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The nude photo of a teenage runaway shows up on a pornographic website, and the girl's father turns to Detective Chief Inspector Alan banks for help. But these are typical circumstances, for the runaway is the daughter of a man who's determined to destroy the dedicated Yorkshire policeman's career and good name. Still it is a case that strikes painfully home, one that Bank The nude photo of a teenage runaway shows up on a pornographic website, and the girl's father turns to Detective Chief Inspector Alan banks for help. But these are typical circumstances, for the runaway is the daughter of a man who's determined to destroy the dedicated Yorkshire policeman's career and good name. Still it is a case that strikes painfully home, one that Banks—a father himself—dares not ignore as he follows it's squalid trail into teeming London, and into a world of drugs, sex, and crime. But murder follows soon after—gruesome ,sensational, and, more than once—pulling Banks in a direction that he dearly does not wish to go: into the past and private world of his most powerful enemy, Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle.


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The nude photo of a teenage runaway shows up on a pornographic website, and the girl's father turns to Detective Chief Inspector Alan banks for help. But these are typical circumstances, for the runaway is the daughter of a man who's determined to destroy the dedicated Yorkshire policeman's career and good name. Still it is a case that strikes painfully home, one that Bank The nude photo of a teenage runaway shows up on a pornographic website, and the girl's father turns to Detective Chief Inspector Alan banks for help. But these are typical circumstances, for the runaway is the daughter of a man who's determined to destroy the dedicated Yorkshire policeman's career and good name. Still it is a case that strikes painfully home, one that Banks—a father himself—dares not ignore as he follows it's squalid trail into teeming London, and into a world of drugs, sex, and crime. But murder follows soon after—gruesome ,sensational, and, more than once—pulling Banks in a direction that he dearly does not wish to go: into the past and private world of his most powerful enemy, Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle.

