web site hit counter Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes

Availability: Ready to download

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Night Gardener, Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is the utterly beguiling tale of a ten-year-old blind orphan who has been schooled in a life of thievery. One fateful afternoon, he steals a box from a mysterious traveling haberdasher—a box that contains three pairs of magical eyes. When he tries the first pair, he is ins From the New York Times bestselling author of The Night Gardener, Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is the utterly beguiling tale of a ten-year-old blind orphan who has been schooled in a life of thievery. One fateful afternoon, he steals a box from a mysterious traveling haberdasher—a box that contains three pairs of magical eyes. When he tries the first pair, he is instantly transported to a hidden island where he is presented with a special quest: to travel to the dangerous Vanished Kingdom and rescue a people in need. Along with his loyal sidekick—a knight who has been turned into an unfortunate combination of horse and cat—and the magic eyes, he embarks on an unforgettable, swashbuckling adventure to discover his true destiny. Be sure to read the companion book, Sophie Quire and the Last Storyguard.


Compare

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Night Gardener, Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is the utterly beguiling tale of a ten-year-old blind orphan who has been schooled in a life of thievery. One fateful afternoon, he steals a box from a mysterious traveling haberdasher—a box that contains three pairs of magical eyes. When he tries the first pair, he is ins From the New York Times bestselling author of The Night Gardener, Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is the utterly beguiling tale of a ten-year-old blind orphan who has been schooled in a life of thievery. One fateful afternoon, he steals a box from a mysterious traveling haberdasher—a box that contains three pairs of magical eyes. When he tries the first pair, he is instantly transported to a hidden island where he is presented with a special quest: to travel to the dangerous Vanished Kingdom and rescue a people in need. Along with his loyal sidekick—a knight who has been turned into an unfortunate combination of horse and cat—and the magic eyes, he embarks on an unforgettable, swashbuckling adventure to discover his true destiny. Be sure to read the companion book, Sophie Quire and the Last Storyguard.

30 review for Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    What is the most telling difference between those works of children’s literature written long ago and those written today? Pose this question to a room full of children’s librarians and I suspect that the answers would be myriad. Books today are less racist. They’re willing to push more boundaries. They’re smarter, hipper, less didactic, and so on and such. Pose the question to a room full of kids now. What do they answer? Would they even know where to begin? I wonder since the memorable childre What is the most telling difference between those works of children’s literature written long ago and those written today? Pose this question to a room full of children’s librarians and I suspect that the answers would be myriad. Books today are less racist. They’re willing to push more boundaries. They’re smarter, hipper, less didactic, and so on and such. Pose the question to a room full of kids now. What do they answer? Would they even know where to begin? I wonder since the memorable children’s books of the past, the ones that we hold in our hearts and pass along from generation to generation have a quality that most children’s books today don’t bother to cultivate: timelessness. Of course there are as many bad books for kids that try to reach that golden goal as there are good ones. It is incredibly difficult to write a book for the youth of today that is interesting to them and yet manages to feel “timeless” without covering itself in must and dust. That Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes succeeds in this endeavor is a testament not only to its author but to a publishing world that’s willing to put out something that doesn’t slot into the usual five categories of books for youth. Babies found floating in baskets usually turn out quite well. They get adopted by pharaohs' daughters and the like, right? Well, that may be the case for some babies, but Peter Nimble isn’t exactly the lucky sort. Found floating in the sea, his eyes pecked out (presumably by the raven perched there), Peter is abandoned to the wilds of the world. On his own he manages to use his talents to become the world's greatest thief. This talent is swiftly exploited by the nasty Mr. Seamus who makes Peter steal for him. All seems bleak until the day Peter stops to listen to a crazy haberdasher who has come to town. Next thing he knows, Peter has pilfered a box containing three pairs of magical eyes and in accepting them he allows himself to take part in a marvelous, epic adventure. A difficulty with writing a story from the perspective of a blind protagonist is that you’re limited to that person’s senses. Or rather, you would be if the book was first person. Auxier sets his tale in the third, leaving the reader to decide whether or not the book should be this deftly described. We’re still with Peter every step of the way, after all. So is it fair that the text should show such a visual world when that is not Peter’s experience? I don’t find it much of a problem myself, though I can see how some folks would deem it strange. Yet the third person narration is the key here. It's not even particularly intrusive. The book is also dotted with small pen-and-ink illustrations throughout the text (created by the author himself, no less) that serve to show a bit of what is described to Peter. It is interesting to see what Auxier chooses to show and not to show. For example, the kitten/horse/knight that is his companion Sir Tode is never fully seen in any of the pictures in this book except for the odd rear view. So it is that Auxier uses his art to give readers just a hint of the story. He leaves most of the characters and situations up to child imaginations, though. He also has his influences. Jonathan Auxier doesn't love Peter Pan. No. He loooooooooooves Peter Pan. And remarkably enough, not in a creepy way. Now I’ll confess to you right here and now that I am not a Peter Pan fan. I find it mighty odd. Not The Little White Bird odd, but odd just the same. Auxier, however, manages to reference the Barrie classic of yore without drawing attention to what he is doing. I doubt that many kids would notice the elements in this book that call upon Barrie, but they’re there. Whether it’s the notion of a boy named Peter fending for himself from babyhood onwards, villains that complain about “bad form”, children who fight over the a mother, or a character who receives a hook for a hand, the details are there. Interestingly, this isn’t the only book this year with oblique Peter Pan references spotted throughout the text. The Mostly True Story of Jack by Kelly Barnhill drew my attention in a similar manner. The violence surprised me a bit. It's nothing grotesque, mind, but the sheer number of corpses that pile up in the course of the story sort of blew me away. Mostly it’s bad guys, but of course the book has fun playing with who precisely IS a bad guy for some time. In fact, there’s a kind of loose end left dangling as a result. At one point the ravens kill someone and you are left feeling very bad about it. Later, that detail is forgotten in the midst of the story. It’s a dangling emotional beat that doesn't quite get tied up. A quibble. What is the most telling difference between works of children’s literature written long ago and those written today? I’ll answer for myself: Tone. The tone of a book like Wind in the Willows or The Secret Garden is difficult to replicate. What Peter Nimble manages to do is create a tone akin to those books of yore. This is straight up quest-driven fantasy fare, my friends, with good old-fashioned stalwart companions, magic, baddies, and the fate of the world in the balance. And while not every tie might be tied off and folks can quibble with a detail here or there, Auxier’s is a strong chapter book debut. Kids will stay with Peter every step of the way. It’s like something you’ve seen before and nothing you’ve ever read. For ages 9-12.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I’ve been looking forward to Peter Nimble since the moment I came across Jonathan Auxier’s website, The Scop. The site is simple, the sketches are fun and that might be the best “about me’ section I’ve ever seen. So to hear Jonathan was publishing his first middle-grade this fall, literally made me giddy. Then I found that this particular middle grade novel is set in a quazi-Victorian age, starring a blind-orphan-thief. Here’s what I need: books that I can look a kid in the eye and say, “Trust me I’ve been looking forward to Peter Nimble since the moment I came across Jonathan Auxier’s website, The Scop. The site is simple, the sketches are fun and that might be the best “about me’ section I’ve ever seen. So to hear Jonathan was publishing his first middle-grade this fall, literally made me giddy. Then I found that this particular middle grade novel is set in a quazi-Victorian age, starring a blind-orphan-thief. Here’s what I need: books that I can look a kid in the eye and say, “Trust me, you’re going to love this.” So that while they’re developing their reading (and thinking) strategies, they’ll fall in love with literature and see the relevancy for these skills. I’m looking for books that create “the circulation effect” (I pass off a book and by the time it’s returned two months later, I’ve seen it on 15 different desks). I’m quite confident that Peter Nimble and his Fantastic Eyes will be one of those books. First and foremost, Peter Nimble has an absolutely mesmerizing flow to it. It’s got all the fun of disenfranchised Dickens mixed with Phantom Tollbooth absurdity. Jonathan Auxier seamlessly blends these two very diverse attributes, strapping his readers to his back as he takes them along for a breakneck ride through complete obscurity. One minute you’re meeting his traveling companion, an enchanted horse-cat-knight; the next minute you’re giggling over a reference to 18th century burgling proverb. And that’s what makes this novel so much fun. Auxier immerses you in this wonderfully substantial tale while relentlessly sprinkling in bits of humor at every turn. To really buy into fantasy, there needs to be in a believable world. In a lot of the high-fantasy for middle-graders that I’ve read, this tends to get a bit descriptive. Not that it’s a bad thing, most of the time it’s completely essential to the story. But for inexperienced readers who haven’t built the stamina to stick it out, such description can slow the story down to abandonment. Auxier does much of his world-building through an astute sense for humor. Thieving terminology and old sayings build Peter’s culture. This enables the author to spend less time creating the world and more time pushing Peter through it. And the reader can pick the rest up along the way. By omitting the overly descriptive elements of fantasy, we’re left with a story that moves at a truly exceptional pace. Take my knees for example. I had an hour to kill before heading home for dinner. I made my way over to the beach with Peter Nimble in tow. Before I knew it three hours had passed, my legs were cooked, and I was late for family dinner. The chapter structure and pace just work sensationally. Some end in total cliffhangers, others are satisfying bookends; all without ever feeling predictable or formulaic. Sometimes a section was wrapped up nicely when I assumed it would stretch out, while other times I thought I knew how a chapter would end only to be left with a dropped jaw and a yearning to find out where we’re going next. And all of this happens from the moment we set foot into Peter’s tale. Right from the introduction it’s clear that we’re in the hands of a storyteller. It doesn’t feel like the characters or the narrator know something that you don’t. The information we learn in the beginning later becomes pertinent but it never comes off overly mysterious. There’s nothing wrong with employing those strategies at a story’s onset but doing so risks losing that audience that isn’t quite ready to pick out the questions they’ll need to keep in their heads for a few hundred pages. Another major component of Peter Nimble’s flow is the manner in which we meet new characters and explore new settings. The story’s landscapes constantly shift without inundating the reader with detail. We grow accustomed to Peter’s new surroundings with him. Seeing as how Peter is blind, both he and the reader are exposed to the setting by moving through it. Characters too, flow in and out without coming off hollow or hurried. But the essential thread that ties this novel together is Jonathan Auxier’s outstanding narration. I’m always telling my students, “You can’t talk to your reader unless you really mean it.” And when they ask me what that means, I tell them, “I don’t know. But go read Adam Gidwitz or Lemony Snicket.” Bad narration is intolerable and insulting to the reader, which makes discovering quality narrators that much more satiating. Auxier guides us through Peter’s story without ever tipping his hand or pandering to his readers, unless he’s doing so intentionally, in which case, it’s pretty damn funny. He’s constantly dropping bits of humor that range from explicit to embedded to ludicrously sarcastic. And we haven’t even touched the most impressive part… Our main character is blind. The disability drives the story without ever becoming preachy or asking the reader for sympathy. It’s refreshing to have a main character whose handicap is the source of his success (without him having to learn some character trait by coming to terms with the disability). In fact, frequently, the disability becomes the butt of many a pun. Good. We certainly want to teach our kids to treat everybody, able or handicapped, with respect. It’s nice to see Peter isn’t discluded from good-natured humor at his expense, like so often is the case when disabilities appear in children’s literature. Peter Nimble and his Fantastic Eyes is sure to be hit with middle grade boys and girls alike. At times it’s utterly absurd; others, rich and poignant, but it always remains sensationally obscure. And if nothing else, it’s that current of obscurity running throughout the novel that will charge its readers and keep them chuckling until the last page. It’s my job to get emerging readers the skills they need to be proficient with text. But what good is a skill set if you can’t find a relevancy in it? I say I have just as much a responsibility to help my readers find both. Many times, it requires some salesmanship. And, a salesman is only as good as his product. Books like Peter Nimble and his Fantastic Eyes makes engendering students to take ownership of their reading easy. It’s the caliber of story that is simply… Fantastic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Miss Bookiverse

