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The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction

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The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction by Susan Ketchin Stories, interviews, and discussions showing the imprint of "old-time religion" on the artistic vision of twelve writers of the American South: Larry Brown, Reynolds Price, Allan Gurganus, Lee Smith, Clyde Edgerton, Harry Crews, Will Campbell, Doris Betts, Sheila Bosworth, Mary Ward Brown, R The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction by Susan Ketchin Stories, interviews, and discussions showing the imprint of "old-time religion" on the artistic vision of twelve writers of the American South: Larry Brown, Reynolds Price, Allan Gurganus, Lee Smith, Clyde Edgerton, Harry Crews, Will Campbell, Doris Betts, Sheila Bosworth, Mary Ward Brown, Randall Kenan, Sandra Hollin Flowers Here are Susan Ketchin's discerning interviews with twelve southerners living and writing in the South, and along with a piece of fiction by each are her penetrating commentaries about the impact of southern religious experience on their work. A little more than a generation ago Flannery O'Connor made a startling observation about herself and her fellow southerners: "By and large," she said, "people in the South still conceive of humanity in theological terms. While the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted. The Southerner who isn't convinced of it is very much afraid that he may have been formed in the image and likeness of God." Guided by O'Connor's perceptive commentary about southerners in general, Susan Ketchin has created a deeply revealing collection that mirrors the pervasive role of religion in the literature by the recent generation of notable southern writers. Ketchin confirms that "old-time religion" remains a potent force in the literature of the contemporary South. Susan Ketchin, a writer, editor, and musician, lives in Orange County, North Carolina.


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The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction by Susan Ketchin Stories, interviews, and discussions showing the imprint of "old-time religion" on the artistic vision of twelve writers of the American South: Larry Brown, Reynolds Price, Allan Gurganus, Lee Smith, Clyde Edgerton, Harry Crews, Will Campbell, Doris Betts, Sheila Bosworth, Mary Ward Brown, R The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction by Susan Ketchin Stories, interviews, and discussions showing the imprint of "old-time religion" on the artistic vision of twelve writers of the American South: Larry Brown, Reynolds Price, Allan Gurganus, Lee Smith, Clyde Edgerton, Harry Crews, Will Campbell, Doris Betts, Sheila Bosworth, Mary Ward Brown, Randall Kenan, Sandra Hollin Flowers Here are Susan Ketchin's discerning interviews with twelve southerners living and writing in the South, and along with a piece of fiction by each are her penetrating commentaries about the impact of southern religious experience on their work. A little more than a generation ago Flannery O'Connor made a startling observation about herself and her fellow southerners: "By and large," she said, "people in the South still conceive of humanity in theological terms. While the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted. The Southerner who isn't convinced of it is very much afraid that he may have been formed in the image and likeness of God." Guided by O'Connor's perceptive commentary about southerners in general, Susan Ketchin has created a deeply revealing collection that mirrors the pervasive role of religion in the literature by the recent generation of notable southern writers. Ketchin confirms that "old-time religion" remains a potent force in the literature of the contemporary South. Susan Ketchin, a writer, editor, and musician, lives in Orange County, North Carolina.

52 review for The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Denae

    Flannery O'Connor said "I think it is safe to say that while the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted." From these words, the title of The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction was born. The book consists of twelve interviews Susan Ketchin conducted with Southern authors about the roles played by faith and doubt in their lives and their writing. Each interview was preceded by a brief biography and either a short story or an excerpt from a b Flannery O'Connor said "I think it is safe to say that while the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted." From these words, the title of The Christ-Haunted Landscape: Faith and Doubt in Southern Fiction was born. The book consists of twelve interviews Susan Ketchin conducted with Southern authors about the roles played by faith and doubt in their lives and their writing. Each interview was preceded by a brief biography and either a short story or an excerpt from a book by the writer. This book came highly recommended by a friend with whom I have a shared Southern and religious background. It is not a subject about which I have thought often in such a direct manner, but it is one which struck a chord with me, and this was one of the finest works of non-fiction I have read. The role of these twin subjects in the life of the South is unmistakable to one who has lived there, and the way in which they must be wrestled by these writers rings true. If I have a complaint, it is that there was no representation of authors who are now atheistic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luann Ritsema