30 review for Kalt wie das Grab

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    ”Any man’s death diminishes me, because I am Involved in Mankind,” as John Donne had said, and Banks knew exactly what he meant.” Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks has never been the typical investigator. His unorthodox style has brought him in constant conflict with his superiors including Chief Constable Jeremiah Riddle. Banks has been assigned to the Eastvale Regional Headquarters, a bit different from his London assignment where any given street might give him a ”whiff of villainy”. To go ”Any man’s death diminishes me, because I am Involved in Mankind,” as John Donne had said, and Banks knew exactly what he meant.” Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks has never been the typical investigator. His unorthodox style has brought him in constant conflict with his superiors including Chief Constable Jeremiah Riddle. Banks has been assigned to the Eastvale Regional Headquarters, a bit different from his London assignment where any given street might give him a ”whiff of villainy”. To go with his quaint surroundings is his small, but adequate cottage with a ghost/spirit in the kitchen. His academic head doesn’t really believe in those sorts of things, but there is no denying the feelings of something there that raises the hair on the back of his neck. ”In the end, he accepted, even embraced, whatever the presence was, and came to believe it was some sort of spirit of the house, the way places are said to have spirits. He had read a little about the subject and named his spirit Haltia, after the Finnish, generally believed to be the spirit of the first person to lay claim to a site either by lighting a fire on it, by building a house on it, or even, in some cases, the first person to die there.” The presence doesn’t in any way, shape, or form replace the wife he still carries a torch for. She has not only left him, but moved in with some other bloke. Banks drinks too much Laphroaig Scotch Whisky, a bit steep for his pocketbook, but it brings a slice of amber heaven into what could be a gloomy existence. His two children are grown, his son’s band is about to press their first CD, and his daughter, as he discovers, would rather go to Paris with her boyfriend than her father. *Sigh* they are most certainly getting on with their lives while his seems to be steadily sliding backwards. Banks reads almost every evening, at least when work isn’t keeping him on a case. He is a big fan of Graham Greene which certainly gives me a point of reference with him. He also listens to Jazz from Duke Ellington to Miles Davis. The GG Jazz club of Banks and Keeten could be in the works. He is more than a bit put off, after settled into a good book and pouring himself a few fingers of Scotch, when he gets the call from Riddle needing to see him right away. It is storming, Riddle is an acknowledge foe intent on ruining his career, but the detective in Banks is intrigued by Riddle, of all people, reaching out to him for help. It seems, Riddle needs the very skills he abhors in Banks to help him find his daughter. Emily Riddle, sixteen going on thirty, ran away from home after leaving her parents in disarray. She made demands of them and then when they gave her what she wanted she loathed them all the more for it. Banks finds her living with a thug named Barry Clough, but he has had other names. Clough is a gangster with a rock star image of himself and a penchant for underage girls. Banks extracts the girl, dodges a rather embarrassing and potentially career ending temptation, and returns the girl to her parents. ”Tall and long-legged, she also had that anorexic, thoroughbred look of a professional model. Heroin-chic. She was wearing denim capris that came halfway up her calves, and a loose cable-knit sweater. She walked barefoot, he noticed, showing off her shapely ankles and slim feet, the toenails painted crimson. For some reason, Coleridge’s line from ‘Cristabel’ flashed through Banks’s mind: “...her blue-veined feet unsandalled were.” It had always seemed an improbable erotic image to him, ever since he first came across the poem at school, and now he knew why.” Dusting of the hands, pour a glass of Laphroaig, put on some music, and open a good book...job well done and all that Banks. Not quite. Little does Banks know, but he is now entwined with the Riddle family and will find himself further drawn into the drama of that dysfunctional family. Banks has another issue, an ongoing one, with the dynamic and sometimes enigmatic Annie Cabbot. She is a police officer working under (well not literally anymore) Banks. She broke off her relationship with Banks, but the snaring pheromones are still dancing the tango between the two of them. Because of their history they have difficulty being totally honest with each other that leads to misunderstandings which leads to a very unhappy investigating team. The twist and turns of the plot are excellent. People seemingly without motive are revealed to be so much more than they seem to be. Bodies continue to be found, taking some much sought after truth to the grave, and adding more layers to an already complex web of deceit. Banks continues to doggedly sort out the truth from the lies and eventually makes some soul crushing revelations that leave all parties involved stunned and reeling from the implications. I didn’t need a great plot from Peter Robinson to enjoy this book. I was quite content to hang around with Alan Banks and watch him find missing cats or guard a watermelon patch, but a great character coupled with an interesting plot certainly makes it a book I can recommend to those that enjoy a great mystery and well drawn characters. A mystery that can be called literature. ”He realized with a shock that the loss of innocence never stopped happening, that he was still losing it, that it was like a wound that never healed, and he would probably go on losing it, drop by drop, until the day he died.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    My new favorite Banks. After a few very minor, but still annoying, illogical and odd things early on in the book (A minor one-> (view spoiler)[ Banks agrees to, as a private person, rather than police, go to London to find and talk to his Chief constable's estranged daughter who's gone there immediately following her 16th birthday. Banks and the Chief does not see eye to eye about anything, but the latter acknowledges Banks' abilities. The Chief cannot go himself because the moment the daughter My new favorite Banks. After a few very minor, but still annoying, illogical and odd things early on in the book (A minor one-> (view spoiler)[ Banks agrees to, as a private person, rather than police, go to London to find and talk to his Chief constable's estranged daughter who's gone there immediately following her 16th birthday. Banks and the Chief does not see eye to eye about anything, but the latter acknowledges Banks' abilities. The Chief cannot go himself because the moment the daughter gets wind of her father's looking for her, she's bound to go into (deeper) hiding. Banks cannot go in his capacity as a policeman, so what does he do in the course of his inquiries? He tells all and everyone that he's the girls... father!? (hide spoiler)] ) When that's all said and done though, we are treated to a great police mystery. I know I compared the top of the crop of these (and others...) with Sjöwall-Wahlöö's Novel about a crime-series, but this one lends itself very much to it. There is a lot happening both in the investigation and in Banks' life. He's become superior officer to the brilliant Annie Cabbott, who he has personal history with and that complicates their working relationship. His history with the Chief constable and with the daughter also very much so, of course. What I liked best about the book was that situations arise that could presumably lead to great misunderstandings and complications and lots of times I found myself going "oh, now I know what's going to happen...", just to have it... not happen. Then, when you're part relaxed, part confused, something does happen and from a totally other and unforeseen direction! This, in combination with sometimes mundane routine work and sometimes pettiness in characters, makes the story life-like and the characters seem real. And both these things begs the Sjöwall-Wahlöö comparison. Add a healthy dose of Britishness, atmosphere and nice musical references and you have a brilliant Banks' mystery as made for summer reading.

