web site hit counter All Is Grace: A Ragamuffin Memoir - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

All Is Grace: A Ragamuffin Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

It has been over twenty years since the publication of "The Ragamuffin Gospel," a book many claim as the shattering of God s grace into their lives. Since that time, Brennan Manning has been dazzingly faithful in preaching and writing variations on that singular theme Yes, Abba is very fond of you! But today the crowds are gone and the lights are dim, the patches on his kn It has been over twenty years since the publication of "The Ragamuffin Gospel," a book many claim as the shattering of God s grace into their lives. Since that time, Brennan Manning has been dazzingly faithful in preaching and writing variations on that singular theme Yes, Abba is very fond of you! But today the crowds are gone and the lights are dim, the patches on his knees have faded. If he ever was a ragamuffin, truly it is now. In this his final book, Brennan roves back his past, honoring the lives of the people closest to him, family and friends who ve known the saint and the sinner, the boy and the man. Far from some chronological timeline, these memories are witness to the truth of life by one who has lived it "All Is Grace.""


Compare

It has been over twenty years since the publication of "The Ragamuffin Gospel," a book many claim as the shattering of God s grace into their lives. Since that time, Brennan Manning has been dazzingly faithful in preaching and writing variations on that singular theme Yes, Abba is very fond of you! But today the crowds are gone and the lights are dim, the patches on his kn It has been over twenty years since the publication of "The Ragamuffin Gospel," a book many claim as the shattering of God s grace into their lives. Since that time, Brennan Manning has been dazzingly faithful in preaching and writing variations on that singular theme Yes, Abba is very fond of you! But today the crowds are gone and the lights are dim, the patches on his knees have faded. If he ever was a ragamuffin, truly it is now. In this his final book, Brennan roves back his past, honoring the lives of the people closest to him, family and friends who ve known the saint and the sinner, the boy and the man. Far from some chronological timeline, these memories are witness to the truth of life by one who has lived it "All Is Grace.""

30 review for All Is Grace: A Ragamuffin Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Wow! Brennan Manning's farewell book really got to me. Through most of the book, I thought it was interesting to read his life story and that the book was "okay." Then as it all came together into a final challenge from the author, made more poignant by the insight into his life that the chapters before gave me, his message hit hard and I thought, "This book is really good!." Then the poem at the end made me cry and closed the deal...THIS BOOK WILL BOTH ENCOURAGE AND HAUNT ME FOR A LONG TIME TO Wow! Brennan Manning's farewell book really got to me. Through most of the book, I thought it was interesting to read his life story and that the book was "okay." Then as it all came together into a final challenge from the author, made more poignant by the insight into his life that the chapters before gave me, his message hit hard and I thought, "This book is really good!." Then the poem at the end made me cry and closed the deal...THIS BOOK WILL BOTH ENCOURAGE AND HAUNT ME FOR A LONG TIME TO COME. This man will never stand before the spotlights again in this lifetime, but I cannot deny how much the legacy of this broken ragamuffin has shined the light of God's grace upon my own life time and time again.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    As Yancey says in the forward: "I heard the details of Brennan's life: his loveless childhood, his marathon search for God, his marriage and divorce, his lies and cover-ups, his continuing struggles with alcohol addiction. As you read this memoir, you may be tempted, as I was, to think, 'Oh, what might have been...if Brennan hadn't given in to drink.' I urge you to reframe the thought to, 'Oh, what might have been...if Brennan hadn't discovered grace.'" At times this book was painful when I'd let As Yancey says in the forward: "I heard the details of Brennan's life: his loveless childhood, his marathon search for God, his marriage and divorce, his lies and cover-ups, his continuing struggles with alcohol addiction. As you read this memoir, you may be tempted, as I was, to think, 'Oh, what might have been...if Brennan hadn't given in to drink.' I urge you to reframe the thought to, 'Oh, what might have been...if Brennan hadn't discovered grace.'" At times this book was painful when I'd let myself imagine what it would be like to be married to a man who split his time between speaking at conferences all over the country and drinking himself into oblivion. Brennan then twists the knife by reminding me of myself when he talks about the frustration his wife felt at him for not being willing to be a part of the human race. I know exactly what he is talking about. I was almost about to accept this memoir as a cautionary tale should I ever think my job is to rescue everyone while neglecting my family and myself but that is oversimplifying a real person who has thousands of layers. So by the end of the book I finally stopped looking for the trigger that dropped the trapdoor and let myself see the beauty in the wounded healer. "We are all frail, but you should think of no one as being frailer than yourself." -Thomas a Kempis

