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Running a marathon is much more than just a metaphor in Benjamin Carey’s powerful memoir Barefoot in November. His inspiring story, beautifully told, encourages us to take charge of our own fate. This book captures his emotional, physical and spiritual journey to the finish line and beyond. Benjamin Carey’s world is understandably rocked when he discovers that he is living Running a marathon is much more than just a metaphor in Benjamin Carey’s powerful memoir Barefoot in November. His inspiring story, beautifully told, encourages us to take charge of our own fate. This book captures his emotional, physical and spiritual journey to the finish line and beyond. Benjamin Carey’s world is understandably rocked when he discovers that he is living with an aortic aneurysm. He credits his family, doctors and surgeons, as well as post John Ritter awareness, for his survival. In the wake of John’s loss the demand for information about aortic dissection and its genetic predisposition was heightened. This wave of awareness has brought about a significant rise in correct diagnosis and in proactive treatment for this dangerous ticking time bomb. Ben’s wife Nicole and his mother keep him on track by reminding him to consider John's fate when assessing his own. I especially appreciate the simplicity and specificity with which he lays out the medical and personal events leading to his life saving surgery. His writing strikes the perfect tone while honestly recounting what it took to survive his ordeal. The tenderness, toughness and humor required will be recognizable to anyone who has gone through this kind of crash course in aortic disease or any life changing event. I recommend this touching and inspiring book to everyone. -Amy Yasbeck, Author & Founder of the John Ritter Foundation


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Running a marathon is much more than just a metaphor in Benjamin Carey’s powerful memoir Barefoot in November. His inspiring story, beautifully told, encourages us to take charge of our own fate. This book captures his emotional, physical and spiritual journey to the finish line and beyond. Benjamin Carey’s world is understandably rocked when he discovers that he is living Running a marathon is much more than just a metaphor in Benjamin Carey’s powerful memoir Barefoot in November. His inspiring story, beautifully told, encourages us to take charge of our own fate. This book captures his emotional, physical and spiritual journey to the finish line and beyond. Benjamin Carey’s world is understandably rocked when he discovers that he is living with an aortic aneurysm. He credits his family, doctors and surgeons, as well as post John Ritter awareness, for his survival. In the wake of John’s loss the demand for information about aortic dissection and its genetic predisposition was heightened. This wave of awareness has brought about a significant rise in correct diagnosis and in proactive treatment for this dangerous ticking time bomb. Ben’s wife Nicole and his mother keep him on track by reminding him to consider John's fate when assessing his own. I especially appreciate the simplicity and specificity with which he lays out the medical and personal events leading to his life saving surgery. His writing strikes the perfect tone while honestly recounting what it took to survive his ordeal. The tenderness, toughness and humor required will be recognizable to anyone who has gone through this kind of crash course in aortic disease or any life changing event. I recommend this touching and inspiring book to everyone. -Amy Yasbeck, Author & Founder of the John Ritter Foundation

30 review for Barefoot in November

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lyn (Readinghearts)

    Barefoot in November is not the type of book I usually read. Although I have been know to read almost any genre, memoirs and self-help books are probably the ones that I read the least of. The premise for this book sounded interesting, though, and it was loaned to me by a friend. Since it was only 190 pages I figured I would give it a try. What I found here was a well written account of the author's journey through his illness and recovery from an aortic aneurysm. I found Benjamin J. Carey's abi Barefoot in November is not the type of book I usually read. Although I have been know to read almost any genre, memoirs and self-help books are probably the ones that I read the least of. The premise for this book sounded interesting, though, and it was loaned to me by a friend. Since it was only 190 pages I figured I would give it a try. What I found here was a well written account of the author's journey through his illness and recovery from an aortic aneurysm. I found Benjamin J. Carey's ability to tell his story and keep me interested wonderful. I especially loved the way that he was able to describe his feelings of denial, depression, anger, etc, without being angry or depressing. In addition, the fact that a healthy, active adult could have such a life threatening illness and not know it also made quite an impact on me. After all, as Ben himself says, this was not a case of an over-weight, sedentary person dealing with the results of his bad lifestyle choices. Another part of the book that drew my attention was how great his family support system was. In fact, after reading the book, I think his wife must be a saint! I'm not sure if I could have come through all of this quite as well as both she and Ben did. In the end, this is a book about facing life and not letting it get the best of you. It is about knowing your responsibility to your family and acting accordingly, and ultimately, about fighting and winning. A great read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason Lilly