  3. 4 out of 5

    The Cats’ Mother

    Cold is the Grave is the eleventh book in the DCI Alan Banks series set in the fictional town of Eastvale, Yorkshire. I’m gradually working my way through the series but somehow only manage one a year, so am still twenty years behind! These are stand-alone mysteries but there is an evolving backstory about Banks’ family, colleagues and relationships, so I think it is worth reading them in order. This one occurs four or five months after the events of In a Dry Season. Banks is still living alone Cold is the Grave is the eleventh book in the DCI Alan Banks series set in the fictional town of Eastvale, Yorkshire. I’m gradually working my way through the series but somehow only manage one a year, so am still twenty years behind! These are stand-alone mysteries but there is an evolving backstory about Banks’ family, colleagues and relationships, so I think it is worth reading them in order. This one occurs four or five months after the events of In a Dry Season. Banks is still living alone in his cottage, faintly hoping he can get back together with his estranged wife Sandra, and trying to figure out how to work with his attractive DS Annie Cabott after their fling. Receiving a summons to the home of his former nemesis, he is shocked to be asked to go to London to track down ACC Riddle’s wayward teenage daughter. Meanwhile the team investigate the execution of a local troublemaker who was supposed to have gone straight. This one started slowly - Banks moping about feeling sorry for himself and self-medicating with Laphroiag and music isn’t very interesting, (although I laughed when he muses about whether he should buy a Discman as he’s fed up with transferring CDs to cassette - no Alan - hold out a couple of years for an iPod!) His pursuit of flighty precocious teenager Emily also takes a while, leading to a deeply awkward scene where she attempts to seduce him. Meanwhile the unenthusiastic murder investigation plods on - until a shocking new death jumpstarts the plot. The strength of this series is the atmospheric writing - the terrible British weather plays it’s part as ever. Robinson’s characters and their dilemmas may be unlikeable, but they are recognisably real. Banks’ bemusement as to why the women he meets keep throwing themselves at him - except the ones he actually wants - was quite sweet. I was relieved that he manages to resist, or I would’ve gone right off him. The mystery was well executed and the eventual reveals pretty sad. Another solid 4 star read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    DCI Alan Banks has never got on well with Chief Constable Riddle, but when Riddle asks him to find his missing daughter Banks agrees to help. There are plenty of unsavoury characters in Cold Is The Grave, but Robinson still slips in some nice moments of humour. The plot is as tight & well constructed as ever and Neil Pearson, a regular narrator of Robinson's books, sets the perfect tone for another great novel. DCI Alan Banks has never got on well with Chief Constable Riddle, but when Riddle asks him to find his missing daughter Banks agrees to help. There are plenty of unsavoury characters in Cold Is The Grave, but Robinson still slips in some nice moments of humour. The plot is as tight & well constructed as ever and Neil Pearson, a regular narrator of Robinson's books, sets the perfect tone for another great novel.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie M

    A complex multilayered plot which is far more personal than the previous instalments in the series..The crime seems straightforward but as per Robinson’s usual style there is so much more occurring. So glad to be working my way through the Banks series!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks and jealous, stubborn, petty Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle have been at odds since they first met a few books back. But despite their enmity, a desperate Riddle comes to Banks and begs him to help him find his daughter, who has run away from home and disappeared into London. Banks hates Riddle, but he thinks of his own daughter Tracy, and his fatherly feelings persuade him to take up the task of finding the willful wild child, 16-year-old Emily Riddle. Readers Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks and jealous, stubborn, petty Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle have been at odds since they first met a few books back. But despite their enmity, a desperate Riddle comes to Banks and begs him to help him find his daughter, who has run away from home and disappeared into London. Banks hates Riddle, but he thinks of his own daughter Tracy, and his fatherly feelings persuade him to take up the task of finding the willful wild child, 16-year-old Emily Riddle. Readers will be best served by going into this roller coaster of a book — the eleventh in Peter Robinson’s wonderful series — with as little foreknowledge as possible. While not as wonderful as the immediately previous novel, the award-winning In A Dry Season, that would be asking too much. I really enjoyed Cold Is the Grave although I was a bit disappointed in the ending. I’ll be getting to No. 12, Aftermath, as soon as I can. As to narrators, I didn’t like Ron Keith as much as I liked James Langton, who has narrated the previous books, Keith did a good enough job to make me glad that I read an audiobook.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    Inspector Banks, book No. 11: Banks finds himself involved in the life of his arch nemesis Chief Inspector Jimmy Riddle as his family is shocked to find their 16 year old daughter on the internet. There is also the murder of a local petty criminal miles away from Yorkshire. A chain of events conspire to keep Banks and Cabot busy. This period for Banks was set three months after the last book, with divorce, new loves and children at university playing a part in his private life. Quite a clever ep Inspector Banks, book No. 11: Banks finds himself involved in the life of his arch nemesis Chief Inspector Jimmy Riddle as his family is shocked to find their 16 year old daughter on the internet. There is also the murder of a local petty criminal miles away from Yorkshire. A chain of events conspire to keep Banks and Cabot busy. This period for Banks was set three months after the last book, with divorce, new loves and children at university playing a part in his private life. Quite a clever episode as Robinson manages to embed a 'roots of who we are, is in a our past' and 'innocence lost' themes throughout the book. 6 out of 12