  3. 5 out of 5

    Todd Wilhelm

    This is an autobiography of Brennan Manning. While reading it I was moved to tears, not something I am prone to do. I can give no better recommendation. "My life is a witness to vulgar grace - a grace that amazes as it offends. A grace that pays the eager beaver who works all day long the same wages as the grinning drunk who shows up at ten till five. A grace that hikes up the robe and runs breakneck toward the prodigal reeking of sin and wraps him up and decides to throw a party no ifs, ands, or This is an autobiography of Brennan Manning. While reading it I was moved to tears, not something I am prone to do. I can give no better recommendation. "My life is a witness to vulgar grace - a grace that amazes as it offends. A grace that pays the eager beaver who works all day long the same wages as the grinning drunk who shows up at ten till five. A grace that hikes up the robe and runs breakneck toward the prodigal reeking of sin and wraps him up and decides to throw a party no ifs, ands, or buts. A grace that raises bloodshot eyes to a dying thief's request - "Please, remember me" - and assures him, "You bet!" A grace that is the pleasure of the Father, fleshed out in the carpenter Messiah, Jesus the Christ, who left His Father's side not for heaven's sake but for our sakes, yours and mine. This vulgar grace is indiscriminate compassion. It works without asking anything of us. It's not cheap. It's free, and as such will always be a banana peel for the orthodox foot and a fairy tale for the grown-up sensibility. Grace is sufficient even though we huff and puff with all our might to try to find something or someone it cannot cover. Grace is enough. He is enough. Jesus is enough. John, the disciple Jesus loved, ended his first letter with this line: "Children, be on your guard against false gods." In other words, steer clear of any god you can comprehend. Abba's love cannot be comprehended. I'll say it again: Abba's love cannot be comprehended." -pages 122-123 "One Christmas- I must have been ten years old - I spent some time walking the creaky wooden floors of Woolworth's five-and-dime searching for a gift for my mother. I happened upon a little notepad, the kind people used to keep beside telephones. It was multicolored, pastels of pink and green and blue. I'd never seen anything like it. I thought it was gorgeous, surely something that would thrill my mother. Christmas morning came, and we were all there-my parents and grandparents, my brother and sister and me. As my mother began opening my gift, I held my breath in anticipation. She tore the wrapping paper away and just stared at the notepad. "What in God's name am I gonna do with this? What a waste of money!" After what felt like an eternity where all eyes in the room were on me, my mother tossed me the pad, and the Mannings moved on to other gifts. I felt like I'd purchased the Hope Diamond for her, but it wasn't enough. I just didn't understand. I was crushed." -page 39 ""What is the telltale sign of a trusting heart?" I cannot remember when I wrote it or what might have prompted the question. Yet it is there, evidence of a ragamuffin's lifelong wondering. Here is my answer, the answer that is, as Thomas Merton wrote, "the 'Yes' which brings Christ into the world." A trusting heart is forgiven and, in turn, forgives. I know that's true because of an experience I had on a November day in 2003. My mother had been dead and gone for close to ten years. As I was praying about other things, her face flashed across the window of my mind. It was not a worn face like that of an old mother or grandmother, but a child's face. I saw my mother as a little six-year-old girl kneeling on the windowsill of the orphanage in Montreal. Her nose was pressed against the glass; she was begging God to send her a mommy and daddy who would whisk her away and love her without condition. As I looked, I believe I finally saw my mother; she was a ragamuffin too. And all my resentment and anger fell away. The little girl turned and walked toward me. As she drew closer, the years flew by and she stood before me and aged woman. She said, "You know, I messed up a lot when you were a kid, But you turned out okay." Then my mother did something she'd never done before in her life, never once. She kissed me on the lips and on both cheeks. At that moment I knew that the hurt between my mother and me was real and did matter, but that it was okay. The trusting heart gives a second chance; it is forgiven and, in turn, forgives. I looked at my mother and said, "I forgive you." She smiled and said, "I guess sometimes you do get what you ask for."" pages 123-124

