web site hit counter Good Dog. Stay. - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Good Dog. Stay.

Availability: Ready to download

“The life of a good dog is like the life of a good person, only shorter and more compressed,” writes Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anna Quindlen about her beloved black Labrador retriever, Beau. With her trademark wisdom and humor, Quindlen reflects on how her life has unfolded in tandem with Beau’s, and on the lessons she’s learned by watching him: to roll with the punche “The life of a good dog is like the life of a good person, only shorter and more compressed,” writes Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anna Quindlen about her beloved black Labrador retriever, Beau. With her trademark wisdom and humor, Quindlen reflects on how her life has unfolded in tandem with Beau’s, and on the lessons she’s learned by watching him: to roll with the punches, to take things as they come, to measure herself not in terms of the past or the future but of the present, to raise her nose in the air from time to time and, at least metaphorically, holler, “I smell bacon!” Of the dog that once possessed a catcher’s mitt of a mouth, Quindlen reminisces, “there came a time when a scrap thrown in his direction usually bounced unseen off his head. Yet put a pork roast in the oven, and the guy still breathed as audibly as an obscene caller. The eyes and ears may have gone, but the nose was eternal. And the tail. The tail still wagged, albeit at half-staff. When it stops, I thought more than once, then we’ll know.” Heartening and bittersweet, Good Dog. Stay. honors the life of a cherished and loyal friend and offers us a valuable lesson on our four-legged family members: Sometimes an old dog can teach us new tricks.


Compare

“The life of a good dog is like the life of a good person, only shorter and more compressed,” writes Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anna Quindlen about her beloved black Labrador retriever, Beau. With her trademark wisdom and humor, Quindlen reflects on how her life has unfolded in tandem with Beau’s, and on the lessons she’s learned by watching him: to roll with the punche “The life of a good dog is like the life of a good person, only shorter and more compressed,” writes Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anna Quindlen about her beloved black Labrador retriever, Beau. With her trademark wisdom and humor, Quindlen reflects on how her life has unfolded in tandem with Beau’s, and on the lessons she’s learned by watching him: to roll with the punches, to take things as they come, to measure herself not in terms of the past or the future but of the present, to raise her nose in the air from time to time and, at least metaphorically, holler, “I smell bacon!” Of the dog that once possessed a catcher’s mitt of a mouth, Quindlen reminisces, “there came a time when a scrap thrown in his direction usually bounced unseen off his head. Yet put a pork roast in the oven, and the guy still breathed as audibly as an obscene caller. The eyes and ears may have gone, but the nose was eternal. And the tail. The tail still wagged, albeit at half-staff. When it stops, I thought more than once, then we’ll know.” Heartening and bittersweet, Good Dog. Stay. honors the life of a cherished and loyal friend and offers us a valuable lesson on our four-legged family members: Sometimes an old dog can teach us new tricks.

30 review for Good Dog. Stay.

  1. 5 out of 5

    ☮Karen

    I wish this was longer. Just as I was settling in to listen to a great Quindlen piece, not wanting to listen to what's on the news or read my other two books, it was over. (It's less than 45 minutes on audio.) A sad and moving eulogy of sorts, following the euthanasia of her beloved lab, Beau. I'm a cat person but I know too well the same emotions expressed here. So beautifully described by Anna Q. I wish this was longer. Just as I was settling in to listen to a great Quindlen piece, not wanting to listen to what's on the news or read my other two books, it was over. (It's less than 45 minutes on audio.) A sad and moving eulogy of sorts, following the euthanasia of her beloved lab, Beau. I'm a cat person but I know too well the same emotions expressed here. So beautifully described by Anna Q.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ❀Julie

