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This collection of short stories is a good example of early Wodehouse. It is here that Jeeves makes his first appearance with these unremarkable words: "Mrs. Gregson to see you, sir." Years later, when Jeeves became a household name, Wodehouse said he blushed to think of the off-hand way he had treated the man at their first encounter...In the story "Extricating Young Guss This collection of short stories is a good example of early Wodehouse. It is here that Jeeves makes his first appearance with these unremarkable words: "Mrs. Gregson to see you, sir." Years later, when Jeeves became a household name, Wodehouse said he blushed to think of the off-hand way he had treated the man at their first encounter...In the story "Extricating Young Gussie," we find Bertie Wooster's redoubtable Aunt Agatha "who had an eye like a man-eating fish and had got amoral suasion down to a fine point." The other stories are also fine vintage Wodehouse: the romance between a lovely girl and a would-be playwright, the rivalry between the ugly policeman and Alf the romeo milkman, and the plight of Henry in the title piece, The Man with Two Left Feet, who fell in love with a dance hostess.


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This collection of short stories is a good example of early Wodehouse. It is here that Jeeves makes his first appearance with these unremarkable words: "Mrs. Gregson to see you, sir." Years later, when Jeeves became a household name, Wodehouse said he blushed to think of the off-hand way he had treated the man at their first encounter...In the story "Extricating Young Guss This collection of short stories is a good example of early Wodehouse. It is here that Jeeves makes his first appearance with these unremarkable words: "Mrs. Gregson to see you, sir." Years later, when Jeeves became a household name, Wodehouse said he blushed to think of the off-hand way he had treated the man at their first encounter...In the story "Extricating Young Gussie," we find Bertie Wooster's redoubtable Aunt Agatha "who had an eye like a man-eating fish and had got amoral suasion down to a fine point." The other stories are also fine vintage Wodehouse: the romance between a lovely girl and a would-be playwright, the rivalry between the ugly policeman and Alf the romeo milkman, and the plight of Henry in the title piece, The Man with Two Left Feet, who fell in love with a dance hostess.

30 review for The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    This is a collection of 12 short stories from one of the grand-master humorist. The blurb says, "a good example of early Wodehouse". If this is a good example I really do not want to see a bad example as I was left very much underwhelmed. The vast majority of the stories (around 8 of them) can be called cute, but nothing to write home about. These reminded me of O. Henry: some of his tales can be called the same. A couple of the stories from this book left me completely cold - the cute ones I ju This is a collection of 12 short stories from one of the grand-master humorist. The blurb says, "a good example of early Wodehouse". If this is a good example I really do not want to see a bad example as I was left very much underwhelmed. The vast majority of the stories (around 8 of them) can be called cute, but nothing to write home about. These reminded me of O. Henry: some of his tales can be called the same. A couple of the stories from this book left me completely cold - the cute ones I just mentioned give you at least warm and fuzzy feeling. This leave exactly one good one which single-handed bumped the rating by one star: Extricating Young Gussie. Yes, this is the very first tale of Jeeves and Wooster and while the former appeared only in exactly one scene and says exactly one phrase I rate it somewhere between very amusing and funny. At least I smiled quite a lot reading it. Speaking about humor I chuckled one time reading the first story, smiles during the second one - as I mentioned above and that was it. Warm and fuzzy feeling is not equal to funny and this was exactly the case here. I wanted to read something humorous and thought that Wodehouse can deliver, but here he did not. I felt he was still looking for his own voice and style and the search was still in the initial stages. So this is a decent book, but not exactly a humorous one. My advice would be reading the second tale and skipping everything else - unless you are a hardcore fan of Wodehouse and a completist to boot.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    I'm on jury duty. A particularly nasty case. I needed something light, humorous and non-taxing to take my mind off of it this weekend. Enter P.G. Wodehouse! Wodehouse is my old fallback when I need a pick-me-up. His comical characters, daffy slapstick and witty turns of phrase threaten to induce knee slaps and a general feeling of being tickled in the best possible way. The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories is a very precise title. There's the titular (tee-hee..."tit") short story, which wr I'm on jury duty. A particularly nasty case. I needed something light, humorous and non-taxing to take my mind off of it this weekend. Enter P.G. Wodehouse! Wodehouse is my old fallback when I need a pick-me-up. His comical characters, daffy slapstick and witty turns of phrase threaten to induce knee slaps and a general feeling of being tickled in the best possible way. The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories is a very precise title. There's the titular (tee-hee..."tit") short story, which wraps up this collection, along with quite a few other shorts. Perhaps my favorite, and definitely the most inventive stories herein, are the ones from the point of view of a dog. Those were not only humorous, but well-crafted as well. Other stories revolve around relationship misunderstandings (a Wodehouse template), the inability to dance and forlorn love. I was surprised and a bit let down by the number of non-humorous, purely dramatic (often melodramatic) pieces here. I know that sort of will-(s)he-won't-(s)he love story was en vogue around the time this was published, but I didn't realize until this book that Wodehouse wrote such straightforward romances. They weren't bad, but meh and unexpected. But hey, at least there weren't any golf stories in this collection. I'm not a big fan of Wodehouse's foray on to the links in prose form. My favorite of his books are the ones that include the Wooster and Jeeves characters, which appear in here once. The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories as a whole is an early work and the Wooster/Jeeves story happens to be the very first appearance of that dynamic duo. They and some of the other characters in the story, who also appear in later Wooster/Jeeves stories, are not quite fully incubated yet. I don't entirely recognize them. I actually found that interesting, to see where and who these beloved characters had once been. Though it was not the best Wodehouse I've ever read, and I doubt I'll ever reread this, I'm not disappointed overall. It was good enough to clear the docket and get my trial temporarily dismissed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    One of the joys of writing short stories is getting to write something different. In this book the wonderful P.G. Wodehouse of 'Jeeves' fame, has only one Jeeves story in it. Some of the stories aren't even funny. Two of them are through the POV of a dog. There is lots of romance 1920's style mostly set in New York, but some in London. Hapless heroes and wise heroines. This is a group of stories no Wodehouse fan should miss. One of the joys of writing short stories is getting to write something different. In this book the wonderful P.G. Wodehouse of 'Jeeves' fame, has only one Jeeves story in it. Some of the stories aren't even funny. Two of them are through the POV of a dog. There is lots of romance 1920's style mostly set in New York, but some in London. Hapless heroes and wise heroines. This is a group of stories no Wodehouse fan should miss.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fiona MacDonald

