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A private investigator hunts a killer & uncovers a fantastic & horrifying secret. An important man is murdered & there are numerous suspects--each from a different planet. A computer helps a young man solve a puzzle & assumes the personality of a long-dead gangster. Isaac Asimov has conspired with collaborators Martin Harry Greenberg & Charles G. Waugh to mastermind this d A private investigator hunts a killer & uncovers a fantastic & horrifying secret. An important man is murdered & there are numerous suspects--each from a different planet. A computer helps a young man solve a puzzle & assumes the personality of a long-dead gangster. Isaac Asimov has conspired with collaborators Martin Harry Greenberg & Charles G. Waugh to mastermind this diabolically clever anthology in which each of the classic categories of crime fiction is represented by a science fiction tale. Here are such science fiction greats as Philip K. Dick, Larry Niven, Clifford Simak, Jack Vance & the illustrious Dr. Asimov himself writing cosmic variations on the whodunit, how-done-it, why-done-it, the hard-boiled detective, the police procedural & even a brand-new category--the psychic detective story. 9 • The Universe of Science Fiction • essay by Isaac Asimov 13 • The Detweiler Boy • (1977) • Tom Reamy 49 • The Ipswich Phial • [Lord Darcy] • (1976) • Randall Garrett 97 • Second Game • (1958) • Katherine MacLean and Charles V. De Vet 141 • The Ceaseless Stone • [Doctor Eszterhazy] • (1975) • Avram Davidson 155 • Coup de Grace • [Magnus Ridolph] • (1958) • Jack Vance 179 • The Green Car • (1957) • William F. Temple 203 • War Game • (1959) • Philip K. Dick 221 • The Singing Bell • [Wendell Urth] • (1955) • Isaac Asimov 239 • ARM • [Gil Hamilton] • (1975) • Larry Niven 297 • Mouthpiece • (1974) • Edward Wellen 367 • Time Exposures • (1971) • Wilson Tucker 387 • How-2 • (1954) • Clifford D. Simak 427 • Time in Advance • (1956) • William Tenn


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A private investigator hunts a killer & uncovers a fantastic & horrifying secret. An important man is murdered & there are numerous suspects--each from a different planet. A computer helps a young man solve a puzzle & assumes the personality of a long-dead gangster. Isaac Asimov has conspired with collaborators Martin Harry Greenberg & Charles G. Waugh to mastermind this d A private investigator hunts a killer & uncovers a fantastic & horrifying secret. An important man is murdered & there are numerous suspects--each from a different planet. A computer helps a young man solve a puzzle & assumes the personality of a long-dead gangster. Isaac Asimov has conspired with collaborators Martin Harry Greenberg & Charles G. Waugh to mastermind this diabolically clever anthology in which each of the classic categories of crime fiction is represented by a science fiction tale. Here are such science fiction greats as Philip K. Dick, Larry Niven, Clifford Simak, Jack Vance & the illustrious Dr. Asimov himself writing cosmic variations on the whodunit, how-done-it, why-done-it, the hard-boiled detective, the police procedural & even a brand-new category--the psychic detective story. 9 • The Universe of Science Fiction • essay by Isaac Asimov 13 • The Detweiler Boy • (1977) • Tom Reamy 49 • The Ipswich Phial • [Lord Darcy] • (1976) • Randall Garrett 97 • Second Game • (1958) • Katherine MacLean and Charles V. De Vet 141 • The Ceaseless Stone • [Doctor Eszterhazy] • (1975) • Avram Davidson 155 • Coup de Grace • [Magnus Ridolph] • (1958) • Jack Vance 179 • The Green Car • (1957) • William F. Temple 203 • War Game • (1959) • Philip K. Dick 221 • The Singing Bell • [Wendell Urth] • (1955) • Isaac Asimov 239 • ARM • [Gil Hamilton] • (1975) • Larry Niven 297 • Mouthpiece • (1974) • Edward Wellen 367 • Time Exposures • (1971) • Wilson Tucker 387 • How-2 • (1954) • Clifford D. Simak 427 • Time in Advance • (1956) • William Tenn

