web site hit counter Mafia Queens Of Mumbai: Stories Of Women From The Ganglands - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Mafia Queens Of Mumbai: Stories Of Women From The Ganglands

Availability: Ready to download

Smuggling, gun-running, drugs, terrorism for many decades, Mumbai has lived under the shadow of the Underworld. Dawood Ibrahim, Karim Lala, Varadara- jan Mudaliar: these are names that any Indian would recognise. Analysed in print, immortalised on film, their lives, their gangs, their 'businesses' are out there for anyone who wants the information. But there have been wome Smuggling, gun-running, drugs, terrorism for many decades, Mumbai has lived under the shadow of the Underworld. Dawood Ibrahim, Karim Lala, Varadara- jan Mudaliar: these are names that any Indian would recognise. Analysed in print, immortalised on film, their lives, their gangs, their 'businesses' are out there for anyone who wants the information. But there have been women, too, who have been part of this murky side of the city, walking along side, sometimes leading and manipulating men in the Underworld to run their own illegal businesses. Here, for the first time, crime journal- ists S. Hussain Zaidi and Jane Borges explore the lives of some of these women, and how, in cold blood, they were able to make their way up in what was certainly a man's world. From Kamathipura to Dongri, from assassins to molls, this is a collection that tells the stories of women who have become legend in Mumbai's streets, lanes and back-alleys. Absorbingly told, impeccably researched, Mafia Queens of Mumbai reveals a side of Mumbai's Underworld that has never been seen before.


Compare

Smuggling, gun-running, drugs, terrorism for many decades, Mumbai has lived under the shadow of the Underworld. Dawood Ibrahim, Karim Lala, Varadara- jan Mudaliar: these are names that any Indian would recognise. Analysed in print, immortalised on film, their lives, their gangs, their 'businesses' are out there for anyone who wants the information. But there have been wome Smuggling, gun-running, drugs, terrorism for many decades, Mumbai has lived under the shadow of the Underworld. Dawood Ibrahim, Karim Lala, Varadara- jan Mudaliar: these are names that any Indian would recognise. Analysed in print, immortalised on film, their lives, their gangs, their 'businesses' are out there for anyone who wants the information. But there have been women, too, who have been part of this murky side of the city, walking along side, sometimes leading and manipulating men in the Underworld to run their own illegal businesses. Here, for the first time, crime journal- ists S. Hussain Zaidi and Jane Borges explore the lives of some of these women, and how, in cold blood, they were able to make their way up in what was certainly a man's world. From Kamathipura to Dongri, from assassins to molls, this is a collection that tells the stories of women who have become legend in Mumbai's streets, lanes and back-alleys. Absorbingly told, impeccably researched, Mafia Queens of Mumbai reveals a side of Mumbai's Underworld that has never been seen before.

30 review for Mafia Queens Of Mumbai: Stories Of Women From The Ganglands

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vishnu Chevli

    Well I cannot accept glorified version of real life gangsters. Still the book has given me some new information. Detailed review may follow.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ronak Gajjar

    That the female of the species is deadlier than the male. - Rudyard Kipling I stumbled upon this one in 2013, as a reference for the evident research subject and it swiped right into the Mumbai loving space of my mind. The underworld connections always intrigued me well enough weaving within the political layers. Guns are more attractive than roses. – Vishal Bhardwaj I completely agree with reading this one. The language of Mr. Former Investigative Journalist - Mr.Zaidi is sharp-clawed and elucida That the female of the species is deadlier than the male. - Rudyard Kipling I stumbled upon this one in 2013, as a reference for the evident research subject and it swiped right into the Mumbai loving space of my mind. The underworld connections always intrigued me well enough weaving within the political layers. Guns are more attractive than roses. – Vishal Bhardwaj I completely agree with reading this one. The language of Mr. Former Investigative Journalist - Mr.Zaidi is sharp-clawed and elucidative. The typical Mumbaiya language – Bhai, Ghoda, Gharwali, & so on grips you in such impactful way. Though fictional, Mr. Zaidi brings every character to life within the story. • The powerful Jenabai started smuggling in 1940 – Danaa Bazaar, Mumbai. The journey as from Jenabai – Jenabai Chaavaliwali – Jenabai Daaruwali – Jenabai (advisor to Haji Mastan and Karim Lala and Vardharajan Mudaliar) - Jenabai Police Informant, continued ruling over the reign of Dawood Ibrahim too. • Gangubai’s story rooted from The red-lighted area of Mumbai – Kamthipura to Karim Lala & certain political reigns branching the access. • I could say – Ashraf aka Sapnadidi is the favorite one of mine. The lady who avenges with the literal guns. Her guts are completely astonishing. Her connection with the rival of Dawood, Hussain Ustra is quite significant. • Mahalaxmi Papamani known as Amma – rages to riches from trading drugs and still unharmed by Narcotics Department. • Abu Salem & Monica Bedi’s anecdote is already widely encountered. • Asha Gawli, Neeta Naik, Sujata Nikhalje and Padma Poojary – the wives who positioned themselves between Uniform-Wallahs(Police) & the criminal activities of their husbands. Looking into their lives literally seems as seeping through a movie script. • Mrs. Paul & Rubina belonged to the “Mole category” - For the average Indian who has grown up on a diet of Bollywood action potboilers, the first image the word ‘moll’ conjures up is that of a fair-skinned, scantily-clad woman blessed with a perfect physique with a penchant for imported liquor and cigarettes. She sways in nightclubs with the same grace and élan with which she sashays through the hearts of men. Her gambling habits at ritzy casinos are the stuff of legend, while she plays mischief-maker on demand at the insistence of her gangster boss. Holding their prime positions in events. • Tarannum Khan made millions from her betting on cricket, while Archana Sharma through being a threat to millionaires. I put this one in the criminal journal to precise Feminine Criminal Journal. At times, this one does gives mixed feelings me on - Feminisim It makes one question it & answer it simultaneously.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Samir Dhond