    Mostly a very enjoyable selection. As with most short story collections there are some that are funnier than others, and some that stick out and make you laugh. Stand outs for me were 'The Mixer' (written from the perspective of a dog), 'Wilton's Holiday' (when a lie catches up with our protagonist), and 'Extricating Young Gussie' (purely because it's Jeeves and Wooster). A fun bag of tricks. Mostly a very enjoyable selection. As with most short story collections there are some that are funnier than others, and some that stick out and make you laugh. Stand outs for me were 'The Mixer' (written from the perspective of a dog), 'Wilton's Holiday' (when a lie catches up with our protagonist), and 'Extricating Young Gussie' (purely because it's Jeeves and Wooster). A fun bag of tricks.

  5. 5 out of 5

    F.R.

    Really early Wodehouse here, this collection might even count as juvenilia. No Wodehouse is pointless to read, but here we’re looking at the development of The Master - the faltering, sometimes strange steps of The Master - rather than The Master himself. As usual I’ve reviewed each tale as I've come to it: Bill the Bloodhound The lead character’s name is actually Henry, but I remember from Robert McCrum’s Wodehouse biography that Bill was the name of Wodehouse’s best friend and his go to when be Really early Wodehouse here, this collection might even count as juvenilia. No Wodehouse is pointless to read, but here we’re looking at the development of The Master - the faltering, sometimes strange steps of The Master - rather than The Master himself. As usual I’ve reviewed each tale as I've come to it: Bill the Bloodhound The lead character’s name is actually Henry, but I remember from Robert McCrum’s Wodehouse biography that Bill was the name of Wodehouse’s best friend and his go to when bestowing a moniker on stolid, uncomplicated men in his fiction. Nowhere near as funny as later Wodehouse, instead we have what must be the sweetest story ever written centring on a private detective and a chorus girl Extricating Young Gussie Hooray! It’s the debut of Jeeves and Wooster! Well, I say it’s the debut of Jeeves and Wooster, but really it’s only Bertie (surname unknown). Jeeves does appear, yet it’s so perfunctory that it’s impossible to get a sense of the man or the genius lying within. Instead we have Bertie dealing with the romantic concerns of his cousin Gussie and reaching out for the support of the (to the best of my recollection) never seen again, Aunt Julia. (We also have Bertie’s first visit to New York. He’s an instant fan.) Both of these opening stories lack the polish of later Wodehouse, but it’s incredible to see that the impeccable prose style of Bertie Wooster is already there, even if Jeeves isn’t. Wilton’s Holiday The light soufflé of Wodehouse’s prose really has no of how to deal with tragedy. I’m not taking about the tragedy of finding oneself engaged to Madeleine Bassett, but instead proper and actual tragic death. Wodehouse tries gamely to deal with the aftermath of a sudden demise here, before realising that he doesn’t have the tools and thus makes the tragedy not quite what it seemed at first – which has the effect of making the whole story distinctly weird. And weirdness is another thing the light soufflé of Wodehouse’s prose isn’t equipped to deal with. An unsuccessful tale then, and surely one of the most peculiar our fledgling Master after published. The Mixer That’s more like it! Funny, erudite and deliciously smart – and yet really not at all like Wodehouse. I suppose though that if P.G. was ever going to write a story from the point of view of a dog, making that dog sound like your typically bemused and naïve English gent was always his best option – and so it proves. An outstandingly entertaining and surprising tale. If only there was a way he could have made it longer without killing the novelty. Crowned Heads Another thing P.G. Wodehouse seemingly couldn’t do: write romantic dialogue for dashing young American types. Our hero here is so direct, abrupt and lacking in human feeling, that you could take the passages where he seduces the heroine out and use them in a serial killer novel. (It didn’t help that his name, Ted Brady, reminded me of Ted Bundy.) Once again an odd story then. Even the best authors are fallible. At Geisenheimer’s Another rarity in the Wodehouse canon: a female narrated story. Actually our narrator here is so hard-boiled and cynical she could slide in her dancing shoes into any noir novel. This then really doesn’t read like Wodehouse. It’s a sweet tale though, with a twist which might be a tad obvious but makes perfect sense. The Making of Macs Reminiscent of Damon Runyon in his prime, although a Runyon who hung out in Leicester Square rather than Time Square and was probably a connoisseur of fish & chips. Wholly told by a nightclub waiter, it captures the voice and has a good rhythm, but it’s once again sweet rather than funny. One Touch of Nature Did they really play exhibition baseball matches at Stamford Bridge? Our tale opens with the narrator dizzily walking away from Chelsea F.C.’s ground and I thought for a moment that P.G. had embraced proper English football (the fact