    “In a world that seems so uncertain, in lives that seem sometimes to ricochet from challenge to upheaval and back again, a dog can be counted on in a way that’s true of little else.” I have read the author’s works before but this bittersweet memoir about her dog, Beau, gave me a renewed appreciation of her writing. It is less than 100 pages, many of which are filled with full length dog photos, but a profound read. It resonated so much with me and my own dogs that it was very personal, and a remi “In a world that seems so uncertain, in lives that seem sometimes to ricochet from challenge to upheaval and back again, a dog can be counted on in a way that’s true of little else.” I have read the author’s works before but this bittersweet memoir about her dog, Beau, gave me a renewed appreciation of her writing. It is less than 100 pages, many of which are filled with full length dog photos, but a profound read. It resonated so much with me and my own dogs that it was very personal, and a reminder why I will always be a dog owner if I can help it. A year ago I was desperate to find a comforting book that would get me through the difficult last days with our beloved dog, Sunny. Anyone who has lived through the painstaking experience of figuring out when “it’s time” can relate. While nothing can bring my dog back reading this made me smile and made me think of the lasting impact he made in our lives. If you are on the fence bout reading this I highly recommend it. It’s beautiful and thoughtful and will touch the heart of any dog owner. Just like a dog’s life, you know it will be short lived but the journey couldn’t be sweeter or more fulfilling. We just wish they could stay.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I acquired "Good Dog. Stay" at a book swap. I am a big time pet lover and I have two dogs (as well as three cats) myself. I was attracted by the pictue of the adorable lab on the cover and looked forward to reading the author's memoirs of her beloved dog. However, I got through the book in one very short sitting (about 45 minutes, if that), and closed the book thinking, "What was the point of that?" Easily one-third of the books pages are random pictures of dogs, and while they are certainly cut I acquired "Good Dog. Stay" at a book swap. I am a big time pet lover and I have two dogs (as well as three cats) myself. I was attracted by the pictue of the adorable lab on the cover and looked forward to reading the author's memoirs of her beloved dog. However, I got through the book in one very short sitting (about 45 minutes, if that), and closed the book thinking, "What was the point of that?" Easily one-third of the books pages are random pictures of dogs, and while they are certainly cute dogs, they had nothing to do at all with Beau, the supposed star of the story. Additionally, there really isn't much about Beau. Descriptions of him at various points in his life; a few charming anecdotes; a recollection of his last days on earth. But that's about it. Most of the time it felt like the author was just rambling aimlessly to fill up some pages. I didn't really feel much emotion coming through the narrative, especially on such a tender subject as pet love. All in all, this book was tolerable but I am really glad I didn't pay $15 for it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jan Rice

    Just a little book I had around the house. It's 82 pages, at least half of them pictures, so I just sat down and read it--the life and death of a beloved dog. I've never read anything by Anna Quindlen before. The lady can write: astute observations, laugh-out-loud, tears-in-the-eyes. I think I must have gotten it for my mother. In her final years I obtained all her books. She read Anna Quindlen, but this one looked like it had never been read. ...and now let the bombardment by ads for dog books b Just a little book I had around the house. It's 82 pages, at least half of them pictures, so I just sat down and read it--the life and death of a beloved dog. I've never read anything by Anna Quindlen before. The lady can write: astute observations, laugh-out-loud, tears-in-the-eyes. I think I must have gotten it for my mother. In her final years I obtained all her books. She read Anna Quindlen, but this one looked like it had never been read. ...and now let the bombardment by ads for dog books begin!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Huffman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was a fast read. Ninety-five pages and at least each page has a picture of a dog. It took about an hour to read it and about an hour and a half to cry over it. The crying started on page eight and then gradually worsened by the end of the book, which took me 30 minutes before I could control the gasping. It is a very sweet book about Anna Quindlen's family dog and how much, in his life until his death, her life was affected by him. It is so poignant: reviewing someone else's life in 'do This book was a fast read. Ninety-five pages and at least each page has a picture of a dog. It took about an hour to read it and about an hour and a half to cry over it. The crying started on page eight and then gradually worsened by the end of the book, which took me 30 minutes before I could control the gasping. It is a very sweet book about Anna Quindlen's family dog and how much, in his life until his death, her life was affected by him. It is so poignant: reviewing someone else's life in 'dog' years -- a span of about 14 years. Her description of Beau aging brought memories of my own beloved dogs, Sugar, Zimba and Soc, all of whom lived beyond the average dog years and all three were with us from puppyhood to their crippling ages. And as Quindlen writes, it was difficult for me and Tim to see our puppies "be" old. And like Beau, we chose to put each one down, probably beyond the time they should have been. Everything Quindlan wrote about, regarding the aging and the death of Beau, was almost exactly how I felt and the emotions just filled me. I remembered holding Zimba after her last breath; caressing Sugar as she left us, and crying uncontrollably. With Soc, well, I missed the opportunity to be with her in her last moments but I knew she couldn't have asked for anything more special than spending her last moments with Tim, the one she adored the most in our little abode. Quindlan speaks of the pain of choosing the last day for Beau and we went through the same painful choice with Sugar. How do you put a date on the death of your pet? Two days and counting! Well, that just isn't right. But neither is allowing your dog to suffer pain. I don't care what some folks say: your dog will let you know when they're ready. Ours did not. And if they did, we didn't understand or were too selfish to see it. Every time we looked at them, during those last few weeks, we still had wagging of tails and longing to be touched by us and yes, they still ate and drank. And beyond the memories of her dog, Anna Quindlen reflects on the life she and her family had going on, alongside Beau's... This book is heartache, heartbreak, and full of love and the ultimate ode she could provide to a wonderful, lifelong friend, Beau.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    I read this years ago, and just have a memory of loving it! I think there were many zingers that pierced your heart, as well as some rich laugh out loud moments. We don't even have a dog, but I've given this to many friends and family members over the years, and they've all agreed with my assessment! I read this years ago, and just have a memory of loving it! I think there were many zingers that pierced your heart, as well as some rich laugh out loud moments. We don't even have a dog, but I've given this to many friends and family members over the years, and they've all agreed with my assessment!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    first of all, you must know ahead of time that this is really an illustrated essay padded to become a commercial book.It is extremely short. That said, it is still wonderful even though I know that if her name was not a proven financial success this book would never exist. It would have instead been a page in a magazine. Quindlen manages to write a love story about a dog without being maudlin. she connects her dog's life with the life markers of her family. His puppy hood and her children's chil first of all, you must know ahead of time that this is really an illustrated essay padded to become a commercial book.It is extremely short. That said, it is still wonderful even though I know that if her name was not a proven financial success this book would never exist. It would have instead been a page in a magazine. Quindlen manages to write a love story about a dog without being maudlin. she connects her dog's life with the life markers of her family. His puppy hood and her children's childhood evolves into his old age and her children's independent lives. The eventual ending is done with such a light hand and such love that you smile with tears in your eyes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sharron