    Dear Peter Nimble, I’m sorry, but you and me, that’s just not going to work. After an 86 pages long relationship I must admit you bore me. I know you are meant to entertain my inner child but either that child is on vacation or you’re not doing a very good job. Also I think you’re overdoing it. Seriously, is there anything you can’t do? You are blind, yet you learned to smell and listen to the world as if it was right in front of you. You even learned how to stop your own heart beat so the dogs won Dear Peter Nimble, I’m sorry, but you and me, that’s just not going to work. After an 86 pages long relationship I must admit you bore me. I know you are meant to entertain my inner child but either that child is on vacation or you’re not doing a very good job. Also I think you’re overdoing it. Seriously, is there anything you can’t do? You are blind, yet you learned to smell and listen to the world as if it was right in front of you. You even learned how to stop your own heart beat so the dogs won’t catch you. You can basically do anything and thus frustrate my not-so-talented self. You do look gorgeous though, I have to give you that. Especially the way you present yourself whenever a new chapter starts. Until later or maybe never. Yours sincerely, A frustrated reader

  4. 4 out of 5

    April

    “Now, for those of you who know anything about blind children, you are aware that they make the very best thieves.” pg. 3 When I read books like Peter Nimble And His Fantastic Eyes by Jonathan Auxier, I get disappointed. Disappointed because mediocre books are hyped so heavily, while truly timeless books like this one don’t even hit my radar unless I have to read it for something (CYBILS). Peter Nimble And His Fantastic Eyes is a truly magical read about a blind orphan, Peter Nimble obvs, who is t “Now, for those of you who know anything about blind children, you are aware that they make the very best thieves.” pg. 3 When I read books like Peter Nimble And His Fantastic Eyes by Jonathan Auxier, I get disappointed. Disappointed because mediocre books are hyped so heavily, while truly timeless books like this one don’t even hit my radar unless I have to read it for something (CYBILS). Peter Nimble And His Fantastic Eyes is a truly magical read about a blind orphan, Peter Nimble obvs, who is the greatest thief in the world, but may be destined for more than stealing. He may even be destined to be a hero. Read the rest of my review here