I read this tale the same day as the FA Cup Final, probably meant I got a bit carried away), but no, as always he has his eye on the American market. Still, this story of sport conquering al is one of the best in the collection. Black for Luck In one of the Mulliner volumes, there are two fantastic stories concerning a cat. This is nowhere near as good. It’s a boy meets girl aided by black cat tale, but there’s a moment of strange (and completely unnecessary) violence in the narrative which leaves a sour taste even at the happy ending. The Romance of an Ugly Policeman More than once in this volume we’ve seen the young, fledgling Wodehouse try things he’s not known for, and – if we’re honest – failing. Here though he gambles and wins. Sundered hearts and star-crossed lovers amongst the working men and women of down at heel Battersea is not the kind of thing P.G. generally goes for. You don’t expect him to take on the romantic triangle of a slightly depressed policeman, a maid with light fingers and a good time milkman – it’s just all too common and proletariat. And yet the tale works like a charm: romantic, sweet and genuinely uplifting. A Sea of Troubles A would be suicide suddenly finds a new reason to live. Unlike its central character, this tale is slender to the point of under-nourished, but laughs-wise this is one of the funniest on display. The Man with Two Left Feet With the exception of the Wooster story, this is the most Wodehousian tale in the volume. A bookish man takes dance lessons in secret to impress his younger wife, but of course complications arise. It’s in short the kind of yarn you can imagine Gussie Fink-Nottle relating to a goggle-eyed Bertie. In a collection that’s without doubt a mixed bag, although an interesting bag, very much your talking point kind of bag – it’s good to finish with the inimitable P.G. Wodehouse given us a story worthy of his name.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Some very early short stories, including the first brief appearance of Jeeves. My favorite story was At Geisenheimer's, which I cannot recommend highly enough. Some very early short stories, including the first brief appearance of Jeeves. My favorite story was At Geisenheimer's, which I cannot recommend highly enough.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    I have to say this is a perfect little book. As I wondered what to rate it, I thought, 'well, they're nice stories, they make me feel good, they are perfectly written.....' It has to be 5-stars. I've read a few of Wodehouse's books, particularly enjoy the whimsy of his Jeeves and Wooster stories. This collection contains one story involving Bertie Wooster, in which Bertie is sent to New York to extricate his cousin from an impending marriage with a 'dance-hall' girl. For once Jeeves play almost I have to say this is a perfect little book. As I wondered what to rate it, I thought, 'well, they're nice stories, they make me feel good, they are perfectly written.....' It has to be 5-stars. I've read a few of Wodehouse's books, particularly enjoy the whimsy of his Jeeves and Wooster stories. This collection contains one story involving Bertie Wooster, in which Bertie is sent to New York to extricate his cousin from an impending marriage with a 'dance-hall' girl. For once Jeeves play almost no role and we see Bertie at his very best. It left me feeling very happy. The stories, for the most part, deal with relationships and you tend to leave the stories with a positive view on life. I particularly enjoyed The Mixer, two stories told from the perspective of 'the dog', in which the dog moves through life happily affecting the people around him and, for all his mishaps, landing on all four feet. Just a joy to read and I highly recommend. (I even liked the cover of this Penguin edition, with illustration by Ionicus.)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Helle

    I’m sorry to say that this collection of short stories was a bit of a disappointment after my enthusiastic encounter with the Jeeves & Wooster stories. These stories were extremely varied; some of them were fun and entertaining, but some were a bit bland and left little impression on me. They were well written but seemed like tentative attempts on Wodehouse’s part to find out in which direction he was going to take his writing. The collection is described as the first in which we meet Bertie Woo I’m sorry to say that this collection of short stories was a bit of a disappointment after my enthusiastic encounter with the Jeeves & Wooster stories. These stories were extremely varied; some of them were fun and entertaining, but some were a bit bland and left little impression on me. They were well written but seemed like tentative attempts on Wodehouse’s part to find out in which direction he was going to take his writing. The collection is described as the first in which we meet Bertie Wooster and the formidable Jeeves, but Jeeves only has one line, and Bertie’s role as well is marginal. That’s a choice of course, but I have to admit that the Jeeves & Wooster stories are the ones that resonate with me the most.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hákon Gunnarsson