    I picked this up at the library and read it in about 45 minutes. Most of that time was spent looking at the pictures. It is a slight book, really more like a magazine article, depicting the author's life with her dogs and in particular one dog named Beau. While I'm a sucker for any book about a dog, I was disappointed in this one. I felt like it was just an excuse to publish a book by a well-known author and have a really adorable dog on the cover hoping that people like me would buy it. I reall I picked this up at the library and read it in about 45 minutes. Most of that time was spent looking at the pictures. It is a slight book, really more like a magazine article, depicting the author's life with her dogs and in particular one dog named Beau. While I'm a sucker for any book about a dog, I was disappointed in this one. I felt like it was just an excuse to publish a book by a well-known author and have a really adorable dog on the cover hoping that people like me would buy it. I really wouldn't recommend the book, maybe look it over at the library or when your in a bookstore.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melea Rose-Waters

    Read this in probably an hour or less total. It's a very sweet short story of life with the author's dog. There are only 2 things that bothered me: one, the book is filled with pictures, which is great, but they are random pictures of random dogs. I would have liked it better had it been filled with pictures of Beau (the dog the story is about). And two, the author says she's never one of those people who treated her dog like a child or referred to herself as "mommy" to her dog..... yet she chos Read this in probably an hour or less total. It's a very sweet short story of life with the author's dog. There are only 2 things that bothered me: one, the book is filled with pictures, which is great, but they are random pictures of random dogs. I would have liked it better had it been filled with pictures of Beau (the dog the story is about). And two, the author says she's never one of those people who treated her dog like a child or referred to herself as "mommy" to her dog..... yet she chose to write a book about the life of the dog and how it moved her? Hm. Denial, maybe? :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Donna Davis

    Brief, personal, and poignant. Quindlen narrates her own audiobook here, and at a key moment or two it sounds as if she is struggling to keep her voice level and even because of the emotion behind her memory of her dog, who was a very good boy. Just about anybody that has had a dog will enjoy this warm, resonant memoir. It's more of an essay length; the audiobook took less than 45 minutes to listen to. Recommended to dog lovers, though if you are grieving a pet recently lost, you should decide w Brief, personal, and poignant. Quindlen narrates her own audiobook here, and at a key moment or two it sounds as if she is struggling to keep her voice level and even because of the emotion behind her memory of her dog, who was a very good boy. Just about anybody that has had a dog will enjoy this warm, resonant memoir. It's more of an essay length; the audiobook took less than 45 minutes to listen to. Recommended to dog lovers, though if you are grieving a pet recently lost, you should decide whether this will help, or whether your loss is still too raw. A lovely read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    LindaW