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kiera

    thank u, next

  6. 5 out of 5

    SwensonBooks

    Jonathan Auxier’s debut book, Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes, released August 1st by Amulet Books, is an imaginative attempt within the Young Adult (YA) fiction genre. But what appears to be the beginning of an action-and-adventure-filled series starring a persevering and original cast of characters is in reality an imaginative but half-hearted tale foiled by an amateur voice and copycat style. By his own admission in the book’s acknowledgments, Auxier is a thief like his protagonist Peter N Jonathan Auxier’s debut book, Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes, released August 1st by Amulet Books, is an imaginative attempt within the Young Adult (YA) fiction genre. But what appears to be the beginning of an action-and-adventure-filled series starring a persevering and original cast of characters is in reality an imaginative but half-hearted tale foiled by an amateur voice and copycat style. By his own admission in the book’s acknowledgments, Auxier is a thief like his protagonist Peter Nimble. Snatching “inspiration from countless other worlds, characters, and books,” his crime is readily apparent. Young, blind, orphaned Peter is of the Dickensian trope and his behavior follows accordingly. He is born of dubious circumstances and ends up in the “care” of a corrupt guardian. He is forced to commit crime but is possessed with deep moral fiber. He is but an innocent, virtuous child graced with an adventuresome spirit who is, in spite of all handicaps, clever and highly self-sufficient. Peter’s friends, sidekicks, and saviors supplement and assist his adventures in a traditional fairy tale manner, appearing in times of duress and possessed with powers sufficient for the impending challenge. There is Professor Cake, an eerie human caricature of C.S. Lewis’s Aslan in omniscience and puissance; Sir Tode, an enchanted knight serving as Peter’s loyal sidekick and a bumbling cross between the Chesire Cat and Don Quixote; King Incarnadine, Peter’s nemesis and villainous uncle of Princess Pam, wearing clockwork armor that’s borrowed from a villain of Marvel comic Hellboy fame; and the monstrous ape army, serving as Night Guard in Incarnadine’s palace, reminiscent of the Wicked Witches’ flying monkeys in The Wizard of Oz. Peter’s entrance into the magical realm is similarly burgled from other tales. Like Alice falling down the rabbit hole, the titular Fantastic Eyes transport Peter to the aptly named Troublesome Lake, kicking off our protagonist’s fantastic adventure. The Eyes themselves are a unique narrative device and it is quite pleasurable to discover, along with Peter, their magical powers. Young readers will find some of the more absurd characters, like Sir Tode the cat-horse-man and Simon the beakless raven, amusing and fresh. All this theft on part of Auxier makes for an imaginative fairy tale and adventure quest “mashup”. However, the delivery and pace of the fiction lacks warmth. There was no joy or wonder in Auxier’s words. While the plot moves along at a nice pace for young readers and is suitable for the action-and-adventure genre, the content lacks depth and the narration is erratic. The beginning of the tale is lush with description of a magical world (simply look at some of the place names: Just Deserts, Troublesome Lake, Kettle Rock, et al) while Peter’s adventures are simply accounted for. The narrator explains and jokes with the reader in some scenes – Vitamin C turns into Vitamin Sea, a nutrient in lemons to prevent scurvy from afflicting pirates and sailors – then hurries the action along in the next by stating simple facts along the lines of, “this happened, then that, and then Peter felt distraught and hopeless.” I paged through Peter’s adventure impatiently, past whale-sized dogfish and raids with banished thieves and perfect palace lives that seem all too perfect, waiting for a delivery that was anything but fantastic or nimble (hee hee). By the third and final section, the book had shifted dramatically. Gone are the witty remarks and the conspiratorial laughter of the narrator explaining unnecessarily complex adult notions. Instead, grotesque descriptions of battle produce an unjustifiably violent affect. Child readers can handle exposure to cruelty and violence, but the line is tenuous – just look at best-selling authors like William Golding and Suzanne Collins, who wrote books in which children commit violence. Peter Nimble is witty and compelling in a first read because of the narrator’s cloying voice, reminiscent of my favorite childhood author Roald Dahl, and this voice vanishes irrevocably into the thick of battle. Furthermore, Auxier fails to produce either narrative justification or consistency for descriptions of violence in the culminating escape and battle. In one scene, where the raven army is pitted against Night Guard apes for control of the palace, the carnage of the nearly overpowered ravens turns the waters of a flooded hallway deep red. Later, the machinery of King Incarnadine’s armor destroys Peter Nimble’s hand to the point that it must be amputated later and replaced with a fishing hook (Captain Hook, anyone?). These descriptions, together with other chillingly honest moments, give a tale of good toppling evil a revolting twist. All these weaknesses can be traced back to a single error: Auxier, like many well-intentioned YA authors, writes for his audience and not for his story. He creates a truly fantastic world full of characters infused with attributes loved in other acclaimed fairy tales… only to lose his imaginative spark as the fiction’s dubious hero toils on. By the final section, when our well-meaning hero has the chance to prove his worth as the greatest thief who ever lived (and likely most honorable), the drawn-out action and predictable moral summations excised all former attention and exhilaration. No reader turns the page to be told the action. It’s the author’s job to use language and unique skill to show and share it. Unlike poor Peter Nimble, the reader will not blindly mistake Auxier’s dim and dark HazelPort with the visionary depth and clarity for which imaginary realms like Narnia, Wonderland, Oz, and Neverland, not to mention contemporary creations like Hogwarts and Panem, are acclaimed. Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes should be a celebration of a child’s world triumphing over the dim, dull and illogical rule of adults. Instead, it pays homage to Lord of the Flies. Wide-eyed adventure no more, this tale suits better the Brothers Grimm.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Excellent and imaginative Middle Grade Fantasy Adventure. 9/24/18 Kindle version on sale today for $2.99.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    The storyline is just ridiculous-crazy. Things happen so fast and so out of the blue, it’s almost delightful. At first the adult in me was putting up a fight and going “Say whaa?”. Pretty soon, I shelved that irritating grown-up sixth sense and just immersed myself in the fantasy that is Peter Nimble. The creatures he meets are truly weird, his companions are funny, and his enemies are deliciously nasty! For me it was like reading The Phantom Tollbooth meets any Roald Dahl book meets Peter Pan m The storyline is just ridiculous-crazy. Things happen so fast and so out of the blue, it’s almost delightful. At first the adult in me was putting up a fight and going “Say whaa?”. Pretty soon, I shelved that irritating grown-up sixth sense and just immersed myself in the fantasy that is Peter Nimble. The creatures he meets are truly weird, his companions are funny, and his enemies are deliciously nasty! For me it was like reading The Phantom Tollbooth meets any Roald Dahl book meets Peter Pan meets something I’ve never read before! It’s wacky and fun. Here’s where it gets interesting though—underneath all the wackiness, I found myself thinking that this was rather advanced for a book that’s meant to be for 8-12 year olds. I wondered if, as an 8 year old, I would’ve been able to take the concept of someone’s eyes being pecked out by ravens for the good of a kingdom or someone’s hand being chopped off and replaced by a hook. Then I remembered watching Peter Pan at age 4 and loving it (totally not judging Captain Hook at all for his hand or ridiculous hair). The best part of the book was its unpredictability. It held such a fantastic twist that I didn’t even see it coming and was genuinely excited when I read it! There were some rather large words scattered here and there in the book. Admittedly I had to look up two of them myself, which made me think “What a GREAT learning book!” I learned all my big words (vocabulary) best when they were disguised in the most fun books possible. That’s what Peter Nimble is—a really fun book. Adults, leave your sense of reason behind when you pick it up. Kids, get ready for a wild ride across land, oceans, and sewers!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    Initially I really enjoyed this book -- the writing is clever and amusing, but I felt the story had several parts that were just jarring, considering that this is a kids' book. Peter Nimble is found as an infant, floating on the ocean in a basket. His eyes have been pecked out by a raven. Okay, what?! Things get no better for Peter after he's rescued by sailors -- he's left at the nearest port town, where officials name him, then abandon him again on the streets to fend for himself. As a baby!! No Initially I really enjoyed this book -- the writing is clever and amusing, but I felt the story had several parts that were just jarring, considering that this is a kids' book. Peter Nimble is found as an infant, floating on the ocean in a basket. His eyes have been pecked out by a raven. Okay, what?! Things get no better for Peter after he's rescued by sailors -- he's left at the nearest port town, where officials name him, then abandon him again on the streets to fend for himself. As a baby!! Now, I know that this actually has happened historically, and that there are many children even today who are left to fend for themselves, but oh my gosh that was harsh! Peter's life skips a few years, as he is trained by the horrible Mr. Seamus to be a master thief. He is deprived of love, food, kindness, on and on and on. But all of this changes when he meets the mysterious Mr. Pound and steals from him three pairs of fantastic eyes. The rest of the book follows Peter on his adventures. A lot of it is fascinating, and the author has one heck of a great imagination. But it's almost overwhelming, all of the characters and dramas and twists and turns. I found myself losing interest as the book progressed, even though I thought it was well written. Maybe it's just not my thing, but this book definitely will not be the end of my search for a new Harry Potter type series. I'm not sure if I would read a sequel if the author publishes one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    What a grand adventure; funny, scary, prophetic and imaginative. Peter Nimble has been blind all his life. Because he is blind, his other senses provide information the rest of us don't even notice - the smells of stones and of wealth, the sound of beating hearts and of friendship. These abilities lead him to becoming an extraordinary thief; perhaps the best thief in all the world. He can pick any lock. At the end of one particularly difficult lock-picking challenge he discovers a box containing What a grand adventure; funny, scary, prophetic and imaginative. Peter Nimble has been blind all his life. Because he is blind, his other senses provide information the rest of us don't even notice - the smells of stones and of wealth, the sound of beating hearts and of friendship. These abilities lead him to becoming an extraordinary thief; perhaps the best thief in all the world. He can pick any lock. At the end of one particularly difficult lock-picking challenge he discovers a box containing six amazing eggs. The yolks of these eggs turn out to be three sets of fantastic eyes that launch Peter on a journey. From gold, to onyx to emerald, Peter moves from world to world and shape to shape on a quest to help the writer of the note that may have come from the Vanished Kingdom. "Kings aplenty, princes few, The ravens scattered and seas withdrew. Only a stranger may bring relief, But darkness will reign, unless he's ..." Each step of the way is hard but Peter knows he has a friend, Sir Tode. He has the fantastic eyes which will be all that he needs if he uses them only when the time is right. And he knows the person he is now is the reason this quest is part of his destiny. It is his true nature that will lead him through each problem he encounters.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pandora