    I think this Wodehouse collection may be my least favorite so far. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not bad. I haven’t read a bad story by Wodehouse yet. He always makes me smile, but there are very few stories here that show Wodehouse at his best. There are a couple of stories I like more than the rest. “Extricating Young Gussie” is a Wooster and Jeeves story which is pretty good. “Bill the Bloodhound” centers around one interesting private investigator, and like happens so often in Wodehouse stories, I think this Wodehouse collection may be my least favorite so far. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not bad. I haven’t read a bad story by Wodehouse yet. He always makes me smile, but there are very few stories here that show Wodehouse at his best. There are a couple of stories I like more than the rest. “Extricating Young Gussie” is a Wooster and Jeeves story which is pretty good. “Bill the Bloodhound” centers around one interesting private investigator, and like happens so often in Wodehouse stories, his problematic love. Then there are “The Mixer: He Meets a Shy Gentleman” and “The Mixer: He Moves in Society” both which are told from a dog’s point of view. I liked these two the best in the entire collection. They are quite funny. The thing is, even with books like this one that I feel are lesser efforts by Wodehouse, I still enjoy them. There is a reason why I keep coming back to him. Re reading this book may not be in the cards in the near future, but re reading Wodehouse will always be.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    I bought this book because it's got the first mention of Jeeves and Wooster in it -- short story called "Extricating Young Gussie." It's typical Bertie gets screwed over while on a mission for Aunt Agatha, and it's entertaining for sure. However, the other stories are also quite good, my favorite being "One Touch of Nature," where a huge fan of baseball goes to some interesting lengths to protect the ultimate baseball fan. Another one that's excellent is "At Geisenheimer's," which brought out th I bought this book because it's got the first mention of Jeeves and Wooster in it -- short story called "Extricating Young Gussie." It's typical Bertie gets screwed over while on a mission for Aunt Agatha, and it's entertaining for sure. However, the other stories are also quite good, my favorite being "One Touch of Nature," where a huge fan of baseball goes to some interesting lengths to protect the ultimate baseball fan. Another one that's excellent is "At Geisenheimer's," which brought out the biggest belly laugh at the end. Oh hell, they're all good!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    The stories ranged from mediocre to good. My favorite was probably The Mixer, which was about a dog, told from the dog's point of view. The stories ranged from mediocre to good. My favorite was probably The Mixer, which was about a dog, told from the dog's point of view.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie Hanna

    It's so wild to think I just read THE FIRST JEEVES STORY E V E R. "Extricating Young Gussie." Weird story, tbh, not at all like what you expect from being familiar with the Jeeves and Wooster 'canon.' Jeeves doesn't swoop in to solve the conflict with his brilliance--he barely even has five lines!! Still and all, it's great to be able to say that I have now Experienced the Story that Started It All, for myself. It's so wild to think I just read THE FIRST JEEVES STORY E V E R. "Extricating Young Gussie." Weird story, tbh, not at all like what you expect from being familiar with the Jeeves and Wooster 'canon.' Jeeves doesn't swoop in to solve the conflict with his brilliance--he barely even has five lines!! Still and all, it's great to be able to say that I have now Experienced the Story that Started It All, for myself.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Libbeth