30 review for The 13 Crimes of Science Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Lemons

    Some of the stories were phenomenal, some of them were just OK, others were a drag to read. Each story explores a different crime fiction trope but within a scifi structure. These tropes include: - Hard-Boiled - Detective Psychic - Detective Spy Story - Analytical Detective - Whodunit - Why-Done-It - How-Done-It - Inverted - Locked Room - Cipher - Police Procedural - Trial - Punishment My favorite story in the bunch was "ARM", which explored the "Locked Room" trope. If you're a fan of eit Some of the stories were phenomenal, some of them were just OK, others were a drag to read. Each story explores a different crime fiction trope but within a scifi structure. These tropes include: - Hard-Boiled - Detective Psychic - Detective Spy Story - Analytical Detective - Whodunit - Why-Done-It - How-Done-It - Inverted - Locked Room - Cipher - Police Procedural - Trial - Punishment My favorite story in the bunch was "ARM", which explored the "Locked Room" trope. If you're a fan of either Crime fiction or Science Fiction, I highly recommend this collection if you can get your hands on it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joe Noto

    Apologies ahead of time, this is a book of 13 stories by different authors, so naturally, I must comment on each. Overall, the stories are so varied, but they stick to mystery/murder/detective theme with futuristic/space elements. Some of them blew me away, some didn't, some sucked. Here we go: The Detweiler Boy by Tom Reamy- Unforgettable images in this one. The writing was great. Very old school detective like writing. The image of the boy's brother and what he does to the boy will not leave me Apologies ahead of time, this is a book of 13 stories by different authors, so naturally, I must comment on each. Overall, the stories are so varied, but they stick to mystery/murder/detective theme with futuristic/space elements. Some of them blew me away, some didn't, some sucked. Here we go: The Detweiler Boy by Tom Reamy- Unforgettable images in this one. The writing was great. Very old school detective like writing. The image of the boy's brother and what he does to the boy will not leave me. Pretty dark overall. 3 The Ipswich Phial by Randall Garrett- Unreadable. I gave it 15 pages and was completely lost. 1 Second Game by Charles V. De Vet and Katherine MacLean- Mind blowing and very intelligent. I wonder if the author was inspired by another story. The writing was high quality and the story was intriguing. The last two pages really came out of nowhere. Bravo. 4.5 The Ceaseless Stone by Avram Davidson- Not fond of this one. I found the writing hard to follow. I wonder if I read it slowly, if I would have gotten something out of it, but I really didn't get anything. 1.5 Coup de Grace by Jack Vance- Really liked this one. It showed the importance of understanding an individual's background and philosophies and adapting to them to be able to effectively communicate with them. Solid writing. 3 The Green Car by William F. Temple- Shocking event immediately followed by story development that feels like it is going down a paranormal path, but takes a turn. Excellent imagery in this one. 3 War Game by Philip K. Dick- So simple. So scary. So wonderfully written. I couldn't put it down and loved the end. 4.5 The Singing Bell by Isaac Asimov- Way too long. Seemed to drone on and on and on and the writing was a little too detailed, so it was a struggle to get to the end, and the end was a let down. 1 ARM by Larry Niven- Very interesting. The writer must have an engineering background. I found the actual murder case and the discovering of the killer to be rather boring though. I wasn't satisfied with it. And I did not understand how the main character had an invisible 3rd arm that can go through skin...weird. 2.4 Mouthpiece by Edward Wellen- See The Singing Bell review. Boring and Dragging. No point to the whole story and then the end was a let down. The only decent part was I liked the writing style a bit more. 1.5 Time Exposures by Wilson Tucker- Cool idea having a camera that can take pictures of a scene and can be adjusted to see the scene in the past up to 14 hours. I love how still primitive it was though with the film coming out and needing the film developed haha. The writing was exciting, but man...what a cliche and crappy ending. 2.5 How-2 by Clifford D. Smark- Wonderful except there being no real ending. Very Black Mirror. Enjoyable story. 3.4 Time in Advance by William Tenn- Fascinating idea of having pre-crime prison sentences. I loved the rational. It actually sounded plausible! Very smart story. No real ending, but I like it. 3.5