    Having lived in Mumbai for many years, I have never encountered or witnessed, thank god for that, the underworld and their dealings. However, as I grew up in that city, I have read, heard many stories about the underworld. The lives of gangsters were in the open whenever one of them was caught. The stories haunted us for days together until we got back to normal life on the streets of Mumbai. When I look back at those years, I realize that Mumbai is quite a safe city for an average citizen of th Having lived in Mumbai for many years, I have never encountered or witnessed, thank god for that, the underworld and their dealings. However, as I grew up in that city, I have read, heard many stories about the underworld. The lives of gangsters were in the open whenever one of them was caught. The stories haunted us for days together until we got back to normal life on the streets of Mumbai. When I look back at those years, I realize that Mumbai is quite a safe city for an average citizen of this hub. I mean, one would not encounter any such ghastly dealings in that city if one keeps to oneself. [image]However, should you step out of that zone and do things that border on the dangerous; you might be exposed to the dealings of the underworld. I read the book with much interest and it also came across as an extremely well researched piece of investigative journalism. I call it “Investigative Journalism” because the authors have essentially done massive research and have investigated the lives of these gangsters in a city like Mumbai. I am shocked to read about their humble beginnings and their naïve existence. I have often wondered how these people who started out their lives as ordinary, average citizens of this city soon turned to a life full of crime and deception. There are stories of the; so called; uneducated as well as the stories of highly educated people who have taken up such paths leading to destruction. The title of the book would tell you that the stories are about women who ruled the underworld on several occasions. Many of them have taken immense risks in order to be there ruling where they were at that time. If you step back and think about the reasons that might have led them to live a life like that, I am sure you would know that many of them got into it by accident, some of them got into it for love, some of them started this to take revenge and some got into it by accident. There were few who got into it unknowingly as well. They were as innocent as any average human being in that city but somehow got the company of men who walked on the path of crime and that pushed them into the underworld dealings. It was sad to read the story of “Gangubai” who was sold by her boyfriend to a brothel in Kamathipura and the ordeal she had to undergo before she became a known figure there. The story is very tragic because it talks about deception in a big way. Young girls of 16-17 years are sold to brothels when they know nothing about the flesh trade. The story is quite difficult to fathom. It was also heartening to read that Gangubai later adopted children from the locality and raised them. Except one, all the remaining children were residing outside this red light area free from the trade and ugly side of life. The story of “Papamani” who ran one of the biggest drugs dealing business in Mumbai is also compelling. It talks about trials and tribulations of these people. One the reasons for my favorable opinion toward the book is the down-to-earth and yet compelling narrative. It highlights the struggle of these women in a so called “man dominated” world. These women walked along with men and also at times, manipulated them to achieve the position they achieved in the profession they chose for themselves. When I read the book, I sensed the sad undertone because these women appeared to come from humble backgrounds with humble expectations from life. All that they needed was love, care and a family. Those expectations were not at all different from any other woman’s expectations. Yet, circumstances, situations forced them to take up the path of crime. It also appears from their stories that once they chose that path, there was absolutely no turning back. They did not turn back as well. They fought the battle with life. The story of “Nita Naik” and her husband Ashwin Naik has quite a tragic touch to it. It was a sad story. One can refuse to look at these stories with sensitivity but if we were to look at another aspect of their existence and understand how meager it was, one would realize that they had no other way but to fight it out with life. I was particularly sad to read the stories of Gangubai and that of Neeta Naik. The book also tells stories of women who hang around men. The metaphor of Hindi movie villains and their women around was quite interesting. The book upfront clarifies that in our Hindi films, these women are shown to be show pieces but in real life, they are women of substance who control many things around these gangsters. There are short stories of many such women who made men turn to them for various reasons. The preface is written by none other than the celebrated director, Vishal Bharadwaj. If I remember his preface, he says that the book is quite tragic and tells stories of women who while ruled the underworld has had a life full of trials and tribulations. However, he also credits the authors by saying that the stories are almost like screenplay of a movie. It is vivid and quite appealing to the reader. One can visualize the surroundings as one goes about reading each of the stories. I wondered about that. I was not sure if someone could write something so well. However, I must admit that while reading the story, “The Matriarch of Kamathipura” on Gangubai I truly felt that the story was almost like a screenplay. It was so well written that as I read each paragraph, the whole surrounding and the characters were moving in my mind like a movie in slow motion. Please read this book if you want a look inside the world of gangsters. Read it to know what it meant for these women to carve a place for themselves in that ugly world of the dons. Read it to know what is means to live a life that seems grand but in reality quite dangerous. Read this book to understand what compels people to take up professions or activities that they, in normal circumstances, would never ever take up. Read it to understand that a human being is driven not only by power and money but also by the need to love and be loved. The book is about women who chose a life full of existentialism.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ravi Prakash