    Very sweet, but short, memorial to her late dog Beau. As always, I love her writing and could put myself in her place because I, we, have traveled the same path with our beloved dogs. Got a little teary, but not too bad. A short story, but just long enough to not get too maudlin.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Liza Fireman

    I think I am not a dog person, there are few dog books that I like (The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein and A Dog's Purpose by W. Bruce Cameron are two amazing ones). A dog's purpose actually got me very emotional when getting the reader into a dog's mind in an outstanding way. This one is really really short, and it has a few great anecdotes. But it is not a great book in any way. It is very heartwarming and very touching. In a world that seems so uncertain, in lives that seem sometimes I think I am not a dog person, there are few dog books that I like (The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein and A Dog's Purpose by W. Bruce Cameron are two amazing ones). A dog's purpose actually got me very emotional when getting the reader into a dog's mind in an outstanding way. This one is really really short, and it has a few great anecdotes. But it is not a great book in any way. It is very heartwarming and very touching. In a world that seems so uncertain, in lives that seem sometimes to ricochet from challenge to upheaval and back again, a dog can be counted on in a way that’s true of little else. And there's the terrible part of the death of a dog, as humane as people try to make it: There’s one other mystery in the lives of people that is not much of a mystery in the life of a dog. That’s the question of how long he’s going to be with you . Beau died two weeks shy of his fifteenth birthday. The five of us knew three days in advance exactly when he would go, which seemed terribly wrong. There are some things that I’ve never really understood scheduling: a cesarean section, a date night with your husband. But I never felt as bad as I did scheduling the last moments of Beau’s life, placing the call to the vet and the crematorium so that both could be ready at nine A.M. on a Monday morning. And it clicked for me with Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande: Then one day we suddenly realized that we had been keeping him alive not because it was good for him, but because it was good for us, because it was too hard to make the decision to let him go. Anna Quinlann is a great writer. If you are a dog person, you might connect well with this book. 3 stars for me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Reese

    Before I read any work written by Judith Viorst, Ellen Goodman, or Anna Quindlen, I have already decided that I'll like it or I'll REALLY like it. Their track records are good; and regardless of the work's topic, length, or intended audience, I feel as if each of these writers runs in the lane beside mine, smells my thoughts and experiences, and artfully records them. They articulate the truths that millions of us less articulate folks love to see in print. A "little" book with wise words and ph Before I read any work written by Judith Viorst, Ellen Goodman, or Anna Quindlen, I have already decided that I'll like it or I'll REALLY like it. Their track records are good; and regardless of the work's topic, length, or intended audience, I feel as if each of these writers runs in the lane beside mine, smells my thoughts and experiences, and artfully records them. They articulate the truths that millions of us less articulate folks love to see in print. A "little" book with wise words and photographs worth countless words was last night's late-night reading. Why? I miss my dog. I keep missing my dog. Of course, I don't miss repeatedly asking myself: Is he concealing his readiness for an end to his suffering because he senses that we need him to comfort us? If you have ever faced the choice between doing everything possible to delay death and letting go of a suffering pet or if -- out of the corner of your eye -- you can see this dilemma coming, then get or keep your copy of Anna Quindlen's "Good Dog. Stay." It can guide you, or it may help you remember why it's better that (s)he didn't stay.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joann

    For anyone who is a dog lover, this book is significantly moving. I loved it! It's short (a scant 82 pages), half of which are pictures; yet it speaks to the heart. Anna Quindlen, an accomplished writer, shares her personal love of her life with Beau, her Labrador retriever. Beautifully written, Quindlen is right on target with the lessons we learn from our family pets. For anyone who is a dog lover, this book is significantly moving. I loved it! It's short (a scant 82 pages), half of which are pictures; yet it speaks to the heart. Anna Quindlen, an accomplished writer, shares her personal love of her life with Beau, her Labrador retriever. Beautifully written, Quindlen is right on target with the lessons we learn from our family pets.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    All you children of mine out there laughing because your mom read another dog book---Anna Quindlen is a wonderful writer. I read it in 1/2 hour. It should have been an essay, but she writes so poignantly about her dog and her children,too. It's about philosophy, a life well-lived, seize the moment, you only live once kind of philosophy. And she learned that from her dog!! All you children of mine out there laughing because your mom read another dog book---Anna Quindlen is a wonderful writer. I read it in 1/2 hour. It should have been an essay, but she writes so poignantly about her dog and her children,too. It's about philosophy, a life well-lived, seize the moment, you only live once kind of philosophy. And she learned that from her dog!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lynn G.

