web site hit counter Hidden Treasure: Uncovering the Truth in Your Life Story - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Hidden Treasure: Uncovering the Truth in Your Life Story

Availability: Ready to download

An inspiring new book from one of our greatest living spiritual teachers. All of these stories teach us that we aren't who we think we are. How we have defined ourselves is not the truth of ourselves. What we think we must have is already present, and when we think we have lost the value of our lives, it is still here if we know where to look. -from Hidden Treasure In this l An inspiring new book from one of our greatest living spiritual teachers. All of these stories teach us that we aren't who we think we are. How we have defined ourselves is not the truth of ourselves. What we think we must have is already present, and when we think we have lost the value of our lives, it is still here if we know where to look. -from Hidden Treasure In this life-changing book, renowned spiritual teacher Gangaji uses the telling of her own life story to help readers uncover the truth of their own. Antoinette (Toni) Roberson Varner was given the name Gangaji by her teacher Sri H. W. L. Poonja in 1990. Before that meeting, she had pursued many paths to enlightenment. Brought up in the 1950s in the racially divided south, she married young and had a daughter. Following the dissolution of her first marriage, she moved to Northern California and immersed herself fully in the spiritual culture that was flourishing there-but all her efforts to achieve lasting fulfillment ultimately fell short. In the wake of her disillusionment, she made a final prayer for help. In 1990, the answer to her prayer came unexpectedly, taking her to India and to the meeting that would change everything. There on the banks of the river Ganges, she met Poonja, also known as Papaji, who opened her mind to the eternal presence of being. In Hidden Treasure, Gangaji guides readers to the realization that once they can uncover and speak the truth about themselves, deep and lasting contentment is entirely possible.


Compare

An inspiring new book from one of our greatest living spiritual teachers. All of these stories teach us that we aren't who we think we are. How we have defined ourselves is not the truth of ourselves. What we think we must have is already present, and when we think we have lost the value of our lives, it is still here if we know where to look. -from Hidden Treasure In this l An inspiring new book from one of our greatest living spiritual teachers. All of these stories teach us that we aren't who we think we are. How we have defined ourselves is not the truth of ourselves. What we think we must have is already present, and when we think we have lost the value of our lives, it is still here if we know where to look. -from Hidden Treasure In this life-changing book, renowned spiritual teacher Gangaji uses the telling of her own life story to help readers uncover the truth of their own. Antoinette (Toni) Roberson Varner was given the name Gangaji by her teacher Sri H. W. L. Poonja in 1990. Before that meeting, she had pursued many paths to enlightenment. Brought up in the 1950s in the racially divided south, she married young and had a daughter. Following the dissolution of her first marriage, she moved to Northern California and immersed herself fully in the spiritual culture that was flourishing there-but all her efforts to achieve lasting fulfillment ultimately fell short. In the wake of her disillusionment, she made a final prayer for help. In 1990, the answer to her prayer came unexpectedly, taking her to India and to the meeting that would change everything. There on the banks of the river Ganges, she met Poonja, also known as Papaji, who opened her mind to the eternal presence of being. In Hidden Treasure, Gangaji guides readers to the realization that once they can uncover and speak the truth about themselves, deep and lasting contentment is entirely possible.

30 review for Hidden Treasure: Uncovering the Truth in Your Life Story

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    Many parts of this book reiterate the points often expressed by Gangaji in satsang recordings, radio programs and interviews. Her quick recap of her own story is more meaningful if you have read her biography "Just Like You" by Gangaji and Roslyn Moore. Still, even though many parts of this book were already quite familiar to me, I enjoyed reading it, because every time I read something from Gangaji, I hear her voice, I feel her more than ever. Always grateful for her invitation to Self! Many parts of this book reiterate the points often expressed by Gangaji in satsang recordings, radio programs and interviews. Her quick recap of her own story is more meaningful if you have read her biography "Just Like You" by Gangaji and Roslyn Moore. Still, even though many parts of this book were already quite familiar to me, I enjoyed reading it, because every time I read something from Gangaji, I hear her voice, I feel her more than ever. Always grateful for her invitation to Self!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joni

    I picked this book up because I heard fascinating things about it on NPR. I found it really difficult to get into for the first 2/3 of the book. The ending was very informative, but it just took so darn long to get there. Perhaps if I re-read this the beginning will make more sense. The first part of the book describes how our life stories define us and how we can interject ourselves into other people's life stories, as well. The ending discusses how we can actually begin to accept all the pain I picked this book up because I heard fascinating things about it on NPR. I found it really difficult to get into for the first 2/3 of the book. The ending was very informative, but it just took so darn long to get there. Perhaps if I re-read this the beginning will make more sense. The first part of the book describes how our life stories define us and how we can interject ourselves into other people's life stories, as well. The ending discusses how we can actually begin to accept all the pain and angst of our life stories by going deeper into things rather than competing and avoiding. The author stressed the inter-connectedness of all things, which I tend to agree with. All in all, this book was very interesting, but I won't be recommending it for book club any time soon.

