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Edited by Harvey Arden, with an Introduction by Chief Arvol Looking Horse, and a Preface by former Attorney General Ramsey Clark. In 1977, Leonard Peltier received a life sentence for the murder of two FBI agents. He has affirmed his innocence ever since--his case was made fully and famously in Peter Matthiessen's bestselling In the Spirit of Crazy Horse--and many remain co Edited by Harvey Arden, with an Introduction by Chief Arvol Looking Horse, and a Preface by former Attorney General Ramsey Clark. In 1977, Leonard Peltier received a life sentence for the murder of two FBI agents. He has affirmed his innocence ever since--his case was made fully and famously in Peter Matthiessen's bestselling In the Spirit of Crazy Horse--and many remain convinced he was wrongly convicted. Prison Writings is a wise and unsettling book, both memoir and manifesto, chronicling his life in Leavenworth Prison in Kansas. Invoking the Sun Dance, in which pain leads one to a transcendent reality, Peltier explores his suffering and the insights it has borne him. He also locates his experience within the history of the American Indian peoples and their struggles to overcome the federal government's injustices.


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Edited by Harvey Arden, with an Introduction by Chief Arvol Looking Horse, and a Preface by former Attorney General Ramsey Clark. In 1977, Leonard Peltier received a life sentence for the murder of two FBI agents. He has affirmed his innocence ever since--his case was made fully and famously in Peter Matthiessen's bestselling In the Spirit of Crazy Horse--and many remain co Edited by Harvey Arden, with an Introduction by Chief Arvol Looking Horse, and a Preface by former Attorney General Ramsey Clark. In 1977, Leonard Peltier received a life sentence for the murder of two FBI agents. He has affirmed his innocence ever since--his case was made fully and famously in Peter Matthiessen's bestselling In the Spirit of Crazy Horse--and many remain convinced he was wrongly convicted. Prison Writings is a wise and unsettling book, both memoir and manifesto, chronicling his life in Leavenworth Prison in Kansas. Invoking the Sun Dance, in which pain leads one to a transcendent reality, Peltier explores his suffering and the insights it has borne him. He also locates his experience within the history of the American Indian peoples and their struggles to overcome the federal government's injustices.

30 review for Prison Writings: My Life Is My Sun Dance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Leonard Peltier tells his story and draws from the ritual of the Sun Dance. Regardless of what side you take on his conviction this book will open your eyes to the struggles that Native Americans have endured and continue to endure.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    This book is a prayer, not just for him but for his people and all peoples and for the earth. A message to humanity Our work will be unfinished until not one human being is hungry or battered, not a single person is forced to die in war, not one innocent languishes in prison,and no one is persecuted for his or her beliefs. ~~Leonard Peltier

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    A few years ago, I watched a documentary about AIM and the 1970s occupations of Wounded Knee, Alcatraz, and the BIA building in Washington D.C. At the time I felt completely, ragingly angry. In part because of the way that Native peoples have been treated, are still being treated, all over the world. But also because I was 28 years old and I had never learned anything about the modern Native American movement. Why had no one ever taught me about this before? Oh, because ignoring the struggle is A few years ago, I watched a documentary about AIM and the 1970s occupations of Wounded Knee, Alcatraz, and the BIA building in Washington D.C. At the time I felt completely, ragingly angry. In part because of the way that Native peoples have been treated, are still being treated, all over the world. But also because I was 28 years old and I had never learned anything about the modern Native American movement. Why had no one ever taught me about this before? Oh, because ignoring the struggle is one way to oppress people. Dammit. After watching that documentary, I started a self education about 20th and 21st century Native American struggle and history, watching all the films and reading all the books I could get my hands on. This book was written from prison by Leonard Peltier, who was convicted of murdering two FBI agents in the 70s on the Pine Ridge Lakota Sioux reservation. It's Peltier's musings on serving 2 life sentences: what it's like to be a prisoner, the ebb and flow of hope for freedom, his take on what happened on that day. There are lots of little pieces of the trial and incidents that Peltier doesn't cover in this book because that's not his purpose in writing it. I'd recommend watching the film 'Incident at Oglala' to really get an idea of the details. This book is more like a window into Peltier's life and mind in prison. Reading it made me feel angry, sad, and helpless. I'm glad I did though, because this man deserves to be remembered. He's innocent in my opinion, and he's been in prison for over 30 years because he is an activist, because he is an Indian.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam82