  3. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    There is a singular masterpiece within this collection: "The Detweiler Boy" by Tom Reamy. It's one of my favorite short stories ever. It's written as a "hard-boiled detective" story and if you are a fan of Dashiell Hammett and imaginative syfy, you can't miss this great story! The rest of the collection is good, but "Detweiler" elevates this collection to a higher level than most short story collections. There is a singular masterpiece within this collection: "The Detweiler Boy" by Tom Reamy. It's one of my favorite short stories ever. It's written as a "hard-boiled detective" story and if you are a fan of Dashiell Hammett and imaginative syfy, you can't miss this great story! The rest of the collection is good, but "Detweiler" elevates this collection to a higher level than most short story collections.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    I don't want to talk about the plot in a lot of detail because I don't want to ruin the story for people who have not yet read it. Wilson Tucker was an American science fiction writer writing mainly in the early 1950's and 1960's. This story is very well written and with a very creative plot. If anyone is interested in a good, well-written, vintage science fiction story, this would be the story for them Merged review: I originally read this SF short story when I was like 25 years old. This is truly I don't want to talk about the plot in a lot of detail because I don't want to ruin the story for people who have not yet read it. Wilson Tucker was an American science fiction writer writing mainly in the early 1950's and 1960's. This story is very well written and with a very creative plot. If anyone is interested in a good, well-written, vintage science fiction story, this would be the story for them Merged review: I originally read this SF short story when I was like 25 years old. This is truly one of the most creative and original SF short stories that I have ever read. Also, the incredible sense of reality that this story creates is amazing. I really think that this is one of the 5 best SF short stories that I have read in my life. For anyone who wants to read a great vintage SF short story, this is the story for them. Merged review: Of the many collections of science fiction short stories that I have read, this is the overall best. So many of the collections of science fiction short stories have only one or two good stories in them. In my opinion. This book has 80% great stories and I would say that only about 20% are OK or poor.

  5. 4 out of 5

    DeAnne

    Such a fun take on SciFi...how would science fiction writers tackle the whole detective genre? Brilliantly, as it turns out. Edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin Harry Greenberg, and Charles G. Waugh. Contents: * The Detweiler Boy by Tom Reamy * The Ipswich Phial by Randall Garrett * Second Game by Charles V. De Vet & Katherine MacLean * The Ceaseless Stone by Avram Davidson * Coup de Grace by Jack Vance * The Green Car by William F. Temple * War Game by Philip K. Dick * The Singing Bell by Isaac Asimo Such a fun take on SciFi...how would science fiction writers tackle the whole detective genre? Brilliantly, as it turns out. Edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin Harry Greenberg, and Charles G. Waugh. Contents: * The Detweiler Boy by Tom Reamy * The Ipswich Phial by Randall Garrett * Second Game by Charles V. De Vet & Katherine MacLean * The Ceaseless Stone by Avram Davidson * Coup de Grace by Jack Vance * The Green Car by William F. Temple * War Game by Philip K. Dick * The Singing Bell by Isaac Asimov * ARM by Larry Niven * Mouthpiece by Edward Wellen * Time Exposures by Wilson Tucker * How-2 by Clifford D. Simak * Time in Advance by William Tenn

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leanne

    As bizarre of a choice as this may seem, this book is one of my favorites. I like mysteries, I like science fiction, and I like the introductions for each short story. Each story was selected to prove that science fiction stories can operate within the "rules" of detective mysteries. As bizarre of a choice as this may seem, this book is one of my favorites. I like mysteries, I like science fiction, and I like the introductions for each short story. Each story was selected to prove that science fiction stories can operate within the "rules" of detective mysteries.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Greg Springer

    A really interesting collection of stories. Several left permanent impressions (e.g., Green Car) and the book has been a major hit with people to whom I've loaned it. A really interesting collection of stories. Several left permanent impressions (e.g., Green Car) and the book has been a major hit with people to whom I've loaned it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Herman Gigglethorpe