    I will use this "review" for all the P. G. Wodehouse I have read. I read them all so long ago and enjoyed them so much that I have given them all 5 stars. As I re-read them I will adjust the stars accordingly, if necessary, and add a proper review. When I first discovered P. G. Wodehouse I devoured every book I could find in the local library, throughout the eighties and early nineties. Alas, this means that I have read most of them and stumbling across one I have not read is a rare thing. I'm su I will use this "review" for all the P. G. Wodehouse I have read. I read them all so long ago and enjoyed them so much that I have given them all 5 stars. As I re-read them I will adjust the stars accordingly, if necessary, and add a proper review. When I first discovered P. G. Wodehouse I devoured every book I could find in the local library, throughout the eighties and early nineties. Alas, this means that I have read most of them and stumbling across one I have not read is a rare thing. I'm sure that through this great site I will joyfully find at least a few I have not read, and be able to track them down. My records only began in 1982, so I do not have a note of any I read before then. I’m sure I will enjoy re-reading them.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Some authors are wonderfully reliable. You can turn to Jane Austen for genteel romance. You can trust Edgar Allen Poe to say something macabre. Roald Dahl's stories for grownups will have a twist in them. I turn to P.G. Wodehouse for humor, clever language, and the knowledge that everything will turn out well in the end, even if I don't know how he'll get there. The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories did not disappoint in this regard. Clever, clever language (the man could put together a sen Some authors are wonderfully reliable. You can turn to Jane Austen for genteel romance. You can trust Edgar Allen Poe to say something macabre. Roald Dahl's stories for grownups will have a twist in them. I turn to P.G. Wodehouse for humor, clever language, and the knowledge that everything will turn out well in the end, even if I don't know how he'll get there. The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories did not disappoint in this regard. Clever, clever language (the man could put together a sentence!), silliness -- often based on awkwardness, and everything always comes out right. Very enjoyable. The stories are medium-length (20-25 pp), which makes them good for a medium-length subway ride, or winding down at the end of the day. The only things I found difficult were a couple of unexpectedly racist phrasings, which I think more reflect the time they were published (1917) than the author. I imagine just about every white person of the time said something like that occasionally, but in the early 21st century it's like having a really fun conversation with someone, and having them suddenly spit at your feet. (Surprise; concern; disgust; anger; hesitation; realization that they've continued yammering away without noticing.) Other than that, reading the collection was a wonderful experience. His stories from a dog's point of view were particularly entertaining, and it was lovely to hear from Bertie Wooster (of Bertie & Jeeves) again. The title story is heart-warming for anybody who spends "too much time" reading books (as if there were such a thing). Recommended for people who enjoy a well-written sentence, who enjoy the theatre (a theme in various stories), and who like happy endings.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Wodehouse is endlessly charming in this collection of short stories. The breezy tone coupled with now-historical details makes humor writing seem somehow edifying. Look, you're being cultured! There do seem to be a few repetitive themes here. I'm not sure if it's an indication of Wodehouse's fixations or that the editor deliberately grouped the stories together. We repeatedly examine the attraction of life onstage and the exhaustion of women whose job it is to dance with men in dance halls. One s Wodehouse is endlessly charming in this collection of short stories. The breezy tone coupled with now-historical details makes humor writing seem somehow edifying. Look, you're being cultured! There do seem to be a few repetitive themes here. I'm not sure if it's an indication of Wodehouse's fixations or that the editor deliberately grouped the stories together. We repeatedly examine the attraction of life onstage and the exhaustion of women whose job it is to dance with men in dance halls. One small problem is that, in addition to these recurring themes, Wodehouse seems to have a dearth of names to work with. There are multiple Bills and Henrys and Kates, plus one location that reappears, to the extent that I'm really not certain if there were intended to be recurring characters or not. Many of the stories blend together disorientingly after reading, which is a bit unfortunate. But there's a warmth to his humor that keeps you reading, even if you can't quite remember what you've read. Some of his characters are idiots, or snobs, or even a criminal or two. But Wodehouse pokes fun so lovingly that you can't help but like the characters, even when they're being complete morons. The author is deeply cynical, but it hasn't made him bitter or hard. His creatures are falliable, even pathetic, but they win through to happy endings in the end, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  16. 5 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    This is a wonderful collection of thirteen stories. Some are silly, some are bitter-sweet, but all have a good ending. Anyone in need of a light book, this could be it. Even when they start as sad stories, each ends with a wonderful note. A hopeful note. Some stories I really liked and some I loved. BILL THE BLOODHOUND - a funny story about a detective (sort of) finding his true calling. "There might be detectives whose work was above this reproach, but he was a confirmed creeper, and he knew i This is a wonderful collection of thirteen stories. Some are silly, some are bitter-sweet, but all have a good ending. Anyone in need of a light book, this could be it. Even when they start as sad stories, each ends with a wonderful note. A hopeful note. Some stories I really liked and some I loved. BILL THE BLOODHOUND - a funny story about a detective (sort of) finding his true calling. "There might be detectives whose work was above this reproach, but he was a confirmed creeper, and he knew it. It wasn't his fault. The boss told him to creep, and he crept." EXTRICATING YOUNG GUSSIE - Bertie Wooster was sent by his horrible aunt Agatha to New York to prevent his cousin to marry a vaudeville artist. "She bosses her husband, Spencer Gregson, a battered little chappie on the Stock Exchange. She bosses my cousin, Gussie Mannering-Phipps. She bosses her sister-in-law, Gussie's mother. And, worst of all, she bosses me. She has an eye like a man-eating fish, and she has got moral suasion down to a fine point." The funniest description of aunt Agatha: "I have never met anyone who can give a better imitation of the Ancient Mariner." WILTON'S HOLIDAY - a wonderful love story: a man lied he lost his girlfriend to save himself from friendly people who seem to think he is there only to listen, but after he proposed to a girl he liked, she refused him because of that non existent dead girl. I loved it. THE MIXER are two stories about luck and misunderstandings told by a dog. CROWNED HEADS - Katie lives with her grandfather whose latest delusion is thinking that he is the King of England. Then she meets a young man who is famous and wants to marry her. But her grandfather doesn't want her to marry a commoner. AT GEISENHEIMER'S - a professional dancer's story how she taught a man from country how he should value his wife and found herself along the way. The story has a great ending. THE MAKING OF MAC'S - a beautiful story of a very successful restaurant. ONE TOUCH OF NATURE - What's a baseball game worth to a fan who hasn't seen one for five years? BLACK FOR LUCK - A black cat has decided to make a building his domain. He is moving from one artist to another bringing his own brand of luck. THE ROMANCE OF AN UGLY POLICEMAN - a scarred beat policeman with a broken nose's love story. I didn't like the unfair ending of this story. A SEA OF TROUBLES - After trying a number of things which will stop the stomach pain, Mr Meggs decided to kill himself. "Mr Meggs's point, the main plank, as it were, in his suicidal platform, was that with him it was beside the question whether or not it was nobler to suffer in the mind. The mind hardly entered into it at all." THE MAN WITH TWO LEFT FEET is a story of a man who couldn't dance so he decided to ask someone to teach him because he wanted to surprise his wife. A wonderful story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Noah Goats