    Written by an innocent man placed behind bars because of his strong stand for his people. Every Native brother and Sister should read this book. It is strongly poetic, symbolic in nature, and an opening of the mind and heart.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I've always wanted to know more about Leonard Peltier - the first interest being our same last names (I was born a Peltier and adopted a McGinnis). But I thought people were fighting for his freedom because he was wronged or taken advantage of or something other than being totally, completely, obviously, utterly, provably, admitted-by-his-prosecutors-to-be NOT GUILTY! And HOW FRUSTRATING that he is still sitting in prison! I admire his heart (and his really beautiful hair haha) and his determina I've always wanted to know more about Leonard Peltier - the first interest being our same last names (I was born a Peltier and adopted a McGinnis). But I thought people were fighting for his freedom because he was wronged or taken advantage of or something other than being totally, completely, obviously, utterly, provably, admitted-by-his-prosecutors-to-be NOT GUILTY! And HOW FRUSTRATING that he is still sitting in prison! I admire his heart (and his really beautiful hair haha) and his determination (nearly always successful) at not living in hatred. But I can understand Reagan and the Bushes for not freeing him - but Bill Clinton! What were you thinking? You had absolutely nothing to lose by the time you left office - everybody tried to discredit you - you had shamed yourself quite publicly - and almost everybody STILL loved you! Why couldn't you have let Leonard Peltier go? And Obama - come on! You should know better. I realize you can't right every wrong done to your people and mine (ok I have a teeny tiny bit of Ojibwe in me, but it comes out when I think of all this) but this is one of the most obvious, public disgraces and injustices ever done. Get on it!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anka

    pg. 10 - "Be thankful you weren't cursed with perfection. If you were perfect, there'd be nothing for you to achieve with your life. Imperfection is the source of every action. This is both our curse and our blessing as human beings." pg. 54- "Today white man lets his statistics do the killing for him. Indian reservations in South Dakota have the highest rates of poverty and unemployment and the highest rates of infant mortality and teenage suicide, along with the lowest standard of living and th pg. 10 - "Be thankful you weren't cursed with perfection. If you were perfect, there'd be nothing for you to achieve with your life. Imperfection is the source of every action. This is both our curse and our blessing as human beings." pg. 54- "Today white man lets his statistics do the killing for him. Indian reservations in South Dakota have the highest rates of poverty and unemployment and the highest rates of infant mortality and teenage suicide, along with the lowest standard of living and the lowest life expectancy-barely 40 years!- in the country. Those statistics amount to genocide. Genocide also disguises itself in the form of poor health facilities and wretched housing and inadequate schooling and rampant corruption."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hai Quan

    The case of Leonard Peltier is so much well known and publicised .I don't see the need to ruminate about all the circumstances and happenings . For the uninitiated, a stroke of his finger will yield all he need to know about this most shameful act ( via Google, of course) committed by , surprisingly,NOT Stalin or Mao but by much much overrated and most vicious and wicked modern Emperors in this twentieth century ,dressed ( and looks benign) in quite respectable suit, in this time, the time when w The case of Leonard Peltier is so much well known and publicised .I don't see the need to ruminate about all the circumstances and happenings . For the uninitiated, a stroke of his finger will yield all he need to know about this most shameful act ( via Google, of course) committed by , surprisingly,NOT Stalin or Mao but by much much overrated and most vicious and wicked modern Emperors in this twentieth century ,dressed ( and looks benign) in quite respectable suit, in this time, the time when we all think all the horror of the dark dungeons and lion cages of Dark Age or more recently , Mao's " reeducation camps" and Stalin's gulags are THINGS OF TIME PAST. Friends, they are still here, names have been changed, but they ARE still here. Leonard Peltier certainly ain't no Solzhenitsyn, but Soviet 's gulags are paled in comparison with America 's rez's. What more, Stalin's gulags have been gone with their landlord, but America gulags are still here , at this very moment, with thousands of honorable inmates languishing in 'em, stripped cleanly of all ancestor land ( their sole livelihood) His Prison Writing is sure very short comparing with thousands of pages from Solzhenitsyn , but sure as hell , as eloquent , poignant, weighty, thought provoking and conscientious as any of Solzhenitsyn 's work. If you think Mao's camps were horrible, visit Uncle Sam 's rez ! Same thing. Mao's were gone, but rez's are still here , until all the irksome , "dirty" , " drunkards" "salvage" perished. When? Unless you nuke 'em, when you wake up, damn, they are still there! You keep supply 'em GOON with guns, ammo's and greenbacks, you keep "buy" 'em tiny remaining land , drive 'em away , you build more prisons and stock 'em fully, with savages.....but they won't perished easily, unless of course you nuke them ( with the uranium you dig up underneath the dirt of some rez) and burn 'em ( with the crude petroleum deposit they are sitting upon.) We feel helpless as onlookers, but nevertheless, support Peltier in whatever way within our capacity, at the very least, offer him encouragement , most precious for him, no doubt. All the big talkers, thieves, fornicators, murderers ( mass) , liars , chicken sh..., loud mouthed windbags, war profiteers from Clinton, Bush daddy and son, The 1st Black Prez in the whole damn US history and this Swamp Thing, they hide their clemency as tightly as their stolen diamonds or uranium in their damn clenched fists .! Hang in there bro.They will soon gone.Just like their buddies ( Stalin, Mao .....) together with their gulags and camps...... Same with their rez's Then we can meet.Outside Sun Dance. Great Mystery Willing!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Killjoy