    The book is divided into three parts: Gold, Onyx, and Emerald. The first part Gold is very strong and I was enjoying the story. There was a dark quirky humor to the story that was like Pullman's I Was a Rat. Examples: "One problem with a life of crime is that it lowers your chances of social advancement." "You see, when it rains, rich people seldom come out for fear of melting." Unfortunarely the book goes on to epic length without having a story to support such length - the book is 381 pages lo The book is divided into three parts: Gold, Onyx, and Emerald. The first part Gold is very strong and I was enjoying the story. There was a dark quirky humor to the story that was like Pullman's I Was a Rat. Examples: "One problem with a life of crime is that it lowers your chances of social advancement." "You see, when it rains, rich people seldom come out for fear of melting." Unfortunarely the book goes on to epic length without having a story to support such length - the book is 381 pages long. By page 271 I was ready for the stroy to end and I still have over a hundred pages to go. My own belief is that if a book goes over 250 pages especially a children's book it needs to have one of three elements: 1. A long time span at least ten years - War and Peace 2. A very large cast - The Fellowship of the Ring 3. Many sub-plots - Les Miserables The book also uses a high vobluary that might frustrate children with words such as Sternutation, Haberdasher, Percoulating etc. My biggest diffculty though was the viloence in the book. There are at least five major battles with a high death count plus minor incidents of violence. There is also the plot of slave children which was uncomfortable as Indianian Jones Temple of Doom. The desciptions are brief but, one comes on top of another and with high death counts. I have read horror novels with less death scences. Examples: "Peter concluded that the gang must have pinned the animal to the ground and was trying to get the knife to land in its backside." "The two were shaking with terrible fear: Old Scabbs was being pecked to pieces not twenty paces from where they hid." "....were instanly transformed into a bloody battlefield. Cries echoed across the dunes as blade struck beak." "Lord Incarnadine loosed a battle cry, and his terrible army attacked. The creatures swept through the crowd, killing and devouring people." "As they approached, a hundred violent sounds swirled through the air below - metal striking claw, beak tearing flesh, stones crushing bone." And on and on it goes with one scence after another. After about the third violent momnet I was getting uncomfortable and the magic of the book was disappearing for me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mundie Moms & Mundie Kids

    4.5 stars Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is one part fairy tale, one part epic adventure and one part magical. It's charming, witty and is definitely an unforgettable read. With everything Peter Nimble's story entails, this book has the same feel as the classic, ageless fairy tales I grew up reading or had read to me. Jonathan Auxier's fresh voice combines an array of timeless fairytale elements, and yet creates a story that in unlike anything I've read before. Peter Nimble is a character who 4.5 stars Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is one part fairy tale, one part epic adventure and one part magical. It's charming, witty and is definitely an unforgettable read. With everything Peter Nimble's story entails, this book has the same feel as the classic, ageless fairy tales I grew up reading or had read to me. Jonathan Auxier's fresh voice combines an array of timeless fairytale elements, and yet creates a story that in unlike anything I've read before. Peter Nimble is a character who doesn't lack courage, he's humble, and through everything he goes through he's someone who always stays true to himself. His story will pull at readers heart strings as they read about the things he's had to endure and overcome in his young life, but this unique, strong willed, good hearted kid is no weakling. It's true his epic journey will be full of trials, heart ache, fear, doubt, bravery and trust both in himself and his abilities, and in those he meets along the way. Blinded as an infant, ten year old orphan, Peter Nimble has never let that stop him from surviving and being able to take care of himself. He's intelligent and is able to sense what many people with site are blinded by. He's earned the nicname, The World's Greatest Thief, and for a good reason. It seems there's no predicament Peter can't get himself out of. One of the most enduring aspects of this adventure is Jonathan Auxier's voice and his vivid descriptions of the characters and places Peter travels to. He has a way of bringing the unimaginable to life. I liked how his creativity made for some interesting characters like talking animals, the traveling companion and true friend to Peter named Sir Tode whom is also Knight and a mix between a kitten and a horse. Talking ravens, an evil King, evil talking Gorilla guards, brave children, a long lost Prince, a Princess in hiding, and fantastic eyes who aid Peter on his journey. There isn't a shortage of adults in this story, but the are foreshadowed by the amazing children who are the true heroes in the book. This is a fantastic heroic adventure with some fabulous twists, action and so much more! Just like the classic fairy tales, there is a great message within the story's pages, along with a mix of heartbreak, happiness, a few scary/mildly violent scenes, and in the end a happily ever after. In order to find out what Peter's happily ever after is, you'll need to read the book. I can safely say, I definitely wasn't excepting it. I highly recommend picking up Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes. This is a book that boys and girls aged 10 yrs & older will really enjoy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    I read this aloud to my two children (age 7 and 10). It did a great job holding the attention of my 10 year old, but not so much my 7 year old. I cannot imagine many children younger than 10 years old reading the book on their own as many words are fairly complex, even for some adults. Despite that, it is a very fun, whimsical book. As an adult, you have to lose your grip on reality and just go with it. I loved Peter Nimble's character and he has to be the best thief that has ever lived. He had a I read this aloud to my two children (age 7 and 10). It did a great job holding the attention of my 10 year old, but not so much my 7 year old. I cannot imagine many children younger than 10 years old reading the book on their own as many words are fairly complex, even for some adults. Despite that, it is a very fun, whimsical book. As an adult, you have to lose your grip on reality and just go with it. I loved Peter Nimble's character and he has to be the best thief that has ever lived. He had amazing skills. For example, he was trained to do the Drowsy Dodger by sea-gypsies where his fingers untied knots in his sleep. It was a very hard skill to master since it could only be practiced when he was unconscious. Haha! There was nothing that Peter could not do thanks to the imagination of Auxier. It was fun to read the twists and turns of the story. There were many plot hints given to the reader that I would often figure out before the kids. It was delightful to see when their lightbulb moment happened. I would give examples of this, but they would involve some major spoilers, and I don't want to give anything away.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Jayne