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Schwartz

    Robinson's Alan Banks series is getting better and better. Each book is complex and the mystery is never straight-forward and easy to figure out. I had seen this particular one done for television before I read the book. As usual though, the book was much, much better because there's more time to develop a storyline and a plot. And Robinson's writing is wondefully easy to read while being intricate and detailed at the same time. Banks is a very realistic character and after reading eleven of Rob Robinson's Alan Banks series is getting better and better. Each book is complex and the mystery is never straight-forward and easy to figure out. I had seen this particular one done for television before I read the book. As usual though, the book was much, much better because there's more time to develop a storyline and a plot. And Robinson's writing is wondefully easy to read while being intricate and detailed at the same time. Banks is a very realistic character and after reading eleven of Robinson's Banks books now I feel that I'm really getting to know this character and I can't believe how multi-facted he is. In this book, Banks is asked by his supervisor to find his sixteeen year old daughter who has run away to London. He is asked to do it off the books, and Banks being Banks, is very thorough in his search. He finds young Emily but he uncovers a real rat's nest of intrigue that she has become enmeshed in. Almost ineveitably the web of lies, deceit and crime follow Banks and Emily all the way back to Yorkshire when he brings her home. I can tell you that if I ever found myself "in a spot of trouble", I would dearly love to have Alan Banks in my corner. I can't recommend this series enough.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This has turned into one of my favorite series. I love the Yorkshire setting, and Detective Banks has become a very intriguing character. He's now separated from his wife, and he's in a dead end position at work. It's usually a good move to put your main character through the ringer every now and then, and Robinson does a deft job of it. The mystery involves the disappearance of Riddle's daughter. She's a great character - the kind you almost can't look away from. From there on out, it's a great This has turned into one of my favorite series. I love the Yorkshire setting, and Detective Banks has become a very intriguing character. He's now separated from his wife, and he's in a dead end position at work. It's usually a good move to put your main character through the ringer every now and then, and Robinson does a deft job of it. The mystery involves the disappearance of Riddle's daughter. She's a great character - the kind you almost can't look away from. From there on out, it's a great read. The only thing I really didn't care for was how things were tied up so nicely in the conclusion. Life tends to be messy, so when it's too cute of an ending, it takes away from an otherwise great novel.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    I found this a harrowing read and had huge sympathy not just with DCI Alan Banks but also with Chief Constable 'Jimmy' Riddle. Banks and Riddle just haven't ever seen eye to eye so Banks is surprised when Riddle asks him to find his daughter Emily who left home just after her sixteenth birthday. The only thing Banks has to go on is the girl's name and a nude photograph of her with a web address. Riddle says he just wants to know that she is all right and he's not asking Banks to bring her home. I found this a harrowing read and had huge sympathy not just with DCI Alan Banks but also with Chief Constable 'Jimmy' Riddle. Banks and Riddle just haven't ever seen eye to eye so Banks is surprised when Riddle asks him to find his daughter Emily who left home just after her sixteenth birthday. The only thing Banks has to go on is the girl's name and a nude photograph of her with a web address. Riddle says he just wants to know that she is all right and he's not asking Banks to bring her home. Everything is off the record but Banks is willing to do and starts to feel a sneaking sympathy with his unlikeable boss. If he could have foreseen what happened he might not have been as willing to help as his weekend in London led to a complex chain of events from which no one escaped unscathed or unchanged. Banks shows himself to be a much more complex character than he might have appeared from some of the previous books in the series and Riddle himself shows a more human side. This is a very well written crime story in which family relationships are shown to be much more complex and fraught than they at first appear to be. Relationships between the police characters involved in the various crime investigations is somewhat fraught and adds to the stresses and strains experienced by everyone involved. This is an uncomfortable but gripping read and I recommend it to anyone who likes crime novels with more depth.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ron Chicaferro

    Cold Is The Grave is a fascinating book about the death of a very beautiful, very troubled young woman. She's the 16 year old daughter of a very senior police official and he personally asks Inspector Banks to conduct the investigation. The senior police official has been the main nemesis of Banks throughout the series and Banks is shocked that he is picked to lead the investigation. The victim dies in a most horrible way and Banks vows to find the killer. He's somewhat conflicted about the youn Cold Is The Grave is a fascinating book about the death of a very beautiful, very troubled young woman. She's the 16 year old daughter of a very senior police official and he personally asks Inspector Banks to conduct the investigation. The senior police official has been the main nemesis of Banks throughout the series and Banks is shocked that he is picked to lead the investigation. The victim dies in a most horrible way and Banks vows to find the killer. He's somewhat conflicted about the young victim. He knew her before she was killed and his feelings for her runs from liking her to desiring her to being angry with her for her life style choices. He has to keep reminding himself that she's only 16. The case reveals much about the victim, her father and her mother. It also reveals much about Banks and his dealings with the victim and his dealings with his own daughter. There is always a lot going on in a Peter Robinson novel and Cold In The Grave is very much a Peter Robinson novel.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Bettie's Books Bettie's Books

  13. 4 out of 5

    Larraine

    'm going to be really really sad when Peter Robinson is no longer writing. DI Alan Banks is one of the most complex characters in the crime fiction genre in my opinion. There's always so much going on, but he always inspires me to try some new music. This book had, as always, so much going with competing investigations that come together in unusual ways. Banks is surprised when Chief Constable Riddle who has made it his goal to get rid of Banks asks him to find his daughter who has run off to Lo 'm going to be really really sad when Peter Robinson is no longer writing. DI Alan Banks is one of the most complex characters in the crime fiction genre in my opinion. There's always so much going on, but he always inspires me to try some new music. This book had, as always, so much going with competing investigations that come together in unusual ways. Banks is surprised when Chief Constable Riddle who has made it his goal to get rid of Banks asks him to find his daughter who has run off to London. She had left home months ago at the age of 16 and, at first, they weren't worried and were, to be honest, relieved. Banks is shocked and surprised by their attitude. The only reason Riddle has asked him to find her is because her younger brother stumbled upon nude photos of her on the internet. He finds her living with a wealthy man of dubious reputation who is surrounded by thugs. He has rock roots, but his present business is shady and unknown. He's only been told to find her and let her know that her parents would like her to come home. He does that and is ready to go home the next day when she shows up at his hotel room with a torn dress. She is frightened and wants to go home. She is home for a while, but is still out partying although she has decided to take the A Levels she should have taken when she left school and go to college. Then she is found dead in a toilet stall after having ingested cocaine laced with strychnine. What a twisted tale this is! The bodies start to mount up including the body of a small time criminal known to the police in the area. The book ends not only with death but also incredible revelations that bring the book to a really shocking end.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Rumney