    I read this in two days. It's light and easy and sad as hell. I've known about Leonard's case for awhile, but this is the first time I've read about it in his own words. There are parts I stumble over, like the continuing appeals to the constitution, and some of his appeals to nonviolence seem... i don't know. a little contrived. I mean, he carried a gun throughout his life with which to defend his people. that's not pacifism. instead, it's useful. But this book is amazing and earnest, and I feel I read this in two days. It's light and easy and sad as hell. I've known about Leonard's case for awhile, but this is the first time I've read about it in his own words. There are parts I stumble over, like the continuing appeals to the constitution, and some of his appeals to nonviolence seem... i don't know. a little contrived. I mean, he carried a gun throughout his life with which to defend his people. that's not pacifism. instead, it's useful. But this book is amazing and earnest, and I feel like the editor must have done a tremendous bit of work to get the whole thing as cohesive as it is. It's insane that it's more than 10 years later and he's no closer to freedom. Probably, he's further from it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    *

    No longer using this website, but I'm leaving up old reviews. Fuck Jeff Bezos. Find me on LibraryThing: https://www.librarything.com/profile/... A sun dance is a ritual that includes (among other things I'm sure) self-mutilation. Spiritual awakening occurs at a sun dance when prayer and pain negate the self in service to a higher power, the Great Mystery. The metaphor is poignant. Leonard Peltier is a spiritual warrior for his people, and the massive repression that he and the American Indian Mov No longer using this website, but I'm leaving up old reviews. Fuck Jeff Bezos. Find me on LibraryThing: https://www.librarything.com/profile/... A sun dance is a ritual that includes (among other things I'm sure) self-mutilation. Spiritual awakening occurs at a sun dance when prayer and pain negate the self in service to a higher power, the Great Mystery. The metaphor is poignant. Leonard Peltier is a spiritual warrior for his people, and the massive repression that he and the American Indian Movement have suffered have caused him enormous suffering. But suffering is something he has been prepared to shoulder through these sacred sun dances. Even though Leonard Peltier is not a superlative writer, I appreciate reading his words as he no doubt very carefully wrote them. You can read the anger at the treatment of Leonard Peltier's people in every word of this book. You can sense his sense of injustice, but on top of all of that you can sense his determination to keep alive, as he insists his people have done, in the face of massive amounts of oppression. The historical memoir of Leonard Peltier's time in the American Indian Movement was my favorite part of the book. Peltier was a hunted fugitive since he was teenager, with arbitrary legal troubles hounding him since he was old enough to go to jail, just like all Native youth. Leonard Peltier had no choice but to rebel, or die forgotten and let his people die forgotten as well. And rebel he did, as a part of the Bureau of Indian Affairs occupation, as part of fishing rights protests, and as part of the spiritual protection he was attempting at Oglala when a FBI agents and paramilitary rightwing GOON (funded by the US government) shot wildly into the area, starting the infamous "Incident at Oglala." One of the images that will stay with me, though, is a much more personal one: the sweat lodge set up by Peltier and other native prisoners in the corner of the recreation area of the prison, the source of their religion and of the spiritual strength that keeps them alive and strong for their people. It's a breathtaking description. Because of this book, I would like to read a more in depth book about the incidents described. I plan on picking up In the Spirit of Crazy Horse by Peter Matthiessen The book design is strange. The book is much taller than it is wide, making for a narrow page area. And the type is very large, with perhaps 100% leading between the lines. It makes the book a quick read, and very legible, but its awkward shape bothered me throughout. I would pair the reading of this book for newcomers to the Leonard Peltier case with the article "I Am Obama's Prisoner Now" http://www.republicoflakotah.com/2009...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I have wanted to read this book for years & am finally got around to it. What a powerful book - I highly recommend this reading this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ani