    A fairytale. Written like a Classic.... with Updated Bonus Materials. So many things in this book made me reminisce of so many things in other books; I could say “it was like ______ “ with at least 11 (just counted) separate things, but in the end it’s not really like any of them. In the end, it is it’s own. It’s own wild adventure of friends and family and children and imagination. And I laughed and I cringed and I got confused and things made sense. I’m really glad I liked the cover. Because I A fairytale. Written like a Classic.... with Updated Bonus Materials. So many things in this book made me reminisce of so many things in other books; I could say “it was like ______ “ with at least 11 (just counted) separate things, but in the end it’s not really like any of them. In the end, it is it’s own. It’s own wild adventure of friends and family and children and imagination. And I laughed and I cringed and I got confused and things made sense. I’m really glad I liked the cover. Because I loved the read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin Lee

    This book would be good for fans of The Edge Chronicles 4: Beyond the Deepwoods: First Book of Twig, as Peter Nimble and Twig have a lot in common. This book jumps around a lot and has a lot going on, but its quick pace is good for middle-grade readers. This book would be good for fans of The Edge Chronicles 4: Beyond the Deepwoods: First Book of Twig, as Peter Nimble and Twig have a lot in common. This book jumps around a lot and has a lot going on, but its quick pace is good for middle-grade readers.