    While it is difficult for me to relate to Carey's predicament (no major medical problems, so far *knock on wood*), his memoir Barefoot in November contains one element that draws me to all memoirs: candid honesty. Carey's words are often harsh and bitter, but they are always honest. In spite of this occasional bitterness, Barefoot in November is ultimately a success story. Ben is a survivor, and proud of it. He is also living proof that "good health" is a holistic lifestyle change and not just " While it is difficult for me to relate to Carey's predicament (no major medical problems, so far *knock on wood*), his memoir Barefoot in November contains one element that draws me to all memoirs: candid honesty. Carey's words are often harsh and bitter, but they are always honest. In spite of this occasional bitterness, Barefoot in November is ultimately a success story. Ben is a survivor, and proud of it. He is also living proof that "good health" is a holistic lifestyle change and not just "diet and exercise." I love the juxtaposition of the simplicity of his writing style with the deep issues he tackles: priorities, love, death, family. I also appreciate that Carey pulls no punches, especially at the beginning of the book when he begins to wrestle with his illness and deal with the weight of his diagnosis. While in the waiting room, Carey has an interior monologue that I'm convinced would be expected from any young man suddenly struck with health problems: "I sat on a vinyl chair in the waiting room...wondering what the hell I was doing sitting around with a bunch of geriatrics. I didn't have anything against them, but I didn't belong there...I felt uncomfortable and out of place." It is this voice, Ben's voice, that I appreciate. Authors like Carey, who admit their faults and lay their hearts out (pardon the expression) for all to see, regardless of possible criticism. This is what I love about memoirs and Carey has done a superb job.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    BAREFOOT IN NOVEMBER is a real life account of Ben Carey.  His wife is Nicole.  He is as heathy as an ox, always takes care of himself, and is as stubborn as a bull! There  is a history of heart disease in his family.  After feeling fatigue for a while and it not being the norm for Ben, his wife finally gets him to make an appointment for a stress test.  He is diagnosed with a aortic aneurysm.  The same thing that killed John Ritter.  Ben refuses to believe it is that bad until he talks with som BAREFOOT IN NOVEMBER is a real life account of Ben Carey.  His wife is Nicole.  He is as heathy as an ox, always takes care of himself, and is as stubborn as a bull! There  is a history of heart disease in his family.  After feeling fatigue for a while and it not being the norm for Ben, his wife finally gets him to make an appointment for a stress test.  He is diagnosed with a aortic aneurysm.  The same thing that killed John Ritter.  Ben refuses to believe it is that bad until he talks with some life saving friends and family members.  He is only 37 years old. His wife is pregnant and they also have two small children. Wow!! Talk about a bump in the road huh? I don't usually read true life stories but I sure am glad I read the one!   His  story would surely be helpful to someone going through with the same life changing issues. It was very warm and heart breaking at times, but also funny and uplifting! Ben is very honest in his book and some readers might take it as naive but he was only 37 at the time, more fit than some people half his age. I can totally understand his was of thinking at first.  If you are dealing with a life threatening issue, this is an awesome read and it shouldn't be missed!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Butler

    Simply put: This book can change your outlook on life. If you are dealing with a life-threatening situation of your own, have a loved one that is, or are simply looking for some answers to what the meaning of life is... this book is for you! During this read, at different points in the book, I found myself laughing, nodding my head, shaking my head, and in near tears. The author does a great job of painting the picture of a man who, like most, made some mistakes in life, but learned so much in a Simply put: This book can change your outlook on life. If you are dealing with a life-threatening situation of your own, have a loved one that is, or are simply looking for some answers to what the meaning of life is... this book is for you! During this read, at different points in the book, I found myself laughing, nodding my head, shaking my head, and in near tears. The author does a great job of painting the picture of a man who, like most, made some mistakes in life, but learned so much in a short period of time due to the fact that he was thrown into a life-threatening situation in a matter of seconds. This man was living a normal life before being brought to a place that no one wants to be, and ended up coming out of it a better man, father, and husband. Again, this is a great read. Highly recommended for anyone who is looking to better themselves, find some meaning in life, or simply find a good ol' uplifting book. 5 stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Glenda