  4. 4 out of 5

    David

    This "review" is simply a pasting of my blog post on this book - http://davehershey.wordpress.com/2012... Sometimes I get tired of being a Christian, let alone a pastor. I struggle with doubt: Is God really there or when I pray am I just talking to myself? I struggle with cynicism: American Christianity is really arguing about ______? Really!? I struggle with feelings of inadequacy: If only I was as talented/gifted/intelligent/personable/etc. as ________, then I’d be a better campus minister. Then I This "review" is simply a pasting of my blog post on this book - http://davehershey.wordpress.com/2012... Sometimes I get tired of being a Christian, let alone a pastor. I struggle with doubt: Is God really there or when I pray am I just talking to myself? I struggle with cynicism: American Christianity is really arguing about ______? Really!? I struggle with feelings of inadequacy: If only I was as talented/gifted/intelligent/personable/etc. as ________, then I’d be a better campus minister. Then I read a book like All is Grace, the memoir of Brennan Manning. In this book Brennan Manning bears his soul, being honest about his struggles with alcoholism and his failure as a husband. He does not write as a man whose life is altogether, he does not write from a tower of self-confidence. Instead, he writes as a broken man caught by the love of Jesus. As I read this book over and over again I thought, yes, I can worship the kind of loving God Brennan Manning keeps talking about. “Ragamuffins have a singular prayer: “God, be merciful to me, a sinner”” (p.31). “If I’ve learned anything about the world of grace, it’s that failure is always a chance for a do-over” (p. 162) “God strips away those falsehoods because it is better to live naked in truth than clothed in fantasy” (p.188). “My message, unchanged for more than fifty years, is this: God loves you unconditionally, as you are and not as you should be, because nobody is as they should be” (p. 192) “This vulgar grace is indiscriminate compassion. It works without asking anything of us. It’s not cheap. It’s free, and as such will always be a banana peel for the orthodox foot and a fairy tale for the grown-up sensibility. Grace is sufficient even though we huff and puff with all our might to try to find something or someone it cannot cover. Grace is enough. He is enough. Jesus is enough” (p. 194) Thank you Brennan Manning.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Josh Morgan

    This review first appeared on my blog, Jacob's Café (http://jacobscafe.blogspot.com/2011/1...). Brennan Manning has long emphasized the importance of grace and God's unconditional love. His speaking and books have touched thousands, if not millions. While I have heard wonderful things about him, I realized I have never actually read any of his works. So my first direct encounter with Manning was through his memoir, All is Grace: A Ragamuffin Memoir. This book is an exemplar of the power of grace t This review first appeared on my blog, Jacob's Café (http://jacobscafe.blogspot.com/2011/1...). Brennan Manning has long emphasized the importance of grace and God's unconditional love. His speaking and books have touched thousands, if not millions. While I have heard wonderful things about him, I realized I have never actually read any of his works. So my first direct encounter with Manning was through his memoir, All is Grace: A Ragamuffin Memoir. This book is an exemplar of the power of grace through all circumstances and actions. I was not aware of Manning's history and controversy, although the fact that he has kept and grown in his faith through it all makes me respect him even more so. I think his mantra that God loves us as we are, not as we should be is profound, simple, complex, and deeply meaningful. This reminder can remove shame, which inhibits change, and moves us toward openness and freedom to love God and accept love from God. An element that particularly stood out over the course of this book was the clear way human relationships affect our relationship with God. The psychological community interested in spirituality have described this in terms of God image. However, Manning's experience with his mother, father, grandparents, siblings, church, and wife vividly demonstrate the power of how we may trust God more or less based on our ability to trust other. And even more so, how much we are willing to believe God loves us because others have or have not loved us. While only God can love perfectly, this is an important reminder to consistently engage in loving acts and love people as they are. This helps them see the face of God, which is the ultimate evangelism. Manning has done just that for innumerable people. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben Zajdel

    All is Grace is Brennan Manning's long awaited autobiography, which he agreed to publish five years ago. It isn't the most complete account of his life, but it's written with the heart and soul that Manning brings to all of his works. His life truly reflects what he has told others countless times throughout his life: "God loves you just as you are, not as you should be." Manning recounts his life from his childhood, giving special attention to his mother and father, and how their influence affec All is Grace is Brennan Manning's long awaited autobiography, which he agreed to publish five years ago. It isn't the most complete account of his life, but it's written with the heart and soul that Manning brings to all of his works. His life truly reflects what he has told others countless times throughout his life: "God loves you just as you are, not as you should be." Manning recounts his life from his childhood, giving special attention to his mother and father, and how their influence affected his life later. He also talks in detail about his marriage and divorce, something he has never done in his other books. Of special interest were times he spent in Alabama and in France, living with the Little Brothers of Jesus. If you've read his other works extensively, some of the stories will be familiar. But they are told in fresh perspective, with many years of experience and wisdom added. There are photographs interspersed throughout the book, as well as letters written by several of his friends. Philip Yancey wrote a touching foreward in honor of his friend. A great read for anyone who has loved Manning's work.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aaron W. Matthews