    In this, DCI banks is asked by the Chief Constable to go to London and bring the runaway Emily back home to her father Chief Constable Riddle. I found it odd why he would be asked to do this and wasn't convinced of Banks's motivation to agree to it. That said this sets off a series of events which introduce us to a gangster type in Barry Clough. Robinson neatly plots the story as Banks investigates a number of murders with Yorkshire connections. One thing annoying is how Robinson continually descri In this, DCI banks is asked by the Chief Constable to go to London and bring the runaway Emily back home to her father Chief Constable Riddle. I found it odd why he would be asked to do this and wasn't convinced of Banks's motivation to agree to it. That said this sets off a series of events which introduce us to a gangster type in Barry Clough. Robinson neatly plots the story as Banks investigates a number of murders with Yorkshire connections. One thing annoying is how Robinson continually describes what various characters are wearing. Unless it moves the story forward I don't care. In the end Robinson neatly brings all the strands in the book together including a jaw dropping reveal involving Clough I didn't see coming.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ray O'Hare

    Very good

  16. 4 out of 5

    Spuddie

    #11 Chief Inspector Alan Banks British police series set in the Yorkshire Dales. Alan is contacted privately by his arch nemesis, his boss, Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle to locate his teenage daughter Emily. Emily is sixteen (going on thirty!) and had debunked to London several months previously. The family wasn't overly worried as Emily had always been older than her years and knew how to survive) but when Riddle's young son spots a pornographic photo of Emily in a pop-up on the computer, he bec #11 Chief Inspector Alan Banks British police series set in the Yorkshire Dales. Alan is contacted privately by his arch nemesis, his boss, Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle to locate his teenage daughter Emily. Emily is sixteen (going on thirty!) and had debunked to London several months previously. The family wasn't overly worried as Emily had always been older than her years and knew how to survive) but when Riddle's young son spots a pornographic photo of Emily in a pop-up on the computer, he becomes worried and wants Emily located--but due to his political aspirations, he can't do this publicly since he fears scandal. Although Riddle hates Banks, he knows he's the best man for the job and promises Alan he'll get off his back if he's successful in locating Emily. Banks does the job, finding Emily posing under the name Louisa Gamine and living with a much older gangster type fellow. Eventually he brings Emily back to Eastvale and delivers her safely home, only to have her turn up dead in the toilet of a local dance club a month or so later, dead of strychnine, the poison having been laced in her cocaine. Banks' attention immediately goes to the gangster--whom he's also investigating in possible connection with another murder case involving smuggling--but did he really care enough about Emily to kill her in such a brutal way? Or was this something more personal? I enjoy this series a lot, and have really enjoyed these last couple in audio format with a great reader (Ron Keith) so will likely continue on listening as long as they are available from my library. I didn't take the red herring that Robinson threw out for this one, but guessing the baddie didn't in any way diminish the enjoyment.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Chief Constable and Alan Banks nemesis Jeremiah Riddle’s wild run-away daughter is spotted nude in a porn web site by Riddle’s young son. Eating crow, Riddle asks CI banks to look into it, unofficially of course. Banks does indeed find the missing Emily, and learns, ultimately more than he bargains for of the Riddle family. Emily winds up dead. Was her London acquaintance, Ruth, a friend or something more? Is there more to the gangster Clough than meets the eye. Why does Emily’s mother, Rosalind Chief Constable and Alan Banks nemesis Jeremiah Riddle’s wild run-away daughter is spotted nude in a porn web site by Riddle’s young son. Eating crow, Riddle asks CI banks to look into it, unofficially of course. Banks does indeed find the missing Emily, and learns, ultimately more than he bargains for of the Riddle family. Emily winds up dead. Was her London acquaintance, Ruth, a friend or something more? Is there more to the gangster Clough than meets the eye. Why does Emily’s mother, Rosalind, seem less than eager for her to return? Why did a local small time hood, Courage, wind up dead? What about the other deaths that have sprung up like mushrooms after a rain. The usual good stuff from Robinson. We learn that copying CD’s and games has become a large criminal enterprise.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deb Saw