    Benjamin Carey was living the American dream when due to fatigue, he goes in for a routine physical. He discovers he has an aortic aneurysm and is facing the possibility of saying goodbye forever to his pregnant wife and two young children. Carey describes his journey through diagnosis, denial, anger, frustration, acceptance, surgery, and recovery. On the one year anniversary of his heart surgery, Benjamin and his wife Nicole run the New York City marathon. This uplifting and inspirational story Benjamin Carey was living the American dream when due to fatigue, he goes in for a routine physical. He discovers he has an aortic aneurysm and is facing the possibility of saying goodbye forever to his pregnant wife and two young children. Carey describes his journey through diagnosis, denial, anger, frustration, acceptance, surgery, and recovery. On the one year anniversary of his heart surgery, Benjamin and his wife Nicole run the New York City marathon. This uplifting and inspirational story reminds us all not to take life for granted, but to cherish each moment and live life to the fullest. Don't miss an opportunity to say thank you, to show gratitude or tell someone you love them because you never know when it may be your last chance to do so. One thing I didn't like was the organization of the the book.....the first chapter was over 100 pages long with no obvious breaks. Made it hard to stop and start up again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brenda VanWie

    Once I started reading this book I couldn't put it down. It was captivating, inspirational and informative. It provides the reader with a story of a typical man with a young family dealing with a life threatening condition in the prime of his life. His courage throughout his medical procedures and his determination in the year following, give everyone hope that they can survive and live life to the fullest regardless of what they may face. The lessons he learned and shared with the reader are ea Once I started reading this book I couldn't put it down. It was captivating, inspirational and informative. It provides the reader with a story of a typical man with a young family dealing with a life threatening condition in the prime of his life. His courage throughout his medical procedures and his determination in the year following, give everyone hope that they can survive and live life to the fullest regardless of what they may face. The lessons he learned and shared with the reader are easily applied to many challenging situations people may face.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Morgan

    Hi folks, I read this book a while ago, and as a fellow aortic aneurysm sufferer I can relate to his story. Here is the review I placed on Amazon at that time, and my opinion of the book and the author are extremely favorable. An inspiration: Amazon Review (just after reading the book): 5.0 out of 5 stars Great First Book, Great First Marathon, Great First Open Heart Surgery - Book Review: `Barefoot in November', April 12, 2011 By Old Dog in Training "Kevin Morgan" (Carrboro, NC, USA) blogging at ht Hi folks, I read this book a while ago, and as a fellow aortic aneurysm sufferer I can relate to his story. Here is the review I placed on Amazon at that time, and my opinion of the book and the author are extremely favorable. An inspiration: Amazon Review (just after reading the book): 5.0 out of 5 stars Great First Book, Great First Marathon, Great First Open Heart Surgery - Book Review: `Barefoot in November', April 12, 2011 By Old Dog in Training "Kevin Morgan" (Carrboro, NC, USA) blogging at http://athletewithstent.com Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: Barefoot in November (Paperback) Brief Book Review: I went on line last week to purchase Benjamin's book, entitled `Barefoot in November.' It arrived in my mailbox on Thursday and I had read it from cover to cover by Sunday morning, in spite of many interruptions. It was a fascinating and emotional read for me. Benjamin describes his distressing and fear-laden journey through diagnosis, denial, anger, frustration, unwilling acceptance, actual acceptance, surgeon selection, surgery, recovery with a few `road bumps,' and then the birth of his third child, and finally training for the New York City Marathon whilst still recovering from the preceding events. Now! That was a busy year! This book brought back many memories of my aortic surgery, especially the associated fear, the critical need for support of family and friends, and the courage needed to face the issue head on. This book made me cry a little (not very British!), laugh a lot, and it provides the much needed inspiration that we all need to survive life's difficulties and challenges with a positive spirit. Benjamin's writing style reminds me of the way another one of my heroes, Tim Ferriss, writes - a young guy with lots of balls! How his wife puts up with him I have no idea, but he sure loves her and their kids. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has relatives, friends, or children that they care about; aka everyone! I would also encourage people to put out the word, as `Barefoot in November' chronicals the critical nature of listening to your body and then doing something about any warning signals, which can be very subtle. Denial can kill, and it nearly did kill Benjamin Carey. Thank goodness he listened, finally! What is more, he is working hard as an advocate for awareness of the risks associated with aortic aneurysms, which are much more common than most people realize. Great job on all fronts! I must add, as the author did in his extensive acknowledgments section, that it is evident that his successes were attributable in no small part to the perseverance of his wife, Nicole! Congratulations to Benjamin Carey, his family, friends, and all of his health-care providers. Thanks so much for writing this important book! Cheers, Kevin