    This is a fine memoir from a man that has written love-drenched words throughout his career. He is not perfect, but that is one of the reasons I love Brennan Manning. What a fitting finale to read after completing all his other literary works. I'm thankful for the inspriation this book brings - raw, brash, lucid, and from the deeps of the heart. All is grace...it most certainly is! This is a fine memoir from a man that has written love-drenched words throughout his career. He is not perfect, but that is one of the reasons I love Brennan Manning. What a fitting finale to read after completing all his other literary works. I'm thankful for the inspriation this book brings - raw, brash, lucid, and from the deeps of the heart. All is grace...it most certainly is!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I’ve yet to read a book by Manning that disappointed me. This farewell song of grace was no exception.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Claxton

    I loved this very much. Thank you, Brennan Manning.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel N

    I was impacted by Manning's vulnerability and willingness to share such raw emotions and heart-wrenching incidents from his life (particularly from his childhood). The description of his vivid, life-altering encounter with Jesus back in 1958 was deeply moving. "All is grace" could not be more true - reminds me of Martin Luther's revelation that we are all "saved by grace" (a revelation that led him to action, ushering in a cultural reformation). There is no doubt that I certainly need an ever-de I was impacted by Manning's vulnerability and willingness to share such raw emotions and heart-wrenching incidents from his life (particularly from his childhood). The description of his vivid, life-altering encounter with Jesus back in 1958 was deeply moving. "All is grace" could not be more true - reminds me of Martin Luther's revelation that we are all "saved by grace" (a revelation that led him to action, ushering in a cultural reformation). There is no doubt that I certainly need an ever-deepening understanding of His grace. There are some great quotes to learn from throughout this memoir, as well. At the same time - I'm wrestling with how a man can claim to have such dramatic encounters with the Lord and still remain in such bondage. I don't doubt that those encounters occurred but I also don't doubt the freedom available through Christ. At times, it's easy to see the brokenness of this man who understands (to a degree) the grace of God; but at other times, it seems that that grace is treated so flippantly. Towards the end of the memoir, in response to "the" question, "how could you relapse into alcoholism after your Abba encounters?" he answers simply, "these things happen." This response left me dissatisfied, even disappointed. Surely there is more to it than that. Perhaps the regrets of his life, and his willingness to share them with the world, will motivate us to do all it takes to not end up in that same place of regret.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicki

    I really don’t know where to start as this is a tremendous memoir by an amazing man. I have thoroughly enjoyed this audio and would recommend this to anyone who enjoys memoirs/biographies. As Brennan himself says he is a survivor and is very honest about his life. It is upsetting at times but very inspirational throughout. I identified with his Irish Catholic roots and the baggage accompanying it, something I haven’t really thought about much before, but which makes a lot of sense. Maurice England I really don’t know where to start as this is a tremendous memoir by an amazing man. I have thoroughly enjoyed this audio and would recommend this to anyone who enjoys memoirs/biographies. As Brennan himself says he is a survivor and is very honest about his life. It is upsetting at times but very inspirational throughout. I identified with his Irish Catholic roots and the baggage accompanying it, something I haven’t really thought about much before, but which makes a lot of sense. Maurice England is just perfect as the narrator, and as I don’t know what the author’s voice sounds like, he was Brennan to me, sharing his life and God’s amazing grace. I feel very privileged to have listened to this wonderful memoir. There is so much in this audio that I think I’ll have to listen more than once to fully appreciate it. Thanks to christianaudio.com’s Reviewers Program for this copy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This book reminded me that only people who wrestle constantly with their flesh can TRULY know what Grace is and delight in it. It is ALSO a reminder to me of how we can encourage one another, but no man or woman should EVER be lifted up as Jesus. Brennan Manning was a very human human. It makes me love him all the more that he revealed these things about himself. Most preachers keep them hidden. As if portraying yourself as something you're not is the way to show others Christ. I see the grace o This book reminded me that only people who wrestle constantly with their flesh can TRULY know what Grace is and delight in it. It is ALSO a reminder to me of how we can encourage one another, but no man or woman should EVER be lifted up as Jesus. Brennan Manning was a very human human. It makes me love him all the more that he revealed these things about himself. Most preachers keep them hidden. As if portraying yourself as something you're not is the way to show others Christ. I see the grace of Father deeply in this man's life. Right after CS Lewis, Brennan Manning is the next person I would like to have a glass of wine and a chat with at the Resurrection. ;)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Spooner