    Prison Writings: My Life is My Sun Dance is a collection of thought, poems, memories of Leonard Peltier - all written from inside a prison cell, with a half-chewed pencil, with barely any light. At the time of writing, he had been wrongfully incarcerated for 23 years. That was 15 years ago. He is still in prison. The book captures Peltier's moments of anger and despair, yet mostly conveys the extraordinary sense of compassion which this man continues to have, in spite of the horrible atrocities Prison Writings: My Life is My Sun Dance is a collection of thought, poems, memories of Leonard Peltier - all written from inside a prison cell, with a half-chewed pencil, with barely any light. At the time of writing, he had been wrongfully incarcerated for 23 years. That was 15 years ago. He is still in prison. The book captures Peltier's moments of anger and despair, yet mostly conveys the extraordinary sense of compassion which this man continues to have, in spite of the horrible atrocities which have been inflicted upon him. What a gift it was to be able to read this. America: FREE LEONARD PELTIER.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Great book about the modern Native American struggle. You really don't hear much about it, but the people are still struggling. Leonard Peltier is a Native that was wrongly accused for the killing of a federal officer during a conflict on a reservation. There is overwhelming evidence for his innocence, but you gotta pin it on someone, right?.... If interested, also see a documentary called "Incident at Oglala" Really good. Great book about the modern Native American struggle. You really don't hear much about it, but the people are still struggling. Leonard Peltier is a Native that was wrongly accused for the killing of a federal officer during a conflict on a reservation. There is overwhelming evidence for his innocence, but you gotta pin it on someone, right?.... If interested, also see a documentary called "Incident at Oglala" Really good.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Angie Lisle

    I admire Leonard Peltier and I do believe that he is a political prisoner of the U.S. government. This book gives us Peltier's version of the 1973 siege at Wounded Knee, the events that followed, a brief account of his life in prison, dispersed with poetry and infused with Lakota spirituality. A great read. I admire Leonard Peltier and I do believe that he is a political prisoner of the U.S. government. This book gives us Peltier's version of the 1973 siege at Wounded Knee, the events that followed, a brief account of his life in prison, dispersed with poetry and infused with Lakota spirituality. A great read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Keely

    This book is disturbing and powerful. It has left me deeply moved and speechless.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beryl Morago

    I hope he will be released soon. The book is well worth reading and I think it opened my eyes. I recommend it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Aisteach

    Let me start by saying that I'm going to make no judgment on Leonard Peltier's legal issues or moral righteousness. My personal politics don't belong in a book review, and therefore I'm going to limit this to discussing the literary merits of the writing. But I will say that those of you looking to this book for proof of Peltier's innocence or guilt will be disappointed. Yes, it's mostly about his point-of-view of the events surrounding the various crimes he's accused of, but, ultimately, there' Let me start by saying that I'm going to make no judgment on Leonard Peltier's legal issues or moral righteousness. My personal politics don't belong in a book review, and therefore I'm going to limit this to discussing the literary merits of the writing. But I will say that those of you looking to this book for proof of Peltier's innocence or guilt will be disappointed. Yes, it's mostly about his point-of-view of the events surrounding the various crimes he's accused of, but, ultimately, there's nothing in there that one could cite without drawing heavily on one's own confirmation bias. I will say that this book suffers from the fact that, to the mainstream American audience, Peltier tends to come across as clinically paranoid and incapable of taking responsibility for his actions. Given the harsh realities of reservation life in the middle of the 20th century, that may or may not actually be the case, but for those seeking "truth," it renders this book suspect as a source. However, for those looking to explore the psychology of a man regarded alternately as a domestic terrorist or as a political prisoner, nothing compares to this book. Written in clear, accessible language as a mix of prose and simplistic poetry, Peltier puts his mind on display for all to see and to judge for themselves. Ultimately, the message is uplifting and rousing, and it's easy to see why Peltier found himself a de facto leader in the American Indian Movement. So read this not as a history or a memoir, but rather as a spiritual journey, told in fragments across a life punctuated with violence and strife.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    This is a great book that introduces you to a tragic story. It is amazing how many people are ignorant to the crimes of the US government against the Native Americans in the past but even I was surprised at how many of those crimes continue to this day. It is absolutely ridiculous that Leonard Peltier is still in jail and I don't believe he killed those FBI agents. Even if he did, the only thing he is guilty of is defending his people against FBI brutality and abuse. It is a good read and this m This is a great book that introduces you to a tragic story. It is amazing how many people are ignorant to the crimes of the US government against the Native Americans in the past but even I was surprised at how many of those crimes continue to this day. It is absolutely ridiculous that Leonard Peltier is still in jail and I don't believe he killed those FBI agents. Even if he did, the only thing he is guilty of is defending his people against FBI brutality and abuse. It is a good read and this man needs as much recognition as he can get. Hopefully, one day justice will be served and he will be removed from prison.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Amazing spiritual message from a famous political prisoner. Falsly imprisoned for over 1/4 century.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This book made me SO very SAD. I belive he is NOT GUILTY.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Jones