    Found this one in my local used bookstore, and thought the title looked interesting. I expected it to be a book of criticisms of the failures of science fictions, but in fact it's an anthology of mystery and crime fiction from the 1970s. Some stories are dull to me, such as The Ceaseless Stone and The Ipswich Phial. The Detweiler Boy is my favorite, because of its "hardboiled" writing style and unusual version of vampires that require blood type compatibility. The PI will probably never find the Found this one in my local used bookstore, and thought the title looked interesting. I expected it to be a book of criticisms of the failures of science fictions, but in fact it's an anthology of mystery and crime fiction from the 1970s. Some stories are dull to me, such as The Ceaseless Stone and The Ipswich Phial. The Detweiler Boy is my favorite, because of its "hardboiled" writing style and unusual version of vampires that require blood type compatibility. The PI will probably never find the "slinky blonde looking for her kid sister", but he will run into a "broad" in true noir fashion. (No "dames" from what I remember.) Coup de Grace involves various gimmick suspects, including one who abides by a strict dress code and would only kill if he were wearing the proper outfit. The Singing Bell has a moon murder, which makes me wonder if that's even technically illegal in "real" life. ARM proposes an overpopulated dystopian society with people who hunt down illegal mothers, and "organlegger" gangs. A "time compressing" machine in that story makes me wonder if the programmers of Final Fantasy 8 read it. Time Exposures is notable mainly for having the "Dean Act", in which the United States not only somehow passes gun control, but enforces long prison sentences for violations. That's probably the least plausible story here, and that includes How-2 where a robot can somehow also be transgender in a society that still seems to be like the 1950s. (Albert desires a female name due to being constructed with a "mother-urge", but doesn't have one by the end of the story.) How-2 is also an early example of a "robot's rights" story, where Albert and descendants successfully sue for human rights in court. The lack of robot spirituality is dismissed by pointing out that there are many human atheists. Time in Advance, the final story, has a society where "pre-criminals" can serve years of a prison sentence before getting a license to commit one murder. One protagonist realizes that everyone treats him badly, not just his intended target, and the other main character finds out his victim died before he came back from his sentence. As you'd expect from an anthology with multiple authors, the quality is inconsistent. The stories are thought-provoking if dated, so you may want to pick it up if you happen to find it. Don't know if it's ever been reprinted.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shanna

    My three favorite genres - sci-fi + mystery + short stories - masterfully compiled in one volume of great stories. The only story I didn't care for was "The Detweiler Boy" but that was only due to the weird (x-file-ish) nature of the resolution, which isn't to my taste. Each story represents a different type of mystery story (spy, whodunit, police procedural, etc). Plenty of the stories had a clever and satisfying final twist. I had a hard time picking a favorite because I liked so many of them! My three favorite genres - sci-fi + mystery + short stories - masterfully compiled in one volume of great stories. The only story I didn't care for was "The Detweiler Boy" but that was only due to the weird (x-file-ish) nature of the resolution, which isn't to my taste. Each story represents a different type of mystery story (spy, whodunit, police procedural, etc). Plenty of the stories had a clever and satisfying final twist. I had a hard time picking a favorite because I liked so many of them!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terra

    I enjoyed the book overall. The majority were interesting, however there were some that were boring. Given that they were single examples of various subgenres though it might be that I dislike the subgenre in particular, or that I dislike that particular story, knowing the difference isn't easy for those who would not know the subgenre to begin with. However, I only happened to dislike 2 of the 13 stories. (The downside being one of the stories is something like 80 pages, pushing the limit of 'sh I enjoyed the book overall. The majority were interesting, however there were some that were boring. Given that they were single examples of various subgenres though it might be that I dislike the subgenre in particular, or that I dislike that particular story, knowing the difference isn't easy for those who would not know the subgenre to begin with. However, I only happened to dislike 2 of the 13 stories. (The downside being one of the stories is something like 80 pages, pushing the limit of 'short story'.) Given all of that though, 4/5.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rex Hurst