    What struck me most about this memoir was realizing that Brennan was in and out of his addiction to alcohol all of his life. I heard him speak in Conway in the late 90s. It was nice to physically see him but his talks were simply parts of his books cut and pasted together. I learned from his memoir that he was drinking to black out stage during this time. I am going blank on the mind disorder that he currently has, but it is a result of years of alcohol abuse and dependence. For me, this made his What struck me most about this memoir was realizing that Brennan was in and out of his addiction to alcohol all of his life. I heard him speak in Conway in the late 90s. It was nice to physically see him but his talks were simply parts of his books cut and pasted together. I learned from his memoir that he was drinking to black out stage during this time. I am going blank on the mind disorder that he currently has, but it is a result of years of alcohol abuse and dependence. For me, this made his understanding of grace all the more genuine and powerful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ken Bickley

    Don't expect this to be an easy-to-read, sweetness-and-light book. It's not. Though he has written some of the most meaningful inspirational books available, Manning has had a hard life and he pulls no punches in this memoir dictated to John Blasé shortly before his death. He failed as a marine, as a Catholic priest, and as a husband and step-father. Most of his failures were caused by his inability to stop drinking alcohol. Any further information from me would spoil it for you, but suffice it Don't expect this to be an easy-to-read, sweetness-and-light book. It's not. Though he has written some of the most meaningful inspirational books available, Manning has had a hard life and he pulls no punches in this memoir dictated to John Blasé shortly before his death. He failed as a marine, as a Catholic priest, and as a husband and step-father. Most of his failures were caused by his inability to stop drinking alcohol. Any further information from me would spoil it for you, but suffice it to say that the title of the book tells you it's all going go come out OK.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Just the thought of this book makes me emotional. The majority of the christian faith I once knew no longer holds the life-giving qualities it once had. But Brennan Manning still represents something to me that I know I cannot find in the secular world. The christian faith I once knew had managed to bury me years-deep into shame. At some points I thought I would never escape, or perhaps drown. Brennan Manning was a shovel, a rope, a ladder, an image of myself that I had never seen elsewhere. Bren Just the thought of this book makes me emotional. The majority of the christian faith I once knew no longer holds the life-giving qualities it once had. But Brennan Manning still represents something to me that I know I cannot find in the secular world. The christian faith I once knew had managed to bury me years-deep into shame. At some points I thought I would never escape, or perhaps drown. Brennan Manning was a shovel, a rope, a ladder, an image of myself that I had never seen elsewhere. Brennan's authenticity, vulnerability, and all-encompassing acceptance was a breath of fresh air, a crack in the door that eventually led to my escape. While I do not see the world as Brennan did, I am certain I will see Brennan in myself till the very end. Forever grateful for his ragamuffin life and his sacred words. 1. “Do you believe that the God of Jesus loves you beyond worthiness and unworthiness, beyond fidelity and infidelity—that he loves you in the morning sun and in the evening rain—that he loves you when your intellect denies it, your emotions refuse it, your whole being rejects it. Do you believe that God loves without condition or reservation and loves you this moment as you are and not as you should be.” 2. “My message, unchanged for more than fifty years, is this: God loves you unconditionally, as you are and not as you should be, because nobody is as they should be. It is the message of grace…A grace that pays the eager beaver who works all day long the same wages as the grinning drunk who shows up at ten till five…A grace that hikes up the robe and runs breakneck toward the prodigal reeking of sin and wraps him up and decides to throw a party no ifs, ands, or buts…This grace is indiscriminate compassion. It works without asking anything of us…Grace is sufficient even though we huff and puff with all our might to try to find something or someone it cannot cover. Grace is enough…Jesus is enough.”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Huizenga

    Manning recounts his life story in All Is Grace, expressing his theology-not through preaching-but in the manner in which grace has acted upon his life. Manning's memoir of alcoholism, need for acceptance, and searching for more, is not at all shocking until the reader pairs this with the knowledge that Manning is a well-known preacher/speaker. He is the hypocritical Christian that we usually shun. Grace stories are my favorite, but All Is Grace is a different version, one where grace does not a Manning recounts his life story in All Is Grace, expressing his theology-not through preaching-but in the manner in which grace has acted upon his life. Manning's memoir of alcoholism, need for acceptance, and searching for more, is not at all shocking until the reader pairs this with the knowledge that Manning is a well-known preacher/speaker. He is the hypocritical Christian that we usually shun. Grace stories are my favorite, but All Is Grace is a different version, one where grace does not arrive during one plot changing moment, but where grace is offered and received daily. In enjoyable writing, Manning shows that the gospel is for everyone, at all times, especially during the dark moments. I wish Manning had presented more of his theology in sermon form, not just through his biography, but All Is Grace is also a sort of companion piece to the Ragamuffin Gospel, and I suppose I could just suck it up and reread that wonderful book. All Is Grace is short and sweet. Of course it is a great reminder of grace on our own sinful lives, but reading Manning's memoir teaches that everyone has a story, and many stories are difficult and dark, and perhaps we can offer a bit more grace.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jodie Pine