  8. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Wow! This is one of those books that I feel the need to share with friends because it's just that good. Normally it takes a while for me to truly get into a book, but not this one. I was captivated within the first couple of pages, and it continued until the very last page. I could truly experience the ordeal Carey's family was going through, despite it being based on a health scare that I knew only a little about prior to reading this. The characters are fully developed, allowing you to really in Wow! This is one of those books that I feel the need to share with friends because it's just that good. Normally it takes a while for me to truly get into a book, but not this one. I was captivated within the first couple of pages, and it continued until the very last page. I could truly experience the ordeal Carey's family was going through, despite it being based on a health scare that I knew only a little about prior to reading this. The characters are fully developed, allowing you to really involve yourself as the story progresses, but Carey didn't use so much description that I found myself losing focus or getting bored. There was just enough, which I don't find often enough in my reading selections. I truly could not put this book down. I read it in one day and felt the need to continue through it because I was invested in this family and their experience. I found myself sympathizing with them and feeling the roller coaster of hope, doubt, nervousness, and relief throughout the book. There was not a part of the book that did not speak to me. Technically speaking, there were some grammatical errors in the book, but not enough to affect the story or frustrate me. In fact, it was endearing because this is Carey's first book, and it's obvious he's writing to share his experience through a very emotional year, not focus on becoming a writer with an emphasis on correctness. I highly recommend this book, and will suggest it as a selection for my book club as I believe it is something that most people would appreciate. Disclosure: I received this book as part of a goodreads giveaway, but the opinions expressed are honest and my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    Great story..a must read for any stubborn patient going through an illness. I actually found the dynamics between Carey and his wife pretty humorous, as I am sure that is the same way my husband and I would be! More than for the basis of the story, I liked it more for what Carey had written between the lines related to familial dynamics and work ethic, as well. I thought he made some very important points whether a person has a life threatening illness or not!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Literary Chanteuse

    This book has pure raw honesty and felt as though I was listening to the author telling me his story over coffee. It literally drew me in at the preface. I was anticipating an emotional journey as this man and his family overcome a battle with aortic aneurysm however it is also full of wit and charm. Truly inspirational!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    This is a very reflective book. It makes you stop and think about what is important in your life and why and what would happen if you got sick and didn't have tomorrow. I got this book in the Goodreads Giveaways. This is a very reflective book. It makes you stop and think about what is important in your life and why and what would happen if you got sick and didn't have tomorrow. I got this book in the Goodreads Giveaways.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Stanley

    I thought this book was amazing. It was very well written and definitely a quick read. It was very informative of aortic aneurysms, so much that I want to go get checked out now. I would definitely recommend this to anyone whose been affected by aortic aneurysms.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    AMAZING! Such an uplifting and inspirational book. Couldn't put it down. AMAZING! Such an uplifting and inspirational book. Couldn't put it down.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    I think this book was a great read! The authors journey was raw & genuine.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Reese