    Some writers write a great first book and then never write anything good again. Wodehouse isn't one of those. He wrote mediocre books and stories for years before he hit his stride and started producing classics like The Code of the Woosters. The stories in this collection were written in the early days before he had honed his art and sharpened his wit, and they just aren't very good. Some of these stories are mildly amusing, and there is a pleasing sweetness to most of them, but they just aren't Some writers write a great first book and then never write anything good again. Wodehouse isn't one of those. He wrote mediocre books and stories for years before he hit his stride and started producing classics like The Code of the Woosters. The stories in this collection were written in the early days before he had honed his art and sharpened his wit, and they just aren't very good. Some of these stories are mildly amusing, and there is a pleasing sweetness to most of them, but they just aren't that compelling. This collection is notable mostly for containing the very first Jeeves and Wooster story, but even that is disappointing. You can see the first glimmering of Bertie's future greatness in it, but Jeeves doesn't do anything in the story at all. The whole thing felt underdeveloped.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Wodehouse described his writing as musical theater without the music, and that's what this set of short stories is. It's delightful, delicious, and charming, but also silly, whimsical, and light. But I haven't laughed so much at an adult book in a long time. And what a vocabulary! So fun to see his wizardry with words. It was refreshing to read such clean, profanity/sex/violence free stories. Maybe that's why I like the classics so much. I need to read more by this guy! Wodehouse described his writing as musical theater without the music, and that's what this set of short stories is. It's delightful, delicious, and charming, but also silly, whimsical, and light. But I haven't laughed so much at an adult book in a long time. And what a vocabulary! So fun to see his wizardry with words. It was refreshing to read such clean, profanity/sex/violence free stories. Maybe that's why I like the classics so much. I need to read more by this guy!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gemma Alexander

    I was never satisfied with the definition of irony in my high school literature classes. "The opposite of what you would expect to happen." In the late 20th century, irony IS what you expect. How refreshing then, to read Wodehouse; a very good writer who predates the Irony Age. The end result - well written stories with happy endings. Hallelujah. I was never satisfied with the definition of irony in my high school literature classes. "The opposite of what you would expect to happen." In the late 20th century, irony IS what you expect. How refreshing then, to read Wodehouse; a very good writer who predates the Irony Age. The end result - well written stories with happy endings. Hallelujah.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Krisette Spangler

    3.5 stars This is the first book where Jeeves makes his appearance. He only features in one story and plays a very small roll, but it was fun to get that first Bertie and Jeeves story. The other stories in the book were entertaining. Some of the stories I would give 2 stars and some I would give 5 stars. Overall, it was a very pleasant read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sterlingcindysu

    A great book of short stories that are light-hearted. The reason why it's classified as Jeeves 0.5 is because he is mentioned once in a story. I received it free from Amazon, so check now and then. My favorite one was from a dog's point of view! Anything for liver! A great book of short stories that are light-hearted. The reason why it's classified as Jeeves 0.5 is because he is mentioned once in a story. I received it free from Amazon, so check now and then. My favorite one was from a dog's point of view! Anything for liver!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ian Wood

    The Man with Two Left feet is Wodehouse’s second collection of short stories after graduating from the school stories and carries on in much the same fashion as its predecessor The Man Upstairs. The Quality does again vary from story to story but the good far outweighs the poor and the Wodehouse genius is definitely making its presence felt although still not as pronounced as it would later become. In the Title story the man with two left feet is concerned that his wife is bored due to his inabil The Man with Two Left feet is Wodehouse’s second collection of short stories after graduating from the school stories and carries on in much the same fashion as its predecessor The Man Upstairs. The Quality does again vary from story to story but the good far outweighs the poor and the Wodehouse genius is definitely making its presence felt although still not as pronounced as it would later become. In the Title story the man with two left feet is concerned that his wife is bored due to his inability to dance when they venture out. His taking dancing lessons on the QT drives their marriage to the brink but when it is discovered that she is at her happiest home listening to her husband reading aloud from his encyclopaedia things work out in typical Wodehouse style. The mixer is the poorest story in this collection written in the first person and telling the story of a dog from being a puppy until it finds its place in the best of all possible worlds. Also written in the first person is ‘Extricating young Gussie’ which first introduces us to Jeeves and Wooster or at least Wooster. The potential of Jeeves as a wealth of all knowledge has yet to be tapped and Bertie is bungling the case of Gussie without any help. Jeeves is very much noises off making the tea and laying out suits. Bertie is virtually fully formed and it his with his voice we learn ‘New York is a large city conveniently situated on the edge of America, so that you can step off the liner right on to it without an effort’ and that ‘The Mannering-Phippses were an old established clan when William the Conqueror was a small boy going round with bare legs and a catapult.’ Without Jeeves coming up with all the answers Wooster can never amount to nothing but both he and Wodehouse are now on the cusp of greatness.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Miller