    Written near the end of his life in 2011, with assistance from John Blase, Brennan Manning reflects on his life's journey in a deeply honest way. As a fan of all of his writing, I was especially moved by the conversational way he writes to his readers so that they might truly know him and recognize that all of his life--with many dark chapters--is grace. One of my favorite stories was from a speaking engagement in Charlotte, NC in 2009 when his mind went completely blank. He asked his audience t Written near the end of his life in 2011, with assistance from John Blase, Brennan Manning reflects on his life's journey in a deeply honest way. As a fan of all of his writing, I was especially moved by the conversational way he writes to his readers so that they might truly know him and recognize that all of his life--with many dark chapters--is grace. One of my favorite stories was from a speaking engagement in Charlotte, NC in 2009 when his mind went completely blank. He asked his audience to pray for him and they gave him a standing ovation, for his silence. Grace. The book concludes with touching letters written to him by the men in his Notorious Sinners group about the life-changing impact Manning has had in their lives.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Claire Johnson

    “My message, unchanged for more than fifty years, is this: God loves you unconditionally, as you are and not as you should be, because nobody is as they should be...Some have labeled my message one of “cheap grace.” In my younger days, their accusations were a gauntlet thrown down, a challenge. But now I’m old and I don’t care.” (192) “If asked whether I’m finally letting God love me, just as I am, I would answer, ‘No, but I’m trying.’” (184)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nick Jordan

    I have several friends I greatly respect who have long adored Manning. That’s never been me. But this was a great read, his last book, I believe.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gerald Zgabay

    Challenges anyone's faith journey... Challenges anyone's faith journey...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Read via audiobook. Engaging narrator for the very moving story of Brennan's life. Read via audiobook. Engaging narrator for the very moving story of Brennan's life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    “It was in those golden moments that I was battered by wave after wave of the theology of delight, that God not only loves me but also likes me.” Brennan Manning

  23. 4 out of 5

    Derrick Harris

    As someone who is a big fan of Brennan Manning's writing and his overall message about grace, love, and acceptance I truly enjoyed learning more about him. Hearing the background of his struggles and triumphs is exactly what I expected. I love is raw honesty about his not so perfect life. Great person! As someone who is a big fan of Brennan Manning's writing and his overall message about grace, love, and acceptance I truly enjoyed learning more about him. Hearing the background of his struggles and triumphs is exactly what I expected. I love is raw honesty about his not so perfect life. Great person!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Holbrook