    My parents have been raving about this author for ages. I never really saw any of the TV series but had a handful on my shelf and this was the earliest. Now, this was published in 2001 but reads as if much earlier. It is such a load of mysogynistic, paternalistic claptrap. Every single woman's physical attributes (or lack of) are detailed but we have no idea of what the blokes look like.if it matters at all. Oh, and why on earth would a DCI in the 21st century not have a mobile phone? I'd had one My parents have been raving about this author for ages. I never really saw any of the TV series but had a handful on my shelf and this was the earliest. Now, this was published in 2001 but reads as if much earlier. It is such a load of mysogynistic, paternalistic claptrap. Every single woman's physical attributes (or lack of) are detailed but we have no idea of what the blokes look like.if it matters at all. Oh, and why on earth would a DCI in the 21st century not have a mobile phone? I'd had one for years by then and I was just a nurse. Upshot is I gave up on it at page 90. I didn't even make the proscribed 100 I try to give a book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    In my opinion, this novel is the best in Peter Robinson's series of books featuring Alan Banks of the [fictional:] Eastvale, Yorkshire police force. Searching for the missing daughter of the Chief Constable, who shares with Banks a great personal emnity, the story takes us to London, through drug deals and eventually to murder. The writing is very taut, the plotline is flawless and the ending unbearable. Excellent book. In my opinion, this novel is the best in Peter Robinson's series of books featuring Alan Banks of the [fictional:] Eastvale, Yorkshire police force. Searching for the missing daughter of the Chief Constable, who shares with Banks a great personal emnity, the story takes us to London, through drug deals and eventually to murder. The writing is very taut, the plotline is flawless and the ending unbearable. Excellent book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Another excellent Alan Banks novel. The daughter of Chief Constable Jeremiah "Jimmy Riddle", Banks' nemesis is missing and Riddle wants Banks to find her. What Banks finds is a nest of worms that will ultimately claim some lives and destroy others. A wonderfully absorbing novel. I sat and read it in it's entirety in an afternoon. I did not want to put it down. Another excellent Alan Banks novel. The daughter of Chief Constable Jeremiah "Jimmy Riddle", Banks' nemesis is missing and Riddle wants Banks to find her. What Banks finds is a nest of worms that will ultimately claim some lives and destroy others. A wonderfully absorbing novel. I sat and read it in it's entirety in an afternoon. I did not want to put it down.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jorge

    First book by this author. A promising beginning, with a story that promised unexpected twists. As the book advanced the story kind of slowed down and became more predictable. I will give a try to some other inspector Banks stories

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anne Brown

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Banks is back at his desk filling out paperwork. When his phone rings one evening, he can’t believe that his arch enemy Chirf Vonstable Jimmie Riddle is asking him to his house and saying that he needs a favour. Banks almost refuses but curiosity gets the better of him and he complies. Riddle tells Banks that his sixteen year old daughter, Emily, went to London rather than come home at the end of the summer term and that he and his wife, Rosalind, have not seen her since. Emily has long been a c Banks is back at his desk filling out paperwork. When his phone rings one evening, he can’t believe that his arch enemy Chirf Vonstable Jimmie Riddle is asking him to his house and saying that he needs a favour. Banks almost refuses but curiosity gets the better of him and he complies. Riddle tells Banks that his sixteen year old daughter, Emily, went to London rather than come home at the end of the summer term and that he and his wife, Rosalind, have not seen her since. Emily has long been a challenging child, becoming sexually active at the age of fourteen, as well as taking drugs. Emily has contacted them a couple of times to say she’s fine and not to try to find her. Now Riddle wants Banks to do just that: find her and persuade her to come home , if possible. There is now a starting point to finding Emily as her young brother found soft porn images of her on a website called Glamourpus by accident. Banks can’t help wondering if the rumours about Riddle looking to start a career in politics are also a factor. Stories about the wild child of a Chief Constable would not help Riddle’s cause at all. Banks goes to London and finds Glamourpus which leads him to an ex boyfriend and then to a friend Emily was staying with when she first reached London. The friend, Ruth Watson, tells Banks that Emily has now taken up with a man called Barry Clough. Clough is old enough to be Emily’s father. He is rich and can supply the lifestyle and the drugs that Emily likes. One look at the set up convinces Banks that Clough is a villain and he enlists the help of Dirty Dick Burgess to find out more. Dick tells Banks that Clough is suspected of being involved in a lot of shady schemes, like selling illegal cigarettes and booze and pirated CD’s, but that nothing has ever been proved. Clough is too smart to do any of the dirty work himself. Banks manages to see Emily alone and tells her that her parents want her back and that he can take her. She refuses to listen at first but something happens to make her change her mind. Meanwhile, the police from Market Harborough in Leicestershire contact the Eastvale police to inform them that the body of a small time Eastvale crook called Charles Courage has been found on their patch. Banks goes to see for himself and takes DS Annie Cabbot with him. Since Annie ended their embryonic relationship, she has been transferred to the Eastvale Station. As Banks has been assigned desk duties, they have been able to stay apart until now. It turns out that Charlie was executed, gangland style. As he had been working as a night watchman at the Deepdale Business Centre for the months prior to his disappearance, it is hard for Banks and Annie to work out what had earned him a trip down the long road. When it turns out that one of the businesses on the Deepdale Business Centre cleared out the same night that Charlie disappeared and that that business seems to have been a front for pirating films and computer games, it seems that Banks’ two cases may be coming together. Then Emily is murdered. Someone has laced her cocaine with strychnine. She suffers a terrible death in a club toilet. Where did she get the drugs from? Who wanted her dead? What will this do to her family? A complicated tale where the separate storylines are woven together in ever changing patterns until the design is complete.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    “He still had time … for a cigarette and a finger or two of Laphroaig.” It would be difficult to ask more of the 11th instalment in such a long-running detective and mystery series. Chief Constable Jeremiah Riddle is DCI Banks’ greatest political enemy within the police force. He despises Banks for his disdain of proper procedure, required protocol and administration and for Banks’ infernal willingness to break the rules and work outside the system. But when he discovers some nude pictures of “He still had time … for a cigarette and a finger or two of Laphroaig.” It would be difficult to ask more of the 11th instalment in such a long-running detective and mystery series. Chief Constable Jeremiah Riddle is DCI Banks’ greatest political enemy within the police force. He despises Banks for his disdain of proper procedure, required protocol and administration and for Banks’ infernal willingness to break the rules and work outside the system. But when he discovers some nude pictures of his sixteen year old black sheep ne’er-do-well daughter on a pornographic web site, he swallows his pride and begs Banks for his help. At heart, he knows that Banks is the man for the job and Banks’ willingness to do what it takes to solve a case is the only chance he has at recovering his daughter. In a clever twist on the usual plot line of this type of novel, Banks’ investigation leads him down a branching road that diverges into two only marginally related crimes. Meanwhile (one might say, back at the ranch), Robinson continues to develop his characters and their underlying stories. Banks wrestles with the conflict between his inability to accept the finality of the end of his marriage and his desire to begin a relationship with his colleague, Annie Cabbot. In her own turn, Ms Cabbot struggles with the knowledge that, if they are to work together as an effective policing team, she and Banks should maintain a professional distance – a distance that she desperately wants to close! The characters are fabulous! The story line is compelling and convincing! COLD IS THE GRAVE will please any reader who enjoys contemporary British police procedurals and mysteries. Definitely recommended. Paul Weiss