    The list of "things" that I can't remember is growing at a faster pace than my fast-growing to-read list. A scary realization. That I can't remember why I bought Benjamin J. Carey's BAREFOOT IN NOVEMBER does not surprise me. When I took it off one of my actual to-read shelves, the title and cover scene must have kept me from putting it back and moving on to another unread book. Since I did not recall anything that I may have read about the work, the sepia image of a little barefoot boy in motion The list of "things" that I can't remember is growing at a faster pace than my fast-growing to-read list. A scary realization. That I can't remember why I bought Benjamin J. Carey's BAREFOOT IN NOVEMBER does not surprise me. When I took it off one of my actual to-read shelves, the title and cover scene must have kept me from putting it back and moving on to another unread book. Since I did not recall anything that I may have read about the work, the sepia image of a little barefoot boy in motion with the house of a bygone (perhaps) era behind him sent my imagination to a "place" where this memoir never goes. Only a few pages into the book, I realized that it would not be the sort of personal narrative that I had envisioned. But because the author was headed toward heartland -- I'm referring to the organ, not to love -- I kept reading. My husband's recent cardiovascular "adventures" whispered, "Read this; it may be useful." Not yet, thank heavens. And now that I've finished reading the work, I have no reason to think that it will be useful down the road. If I ever need a book about aortic aneurysms or about running in the New York Marathon a year after major heart surgery, Carey's would not be my pick. It's a "heavy" work -- heavy on cliches, that is. And despite Carey's admirable qualities, I don't particularly like the person revealed in this memoir. Although I'm disinclined to overlook grammatical and spelling errors in published nonfiction, when the publisher is an unknown press, I'm willing to lower my expectations. I'm not, however, willing to discard them. The number and type of errors in BAREFOOT IN NOVEMBER distracted and irritated me. "Call me, Ismael"; no, seriously, call me a cranky, unrealistic, old-school English teacher. I've been called much worse. I can't help feeling as if I'm having a myocardial infarction when I see "it's" and "its" misused or forms of "lie" and "lay" misused. So what? Who cares? Wait -- how about an apostrophe in the verb "gets"? OMG. Suddenly I felt compelled to read the "ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS" (apparently Carey prefers the less common US spelling). The charitable part of me wanted to believe that he couldn't afford -- and therefore didn't have -- editors or even one editor. Alas, another foolish notion. Carey tells his readers: "There is a rumor about my executive editor being such a perfectionist that she circles errors in library books and returns them, so if you ever come across one you know who did it." If she has a benefits package, I want her job. Appalling mechanical errors. Lame dialogue. Dull exposition. I'd give it a D-.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Capanelli

    Carey's brash prose and honesty should not be taken for "arrogance". His fierceness and ambition are to be admired, and his imperfections are answered with as many instances in which he pours out his heart and shows his sensitive side. I was intrigued after seeing the author's interview on the Larry Davidson show and was not surprised to find dozens of good reviews on the book. It never ceases to amaze me though when a handful of people refer to someone who's almost lost their life as "arrogant" Carey's brash prose and honesty should not be taken for "arrogance". His fierceness and ambition are to be admired, and his imperfections are answered with as many instances in which he pours out his heart and shows his sensitive side. I was intrigued after seeing the author's interview on the Larry Davidson show and was not surprised to find dozens of good reviews on the book. It never ceases to amaze me though when a handful of people refer to someone who's almost lost their life as "arrogant". I almost didn't buy Matt Long's "The Long Run" because of a few such reviews on that book. I'm a runner and I'm glad I wasn't persuaded by the reviews who similarly referred to Matt as "Arrogant" and "Conceited". Running the NYC Marathon for a healthy person is an accomplishment let alone by someone who's almost died. I downloaded Barefoot in November on my kindle, and was captivated by this man's reflections on his brush with death. I cried reading the part where his son greets him at the door on his return home from the hospital, and the passage when his newborn slept on his chest. This is not an "arrogant" man. The story is at once heartbreaking and triumphant. I read a review that criticizes the book as being a collection of "diary entries", but I enjoyed how the book was divided into "memories" preceded by relevant quotes. I appreciated the uniqueness over the traditional chapter 1,2,3 format. After seeing the interview I was not disappointed by the book, and it makes me feel good that a percentage of what I paid for it will go to a heart charity. Hearing Carey talk about his alcoholism, childhood struggles, and near death made me want to learn more about him. I will definitely be anticipating his next book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I found "Barefoot in November", by Benjamin J. Carey, while doing some research on aortic aneurysms. Just a couple of days before this, I found out what the doctor was initially calling an enlarged aortic root had increased in size, and now I was hearing the word aneurysm. Combine this with a leaky bicuspid aortic valve, and I was told by my doctor that we were getting close. I came across Heartosaurus.com, and could not stop reading. This is where I found Benjamin's book "Barefoot in November". I found "Barefoot in November", by Benjamin J. Carey, while doing some research on aortic aneurysms. Just a couple of days before this, I found out what the doctor was initially calling an enlarged aortic root had increased in size, and now I was hearing the word aneurysm. Combine this with a leaky bicuspid aortic valve, and I was told by my doctor that we were getting close. I came across Heartosaurus.com, and could not stop reading. This is where I found Benjamin's book "Barefoot in November". It took about a week to come through the mail, but seemed like so much longer. I had never looked so forward to reading a book, than I did for this one. I'll be honest, I have never been one to be able to stay awake through a book. When it came in, I started reading immediately. I could not put it down. I felt justified for all the feelings that I had over the last week and a half. Don't want to give anything away here, but the feelings Benjamin was going through, was point on with the way I was feeling. The denial, the anger, the fear, mixed in with the uncertainties. This book has helped me to better prepare myself for my upcoming surgery, as well as prepare my family. My wife is currently reading this book, and my mother, who lives thirteen hours away has now ordered the book too. "Barefoot In November" is a must read for anyone about to go through or has gone through Open Heart Surgery, as well as family members, friends, or anyone that is looking to be inspired. Thank you Benjamin J. Carey for sharing your's and your family's ups and downs throughout that trying year. You all have given me the strength and courage to get past this difficult time.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Thurmon