    Available on Project Gutenberg and Librivox A nice collection of Wodehouse short stories. Most of the stories follow a common pattern for Wodehouse, 1) boy meets girl 2) Problem keeps them separated 3) Problem resolved in often comedic fashion. Come to think of it this is pretty much the patter for all of his books, though in the case of the Jeeves novels they contain that but also it's antithesis of Bertie running away from a romantic entanglement. Wodehouse as the master can take the simplest st Available on Project Gutenberg and Librivox A nice collection of Wodehouse short stories. Most of the stories follow a common pattern for Wodehouse, 1) boy meets girl 2) Problem keeps them separated 3) Problem resolved in often comedic fashion. Come to think of it this is pretty much the patter for all of his books, though in the case of the Jeeves novels they contain that but also it's antithesis of Bertie running away from a romantic entanglement. Wodehouse as the master can take the simplest story and elevate with his prose and humor and the common becomes uncommon. I really liked just about every story in this collection. There is even an early Bertie Wooster story with his Aunt Agatha sending him on a mission. Jeeves is only mentioned, but has no part of the story. But there are the early elements of what made the Jeeves/Wooster novels so good. The last line of this story was perfect. In fact a couple of the last lines were quite good. Wodehouse knows how to wrap up and complete a story and you are never left in the lurch. There are even two stories written from a dogs point-of-view which were also quite good. I listened to the version available on Librivox and the narrator was just fine.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jane Hoppe

    The Man with Two Left Feet is a delightful collection of 13 short stories by P.G. Wodehouse. Each is clever and witty. Two are written from a dog’s point of view, which I appreciated, since my dog Charlie blogs (http://dogblog1.blogspot.com/). I loved that the dog calls himself a “mixer,” since my dog likes people, too; and it was so funny how the mixer’s sensitivity to the “shyness” of a gentleman carried the story. The little romances were sweet. “At Geisenheimer’s” was my favorite. I was hopi The Man with Two Left Feet is a delightful collection of 13 short stories by P.G. Wodehouse. Each is clever and witty. Two are written from a dog’s point of view, which I appreciated, since my dog Charlie blogs (http://dogblog1.blogspot.com/). I loved that the dog calls himself a “mixer,” since my dog likes people, too; and it was so funny how the mixer’s sensitivity to the “shyness” of a gentleman carried the story. The little romances were sweet. “At Geisenheimer’s” was my favorite. I was hoping for more Bertie Wooster stories, but this volume included only one, “Extricating Young Gussie,” whose ironies and silly names I thoroughly enjoyed. I’ll finish with an example of Wodehouse’s subtle humor, taken from the anthology’s final story, titled “The Man with Two Left Feet.” Henry liked to read the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and he took notes as he read. “He read the BIS-CAL volume because, after many days, he had finished the A-AND, AND-AUS, and the AUS-BIS. … The ordinary man who is paying installments on the Encyclopaedia Britannica is apt to get over-excited and to skip impatiently to Volume XXVIII (VET-ZYM) to see how it all comes out in the end. Not so Henry.”

  25. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I first heard about P.G. Wodehouse in an interview of Hugh Laurie's in which he claimed that reading Wodehouse novels saved his life. I was intrigued. Who was this Wodehouse, and what about him made his novels special? My curiosity (and my overwhelming fannish love for Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry) led me to watch all of Jeeves and Wooster, loving every minute of it. I read several Jeeves and Wooster books as well as one or two about Psmith and Blandings Castle. I love that the characters are all I first heard about P.G. Wodehouse in an interview of Hugh Laurie's in which he claimed that reading Wodehouse novels saved his life. I was intrigued. Who was this Wodehouse, and what about him made his novels special? My curiosity (and my overwhelming fannish love for Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry) led me to watch all of Jeeves and Wooster, loving every minute of it. I read several Jeeves and Wooster books as well as one or two about Psmith and Blandings Castle. I love that the characters are all semi-connected, and I must admit that the time period Wodehouse writes about is my absolute favorite, a time when women were women, and men were fops. The short stories in this collection are essentially Wodehousian in all aspects. The characters are delightfully earnest. One story stands out in particular: a dog does everything in his power to make his master (a thief) happy, but only ends up foiling his plans. These characters, bumbling through life, trying their best, and achieving dreams through sheer dumb luck, made me incredibly happy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm1858