  16. 5 out of 5

    TheBookSmugglers

    Originally Reviewed on The Book Smugglers: http://thebooksmugglers.com/2011/08/j... REVIEW First Impressions: Ana: I am just going to be upfront and start by saying: this book broke my heart. I love stories with thieves as protagonists and I was most intrigued and happy to see a blind kid as the main character of this story. And I was delighted with about 99% of the book: it is a fun book, it is wonderfully written, the story itself has awesome twists and turns and right up until the very e Originally Reviewed on The Book Smugglers: http://thebooksmugglers.com/2011/08/j... REVIEW First Impressions: Ana: I am just going to be upfront and start by saying: this book broke my heart. I love stories with thieves as protagonists and I was most intrigued and happy to see a blind kid as the main character of this story. And I was delighted with about 99% of the book: it is a fun book, it is wonderfully written, the story itself has awesome twists and turns and right up until the very ending I was a very happy reader. And then everything was RUINED by one single event - one single event that to me, comes with a lot of negative connotations and effectively ruined the whole experience for me (I will talk about it in depth below in a separate section with SPOILER WARNING). For now, I will simply repeat: this book broke my heart. Thea: I, on the other hand, disagree! I have no problem saying this: I think that Ana is off her rocker. Peter Nimble is a charming, adventurous, delightful gem of a novel about a brave boy that is both a thief and a hero. I loved it from start to end. That is all. On the Plot: Ana: Peter Nimble is the greatest thief that has ever lived - and he is only a 10 year old blind orphan. If you are surprised by this, don't be because as the omniscient narrator tells us: For those of you who know anything about blind children, you are aware that they make the very best thieves. And just like that, the whimsical tone of this story is set. And what a story this is! When Peter was a baby, he was found floating in a basket in the ocean, a raven perched on his face, eating his eyes. Taken to a city that had no need for a blind baby, he was left to fend for himself, which he does by becoming a great thief. His talents are eventually exploited by Mr Seamus, who takes the boy in and makes him steal for him. Until one day, Peter steals a box containing three pairs of Fantastic Eyes. The first pair, is a transportation pair and he is taken to a different kingdom where he is offered a choice and a mission: he is to be the hero answering a plea from a long-forsaken kingdom under the tyranny of a cruel King. With the aid of a Cursed Knight and nothing but his smarts and the pairs of Fantastic Eyes, Peter embarks on a journey that will change his life forever. It is really hard to condense the plot of Peter Nimble and his Fantastic Eyes like this because so many things happen in this story and it is hard to convey how great the story is, with its twists and turns, ups and downs. Although the story and where it was going was fairly predictable from the start, this is not really the point. Because the writing is so whimsical and engaging and journey itself so fantastic and creative that it doesn't really matter that at its core, this is another story which follows a Special Orphan. As we all know, an unoriginal premise can turn into a fabulous story in the hands of a good author with good ideas. And this author just gets it right. I love the different places Peter went to and how there was different types of thieves and heists, for example. One particular thing that I absolutely loved about the story, was Jonathan Auxier's way with words and how he played with language itself. For example, at one point Peter is stranded in a place called "Just Deserts" which is a well, desert where criminals were sent to spend the rest of their lives in (get it? the play with words? I thought that this was so cool. But I am a geek like that). And how about this one: Peter awoke to the smell of flour. Not the boring perennials that wise men are constantly badgering us to stop and smell, but the white powdery stuff meant for baking and booby traps. SO much fun and just another aspect that I loved about the story. Thea: I agree that the plotting and style of the storytelling is fantastic and what makes Peter Nimble stand out in a sea of other Brave Young Orphan Saves the Day stories. Related by an invisible narrator that occasionally addresses the audience in charming (if somewhat familiar, in the style of Lemony Snicket) asides, this is a book about adventure, destiny, justice, and magic. I loved the whimsical nature of the book and the storytelling, which provides little pearls of insightfulness - in a nonsensical, childhood imagination fashion - along the way. For example, regarding a thief and his fervent desire for a drop of lemon juice: "What good would a drop of lemon do your tooth?" Those of you who are asking the very same question have clearly never been pirates or buccaneers. If you had been, then you would know that lemons and other citrus fruits are used to defend against a nasty disease called "scurvy." Scurvy comes from a lack of a magical vitamin that prevents one's teeth from rotting away during ocean voyages, which is why they call it "Vitamin Sea." Sailors are prone to this disease because, as you may know, lemons and oranges do not grow in the ocean. For this reason, citrus fruits are a precious commodity aboard boats, worth even more than gold. Yes, very whimsical indeed. So far as the actual story goes, it's, well, fantastic. From the dockside slums to a mysterious island surrounded by ALL the waters of the world, to the desert on the edge of a vanished kingdom, and a "perfect" palace, Peter Nimble follows the adventures of a heroic young vagabond and the world's greatest thief (with the help of a Knight Errant...trapped in the bodies of a cat and horse). Yes, it is as extravagant and wonderful as it sounds. In fact, the only criticism I have for the book is completely beyond the power of the author. The reason Peter Nimble falls short, for me, is because I've already read a whimsical, magical, incredible book in this style earlier this year and it will forever be the yardstick to which I measure other stories of this nature. That book, of course, is Cathrynne M. Valente's masterful The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making . On the Characters: Ana: Oh, there are so many wonderful characters in this story! From Peter with his resourcefulness, smarts and reluctant heroism to all the friends he makes. Like for example Sir Tode, the not-so-noble Knight who joins him on his quest and who becomes his steadfast companion. And Peg, the girl he meets halfway through leader of Missing Ones (who reminded me a lot of Peter Pan's The Lost Boys). But I think that my favourite characters were the Ravens. Without spoiling too much because there is a great plot point about which side some of the Ravens were on but I truly loved the role they had to play. And did you know that a company of Ravens (i.e. the collective noun)is called "unkindness"? I never knew that! I also loved that the author did not shy away from letting good characters die violent deaths or get maimed because this story is after all, a fight between Good and Evil. Thea: As with any proper Adventure, this book is populated by a cast of wonderful, strange, and sufficiently villainous characters. Our hero, the titled Peter Nimble is an orphan who was blinded as a babe, but quickly became the world's greatest sneak-thief because of his other sharpened senses and desire to survive. Peter is an endearing young man, who is not saccharine-sweet good (there's one point where he treats his best friend very poorly indeed - but learns his lesson), but brave and noble just the same. I loved that Peter is shown with his share of self doubts - as a thief, he hardly thinks he can be a hero - which adds a layer of depth to an otherwise straightforward character. My favorite characters of the bunch had to be Princess Peg, the dethroned heiress who has been forced to live underground and form her own resistance effort, and the hilarious, Puss-in-Boots character of Sir Tobe. Tobe, as we've said before, is a knight - or he was one before he angered the wrong hag and was forced into the body of a cat (along with his horse). Hilarious, kind-hearted and loyal, I loved the friendship that blossomed between Peter and his noble friend Sir Tobe. As our faceless narrator says: Being wise, Professor Cake knew that any relationship not beinning with a punch or two would most assuredly fade over time: it is a well-known fact that brawling begets friendship. Already Peter and Sir Tode were planting seeds of a mutual respect that might one day blossom into something far greater - a friendship to rival the stuff of legends. My only quip with characters is that the villains were kind of simple and two dimensional in their villainy. But, as Ana says, this is a story about Good and Evil, so perhaps that isn't so surprising. On the Ending: **Spoiler warning! The section below contains spoilers. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED** Ana: In the end, the time comes for Peter to use the third pair of eyes and those pair of eyes turn out to be HIS original eyes and he is therefore, blind no more. To be honest, I feared something like this might happen throughout the book and I read the whole book with a mix of excitement for how good it was and fear that at some point Peter would recover his sight. As the story progressed and nothing like that happened, I relaxed a bit until the end. And then everything changed. My problem with this is that blindness, obviously, can not be cured by magic. The book might be Fantasy but blindness is something really real, that happen to real people, to real kids. What is this event really saying? That being an awesome blind thief, with an awesome family and friends, and a Kingdom to run is not enough, that the character will only be completely happy and whole if he has his vision back. Of course I understand that being blind comes with unfathomable hardships that someone like me, who is not blind can never hope to understand and unfortunately blind people have no choice but to deal with those hardships. Up until that point, the story was awesome because it acknowledged this at the same time that it made Peter an amazing character who relied on smarts and his other senses to get through life and was not completely defined by being blind. Then he gets miraculously granted his vision back and it just felt wrong. There was absolutely no need for this to happen and unfortunately it effectively ruined what was otherwise a wonderful book for me. I feel really, really strongly about this. Thea: This is the part where I say Ana is off her rocker. I agree that Peter recovering his sight at the end - with the last pair of magic, fantastic eyes - was a bit fairytale-ish, but this is a fairytale! And isn't that what happens in the vast majority of fairytales? The Beast transforms back into a handsome prince, the evil curse is lifted, the wronged are rewarded, those that have been blighted are vindicated. I don't think Peter's blindness and the awesomeness of having a blind protagonist was in any way diminished by the return of his rightful eyes. He still saved the kingdom, his friends, his family, and he did it all when he was blind and because he was blind. Had he been able to see, he would not have been able to embark on this adventure and save the day. It's a grade-A Happy Ending, but I don't think it says or belittles anything about being blind. I understand the concern, but I think it's misplaced because this is a fairytale and a book about magical eyes, after all. But, that's just my opinion. END SPOILERS Final Thoughts, Observations & Rating: Ana: I am at a loss here. I loved most of the book and think kids would totally love it too. But the cop-out ending makes me sick and sad and uncomfortable and I don't feel I can really recommend it. Thea: I, on the other hand, think that Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is a truly winsome, whimsical story that should be read and enjoyed by all. Absolutely recommended. Notable Quotes/Parts: After a conversation between Peter and a small beetle: Well, that was a perfectly useless conversation," he said with a sigh. Now, there is a wonderful thing in this world called "foresight." It is a gift treasured above all others because it allows one to know what the future holds. Most people with foresight end up wielding immense power in life, often becoming great rulers or librarians. Sadly, Peter (being a ten-year-old boy) was built without any capacity for foresight. And so he continued walking, unaware of how his chance encounter with a grumpy insect would prove to be nothing short of transformational. Rating: Ana: If the ending hadn't happened like it did? This book would have been a 7/8. But it did and I can't forget that to the point where I won't be able to rate it. Thea: 7 - Very Good