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gloria Feit

    Cold is the Grave By Peter Robinson William Morrow Paperbacks September 13, 2016 ISBN: 978-0-0624-3128-8 Paperback, 447 pp., $15.99 Reviewed by Theodore Feit Stranger things have happened, but when Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle asked Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks for a favor the world didn’t stop turning. Neither man liked the other, and the antagonism between them was more than apparent. But Riddle recognizes that Banks was good at what he does and is discreet, and that is what he needed. It see Cold is the Grave By Peter Robinson William Morrow Paperbacks September 13, 2016 ISBN: 978-0-0624-3128-8 Paperback, 447 pp., $15.99 Reviewed by Theodore Feit Stranger things have happened, but when Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle asked Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks for a favor the world didn’t stop turning. Neither man liked the other, and the antagonism between them was more than apparent. But Riddle recognizes that Banks was good at what he does and is discreet, and that is what he needed. It seems that his daughter had left home some time ago, and there was no word from her. Banks is asked to find her in London, talk to her, and reassure her parents that she’s OK. But Banks does more than that, in just over a weekend. He not only finds her, but he brings her home. And the consequences flow from this simple task. And then a series of murders takes place, and Banks finds himself in the middle of not only a murder investigation, but also in the midst of his chief antagonist’s private life. Meanwhile, Bank’s own private life begins to take some dramatic turns as well. As are all he novels in the series, this book is finely nuanced, well-written, and filled with twists and turns to keep the reader on the edge of the seat. Enough said. Recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Lowther

    Cold is The Grave is another solid and reliable Inspector Banks story set in North Yorkshire. One of the great strengths of this series is the very nicely done characterisation. There are always plenty of interesting people turning up in the stories and they usually contrast nicely with one another - Banks himself the outstanding detective whose great weakness is that he often can't distance himself from events that he feels might have turned out better had he himself acted differently. Banks' po Cold is The Grave is another solid and reliable Inspector Banks story set in North Yorkshire. One of the great strengths of this series is the very nicely done characterisation. There are always plenty of interesting people turning up in the stories and they usually contrast nicely with one another - Banks himself the outstanding detective whose great weakness is that he often can't distance himself from events that he feels might have turned out better had he himself acted differently. Banks' police colleagues are the usual mixture of men and women, young and old, enthusiastic and lazy, intelligent and dim but nearly all them eat the wrong food and drink too much. The villains are bad and the innocent bystanders who get caught up in the (several) deaths evoke sympathy. Locations are convincing and well researched but the plot has a few holes in it and stretches credibility at times. Nevertheless a fun read and an interesting diversion. David Lowther. Author of The Blue Pencil, Liberating Belsen and Two Families at War, all published by Sacristy Press.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marsha Valance