    This book changed my life. I was diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm on May 4, 2011, and I found the author's blog heartosaurus.com and the book while I was scouring google for information on the condition. I am only 27 years old and I identified with the author's story immediately and am so grateful that he shared his experience. I felt all of the same feelings of denial, anger, and fear. The book is very candid and often profane but the story could not be told any other way. If you're religious This book changed my life. I was diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm on May 4, 2011, and I found the author's blog heartosaurus.com and the book while I was scouring google for information on the condition. I am only 27 years old and I identified with the author's story immediately and am so grateful that he shared his experience. I felt all of the same feelings of denial, anger, and fear. The book is very candid and often profane but the story could not be told any other way. If you're religious or like light hearted books, this isn't for you. I know how the author felt because I've been there and I'm so glad that I was able to read this story during a time in my life when the whole world came crashing in, I was angry and bitter, and no one seemed to understand. No one could understand what I was going through, but this book gave me hope. The best part about it was how real the author came across. This is not an author worried about offending anyone, he tells it how it is and that's what makes this book so great! I had open heart surgery on June 27, 2011 and am on the road to a good recovery. Thanks Benjamin Carey, I'll be looking for you at Cow Harbor this year!

  19. 5 out of 5

    colleen

    Barefoot in November was an outstanding book. I could not put it down once I started I read it. It is a true page turner. It is an inspiring, emotional memoir of his life while going after the "American Dream" he is suddenly faced with his own mortality. It takes you on his amazing journey as if you are right there. It is filled with fear, sorrow, joy and ultimatey triumph. It has left me thinking for days. It shows how truly important families and spouses are and how they all pulled togethe Barefoot in November was an outstanding book. I could not put it down once I started I read it. It is a true page turner. It is an inspiring, emotional memoir of his life while going after the "American Dream" he is suddenly faced with his own mortality. It takes you on his amazing journey as if you are right there. It is filled with fear, sorrow, joy and ultimatey triumph. It has left me thinking for days. It shows how truly important families and spouses are and how they all pulled together in this story is beautiful and touching.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Rutha