    A series of excerpts and interviews with 12 Southern writers focusing on the subject of the influence of religious/Christian faith on their writing/as subject. I dipped into this over a period of weeks and grew to like it as a whole. I'd read some of the writers before, some I had resisted and was curious about others. The excerpts were interesting selections for the most part -- the interviews were pretty interesting though I felt the interviewer had a tendency to fawn over the writers. Frankly A series of excerpts and interviews with 12 Southern writers focusing on the subject of the influence of religious/Christian faith on their writing/as subject. I dipped into this over a period of weeks and grew to like it as a whole. I'd read some of the writers before, some I had resisted and was curious about others. The excerpts were interesting selections for the most part -- the interviews were pretty interesting though I felt the interviewer had a tendency to fawn over the writers. Frankly, I could have used more indepth interviewing even at the expense of the writing samples. A number of highlights but the rambling, free associating responses of Harry Crews were tops for me. The book is listed at $35.00 on Amazon - which I'd never pay and wouldn't recommend at that price. But a good read. After reading the interview, I'm inclined to give Lee Smith another try.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Stone

    This critical essay series is told through a short essay about an author, an interview with the author, and then an example of the author's writing. It is a great collection on where southern literature meets its religious upbringing. This critical essay series is told through a short essay about an author, an interview with the author, and then an example of the author's writing. It is a great collection on where southern literature meets its religious upbringing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James Aura

    If you're interested in Southern fiction this is a very good overview with some of the South's most acclaimed authors. It introduced me to a couple I was not familiar with. Very enjoyable. If you're interested in Southern fiction this is a very good overview with some of the South's most acclaimed authors. It introduced me to a couple I was not familiar with. Very enjoyable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    Growing up in the south, though not a church-goer, still fear of hell, ect and this book explains why we are like that...great interviews and pieces from southern others that i have never read...helps put a little water on the fire of fire and brimstone to know that others feel this

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mary Frances

    Some of the stories are well-crafted, some deep, some confusing, all pretty sad and many overwrought. Well, it is Southern fiction. Which I don't generally enjoy. However, the interviews with the authors are very interesting. Some of the stories are well-crafted, some deep, some confusing, all pretty sad and many overwrought. Well, it is Southern fiction. Which I don't generally enjoy. However, the interviews with the authors are very interesting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    This book is takes an interesting look into the religious thoughts of some of the most popular American-Southern writers of our day -- through interviews and short samples of their fiction. So much fun. I only wish Flannery O'Connor had been alive for an interview when Dr. Ketchin did this book. This book is takes an interesting look into the religious thoughts of some of the most popular American-Southern writers of our day -- through interviews and short samples of their fiction. So much fun. I only wish Flannery O'Connor had been alive for an interview when Dr. Ketchin did this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    W

  9. 4 out of 5

    Madly Jane

    Love this book. It's so insightful into the landscape of southern fiction. Highly recommended if you like southern fiction and want a look into the mythic side of things. Love this book. It's so insightful into the landscape of southern fiction. Highly recommended if you like southern fiction and want a look into the mythic side of things.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    There are so many parts in this book that ring true. It's almost therapeutic to read it. There are so many parts in this book that ring true. It's almost therapeutic to read it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I must qualify this some, I haven't read all of the book. BUT it's a great anthology that shows how various southern authors have been affected by their belief (or lack thereof) in a Higher Power I must qualify this some, I haven't read all of the book. BUT it's a great anthology that shows how various southern authors have been affected by their belief (or lack thereof) in a Higher Power

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I love the title of this book. It was required for a Southern Lit class but I enjoyed every minute of it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bobbie M.

  14. 4 out of 5

    bobbie meacham

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matt Jaeger

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

  17. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rose Earley

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie Hudson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alli B

  21. 4 out of 5

    Savannah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alex Thompson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lawyer

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Davis

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amie Koporc

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kris

  32. 5 out of 5

    Margie Ferguson

  33. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  34. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Honeycutt

  35. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  36. 4 out of 5

    Tara

  37. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Bailey

  38. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

  39. 4 out of 5

    Zack Parris

  40. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  41. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

  42. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

  43. 5 out of 5

    Mike Elliott

  44. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  45. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Newton-Smart

  46. 5 out of 5

    David Abrams

  47. 4 out of 5

    Klee

  48. 5 out of 5

    Cheryel

  49. 4 out of 5

    Connie Cox

  50. 4 out of 5

    Berkles

  51. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  52. 4 out of 5

    Julie

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