metal and he left her hanging there for a while until someone else noticed she was missing. This is just one of the many anecdotes in this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jared Anderson

    There were some good stories in here, but it seemed as if Margaret Truman focused on mainly a few presidents and their stays. There was a lot about Truman (obviously), FDR, and Coolidge. Sprinkled in there were Lincoln, Adams, Washington, Monroe, and Teddy Roosevelt. Very little was said about any presidencies from the last 40 years. I guess it just seemed a little outmoded. Also, Truman was biased towards her father. I understand that this may be expected, but sometimes it was just too much. Th There were some good stories in here, but it seemed as if Margaret Truman focused on mainly a few presidents and their stays. There was a lot about Truman (obviously), FDR, and Coolidge. Sprinkled in there were Lincoln, Adams, Washington, Monroe, and Teddy Roosevelt. Very little was said about any presidencies from the last 40 years. I guess it just seemed a little outmoded. Also, Truman was biased towards her father. I understand that this may be expected, but sometimes it was just too much. The author seemed to toot her horn in a few places. The most painful occurrence of this was when she not-so-subtly took credit for the Lincoln Bedroom being moved to its present place. I don't know why that rubbed me the wrong way; maybe it was the way it was worded. But there are lots of fun anecdotes about White House pets, the press, and renovations (another Truman-was-perfect topic). This is a good quick read for anyone who's generally interested in learning about the history of the White House from a first-hand, non-academic source.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Thank you Margaret Truman, for a most interesting book. I couldn't stop listening to it. The book is separated into sections and not necessarily chronologically related to the residents of The White House. You'll hear/read about architects who built and remodeled the buildings and rooms, births, deaths, marriages, children and the devoted staff were also featured. Ms Truman has a charming conversational style that is perfect for this type of book (but I have enjoyed her mystery books too). The na Thank you Margaret Truman, for a most interesting book. I couldn't stop listening to it. The book is separated into sections and not necessarily chronologically related to the residents of The White House. You'll hear/read about architects who built and remodeled the buildings and rooms, births, deaths, marriages, children and the devoted staff were also featured. Ms Truman has a charming conversational style that is perfect for this type of book (but I have enjoyed her mystery books too). The narrator was skilled in interpreting Ms Truman's writing style. Filled with anecdotes from myriad sources,the intimidating amount of information was parceled out in easily digested vignettes. Delightful choice for a long drive or while working on a tedious project (I was editing photos), you'll find yourself responding to the material. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I found this book insightful, intriguing, informative and fun to read. Not knowing much of the history of the White House it came to life through this book. There was a new found respect for those early "First Families", what they went through and how they tried to preserve the founding ideals. Even though it is 396 pages it is a very quick read as the stories are short. Margaret Truman does a wonderful job bringing the White House to life. I don't remember many of the residents (okay I didn't pa I found this book insightful, intriguing, informative and fun to read. Not knowing much of the history of the White House it came to life through this book. There was a new found respect for those early "First Families", what they went through and how they tried to preserve the founding ideals. Even though it is 396 pages it is a very quick read as the stories are short. Margaret Truman does a wonderful job bringing the White House to life. I don't remember many of the residents (okay I didn't pay attention) but those that have seen more than a few presidents come and go would enjoy this book. For me it was a history lesson that I enjoyed learning.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I needed a break from novel reading and I stumbled across this in the library. I am so glad I did!! Margaret Truman did a wonderful job of describing the behind-the-scene stories and facts about the white house. It is written in a lot of little stories, so it's very easy to pick up and put down. She also categorizes the chapters in an awesome way- women in the household, servants, the west wing, etc. I love history, and this book really brought the history of the white house alive. Even if you a I needed a break from novel reading and I stumbled across this in the library. I am so glad I did!! Margaret Truman did a wonderful job of describing the behind-the-scene stories and facts about the white house. It is written in a lot of little stories, so it's very easy to pick up and put down. She also categorizes the chapters in an awesome way- women in the household, servants, the west wing, etc. I love history, and this book really brought the history of the white house alive. Even if you aren't a big history buff, this is entertaining enough to draw you in. Five stars!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I usually enjoy anecdotal stories. I was hoping for a bit of “insider” info. This one had “some” interesting tidbits. As with all celebrities, political and otherwise…their personal views will come thru. Margaret was no different. I found her opinions too strong, distracting and aggravating. What a pompous attitude! Guess she felt entitled. Almost stopped reading… thankfully the bits were brief, but unfortunately numerous. You knew who she liked and didn’t like. I also felt the subjects jumped ar I usually enjoy anecdotal stories. I was hoping for a bit of “insider” info. This one had “some” interesting tidbits. As with all celebrities, political and otherwise…their personal views will come thru. Margaret was no different. I found her opinions too strong, distracting and aggravating. What a pompous attitude! Guess she felt entitled. Almost stopped reading… thankfully the bits were brief, but unfortunately numerous. You knew who she liked and didn’t like. I also felt the subjects jumped around…for me I would have preferred a chronological order.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ellis

    This book was really pretty good. It was based on a building, so for a guy like me it could only be just so good, but in conveying the history of the White House, Margaret Truman does inject interesting historical nuggets. What comes first to my head is the interesting relationship between Churchill and FDR. Also, Churchill liked to have lots of naked time in his room. Maybe that's why he was so smart. Free the body, Free the mind..... This book was really pretty good. It was based on a building, so for a guy like me it could only be just so good, but in conveying the history of the White House, Margaret Truman does inject interesting historical nuggets. What comes first to my head is the interesting relationship between Churchill and FDR. Also, Churchill liked to have lots of naked time in his room. Maybe that's why he was so smart. Free the body, Free the mind.....

  28. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    This is a great book about the history and experiences of the White House. I used the North Carolina Digital Library (NCDL) to check out this book on my Kindle app on my iPad. Ms. Truman not only includes her memories from the White House as a First Daughter, but she includes remembrances from many presidential families, White House staff, and other Americans who have lived in or around the People's House. This is a great book about the history and experiences of the White House. I used the North Carolina Digital Library (NCDL) to check out this book on my Kindle app on my iPad. Ms. Truman not only includes her memories from the White House as a First Daughter, but she includes remembrances from many presidential families, White House staff, and other Americans who have lived in or around the People's House.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bart Breen

    Very Informative and Entertaining I listened to the Audio CD version of this book. In terms of strong historical value, there is not a lot to this book. It really is pretty fluffy in its tone and approach. Margaret Truman is a credible source however and she does make it very entertaining to listen to. The organization is interesting. The language is conversational. You'll come away with better knowledge of the White House, its residence and our Nations History. Very Informative and Entertaining I listened to the Audio CD version of this book. In terms of strong historical value, there is not a lot to this book. It really is pretty fluffy in its tone and approach. Margaret Truman is a credible source however and she does make it very entertaining to listen to. The organization is interesting. The language is conversational. You'll come away with better knowledge of the White House, its residence and our Nations History.

  30. 5 out of 5

    David R.

    A mercilessly chatty story of many of the people who were part of the history of the White House. It doesn't run deep, but is often interesting. And despite the title, Truman does very little heavy lifting in research much before the Lincolns in the 1860s, and spreads it thickly where her family, the Kennedys, the Johnsons and the Clintons are concerned. A mercilessly chatty story of many of the people who were part of the history of the White House. It doesn't run deep, but is often interesting. And despite the title, Truman does very little heavy lifting in research much before the Lincolns in the 1860s, and spreads it thickly where her family, the Kennedys, the Johnsons and the Clintons are concerned.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.