    this book was very good and interesting. the book showed a lot about the struggles of living and having to deal with being in prison. throughout the book he would complain of dealing with his demons and how he got through it. in the book he would "sit in the corner of his bed" to "think" about "the people that put me in here" (pg 56,57). this represents how he is still dealing with being locked up in there unfairly. it also shows how he is constantly thinking about the fear he has of being in th this book was very good and interesting. the book showed a lot about the struggles of living and having to deal with being in prison. throughout the book he would complain of dealing with his demons and how he got through it. in the book he would "sit in the corner of his bed" to "think" about "the people that put me in here" (pg 56,57). this represents how he is still dealing with being locked up in there unfairly. it also shows how he is constantly thinking about the fear he has of being in there. Leonard talks a lot about how he had to deal with being made fun of being an Indian and how he is abused for his skin color. through out the book he would say the daily verbal and physical abuse he was put through. he was "made fun of" in the cafeteria or "the heart of the hell" he was put through (45). he was once "beat up" (64) and because he stood up for his race. this shows how he was constantly harassed wherever he went and he was helpless. you can see how Leonard was struggling with bully's in prison. A major problem in prison was feeling helpless and alone. in the whole book he would bring up how he never felt like he had anyone to talk to but he would not lose hope in himself. he said every night "would feel like the darkest time" because of the "emptiness" he had and "unshaken feelings of loneliness" (34 and 80). these quotes show how lonely he felt and how he never could really open up to anyone. you can tell just how sad he was but through all that he was still hopeful in himself and his future.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    This is an important book that details the continuing efforts by government and big business to take more Native American land for various greedy reasons, including its rich natural resources, desire for further commercial development and blatant power grabs. It highlights how this has been done and how it continues to occur through any means possible - mostly illegal, unconstitutional and definitely unconscionable. The author's effort to protect his people from this travesty resulted in his mak This is an important book that details the continuing efforts by government and big business to take more Native American land for various greedy reasons, including its rich natural resources, desire for further commercial development and blatant power grabs. It highlights how this has been done and how it continues to occur through any means possible - mostly illegal, unconstitutional and definitely unconscionable. The author's effort to protect his people from this travesty resulted in his making the FBI's 10 Most Wanted list on falsified charges. The author has been in federal prison for over 35 years, serving 2 consecutive life sentences, even though there is no evidence linking him to any of the charges, and substantial evidence of falsified testimony, coerced witnesses and prejudiced judges, lying law enforcement officials, and withheld evidence that could have refuted the charges. This book is a reasonably quick, albeit disturbing read, well worth your time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    A great primer for this book would be for a person to watch the video, Incident At Oglala. Leonard Peltier was given the shaft for the deaths of two F.B.I. agents on the Pine Ridge reservation and at the time this book was written had been sitting in prison for 23 years. The year was 1998. He is still in prison serving 2 life sentences plus 7 years for a crime that the government admits they cannot prove. What is amazing about this case is the amount of documents that have been found that actual A great primer for this book would be for a person to watch the video, Incident At Oglala. Leonard Peltier was given the shaft for the deaths of two F.B.I. agents on the Pine Ridge reservation and at the time this book was written had been sitting in prison for 23 years. The year was 1998. He is still in prison serving 2 life sentences plus 7 years for a crime that the government admits they cannot prove. What is amazing about this case is the amount of documents that have been found that actually shows that the government was railroading a person that they could not prove actually committed these murders . Of course there is still a mountain of documents that the F.B.I. either claims not to have and or will not release. This book is amazing because this is straight from Peltier himself. I highly recommend this book to anyone that can find a copy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Denton Peter McCabe