    A short, sweet, love-filled memoir about the author's dog, Beau. Quindlen's beloved Labrador Retriever's death sends the author into a reflective frame of mind contemplating the relationship between dog and human. She doesn't anthropomorphize Beau, doesn't regard him as any more or less than the family's beloved, quirky, loyal, and ever-present pet. One of the questions that Quindlen ruminates about is one that many pet owners must deal with: Why do we keep our aging, aching, declining, dying pe A short, sweet, love-filled memoir about the author's dog, Beau. Quindlen's beloved Labrador Retriever's death sends the author into a reflective frame of mind contemplating the relationship between dog and human. She doesn't anthropomorphize Beau, doesn't regard him as any more or less than the family's beloved, quirky, loyal, and ever-present pet. One of the questions that Quindlen ruminates about is one that many pet owners must deal with: Why do we keep our aging, aching, declining, dying pets alive? Is it because we believe it is good for the pet or is it good for us? The answer: "Then one day we suddenly realized that we had been keeping him alive not because it was good for him, but because it was good for us, because it was too hard to make the decision to let him go. And in the joyful bargain between dog and person, that is the one unforgivable cheat." (page 75)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    After reading the dust jacket I knew this would likely make me cry some, especially just having lost my baby girl less than a month ago. I also knew Quindlen's short book would be funny, bittersweet and honest, and I wasn't disappointed at all. But, I wasn't prepared for the sobbing I ended up doing, so make sure you have plenty of Kleenex on hand! I won't spoil by telling about the part that "got me," but I'm sure you can make an assumption. I think this is a great book for any pet lover, not onl After reading the dust jacket I knew this would likely make me cry some, especially just having lost my baby girl less than a month ago. I also knew Quindlen's short book would be funny, bittersweet and honest, and I wasn't disappointed at all. But, I wasn't prepared for the sobbing I ended up doing, so make sure you have plenty of Kleenex on hand! I won't spoil by telling about the part that "got me," but I'm sure you can make an assumption. I think this is a great book for any pet lover, not only those who love dogs, because she gets to the heart of the connection we feel with our pets, what they mean to us and do for us and see us through. If you're recently bereaved (or know that you are soon to be), Good Dog. Stay. may help you through the process. Beautiful, short as it is.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kris Lodwig

    Listened to this on a walk with my dog, cried at one point, which was not pretty at all, but aside from getting emotional at that one part, I feel like my emotions were because of the love I have for my dog, I didn’t get lots of dog love coming from the author. Oh well, cost me nothing, only took up about 45 minutes of my time, so yes, 2⭐️ and I move on.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lena Wright