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sierra Abrams

    Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes by Jonathan Auxier Pages: 381 Release Date: August 1st, 2011 Date Read: 2012, April 9th - May 8th Received: Audiobook from library Rating: 5/5 stars Recommended to: 10+ SUMMARY - Peter Nimble is nothing but a blind thief. He steals from pockets, purses, and shops. He is light on his feet and smart with his fingers. He has a gift for thievery, and that's all he's ever done... But when a strange man appears in town, showcasing something marvelous, and blackmails Peter in Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes by Jonathan Auxier Pages: 381 Release Date: August 1st, 2011 Date Read: 2012, April 9th - May 8th Received: Audiobook from library Rating: 5/5 stars Recommended to: 10+ SUMMARY - Peter Nimble is nothing but a blind thief. He steals from pockets, purses, and shops. He is light on his feet and smart with his fingers. He has a gift for thievery, and that's all he's ever done... But when a strange man appears in town, showcasing something marvelous, and blackmails Peter into helping him, Peter finds himself whisked away on the greatest adventure of his life. And what is in the box, the one the strange man was showcasing? It might hold the answer to all of Peter's questions. MY THOUGHTS - I was so shocked and surprised by the mastery of this book. I thought it would be your average MG novel, but it was so, so SO much more. The writing, for one, is exemplary. Completely and utterly gripping and beautiful and it just flowed so well. It had a fantastical element to it that really went along with the theme of the book. It was perfect. I read this book nearly a year ago (or listened to it via audio, I should say), and I honestly have no complaints about it at all. It left only the fondest memories of the story and the most beautiful ideas in my head. Inspiration is still abundant when I think of this story. Someday, I will have it on my shelf. I will read it to my children. It's just that good. CHARACTER NOTES - Peter Nimble is no ordinary boy. He may look like one on the outside, but inside he has courage and love and all the capacity for adventure that an avid reader could every hope for. He is one of a kind, also. He may have elements of the character we all want to read about, but he's his own person - totally a unique creation. I loved him so much. It was the perfect narration because, although he could not see, he described things based on how they felt or sounded or tasted, and it really added so much to who he was. The other side characters were also excellent. Especially Sir Tode. OMG I loved him so much!! The narrator's voice for him was perfect and it made me laugh! Sir Tode had the best one-liners, hands down. There was also an old woman, a whale-like sea creature, thieves, and an evil king. There were orphans and bugs and monsters and all sorts of other characters to keep the reader glued to the page. (Or the audiobook, if you prefer.) But honestly. I can't say enough about how glorious these characters were! STORY NOTES - And if the characters were glorious, wait till I tell you about the story! Good golly, it was absolutely out of this world fanTAStic! Totally amazing. All the fantasy elements were there, plus so much more that makes it its own unique fairy tale. The execution was just as brilliant as the idea, too, which is saying something. I loved absolutely every moment that included the magic box. I won't tell you what's inside of it - that's just half the fun - but I can't help but mention it. The imagery was stunning. I just...I don't even know how to explain how I'm feeling right now without giving it all away! Besides the box, I loved every setting and place that Peter Nimble found himself in. It was all ingeniously written and had such a grand scope. The ideas were so brilliant that some settings I normally don't particularly enjoy reading about - such as the desert - became absolutely the most interesting thing I'd every read about. Annnnd on top of that - the ending. It was so perfect and heartwarming and fairy tale and lovely. It leaves the reader wondering and imaginative and excited and ready for adventure. There's no end to how magical it all was! In short, this book had it all. And what else is there to say, without giving it all away? You read it for yourself. You'll understand. SUMMING IT UP - Utterly gorgeous! In every way! I'm so stunned but the magnificence of this story and can't wait for more and more people to read it! I've been telling everyone I can about it. It deserves to be read over and over again! For the Parents - So clean and sweet, and not too graphic so young readers can enjoy it as well. Recommended 10+ Read more reviews at Yearning to Read!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" is an adventure and fiction book filled with twists and turns. In my opinion, "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" is a book, which I enjoyed very much, and had many unexpected events, such as Peter going from a thief to a king. Also, it was interesting to follow the adventures of a blind person. "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" is a book I would recommended to many of my friends and even to you. "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" takes place in Pet "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" is an adventure and fiction book filled with twists and turns. In my opinion, "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" is a book, which I enjoyed very much, and had many unexpected events, such as Peter going from a thief to a king. Also, it was interesting to follow the adventures of a blind person. "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" is a book I would recommended to many of my friends and even to you. "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" takes place in Peter's home town, Professor Cake's land, the Just deserts, and the vanished kingdom, which becomes Hazel Port once again. Also, a few of these settings may be confusing, because in the story they explain how some of the settings are not on the map, some of them are, such as, Peter's hometown. In Peter's hometown, Peter receives a riddle saying, "Kings aplenty, princes few, The ravens scattered and seas withdrew. Only stranger may being relief, But darkness will reign, unless he's-...", so Peter was determined to solve the riddle. However, the riddle was not complete, so he went on a journey to find the writer of the riddle. Also, since Peter is blind, he was given a companion, Sir Tode, to help him see and guide him through his adventure. Then, he reaches his final destination and even more obstacles to get to the answer to his riddle. Therefore, it is person vs. fate or Peter vs Fate, because of all the interminable obstacles Peter faces, while being blind, his biggest obstacle. The other conflict I noticed, was person vs. self or Peter vs. Peter, because Peter has to face his greatest obstacle, which is being blind. Also the main themes of "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes" is determination and love & sacrifice, because Peter was so determined to solve the riddle and when he figure out about Peg and his family his determination turned more into a sacrifice for love. It was a sacrifice for love, because he fought and overcame all of his obstacles, so he can have what was once his back. The title, "Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes", relates to the story, because the main character, Peter, is given 3 sets of eyes, the fantastic eyes, that give him extraordinary abilities including, transformation, transportation, and sight. According to the story, "Ever so gently, he slipped the two eyes into his sockets. He blinked. And just like that, Peter Nimble vanished into thin air. ...these eyes turned him into whatever animal he had last touched ...'They are just normal eyes.' He blinked, welling up with tears. 'My very own pair of eyes.'". This shows Peter after putting in his golden eyes, his onyx eyes, and his emerald eyes and how they work. Therefore, the title of the book shows Peter and his fantastic pairs of eyes in the story, how Peter used his eyes to overcome obstacles. I was surprised when Peter turned out to be Prince NoName, because he spent the first 10 years of his life in a poor village where he was a thief, only to turn out to be a lost prince. This happened, because a war broke out at Peter's father's kingdom and the ravens did not want Peter to get harmed, so they pecked out his emerald eyes, which resembled his father's eyes, and sent him down Troublesome Lake. Then, he ended up in a poor village, Peter's home town, where he grew up an orphan and a thief. Then, he found out he was a lost prince by receiving a box of eyes and solving a riddle. The story states, "...the tale of the prince who became a thief to become a king.". In conclusion, I rated this book a 4 out of 5 stars, because it could have had more events towards the end. For example, they could have showed how Peter and Sir Tode went on to their new adventure, or how Peter and Peg served as the new king and queen. However, I loved the unexpected events in the book and the the resolution of all the obstacles. Also, it wasn't my most favorite book. I would recommend this book to readers who enjoy adventure books and who enjoy page turners. If your planning to read this, you should know that this book is is taking you on a journey, filled with many obstacles and shocking events, which is a book I would definitely recommend to others.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Peter Nimble, a boy who was abandoned as an infant, is the greatest thief in the world. Despite the fact that he is blind, he can pick locks and sniff out loot better than any other thief. He finally stumbles into an adventure that sends him to a lost land to save a bunch of people from some bad things that are happening. I'm having a tough time figuring out what I liked and did not like about this story. It took me over two weeks to read this whole book, a snail's pace for a determined summer r Peter Nimble, a boy who was abandoned as an infant, is the greatest thief in the world. Despite the fact that he is blind, he can pick locks and sniff out loot better than any other thief. He finally stumbles into an adventure that sends him to a lost land to save a bunch of people from some bad things that are happening. I'm having a tough time figuring out what I liked and did not like about this story. It took me over two weeks to read this whole book, a snail's pace for a determined summer reader of children's books. So, what I liked: Adventure, adventure, adventure!! Peter Nimble goes everywhere and faces danger after danger. Many of his dire situations are unique and have a fresh feel. The narrator has a strong and fun voice and I enjoyed the humor and mischief that shined through. I also really liked the mystery elements of the story and that the reader doesn't always know who's good or bad. But what I didn't like was that this book was just packed with story. It felt like every one of Joseph Campbell's ideas about heroes was included in the text. The plot of this book is nearly impossible to sum up in just a sentence or two (see my brief summary above). While Peter Nimble and the main characters are well-developed, the plot swirls around them in a confusing mess of good, bad, right, wrong, and just plain gruesome. I bet kids will like this book and I would recommend to students, especially boys, in grades 5 - 7. They will be delighted with Peter's early thieving days and will be absorbed by his adventures in the Vanished Kingdom. I definitely look forward to reading Auxier's works and hope that he continues to develop wonderful characters. ARC Provided by... the publisher at ALA 2011 Annual Conference.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kwoomac