    Thirteen science fictions stories all revolving around crime. The private eye, mystery, locked room and police procedural stories are thrust into a futuristic setting creating a truly interesting collection. One that really stand out are "Time in Advance: where a person can serve time before they commit a crime. Old school sci-fi at its best. Thirteen science fictions stories all revolving around crime. The private eye, mystery, locked room and police procedural stories are thrust into a futuristic setting creating a truly interesting collection. One that really stand out are "Time in Advance: where a person can serve time before they commit a crime. Old school sci-fi at its best.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marko

    I have the german edition: Utopia der Detektive

  13. 4 out of 5

    Peter C Sauer

    Its okay, thats about all I can say.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    A quirky and entertaining collection of stories - mostly really well-written, and definitely worth a re-read. Buy it if you find it at a decent price.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Some way to combine something I adore with something I'm ambivalent about! This is a collection Asimov, Greenberg, and Waugh compiled of science fiction and mystery short stories in 1979 which I finally finished. Overall, it turned out that I liked it more than I didn't care for whodunit. Mini-reviews of each: The Detweiler Boy: Detweiler makes me think of a kind of dog, while I didn't think much of the character; this story has such an intriguing ending! I think it was a good first selection to be Some way to combine something I adore with something I'm ambivalent about! This is a collection Asimov, Greenberg, and Waugh compiled of science fiction and mystery short stories in 1979 which I finally finished. Overall, it turned out that I liked it more than I didn't care for whodunit. Mini-reviews of each: The Detweiler Boy: Detweiler makes me think of a kind of dog, while I didn't think much of the character; this story has such an intriguing ending! I think it was a good first selection to begin the book. The Ipswich Phial: Some way to look at European history. I adored the idea of the mendacious cantata mentioned in this story. The composer's tricking the listener into believing (s)he's hearing something completely different. The Second Game: Tehehe, this made me think so much of the chess novel I'd read before, The Eight! As I suspected, the Katherine who co-wrote this is of a different surname. However, the game that they were playing is not chess, per se, it is something more complicated. Still this may be tied with the last one as my favourite story in this set. The Ceaseless Stone: I don't have anything of note to comment about this one. It existed. I read it and went on. Coup de Grace: Or this one. The Green Car: I had a feeling I should really linger on this, but I didn't since I really didn't want to think much about green or blue cars. War Game: I really liked the idea of the Bureau of Standards, and all the other governmental departments! Overall PKD is worthwhile. (Philip K. Dick is the author of this one) The Singing Bell: This is Isaac Asimov's contribution, and it shows very clearly. Talk about getting psychoprobed! Hahaha. ARM: Hmm, it is nice also that before each short story the type of mystery is explained, though I think I did get a little lost in ARM. Perhaps I just couldn't follow its logic. Oh well, it happens in everything. Maybe next time I come back it'll be clearer. Mouthpiece: Meanwhile the code story Mouthpiece was pretty clear to me, and I thought it was clever! Perhaps it's just the different kind of science that appeals to each individual reader. Time Exposures: Probably my family might like the police procedural story, if they could universally bear the novel format, but it didn't appeal too much to me. I skimmed it. How-2: This is probably my second favourite right after the tie of the next short story and The Second Game. (view spoiler)[ It's an advanced build-your-own-rocket type story. Except it's not a rocket. It's a dog. And it's robotics. (hide spoiler)] Time in Advance: This closing story reminded me sooo much of all the rest of the convict literature I've already scoured that I thought I had already read it. And, mayyybe I have years and years ago, for the short story is copyright 1956, and this IS my speciality... So overall I am satisfied with completion of The 13 Crimes of Science Fiction! It is an oldie, but a goodie. In retrospect, the four amazing ones I enjoyed counterbalance the four stories I disliked especially with the others in ambivalence.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    A fun book! I keep coming back to this one periodically, when I want something that is pure fun and not too deep. War Game by Philip K. Dick is the one that stands the strongest on its own for its examination of political philosophy, and Coup de Grace by Jack Vance has a very Deep Space 9 feel to it. Every other story manages to forcibly insert an irrelevant objectification of women into the mix, which is probably indicative of the times.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roger Verstraete