    The memoir, “Good Dog. Stay.” by Anna Quindlen tells the history of the relationship between her, and her Labrador retriever of fifteen years. Through the use of time shift, imagery, and detailed anecdotes, she shares the experiences and memories made with her best friend. The book beings with her, in a familiar situation. The vets waiting room, without her dog. Beau, on her oriental rug at her penthouse apartment, in New York City. He had become too old to make the journey, so she stopped drag The memoir, “Good Dog. Stay.” by Anna Quindlen tells the history of the relationship between her, and her Labrador retriever of fifteen years. Through the use of time shift, imagery, and detailed anecdotes, she shares the experiences and memories made with her best friend. The book beings with her, in a familiar situation. The vets waiting room, without her dog. Beau, on her oriental rug at her penthouse apartment, in New York City. He had become too old to make the journey, so she stopped dragging him. The whole life span of her dog, filled with memories with her and her kids, her husband and everyone, touched by the life of her dog. The best part of this book would have to be, as a dog owner, just how rateable it is. They way she describes his face,a nd his “little puppy paws,” brings you back to those days with yours, and really makes you treasure it, and hope you never have to lose them. You are welcomed to the book when her old dog is left home, shes off to deal with whatever her dog has to deal with, almost like she didn't bother bringing him because she would never want hi to have to go it alone. She then goes back to his life as a puppy. This including house training, waking up to wet beds, much like when raising her children and being convinced she did everything right. Not seeming lie she did, she continues to tell the timeline of his life. The time he ran away, her kids cried for the whole three hours. How he always knew they were going upstate when her laptop was in its case by the door. How he made her feel secure. The things she dreamed growing up that she achived with her dog, more than she thought she ever would with a husband. Mostly the fact that he listened to her, kept her warm and always gave her those eyes. (If that's not what you were thinking then get your head out of the gutter!) “His eyes cried, or maybe only the sound of his voice. In the next room but felt like miles and mountains away. His tears must have flowed like rivers through those mountains and mountains.” This quote really drew me in. I saw the water flowing through the mountains, and you had the feeling of him being far away. The sadness in his eyes, and not the fact that he was really crying, but that the sounds of his cries would fill his eyes, and over whelm them to the point of tears running down his face. It puts a different outlook on a dog crying, feet away from you. The fact that she could use the art of word, to change an innocent event, and turn it into, such a deep concept. I can imagine this was exactly how it all played out in her head. Every event in this book is very eloquently put out. Every story has a detail, put in the weirdest way, that somehow works. Saying, “The life of a dog, is like the life of a good person, only shorter and more compressed.” Such an interesting way, to give an opinion. The whole book really hugs you, if that makes sense, you get engulfed in the love story, as cheesy as it may sound. The book ends with being brought back up to speed, back on that oriental rug and onward. The end brought the whole family together, beau needed to be put down, and even the saddest even brought them together, and helped them remember the best times.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    "With people, it's assumed you'll do everything; with animals you have the luxury of doing the right thing." This may have been a reread for me, but I was in the mood today to reflect on what our dogs have meant to me and my family and to enjoy Quindlen's writing. Beau, the black Lab mainly featured in this memoir, was given to Quindlen by good friends as a fortieth birthday present. Quindlen traces his life, from his wild and mischievous puppy days through his long life which ended at almost fif "With people, it's assumed you'll do everything; with animals you have the luxury of doing the right thing." This may have been a reread for me, but I was in the mood today to reflect on what our dogs have meant to me and my family and to enjoy Quindlen's writing. Beau, the black Lab mainly featured in this memoir, was given to Quindlen by good friends as a fortieth birthday present. Quindlen traces his life, from his wild and mischievous puppy days through his long life which ended at almost fifteen, as the entire family gathered lovingly around him. In the meantime, the family added a yellow Lab, Bea. Beau's story reminded me of our yellow Lab, Daisy, who died two years ago at 11. When Daisy was nine, we got a black Lab puppy, Nessa, who enlivens our life and brings us much happiness. However, I will always think of Daisy as "my" dog. We got Daisy just after I retired. That year, our two dogs, Ginger and Lucy, both had to be put down due to terminal cancer. I knew it would not be wise to get a puppy while I was still teaching, so I waited until the first opportunity. When that school year finally ended, I looked at the Boston Globe classified and saw an ad for a kennel that had yellow Lab puppies. I called, spoke to the breeder, and that afternoon we drove to the kennel. From the moment that I held Daisy, I knew she was mine. We had to wait a few weeks to pick her up, but she was my sidekick from then on. As you may know, retirement is a big adjustment. For me, having Daisy made it a lot easier. We took long walks and I took her in the car with me while running errands. Having her companionship made a big difference in my life, and the whole neighborhood loved her too. I took her with me to visit the elderly couple across the street, and she was a celebrity at the vet. Daisy had a ruptured ACL, which caused her to limp whenever she did any sustained running. It was repaired by the surgeon at our veterinary hospital, and I was told to take her for many walks for rehab. However, that winter we got a lot of snow and walking her was difficult, so the vet recommended an animal hospital where there was an underwater treadmill for dogs needed postop rehab; Daisy loved it! More health problems developed for Daisy, and they were more serious. She had fatty lumps, typical of Labs, and as time went on, a few became malignant. She had surgery to remove them, but they grew back. We began to see the end in sight, and finally I knew it was time. Our wonderful, caring vet came to our house and put Daisy down, as my husband, our daughter, son in law, and I comforted her. We will never forget her, she was the best.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Book Club Mom

