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American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly

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American Indian affairs are much in the public mind today—hotly contested debates over such issues as Indian fishing rights, land claims, and reservation gambling hold our attention. While the unique legal status of American Indians rests on the historical treaty relationship between Indian tribes and the federal government, until now there has been no comprehensive histor American Indian affairs are much in the public mind today—hotly contested debates over such issues as Indian fishing rights, land claims, and reservation gambling hold our attention. While the unique legal status of American Indians rests on the historical treaty relationship between Indian tribes and the federal government, until now there has been no comprehensive history of these treaties and their role in American life. Francis Paul Prucha, a leading authority on the history of American Indian affairs, argues that the treaties were a political anomaly from the very beginning. The term "treaty" implies a contract between sovereign independent nations, yet Indians were always in a position of inequality and dependence as negotiators, a fact that complicates their current attempts to regain their rights and tribal sovereignty. Prucha's impeccably researched book, based on a close analysis of every treaty, makes possible a thorough understanding of a legal dilemma whose legacy is so palpably felt today.


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American Indian affairs are much in the public mind today—hotly contested debates over such issues as Indian fishing rights, land claims, and reservation gambling hold our attention. While the unique legal status of American Indians rests on the historical treaty relationship between Indian tribes and the federal government, until now there has been no comprehensive histor American Indian affairs are much in the public mind today—hotly contested debates over such issues as Indian fishing rights, land claims, and reservation gambling hold our attention. While the unique legal status of American Indians rests on the historical treaty relationship between Indian tribes and the federal government, until now there has been no comprehensive history of these treaties and their role in American life. Francis Paul Prucha, a leading authority on the history of American Indian affairs, argues that the treaties were a political anomaly from the very beginning. The term "treaty" implies a contract between sovereign independent nations, yet Indians were always in a position of inequality and dependence as negotiators, a fact that complicates their current attempts to regain their rights and tribal sovereignty. Prucha's impeccably researched book, based on a close analysis of every treaty, makes possible a thorough understanding of a legal dilemma whose legacy is so palpably felt today.

35 review for American Indian Treaties: The History of a Political Anomaly

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Kind of a bureaucrat's history of violence and displacement. If you're interested in a history of documents and process that says nothing about their consequences for peoples' lives, then this is the book for you. If, on the other hand, you're a human being, and would like to know about the United States' history of dealing with native people from that perspective, there are lots of other books out there. Kind of a bureaucrat's history of violence and displacement. If you're interested in a history of documents and process that says nothing about their consequences for peoples' lives, then this is the book for you. If, on the other hand, you're a human being, and would like to know about the United States' history of dealing with native people from that perspective, there are lots of other books out there.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    When I first picked up this book I was afraid from the title that it was going to be a chronological overview of every treaty made between the US government and indigenous tribes. Fortunately, I was wrong! While chronological and dense, it is a comprehensive overview of the political climate surrounding the history of treaty making with more in depth conversation on landmark cases en route. For me it really helped fill in the philosophical gaps behind certain cases and political pushes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tabby

    The go-to place for information and history of American Indian treaties. This is not meant to be a history of native culture or rights but a study of US-tribal relations and US Indian policies. Prucha is not an ethnographer but came to native policy history from a political viewpoint. A must-read for American, native, legal, and political historians.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee Rios

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hybrazil

  6. 5 out of 5

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  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mnjayhawk

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shane Lynch

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julene2034

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

  13. 5 out of 5

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  14. 5 out of 5

    Carly Jo

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eric Smith

  16. 5 out of 5

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  17. 5 out of 5

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  18. 5 out of 5

    Touraj Rahimi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  20. 4 out of 5

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  21. 5 out of 5

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  22. 4 out of 5

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  23. 5 out of 5

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  24. 5 out of 5

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  25. 5 out of 5

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  26. 4 out of 5

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  27. 5 out of 5

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  28. 4 out of 5

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  29. 5 out of 5

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  30. 5 out of 5

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  31. 5 out of 5

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  32. 4 out of 5

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  33. 4 out of 5

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  34. 5 out of 5

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  35. 4 out of 5

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