    I generally love a story with a quest. But... Our young hero, ten-year-old Peter Nimble, who is blind, is sent on a vague quest to save an unknown someone from something in a place that no longer exists. The characters are quirky and Peter has to figure out who the good guys and bad guys are and then fight for what's right. There was actually a bit too much carnage in the story for me. Lots of people and animals getting slaughtered left and right. I thought it was overkill (ha!). And a personal p I generally love a story with a quest. But... Our young hero, ten-year-old Peter Nimble, who is blind, is sent on a vague quest to save an unknown someone from something in a place that no longer exists. The characters are quirky and Peter has to figure out who the good guys and bad guys are and then fight for what's right. There was actually a bit too much carnage in the story for me. Lots of people and animals getting slaughtered left and right. I thought it was overkill (ha!). And a personal pet peeve of mine is to have one of the characters survives years of struggle only to be killed off late in the game. Hate this! It takes me out of the story. I always feel like the author is saying, "See, I can kill off whomever I want." So then I'm angry and distracted from the action. Again, just my pet peeve. Fun enough story line. May be just right for a ten-year-old reader.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This epic was really enjoyable and I look forward to the next in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lili P

    This book was fun! I really enjoyed it! It was a little slow, and some of the world developments felt weird rather than charming, but I loved the characters.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is an odd, but dramatic tale about fulfilling a legacy and embracing your true nature. I liked it, but I had a lot of trouble staying engaged with the story and I put it down many times in favor of another book. The story is sometimes violent, sometimes suspenseful, and often just...weird. I have to admit, though, that once I committed to finish the book, I began to become enthralled with the storytelling. You know that a book is good when you plan to read just a couple of pages, but find yo This is an odd, but dramatic tale about fulfilling a legacy and embracing your true nature. I liked it, but I had a lot of trouble staying engaged with the story and I put it down many times in favor of another book. The story is sometimes violent, sometimes suspenseful, and often just...weird. I have to admit, though, that once I committed to finish the book, I began to become enthralled with the storytelling. You know that a book is good when you plan to read just a couple of pages, but find yourself startled by how many you've read when you finally come up for air. interesting quotes: "I much prefer nights myself - the world takes on greater dimensions when obscured by shadow. " (p. 51) "Being wise, Professor Cake knew that any relationship not beginning with a punch or two would most assuredly fade over time: it is a well-known fact that brawling begets friendship. " (p. 55) "In my experience, heroes are no more good than you or I. And though occasionally noble, they are just as often cunning, resourceful, and a little brash." (p. 65) "It was a choice between comfortable misery and terrifying uncertainty." (p. 68) "There is something wonderful that happens between true friends when they find themselves no longer wasting time with meaningless chatter. Instead, they become content just to share each other's company. It is the opinion of some that this sort of friendship is the only kind worth having. While jokes and anecdotes are nice, they do not compare with the beauty of shared solitude." (pp. 75-76) "Now, there is a wonderful thing in this world called 'foresight.' It is a gift treasured above all others because it allows one to know what the future holds. Most people with foresight end up wielding immense power in life, often becoming great rulers or librarians." (p. 181) "You may have observed in your own lives that there is a great power in storytelling. A well-spun tale can transport listeners away from their humdrum lives and return them with an enlarged sense of the world." (p. 218) "...for no child ever truly forgets the love of his mother." (p. 253) "If you ever have had the chance to spend quality time with a villainous mastermind, you will know that these people are extraordinarily fond of discussing their evil schemes out loud." (p. 268) "You know I won't abide slander in my cage. If you're going to talk like that, then you can march your shackles and your attitude right out of this slave wheel." (p. 323) "Many a historian will tell you that a great performance is just as much a matter of timing as it is material." (p. 371) "He could never remain ashore too long without feeling the itch to sail out once more. Sir Tode always insisted on joining him - believing rightly that one should never leave a good friend to adventure alone." (p. 380)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joceline Foley

    Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is a classic hero-on-a-quest novel, yet it manages to be anything but predictable and boring. The archetypal characters are fresh, funny, and smart. What I loved: --The fly on the wall narrator, who tells the story with wry asides and witty wordplay. --The view of the world, reminiscent of Roald Dahl's children's novels, that adults are evil and stupid, for the most part, and children are the smart, brave heroes who can be trusted above anyone else. --The author' Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes is a classic hero-on-a-quest novel, yet it manages to be anything but predictable and boring. The archetypal characters are fresh, funny, and smart. What I loved: --The fly on the wall narrator, who tells the story with wry asides and witty wordplay. --The view of the world, reminiscent of Roald Dahl's children's novels, that adults are evil and stupid, for the most part, and children are the smart, brave heroes who can be trusted above anyone else. --The author's ability to write engaging children's literature that manages to be dark--quite dark--without being completely brainless, like much of what exists in YA literature (cough, cough, Twilight...). I won't say more, for fear of revealing any spoilers. I was able to pretty much devour the book in just two days, thanks to "Yo Gabba Gabba," naptime, and my husband, all of which kept my children occupied so that I could read. I really look forward to whatever else Auxier writes in the future!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen Bigheart

    This book is exactly what you would expect from the cover. What about the "fantastic" eyes? I'll tell you, they are magical! They get Peter - and cast of characters - out of harrowing situations, they put him in harrowing situations, but most of all....they take him for a wild ride. Fun fantasy suited for upper elem and middle grader! Language is challenging for the smarty-pants, and the adventure will keep every kid tuned in. I hate to say that this book is perfect for a male reluctant reader ( This book is exactly what you would expect from the cover. What about the "fantastic" eyes? I'll tell you, they are magical! They get Peter - and cast of characters - out of harrowing situations, they put him in harrowing situations, but most of all....they take him for a wild ride. Fun fantasy suited for upper elem and middle grader! Language is challenging for the smarty-pants, and the adventure will keep every kid tuned in. I hate to say that this book is perfect for a male reluctant reader (you know, labeling), but this book is perfect for a male reluctant reader. This would be excellent for a read-a-loud! I know several little ones that will be getting this one for the holidays. 4 Stars

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Farrell

    This is a very enjoyable YA book. I could not put it down and give it at least 4-1/2 stars. The main character is Peter who was found floating in a small crib with his eyes pecked out by ravens. Kind of a rough start. Following that was a very rough childhood that lead him to become a great child thief. Then he is suddenly sent toward his destiny on a mission with a most unlikely companion. I liked the subtle humor that the author has sprinkled throughout the book. There are impossible characters This is a very enjoyable YA book. I could not put it down and give it at least 4-1/2 stars. The main character is Peter who was found floating in a small crib with his eyes pecked out by ravens. Kind of a rough start. Following that was a very rough childhood that lead him to become a great child thief. Then he is suddenly sent toward his destiny on a mission with a most unlikely companion. I liked the subtle humor that the author has sprinkled throughout the book. There are impossible characters and an improbable plot that when mixed together worked out very well. The end left a lot of room for more adventures from Peter Nimble. I expect more good things from Jonathan Auxier in the future.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Ugghh This is a hard one to review! I liked some parts and other parts I didn't. I would not let my kids read this book, there are some violent parts that would scare my son (he has autism). Saying that I might read any further books in the series, I kinda want to know what's going to happen but not enough to add to my long TBR. Ugghh This is a hard one to review! I liked some parts and other parts I didn't. I would not let my kids read this book, there are some violent parts that would scare my son (he has autism). Saying that I might read any further books in the series, I kinda want to know what's going to happen but not enough to add to my long TBR.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angela Seals

    This is the first book I have ever pre-ordered before publication. Can't wait to get my hands on it in August. This is the first book I have ever pre-ordered before publication. Can't wait to get my hands on it in August.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maham S

    ❤️❤️

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily Goldthwaite

    LOVED this book! So amazing. Our whole family loved it. Two years later our child who was five at the time, still talks about it, and I often find myself thinking about it. Loved it!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.