    Good Dog. Stay. is a short book of sentimental reflections about the relationships between dogs and their human families and how families face the inevitable end-of-life decisions of their beloved pets. Dog lovers will undoubtedly identify with Quindlen’s observations about a dog’s role in family life. She includes many photographs of dogs with happy expressions and soulful eyes, and all readers will recognize the unconditional love that is represented in these faces. I enjoyed reading this book Good Dog. Stay. is a short book of sentimental reflections about the relationships between dogs and their human families and how families face the inevitable end-of-life decisions of their beloved pets. Dog lovers will undoubtedly identify with Quindlen’s observations about a dog’s role in family life. She includes many photographs of dogs with happy expressions and soulful eyes, and all readers will recognize the unconditional love that is represented in these faces. I enjoyed reading this book because, although the author doesn’t express many original ideas about owning a pet, this part of her message is a nice warm one. For example, she remarks about the ability of dogs to wag their tails even when they are old and sick, how simple pleasures make them happy even at the end of their lives. Quindlen also discusses the important role dogs play in people’s lives. “The job so many dogs really perform is to allow us to project our feelings upon them, to assume they are excited or downhearted or lonely when we are.” In addition, like a best friend, they offer “companionship without question or criticism.” Quindlen also raises a nice point about how the paths of our lives and those of our children are uncertain, but the life of a dog is without mystery. “With few exceptions, he will be who he has always been. His routine will be unvarying and his pleasures will be predictable – a pond, a squirrel, a bone, a nap in the sun.” True! I think the author’s main objective in writing Good Dog. Stay., however, is to state her opinion about end-of-life decisions, for dogs and humans. She writes, “With people, it’s assumed you’ll do everything; with animals you have the luxury of doing the right thing.” She wishes it were the same for people. After a difficult decision to put down their dog, Beau, she writes, “I was almost exultant at the love we had managed to muster for that old dog, and at the thought that someday, if I was very, very lucky, I might have a death as simple and serene as this one, with these same people around me.” So in the end, Quindlen has written a simple book and inserted her own opinion about a controversial issue. All in all, this is a very quick read with both light and heavy ideas.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael P.

    This book was on its way to no stars until the sentimental ending. Frankly, the author comes across as a real jerk who does not love her dog. She is condescending about those who understand dog psychology and motivation differently than she does, she ADOPTED a dog but discounts similarities between child rearing and dog rearing, and she complains about the dog's behavior but does not seem to have done the work to curb it. Beau seems to be just a thorn in Ms. Quindlen's side until it is time for This book was on its way to no stars until the sentimental ending. Frankly, the author comes across as a real jerk who does not love her dog. She is condescending about those who understand dog psychology and motivation differently than she does, she ADOPTED a dog but discounts similarities between child rearing and dog rearing, and she complains about the dog's behavior but does not seem to have done the work to curb it. Beau seems to be just a thorn in Ms. Quindlen's side until it is time for him to die, then, without noting the inconsistency, without revealing how Beau won her over, she is quite shaken by his death. This is just bad writing, though I acknowledge this may be the wrong way to evaluate this book. Maybe, just maybe it was written as therapy to deal with the loss of Beau. If so, I hope it worked, but there was no reason for Ms. Quindlen to inflict her therapy upon the public.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    This very short story of a loyal, loving pet serves as a eulogy, not just for Beau, but for all those other pets we have loved and lost. My own black lab/chow mix did not live as long, but we loved her dearly. This book was celebrating a life and lamenting a death. I did take exception to the comment that people should not dress dogs in clothing, since I did have a sweater for our dog for those days when the cold bit through even the thick fur and protective fat of an outdoor dog. I laugh when I This very short story of a loyal, loving pet serves as a eulogy, not just for Beau, but for all those other pets we have loved and lost. My own black lab/chow mix did not live as long, but we loved her dearly. This book was celebrating a life and lamenting a death. I did take exception to the comment that people should not dress dogs in clothing, since I did have a sweater for our dog for those days when the cold bit through even the thick fur and protective fat of an outdoor dog. I laugh when I see her in my mind, running in her maroon and grey sweater. My mind's eye also turns to horses in neighboring farms, dressed in horse blankets against the chill. I disagree against dressing animals - sometimes they need the protection. But this bittersweet story is a poignant reminder that nothing is permanent, loss is inevitable, and we need to share our love with those we care for.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Janene