    I found this book gripping. As soon as I started I was hooked up and finished the whole in just two sittings. Male villains are interesting, but the female ones are more interesting, that's what Vishal Bhardwaj tries to convey in the preface, but as I proceed through the stories of these underworld women, I find in them a lot of innocence, good nature and a bit of cunningness and grey shade. Most of them were helpless by the situations. Only a few were real villains. This was the first time that I I found this book gripping. As soon as I started I was hooked up and finished the whole in just two sittings. Male villains are interesting, but the female ones are more interesting, that's what Vishal Bhardwaj tries to convey in the preface, but as I proceed through the stories of these underworld women, I find in them a lot of innocence, good nature and a bit of cunningness and grey shade. Most of them were helpless by the situations. Only a few were real villains. This was the first time that I read S. Hussain Zaidi. He is a journalist, but I don't think I have ever read any of his articles. Starting from Jenabai Daruwali who almost acted as the Godmother for Haji Mastan and Dawood Ibrahim, the book ends on vicious and crafty bar girls. Story of Jenabai was really impressive, Gangubai-the sex worker or 'Kamathipura Ki Amma' and her connection with the gangster Karima Lala as brother-sister and in later days her social works were also good, somewhat like Nalini Jameela (the first sex-worker who wrote her autobiography), but the most awful and heart-rending story in the collection was of Ashraf aka Sapna Didi, a widow whose husband was murdered by Dawood Ibrahim because he wanted to leave his Comapany. She loved her husband so much that she decided to kill Dawood and for this went through extensive training of arms and weapons, but she came to dreadful and brutal end. Ibrahim's goons butchered her with knives. At that time, it was the most brutal murder in police record. Total 22 cuts. I got some real villainy in Mahalakshmi Papamani, the drug-mafia. She too was helpless by her poverty and her handicapped and alcoholic husband. She started as a drug-peddler but built a huge empire in illegal drug-dealings later. Then comes the story of Monika Bedi and Abu Salem, of which I was a little familiar but here it was in full detail, from the beginning of the trap till the extradition of both from Lisbon. Afterwards, there are stories of Hindu gangsters' wives; Asha Gawli aka Mummy, wife of Arun Gawli aka Daddy (their followers called the duo Mummy-Daddy). You might be acquainted with this gangster-cum-politician, if you have watched the Bollywood movie Daddy (2017). Neeta Naik, wife of the gangster Ashwin Naik. She was educated and from good family but fell in love with a gangster. Later, she supported her husband by joining politics when he was in jail, but the bastard get killed her suspecting she had an affair. Sujata Nikhalje aka Nani wife of Rajendra Sadashiv Nikhalje aka Chhota Rajan aka Nana, this lady was really much indulged with her husband in various organised crimes. She has been arrested and sent to jail many times. In present, she is on bail and living in Tilak Nagar area of Mumbai. Padma Pujari wife of Ravi Pujari, a close aid of Chhota Rajan, she too was indulged in extortion with her husband. Right now, she is absconding and in the wanted list of INTERPOL. There are a few girlfriends and mistresses of the gangsters; Shamim Mirza Beg aka Mrs Paul, inamorata of Arif Beg, a close aid of Chhota Shakeel; Rubina Siraj Sayyed, mistress of Chhota Shakeel; Tarannum Khan, a bar dancer who made huge money in cricket betting; Archana Balmukund Sharma aka Manisha aka Lady Don with Killer Looks, her face resembled of Manisha Koirala, the Nepali beauty, she used several men even notorious gangsters for money. Right now, she is missing. So, this is all about of the contents. I have just given one or two lines for every character, but the writer has delved deep and described them in full detail. I found it as a fine work of narrative journalism. The style is so picturesque you will feel like you are watching a movie while reading it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vijai