    Table of Contents: 1. The Detweiler Boy by Tom Reamy deals with vampires 2. The Ipswich Phial by Randall Garrett is set in a past where the machines are based on magic 3. Second Game by Charles De Vet studies an alien race and the game they play 4.The Ceaseless Stone by Avram Davidson where a mystery is thoughtfully solved when the investigator follows the money 5. Coup de Grace by Jack Vance where detective Magnus Ridolph must solve the murder of Lester Bonfils 6. The Green Car by William Temple appe Table of Contents: 1. The Detweiler Boy by Tom Reamy deals with vampires 2. The Ipswich Phial by Randall Garrett is set in a past where the machines are based on magic 3. Second Game by Charles De Vet studies an alien race and the game they play 4.The Ceaseless Stone by Avram Davidson where a mystery is thoughtfully solved when the investigator follows the money 5. Coup de Grace by Jack Vance where detective Magnus Ridolph must solve the murder of Lester Bonfils 6. The Green Car by William Temple appears to be a ghost story 7. War Game by Philip Dick questions the innocence of children's toys. 8.The SInging Bell by Isaac Asimov depicts rockets and greed. 9. ARM by Larry Niven is placed in a world of transplants and artificial limbs and space travel 10. Mouthpiece by Edward Wellen loads the personality of a gangster into a powerful computer 11. Time Exposures by Wilson Tucker 12. How-2 by Clifford Simak 13. Time in Advance by William Tenn where colonists are badly needed for expansion into the galaxie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    A good collection of science fiction mysteries, along with an explanation of that relatively obscure sub-genre from Isaac Asimov. I've read a fair number of SF mysteries, and had read most of the ones in the book; most of them are excellent examples of the form. The leading story, "The Detweiler Boy" by Tom Reamy, was not particularly good; putting a relatively weak story first in an anthology is an unfortunate flaw. But there are a number of gems here, including Larry Niven's "Arm". "War Games" A good collection of science fiction mysteries, along with an explanation of that relatively obscure sub-genre from Isaac Asimov. I've read a fair number of SF mysteries, and had read most of the ones in the book; most of them are excellent examples of the form. The leading story, "The Detweiler Boy" by Tom Reamy, was not particularly good; putting a relatively weak story first in an anthology is an unfortunate flaw. But there are a number of gems here, including Larry Niven's "Arm". "War Games" by Philip K. Dick, was simply not readable for me; I can take some PKD, but only in mild doses - and not a lot of it. I don't know if it was the mood I was in, or if the story was particularly Dick-ish (sorry, couldn't resist), but after a page or two I simply skipped that story altogether. That said, the vast majority of the book is excellent and well worth reading.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Really the only ones worth reading are Reamy's and Asimov's. One star for each good story. Really the only ones worth reading are Reamy's and Asimov's. One star for each good story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Richp

    There are no bad stories. More of them tend toward so-so than top-notch, but there are a few of the latter. On the scale of fantasy to science fiction, fantasy was more represented, but at least it wasn't swords and sorcery. There are no bad stories. More of them tend toward so-so than top-notch, but there are a few of the latter. On the scale of fantasy to science fiction, fantasy was more represented, but at least it wasn't swords and sorcery.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    A fair collection of science fiction mystery stories composed by name authors in the field(s).

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rosalind Hartmann

    One of, maybe THE most favorite collection of science fiction mysteries of mine.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Isblue

    A short story collection. Science fiction/crime fiction stories nicely introduced.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fishsanwitt

    stamped

  25. 4 out of 5

    SciFiOne

    Grade B. Short stories.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jetamors

    Well, uh, this is certainly an older book! Some of the stories are enjoyable, but you'll have to dodge a number of racist and sexist stuff to enjoy many of them. Well, uh, this is certainly an older book! Some of the stories are enjoyable, but you'll have to dodge a number of racist and sexist stuff to enjoy many of them.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rmoore

  28. 4 out of 5

    Boris

  29. 4 out of 5

    Constructionv4

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie Salyards

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