    The Ravishing Readers Book Club marked their 3rd year anniversary with a holiday celebration and part of that celebration was playing the 'dice game'for books. Each member brought a wrapped book from their own library and we threw the dice and battled for the package we thought were going to be 'it'. Well, I won a bag full of books, and in the bag was this little honey. An actual eulogy of sorts, that the author wrote for her beloved Labrador. It is an extremely quick read, with wonderful pictur The Ravishing Readers Book Club marked their 3rd year anniversary with a holiday celebration and part of that celebration was playing the 'dice game'for books. Each member brought a wrapped book from their own library and we threw the dice and battled for the package we thought were going to be 'it'. Well, I won a bag full of books, and in the bag was this little honey. An actual eulogy of sorts, that the author wrote for her beloved Labrador. It is an extremely quick read, with wonderful pictures of dogs on almost every page. I must forewarn you though. If you have an aversion to shedding tears in front of others, you might want to read this one in a quiet, comfortable room.....alone. Highly recommended for the dog lover. I'm giving my Labrador extra huggies tonight.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kira4Inu Kira4Inu

    This book touched my heart and brought tears to my eyes. It caused me to reflect upon the relationship that I share with my 12 year old dog Holly and I pondered quite a bit if she truly felt what I thought she did or if it was just a projection. I normally don't read non fiction books but I couldn't put this one down. I started and finished it in an hour or less. Great pictures of cute dogs are inside too. The cover picture is amazing too, it looks just like Holly. I recommend this book to any a This book touched my heart and brought tears to my eyes. It caused me to reflect upon the relationship that I share with my 12 year old dog Holly and I pondered quite a bit if she truly felt what I thought she did or if it was just a projection. I normally don't read non fiction books but I couldn't put this one down. I started and finished it in an hour or less. Great pictures of cute dogs are inside too. The cover picture is amazing too, it looks just like Holly. I recommend this book to any and all dog lovers and dog owners.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shari

    I thought there were no words to express the difficulty of losing a beloved dog, but Quindlen has created a beautiful sentiment to the dogs we cherish and love for their lifetimes. I read this in one sitting on the day we made the difficult choice to ease Chloe's pain and dementia. I have highlighted so much of this beautiful writing because it has truly helped ease the grief and sadness. I love you, Chloe, you had a beautiful life and made ours so much fuller. (May 6, 2004-July 10, 2018) I thought there were no words to express the difficulty of losing a beloved dog, but Quindlen has created a beautiful sentiment to the dogs we cherish and love for their lifetimes. I read this in one sitting on the day we made the difficult choice to ease Chloe's pain and dementia. I have highlighted so much of this beautiful writing because it has truly helped ease the grief and sadness. I love you, Chloe, you had a beautiful life and made ours so much fuller. (May 6, 2004-July 10, 2018)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rcltigger

    I picked this up since I like a good story. It turns out that this was just an expasion on a column that she wrote. And while it was lovely, it didn't have the impact of a great dog book like Marley and Me. I think that I would have liked the column better. I picked this up since I like a good story. It turns out that this was just an expasion on a column that she wrote. And while it was lovely, it didn't have the impact of a great dog book like Marley and Me. I think that I would have liked the column better.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Cox

    I 'previewed' this book, which was given to my son Dan for Christmas. It's an easy read - lots of dog pictures. I found it really moving. I've owned and loved Labradors for 20 years, and it's a moving, touching story about how they invade (literally) our lives and enrich them. I 'previewed' this book, which was given to my son Dan for Christmas. It's an easy read - lots of dog pictures. I found it really moving. I've owned and loved Labradors for 20 years, and it's a moving, touching story about how they invade (literally) our lives and enrich them.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Frances Bessellieu

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A poignant quick read about an older Labrador retriever dying with quiet dignity and the gifts he gave the family through the years. A must read for someone who has ever lost a beloved pet. I am giving a copy to my vet’s office to have on hand for people who may be faced with the death of a pet.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    A must-read for every dog lover (especially if you are blessed to be loved by a Lab). I found myself reading it outloud to my own lab, Bailey, at times. Saying "You do this, too!" I say read it at the park with your favorite four-legged friend! A must-read for every dog lover (especially if you are blessed to be loved by a Lab). I found myself reading it outloud to my own lab, Bailey, at times. Saying "You do this, too!" I say read it at the park with your favorite four-legged friend!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.