    This is the type of book that will have you staying up late and thinking about coming home to read. The story is engaging, motivational, inspirational and full of heartfelt honesty. The writing will take you to the exact moment that the author describes and when you look up from the book, you won't believe how long you've been reading! An amazing read hands down! This is the type of book that will have you staying up late and thinking about coming home to read. The story is engaging, motivational, inspirational and full of heartfelt honesty. The writing will take you to the exact moment that the author describes and when you look up from the book, you won't believe how long you've been reading! An amazing read hands down!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    A very heart-felt memoir regarding Mr. Carey and his family's experience with an aortic aneurysm. Follow his emotional highs and lows as he discovers his illness, and seeks treatment. For the most part, I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to someone suffering with an aortic aneurysm or aortic dissection. A very heart-felt memoir regarding Mr. Carey and his family's experience with an aortic aneurysm. Follow his emotional highs and lows as he discovers his illness, and seeks treatment. For the most part, I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to someone suffering with an aortic aneurysm or aortic dissection.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Uplifting, thought provoking. Reminder that life is uncertain so cherish each day.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Don H.

    A MUST READ : FEAR / STRENGTH / COURAGE / LOVE

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Sarans

    An incredibly emotional story of the author's experience facing a life threatening diagnosis at a young age. At different points in the book I loved him, hated him, laughed at him, and ultimately admired him and his wife. I found the book to be chock full of many interesting incidents. I could relate to in the familial dynamics he describes, and I found the story to be very uplifting overall. An incredibly emotional story of the author's experience facing a life threatening diagnosis at a young age. At different points in the book I loved him, hated him, laughed at him, and ultimately admired him and his wife. I found the book to be chock full of many interesting incidents. I could relate to in the familial dynamics he describes, and I found the story to be very uplifting overall.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tonya

    While I enjoyed this book and the story line, the author is very arrogant and that detracted from my overall opinion. I wanted so much to like him, but he made it very hard. Every time he mentioned his children he named them and stated their ages. He was irritatingly redundant about his children and his neighbors and friends. It got very old. I would still recommend this read, but I am not a fan of his writing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alice Weaver

    For anyone going through this with a family member or friend this is a must read!! My husband and I are living through this right now and reading this book is like we are writing it from our lives. Thankful for the stress test that found this but not looking forward to the rest.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erin Black

    I read this book because I usually love books with a medical aspect to them. Looking at all of the reviews I thought that I was going to love it, and be unable to put it down….I was so very wrong! I can understand how people who have been diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm could relate to this memoir. And I hope that the author meant to only engage those people, because this book totally lacked interest and emotion. Both something that I feel is important in writing a good book. It is so important I read this book because I usually love books with a medical aspect to them. Looking at all of the reviews I thought that I was going to love it, and be unable to put it down….I was so very wrong! I can understand how people who have been diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm could relate to this memoir. And I hope that the author meant to only engage those people, because this book totally lacked interest and emotion. Both something that I feel is important in writing a good book. It is so important for me to be emotionally invested in a book, to feel some type of a connection with the characters in the story. This book lacked all of that. The writer didn’t make me feel the heartache and pain that his family was going through…it was all “Me, Me, Me!” When in reality your entire family would be going through a rough time, it affects them all…but the fact that all you could talk about was yourself totally threw me off.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    I received this book from GoodReads firstbook giveaway. The book is a memoir, and I just could not get past my dislike of the author, who comes off as pompous. His tone is annoying, everything he touches is wonderful, everyone he meets is perfect (and he'll tell you their hair color), he over uses italics and under uses commas. If you have been touched by aortic aneurism, you will probably find meaning in the book, but I was just annoyed. I received this book from GoodReads firstbook giveaway. The book is a memoir, and I just could not get past my dislike of the author, who comes off as pompous. His tone is annoying, everything he touches is wonderful, everyone he meets is perfect (and he'll tell you their hair color), he over uses italics and under uses commas. If you have been touched by aortic aneurism, you will probably find meaning in the book, but I was just annoyed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    I can't finish this book. I only made it to page 45. It was eminently readable but I so much disliked the author, writing his memoir, that I gave up in disgust. I hope he lives to be 100 and maybe he will learn humility and wisdom. If he found it by books end, I will never know. I can't finish this book. I only made it to page 45. It was eminently readable but I so much disliked the author, writing his memoir, that I gave up in disgust. I hope he lives to be 100 and maybe he will learn humility and wisdom. If he found it by books end, I will never know.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    REVIEW PENDING

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