  3. 5 out of 5

    wildflower

    I LOVE this book. I keep rereading it.I am always reading it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    William Arsenis

    HIDDEN TREASURE is not one of your run-of-the-mill books on spirituality. It’s a major find. So what makes her book so special? There’s a highly vulnerable, female, and bitingly intelligent quality to her writing that is both deeply personal and quite moving. At the same time, she can be as tough as Krishnamurti or and as uncompromising as Tony Parsons. And yet, she’s naturally humble...ordinary. Just another person. Like you. Like me. There’s an extremely personal, intimate quality to her accoun HIDDEN TREASURE is not one of your run-of-the-mill books on spirituality. It’s a major find. So what makes her book so special? There’s a highly vulnerable, female, and bitingly intelligent quality to her writing that is both deeply personal and quite moving. At the same time, she can be as tough as Krishnamurti or and as uncompromising as Tony Parsons. And yet, she’s naturally humble...ordinary. Just another person. Like you. Like me. There’s an extremely personal, intimate quality to her accounts. That said, the “teaching story” simply didn’t work for me. It felt like I had to strain to care about strangers that I didn’t relate to in any way. It wasn’t the author’s story, and it wasn’t mine. I was tired and put off by the constant references to a tale that read like a simplistic fable. Though I’m a guy, I could relate more easily to her story rather than the “teaching story,” because to her story was real to her, and that passion comes out loud-and-clear in her writing. The “teaching story” is both unreal and unnecessary. The author is not a novelist, and she clearly knows little about breathing life into fictional characters—about making the reader care about their fate. Why use a parable when there’s no lack of real-life stories to reference? For each example of the use of inquiry, she could have referenced stories from her own life exclusively, not just occasionally throughout the book, and I would have been able to relate to those examples with an urgency and immediacy as though I’d lived them myself. That would have brought her points straight to the core of my being, as it did in each case where she spoke about herself, and not some fictitious family. Her message is as profound and ageless as they come, and while there’s nothing new in this non-dualistic perspective on spirituality, the author brings a human quality to it that bridges the gap between the holier-than-thou traditional teachers and the ordinary person. While her prose is polished and at times quite beautiful, the overall structure of the book feels disorganized and poorly crafted. She is very attached to her guru, which I find a bit odd, considering her hard-core, no-nonsense approach to thoughts, stories, and beliefs. To each his or her own, I guess. Like everyone, she sees life through her experiences and her personality. People who claim to be liberated often expound drastically different methods and approaches to teaching. This isn’t to say that the author doesn’t have a fresh perspective. She transcends the simplistic self-help/self-realization formulas, and frames a more abstract, direct experience of the moment, especially of the most painful moments in life. The author addresses readers in the more “advanced stages” of spiritual development—if there is such a thing—who are ready and willing to abandon the concept of a path. Like her guru, Papaji, she directs you to be still. Hmmm. “Be still and know that I am God.” Sounds familiar? Psalm 46:10. Again, nothing new here. But there is something special about the book and something definitely special about the author—something loving and harsh about the way she delivers the message. In the final analysis, no current teacher says anything that hasn’t already been said. What’s important is how they say it and whether or not their perspective resonates with the reader. I highly recommend this book for people ready to abandon techniques and paths and accept responsibility here and now for whatever occurs within and without.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I loved Gangaji's "Diamond in Your Pocket" and loved this book even more. It soothes me when I read that my trials in life DO have purpose and that I can come to the point where I tolerate those trials with confidence and peace. Not only does she tell me that, she seems to be an example of someone who has found that peace. She does not say that life is just a bowl of cherries, she says that we have Something within that can help us deal with lemons and come out on the other side stronger and wis I loved Gangaji's "Diamond in Your Pocket" and loved this book even more. It soothes me when I read that my trials in life DO have purpose and that I can come to the point where I tolerate those trials with confidence and peace. Not only does she tell me that, she seems to be an example of someone who has found that peace. She does not say that life is just a bowl of cherries, she says that we have Something within that can help us deal with lemons and come out on the other side stronger and wiser and more joyful.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I really got a lot out of Gangaji's other book, Diamond in Your Pocket--I'm actually surprised I only gave it 4 stars, as I recall even copying pages for my sister (who really needs to hear about letting your victim story go). This book felt like a dull rehashing and just did not grab me in the same way. I really got a lot out of Gangaji's other book, Diamond in Your Pocket--I'm actually surprised I only gave it 4 stars, as I recall even copying pages for my sister (who really needs to hear about letting your victim story go). This book felt like a dull rehashing and just did not grab me in the same way.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mindy

    This book in a nutshell (in the author's own words): "I yearned to be free of my persistently recurring self-involvement." This book in a nutshell (in the author's own words): "I yearned to be free of my persistently recurring self-involvement."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pauline

    Worth reading!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Barbiegirlnow

  11. 5 out of 5

    Min

    Too deep for my shallow mind

  12. 5 out of 5

    Angelika Yelapaangel

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Hart

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shashank

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anni

  16. 4 out of 5

    Barry Thorsness

  17. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hylka

  20. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy Hartman

  22. 4 out of 5

    Frank

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lucie Voskuil

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather S

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bigwo

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul Love

  29. 5 out of 5

    Selma

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Eve

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.