    A very moving work and reading it marks a beginning for me. I have picked this up for research for a series of musical compositions I am writing at the moment and what I have come to realize is that Peltier has had experiences very similar to my own as a Native American. I think this book should be read along with A Plague of Prisons by Eric Drucker. This will give the reader a renewed perspective on Peltier's claims of being framed by the FBI, especially in light of his claims of being singled A very moving work and reading it marks a beginning for me. I have picked this up for research for a series of musical compositions I am writing at the moment and what I have come to realize is that Peltier has had experiences very similar to my own as a Native American. I think this book should be read along with A Plague of Prisons by Eric Drucker. This will give the reader a renewed perspective on Peltier's claims of being framed by the FBI, especially in light of his claims of being singled out by authority figures since his childhood. This is essential reading for any student of law, government, sociology, and civil rights.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Five out of five stars! To quote Desmond Tutu "a deeply moving and very disturbing " story of a miscarriage of justice. Although I'm passionately interested in Native American practices, ceremonies and spirituality, my knowledge is less than skin deep. This book is a wonderful, optimistic and uplifting story of a man who has spent most of his life behind bars, is a horrifying prison system. That said, he openly explains his story as well and much of the way of life that was almost snuffed out de Five out of five stars! To quote Desmond Tutu "a deeply moving and very disturbing " story of a miscarriage of justice. Although I'm passionately interested in Native American practices, ceremonies and spirituality, my knowledge is less than skin deep. This book is a wonderful, optimistic and uplifting story of a man who has spent most of his life behind bars, is a horrifying prison system. That said, he openly explains his story as well and much of the way of life that was almost snuffed out decades ago. I highly recommend this for anyone interested....

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    What a powerful narrative from an extraordinary man. Peltier demonstrates the mistreatment and incarceration of Native men and women through his own testimony. It is well written and forces the reader to see things from another perspective while challenging all of humanity to make a change. Free Leonard Peltier!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    This. Is. A. Wonderful. Book. And. Story. It. Do. Not. Matter. Where. You. Are. Convict or. Not. Everybody. Has. Goals. And. Dreams. If. They. Cannot. Do. Any. Thing. Else. In. Prison. What. Ever. Life. Make. Look. Like. Or. How. Life. May. Seem. Still. Cant. Anyone. Take. Away. There. Dream, Doris.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    A most amazing read. It helped me look beyond my own life. This man should not be in prison and it's a great tragedy that more people/politicians/media are not coming to his aid. Something for Obama to rectify perhaps? A most amazing read. It helped me look beyond my own life. This man should not be in prison and it's a great tragedy that more people/politicians/media are not coming to his aid. Something for Obama to rectify perhaps?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Whitney

    "But the fear of pain is much worse than the pain itself. That's what you quickly come to realize. And that's a lesson you'll need to learn if you're going to survive in this world, so you may as well learn it well." p185-6 "But the fear of pain is much worse than the pain itself. That's what you quickly come to realize. And that's a lesson you'll need to learn if you're going to survive in this world, so you may as well learn it well." p185-6

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A soul-stirring biography filled with love and hope in the face of gross injustice. A story that deserves to be known and shared, if there is any chance for a better tomorrow.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Koren

    The author was an American Indian activist in the 60's and 70's. He was accused of murdering two FBI agents at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation conflict in 1975 and sentenced to two life sentences. He says he is innocent and a lot of people agree. This book is his reflections and writings in prison. Most of it has to do with racial prejudice of the Native American Indian. It is so hard to believe that this still goes on but of course we know it does just by hearing about the protests over the p The author was an American Indian activist in the 60's and 70's. He was accused of murdering two FBI agents at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation conflict in 1975 and sentenced to two life sentences. He says he is innocent and a lot of people agree. This book is his reflections and writings in prison. Most of it has to do with racial prejudice of the Native American Indian. It is so hard to believe that this still goes on but of course we know it does just by hearing about the protests over the pipelines going through Indian Reservations. There was a moment during the book that made me wonder. The author is talking about his childhood working on a potato farm. The author says as a young child his job was to go ahead of the adults and shake the potatoes from the vine so the adults just had to walk behind him and pick them up. I think most of us know that you dig potatoes from the ground, not shake them off a vine. It made me wonder how many other things were false in the book and changed my opinion of the writing. But it does make you think about how poorly the American Indian has been treated. The book came out in 1999. At that time he had already been in prison over 20 years. I did a google search to see if he is still alive or still in prison and found out he is still alive. While Obama was president he had a chance to issue a pardon but did not do it. He has a chance for parole in a few years. He is 74 years old now. I hope if he is truly innocent he will get his freedom.

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