    I was reminded in this book of one of the best first lines in any novel I have read; “I am a Christian because of Owen Meany” (A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving, Random House Publishing Group, 1990). Reading this present book spoke of a similar reality for me - the way I seek to follow Christ is due, to a large degree, because of Brennan Manning. I have never personally met Fr. Manning, nor have I had opportunity to “share my heart” with him; I have only had the privilege of him sharing hi I was reminded in this book of one of the best first lines in any novel I have read; “I am a Christian because of Owen Meany” (A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving, Random House Publishing Group, 1990). Reading this present book spoke of a similar reality for me - the way I seek to follow Christ is due, to a large degree, because of Brennan Manning. I have never personally met Fr. Manning, nor have I had opportunity to “share my heart” with him; I have only had the privilege of him sharing his heart with me. Such vulnerability, honesty and sound theology as he sets forth in his writings have caused me to examine my life and how I understand Christ in ways that have resulted in my being deeply changed. After reading most (all?) of his books, I felt that Fr. Manning was being modest when he stated he “understood ragamuffins (liars, thieves, scoundrels, all around booger-heads) because I am one.” He states, repeatedly in all of his works, that God “loves us as we are, not as we should be,” that God delights in us because God’s loves us (not loves us AFTER we delight Him) and Grace in beyond understanding so all one can do is accept it. A message that is much needed in a culture that is filled with a desire to “find” fulfillment, acceptance and completion (not a bad “to do list” at that). What sets Fr. Manning apart from most of the writers who try to relate a similar message is that he is being honest when he states that he “understands” ragamuffins because he truly is one. If anyone has any doubt of the reality of his being “despicable,” reading this memoir will erase any hint that Fr. Manning was using poetic license when he speaks of his relationship to his need for Grace. He details, in his usual clear, precise prose, just how much of a betrayer to Christ he been all while seeking with no little effort to become more like that Nazarene Rabbi. Beginning at his birth (a good place to begin an autobiography), he gives the particulars of being born to a mother who, “prayed for a girl” (p. 37) and got Richard Manning (he changed his name to Brennan upon his solemn vows as a Franciscan Priest). He felt unwanted, literally, from his birth and that sense of not being “enough,” of lacking an undefined “something” has informed the remainder of his life. He showed promise as a writer while he was in high school and entered college toward becoming a sports writer only to drop out that the beginning of his sophomore year to join the Marine Corps. By that time (age 20) he was a seasoned drinker, having started following the footsteps of his father and grandfather into heavy drinking when he was 16. By the time he was 20, he had the nick name of Funnel, which was fitting given he was drinking “a dozen or so beers every night, five nights a week, a pint of rye whiskey every other day and often a liter of sake once a week.” (p. 76). This was but the beginning of his a life-long relationship with alcohol but the most profound relationship began when, after leaving college again (after leaving the Marine Corps) to enter a Franciscan monastery. He was unsure why he entered the Monastery beyond he wanted something “more” than awards and fame out of life. A week after entering he was ready to leave, “I decided that I had given God a sporting chance” (p. 90). Before leaving, he stopped by the chapel on the way to tell the head friar “so long.” While there, he began praying the 14 Stations of the Cross; the first 11 took him but a few moments, he was at the Twelfth for 3 hours and that “moment” was to set the course for the rest of his life. He has spoken to thousands of people of the possibility of a relationship with God that exceeds all expectations, of a God who wants to be known as “Daddy” (Abba), of Grace that surpasses all real or perceived short comings, lacking, sin or judgment and accepts ALL ragamuffins, of whom Brennan Manning could be considered chief. Because of his drinking, he lost his marriage, was in an alcoholic blackout during his mother’s funeral and is now incapacitated due to Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, a brain disorder caused by thymine deficiency common to alcoholics. The man who speaks so eloquently of God’s acceptance and love has a front row seat in understanding what that truly means, as he, in his own estimation, is in greatest need for it. Thanks be to God that mercy and grace in boundless.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Quick read. Powerful read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Highly satisfying. Only thing that kept it from being 5 stars for me is that I have such a long history of loving his writings that to be let in on the reality of his life's longings and regrets was deeply saddening for me. Highly satisfying. Only thing that kept it from being 5 stars for me is that I have such a long history of loving his writings that to be let in on the reality of his life's longings and regrets was deeply saddening for me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robb Ryerse