    DCI Banks, his romance with police colleague Annie Cabbot having cooled off, is seriously thinking of asking his wife, Sandra, to end their separation and give the marriage another try. He's also applied to the National Crime Squad to escape his loathsome boss, Chief Constable Riddle. But just as Banks is packing for a weekend train jaunt to Paris, the wretched Riddle calls to ask a favor. Riddle's 9-year-old son, snooping around on the Internet, has come upon a naked picture of his 16-year-old DCI Banks, his romance with police colleague Annie Cabbot having cooled off, is seriously thinking of asking his wife, Sandra, to end their separation and give the marriage another try. He's also applied to the National Crime Squad to escape his loathsome boss, Chief Constable Riddle. But just as Banks is packing for a weekend train jaunt to Paris, the wretched Riddle calls to ask a favor. Riddle's 9-year-old son, snooping around on the Internet, has come upon a naked picture of his 16-year-old sister, Emily, who ran away from home and disappeared into the London drugs and smut cesspool. Despite their mutual hatred, Banks, realizing what it took for Riddle to ask for his help in finding the girl, just can't refuse. Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel (2001), Palle Rosenkrantz Prisen (2005).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    It's a very engaging, dark mystery. Through the foolishness of the teenage daughter of his nemesis, Chief Constable Riddle, the recurring protagonist...CI Alan Banks gets caught up in the drug world in and beyond London. It seems that Chief Constable "Jimmy" Riddle may be becoming "a more likable human being"...if that is even possible... as he overcomes his extreme dislike for Alan Banks and has to ask for his help. All of the characters in Peter Robinson's Alan Banks series seem real and belie It's a very engaging, dark mystery. Through the foolishness of the teenage daughter of his nemesis, Chief Constable Riddle, the recurring protagonist...CI Alan Banks gets caught up in the drug world in and beyond London. It seems that Chief Constable "Jimmy" Riddle may be becoming "a more likable human being"...if that is even possible... as he overcomes his extreme dislike for Alan Banks and has to ask for his help. All of the characters in Peter Robinson's Alan Banks series seem real and believable. Alan Banks is heroism personified...Cabot is tough and vulnerable. Together they are a force to be reckoned with. The plot is complicated enough to keep you guessing to the very end.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    It's a very engaging, dark mystery. Through the foolishness of the teenage daughter of his nemesis, Chief Constable Riddle, the recurring protagonist...CI Alan Banks gets caught up in the drug world in and beyond London. It seems that Chief Constable "Jimmy" Riddle may be becoming "a more likable human being"...if that is even possible... as he overcomes his extreme dislike for Alan Banks and has to ask for his help. All of the characters in Peter Robinson's Alan Banks series seem real and belie It's a very engaging, dark mystery. Through the foolishness of the teenage daughter of his nemesis, Chief Constable Riddle, the recurring protagonist...CI Alan Banks gets caught up in the drug world in and beyond London. It seems that Chief Constable "Jimmy" Riddle may be becoming "a more likable human being"...if that is even possible... as he overcomes his extreme dislike for Alan Banks and has to ask for his help. All of the characters in Peter Robinson's Alan Banks series seem real and believable. Alan Banks is heroism personified...Cabot is tough and vulnerable. Together they are a force to be reckoned with. The plot is complicated enough to keep you guessing to the very end.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Owlsinger

    It's very satisfying to finish a DCI Banks novel and not have to worry about him or his relationships; that worry drives me to seek out the next in the series too soon, reading only one or two from other series, or a stand-alone. A good series, IMO, should be stretched out and savored for as long as possible. If you're nearing the end, wait a month or two between installments - pleasure delayed is pleasure intensified. There's a way to go from this point, so I won't be staving myself just yet. T It's very satisfying to finish a DCI Banks novel and not have to worry about him or his relationships; that worry drives me to seek out the next in the series too soon, reading only one or two from other series, or a stand-alone. A good series, IMO, should be stretched out and savored for as long as possible. If you're nearing the end, wait a month or two between installments - pleasure delayed is pleasure intensified. There's a way to go from this point, so I won't be staving myself just yet. That said, the lack of worry for him and his at the end is because, for once, all (or *most*)of the main characters' prospects are looking up - all at the same time, wouldja believe? Except, of course, for the criminals. Oh, and the dead people. *All* of them.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Penny P Hammack

    I've been following the Inspector Banks books by Peter Robinson for many years because I like police procedurals and it has been an interesting series. But this one seemed way too long and had too many personal plot lines in addition to the main mystery. The interactions between Banks and Annie seemed forced and awkward. I can't think of a better description of the writing than clunky and I don't remember feeling that way about all the previous books in the series. I also don't remember the auth I've been following the Inspector Banks books by Peter Robinson for many years because I like police procedurals and it has been an interesting series. But this one seemed way too long and had too many personal plot lines in addition to the main mystery. The interactions between Banks and Annie seemed forced and awkward. I can't think of a better description of the writing than clunky and I don't remember feeling that way about all the previous books in the series. I also don't remember the author referring to and retelling so many previous plots. Is it just me or do other readers wonder why there are so many references to music, almost like they're being used to pad the story for the publisher.

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