    The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories by PG Wodehouse First Published in 1917 Short Stories; Humor 4/5 stars Source: Through Daily Lit Summary: A collection of stories, including the first appearance in print of the characters Jeeves and Bertie Wooster. Thoughts: I decided to give this a read because I've never read any Wodehouse and I wanted to try Daily Lit through my google reader. Unfortunately for me, it is not a method that seems to work well. Some days I wouldn't have time to read it so The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories by PG Wodehouse First Published in 1917 Short Stories; Humor 4/5 stars Source: Through Daily Lit Summary: A collection of stories, including the first appearance in print of the characters Jeeves and Bertie Wooster. Thoughts: I decided to give this a read because I've never read any Wodehouse and I wanted to try Daily Lit through my google reader. Unfortunately for me, it is not a method that seems to work well. Some days I wouldn't have time to read it so that the next day, I'd have two installments. Other days it seemed like I had forgotten what I had read before. I think I really do better when I have the whole text before me, whether it's an ebook or a real book. That was also part of my problem with audiobooks. Overall: The stories were pretty easy reads and there were some delightfully funny bits sprinkled throughout. I can't choose a favorite but I can recommend that you give it a try.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Entertaining, from an historical perspective as well as giving us the first glimpse of Bertie Wooster (although with a different name). Wodehouse's skill with plots is evident in many of the stories as well. His writing is quite dated but no less readable for that - it may appear light and disposable but the very delicacy of the prose is its charm. "Extricating Young Gussie" stands out of the collection and Bertie appears to emerge fully formed, it's no surprise he went on to appear so often. I f Entertaining, from an historical perspective as well as giving us the first glimpse of Bertie Wooster (although with a different name). Wodehouse's skill with plots is evident in many of the stories as well. His writing is quite dated but no less readable for that - it may appear light and disposable but the very delicacy of the prose is its charm. "Extricating Young Gussie" stands out of the collection and Bertie appears to emerge fully formed, it's no surprise he went on to appear so often. I found it intruiging that so many of the stories are set in New York; I've now read a bit more about Plum's life and career and realise he spent a lot of time over the pond. One for Wooster completists but not lacking in entertainment value for all that. I remember my English teacher introducing me to Jeeves and Wooster but since school I've not really read much of them. Watch this space.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Glen Engel-Cox

    Another collection of Wodehouse stories, only one of which ("Extricating Young Gussie") is a Bertie Wooster story. Reading these stories at the same time as a Theodore Sturgeon volume of short stories constantly had me drawing comparisons between the two writers. Wodehouse never wrote fantasy per se (that is, Bertie Wooster never encountered a genie or a god in his garden), but in truth his stories were always fantastical. As commentators have said, the idyllic world of young men in spats and au Another collection of Wodehouse stories, only one of which ("Extricating Young Gussie") is a Bertie Wooster story. Reading these stories at the same time as a Theodore Sturgeon volume of short stories constantly had me drawing comparisons between the two writers. Wodehouse never wrote fantasy per se (that is, Bertie Wooster never encountered a genie or a god in his garden), but in truth his stories were always fantastical. As commentators have said, the idyllic world of young men in spats and authoritative aunts was a figment of Wodehouse's imagination, and never existed at any time in England. I don't think Wodehouse would have disagreed; he knew the power of fantasy. In this volume, he tells one story ("The Mixer") from the point of view of a dog, and one of his habits was to read the entire Shakespeare's collected works every year, and Willy wasn't a stranger to fantasy, either.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Natalia

    This was my first introduction to P.G. Wodehouse, and I am kicking myself for not having sought out his books earlier. This collection of short stories is a little uneven when it comes to the quality of each individual story, but I was consistently delighted by the wordplay and turns of phrase throughout the entire collection. Over and over, Wodehouse is able to sum up something like someone's appearance, dancing ability or state of mind in a single pithy, colorful, and unexpected simile. Many of This was my first introduction to P.G. Wodehouse, and I am kicking myself for not having sought out his books earlier. This collection of short stories is a little uneven when it comes to the quality of each individual story, but I was consistently delighted by the wordplay and turns of phrase throughout the entire collection. Over and over, Wodehouse is able to sum up something like someone's appearance, dancing ability or state of mind in a single pithy, colorful, and unexpected simile. Many of the stories are sweet little romances, and people seem to be constantly abandoning their stable respecible lives to perform on vaudeville stages, dance in nightclubs, and in all ways have grand adventures. Overall, a bunch of silly escapism. I loved it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I don't gravitate toward short stories; if I'm going to care about characters, I want to invest my interest in more than just a few thousand words. I did, however, want to read this collection because it contains the first Bertie Wooster story, and if anyone can cut to the quick with characters, it's Wodehouse. There's no wishy-washiness here; call Wodehouse's characters two-dimensional if you want, but he knows how to work and use characters who are crystal clear and crystal sharp. While there I don't gravitate toward short stories; if I'm going to care about characters, I want to invest my interest in more than just a few thousand words. I did, however, want to read this collection because it contains the first Bertie Wooster story, and if anyone can cut to the quick with characters, it's Wodehouse. There's no wishy-washiness here; call Wodehouse's characters two-dimensional if you want, but he knows how to work and use characters who are crystal clear and crystal sharp. While there were a few stories I had to plod through, I still found much to enjoy in this collection, especially "The Romance of an Ugly Policeman" (I'd happily read a novel about these two characters!) and "At Geisenheimer's."

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