    If your life were to be summed up in a single sentence, what would it be? If you could encapsulate all that you have experienced, all that you have tried to pass on to your children and others, all that your life has been about in a few words, which would you choose? How about these: God loves me unconditionally, as I am and not as I should be. Could that impossibility be true? It seems too good to be true, doesn’t it? It sounds so unfair, so unrestrained, so unqualified. It sounds so much like we If your life were to be summed up in a single sentence, what would it be? If you could encapsulate all that you have experienced, all that you have tried to pass on to your children and others, all that your life has been about in a few words, which would you choose? How about these: God loves me unconditionally, as I am and not as I should be. Could that impossibility be true? It seems too good to be true, doesn’t it? It sounds so unfair, so unrestrained, so unqualified. It sounds so much like we are being let off the hook, given license, given permission to take the love of God for granted. It sounds so vulgar. Appropriating the phrase from Robert Farrar Capon, Brennan Manning calls it vulgar grace. And vulgar grace has been the story of his life. – I was first introduced to Brennan Manning in 1995 when I read The Ragamuffin Gospel. I don’t know how I heard of the book, but I devoured it. I can honestly say, of all the books I read in college, both those assigned and those I chose myself, no book was more formative for me than Manning’s classic. It spoke to something deep inside of me that longed to be loved and cared for. I had grown up with a distant and angry God who was looking for the best possible moment to expose my sin and destroy my life. The Ragamuffin Gospel painted a better picture of God – a God who loves me, no matter what – and that is the God I’ve been searching for ever since. In his memoir All Is Grace, Brennan Manning shares the story of his a life, a story about how he has been searching for this God too. The story starts, appropriately, with his mother, Amy, an orphan who ends up raising a family that is distant, untrusting, and more than a little harsh. In time, Brennan goes off to college, and then abruptly joins the Marines, and then abruptly becomes a Franciscan priest, and then abruptly joins the Little Brothers of Jesus in Europe, and then abruptly starts a new community in Mobile Alabama, and then abruptly … You get the picture. Brennan’s life is full of fits and starts, new beginnings, new adventures, like he can’t sit still for any amount of time. Eventually, he – somewhat less abruptly – leaves the priesthood to marry Roslyn, becoming in a moment a husband and father. Their story is touching and tragic. But this is not a happy-ever-after tale of a former Catholic priest turned Evangelical rockstar. It’s more vulgar than that. Roslyn is not the love of Brennan’s life. Alcohol is. With heartbreaking authenticity, Brennan shares about his lifelong struggle with alcohol. At times, it’s difficult to read. I don’t want to picture one of my spiritual heroes staggering about like Nicolas Cage in Leaving Las Vegas. But that’s precisely the vulgar picture Brennan paints of himself. And in the midst of it, there is God, loving him unconditionally, as he is not as he should be. It’s beautiful and heart-wrenching and inspiring and so very hopeful. – Last year, I read The Pastor by Eugene Peterson. It is a wonderful memoir of a sweet and simple pastoral ministry. It made me long for the kind of gentle grace that is the hallmark of Peterson’s life and ministry. All Is Grace is the other side of the same coin. Complicated and brash and void of any easy answers. It makes me long for the kind of vulgar grace that has sustained Brennan Manning all these years. Vulgar. Messy. Angst-ridden. Full of failure and new hope. This is grace. Because this is life.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana Torres

    brennan breaks you with his honest truths and love. in a good way. makes you feel, makes you love, makes you think

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Bennett

    I really enjoyed this book. A paragraph I've bookmarked that sums it up says: "My hope, as always, is to point to the God too good to be true, my Abba. I've no delusions of heroically bringing down the house of fear that imprisons so many. My desire is to witness, nothing else. My message, unchanged for more than fifty years, is this: God loves you unconditionally, as you are and not as you should be, because nobody is as they should be. It is the message of grace ..." This was a very encouraging I really enjoyed this book. A paragraph I've bookmarked that sums it up says: "My hope, as always, is to point to the God too good to be true, my Abba. I've no delusions of heroically bringing down the house of fear that imprisons so many. My desire is to witness, nothing else. My message, unchanged for more than fifty years, is this: God loves you unconditionally, as you are and not as you should be, because nobody is as they should be. It is the message of grace ..." This was a very encouraging book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Bought this on a whim last week; I had read a couple of Manning's books probably 10 years ago (Abba's Child and The Ragamuffin Gospel) and I appreciate his ability to capture an aspect of the Christian idea of grace in brutally simple terms. But if you have, like me, always been a bit concerned by the hint of 'license' in Manning's work on grace, this book will confirm your fears. It's not that he ceases to proclaim the part of the good news that involves God's radical acceptance of us "just the Bought this on a whim last week; I had read a couple of Manning's books probably 10 years ago (Abba's Child and The Ragamuffin Gospel) and I appreciate his ability to capture an aspect of the Christian idea of grace in brutally simple terms. But if you have, like me, always been a bit concerned by the hint of 'license' in Manning's work on grace, this book will confirm your fears. It's not that he ceases to proclaim the part of the good news that involves God's radical acceptance of us "just the way we are - not as we should be"; there's plenty of that here, and, at times, the message is powerfully stated or represented. But this book is Manning's attempt at memoir and in telling the story of his life, he reveals what he had hinted at in his other books (that I've read) : that he has remained an active alcoholic for most of his adult life. The details are hard to put together exactly, but that's the impression I get from the book; if I'm missing something here, please someone inform me. In fact, from what I can tell, Manning was suffering from the medical effects of his addiction during some of the writing of the book, effects he may die from in the very near future. But there's more than the addiction; there's his leaving the Roman Catholic priesthood to marry his wife, whom he later divorced. There's the pattern of Brennan entering a new phase of his calling among a set group of people, staying for a short while, and then moving on to something else. (And we're not talking about moving from one law firm to another, or even jumping vocations; we're talking about entering and then leaving fraternal orders and ministries usually considered permanent). Not judging him; but the book was more discouraging than encouraging because of these elements.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.