    In the corner of a graveyard in Mumbai lies an unmarked tombstone of a woman who was revered as godmother by you-know-who himself. Somewhere else, many years ago, an alone, sick and pained woman was stabbed multiple times in her private parts because she dared to stand up for her beloved departed and many more years ago and still remembered as a deity by few was a sex worker who'd put today's feminists to shame. True stories of women who made their own footing in the dangerous and bloody of Mumb In the corner of a graveyard in Mumbai lies an unmarked tombstone of a woman who was revered as godmother by you-know-who himself. Somewhere else, many years ago, an alone, sick and pained woman was stabbed multiple times in her private parts because she dared to stand up for her beloved departed and many more years ago and still remembered as a deity by few was a sex worker who'd put today's feminists to shame. True stories of women who made their own footing in the dangerous and bloody of Mumbai's underworld and were unremembered until Mr Zaidi wrote this book. There is this line from a Tamil song I always remember when reading Mr. Zaidi's characters in his books - "Naragam adil nee vazhandaal, mirugam ena maara vendum" which roughly translates as "should you live in hell, it is imperative you become an animal (to survive & thrive)". Victims of their circumstances and environment the people in Mr Zaidi's books did what they had to do and paid the price, lived by the sword and died by it. What I liked: 1. Instead of painting it all black and white Mr. Zaidi puts perspective to the narrative which is important. 2. I am no expert on the underworld but this for sure reeks of authenticity. Don't know if I can point to a particular chapter or a paragraph to prove my point but there is something about listening to similar stories from veteran reporters that I know that what Mr Zaidi writes is only what a very credible source could've told him. Total paisa vasool. 3. The photographs were a revelation. Interesting to put faces to infamous names. What I did not like: Not much, just that it looked like he tried to cram a few uninteresting ones in the end to fatten the book which he shouldn't have at all. The quality matters not quantity but who am I to say that to a veteran journalist who put his life at risk to bring this book to light for us? I will end by saying that India's non-fiction scene has taken a definite turn for good with Mr. Zaidi's works. Worth the read and worth the five stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Malvika

    I don't read a lot of books about gangsters, but the ones that I have, all revolve around male gangsters. In Mafia Queens of Mumbai, lives of women who were part of the mafia have been told so well by Hussain S. Zaidi. From Jenabai to Pappamani, from being narco empresses to mobster molls, the stories seem unreal when you first start reading them, because we (or maybe it's just me) have never seen/read stories of women from the ganglands. The stories themselves have been narrated so well, it's d I don't read a lot of books about gangsters, but the ones that I have, all revolve around male gangsters. In Mafia Queens of Mumbai, lives of women who were part of the mafia have been told so well by Hussain S. Zaidi. From Jenabai to Pappamani, from being narco empresses to mobster molls, the stories seem unreal when you first start reading them, because we (or maybe it's just me) have never seen/read stories of women from the ganglands. The stories themselves have been narrated so well, it's difficult to put the book down.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ankur

    Wow! wat a book! i picked it at 0040 AM today, thinking it'll lull me to sleep - and instead i sat up till 330 and finished this at 1 shot! Def 1 of the most riveting pieces of journalistic writing that i hv come across in a long time, and the author has manged to keep it succinct, yet filled with tidbits to titillate our never ending fascination with Mumbai and its underbelly! Go read it! Wow! wat a book! i picked it at 0040 AM today, thinking it'll lull me to sleep - and instead i sat up till 330 and finished this at 1 shot! Def 1 of the most riveting pieces of journalistic writing that i hv come across in a long time, and the author has manged to keep it succinct, yet filled with tidbits to titillate our never ending fascination with Mumbai and its underbelly! Go read it!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Raja Subramanian

    Most human beings hate crime and would be appalled at the violence and depravity often displayed by the underworld. But few can claim to be completely disinterested in reading about the underworld or watching movies made around the underworld. I guess I am not an exception. I keep buying books and read them even as I abhor the utter lack of morals and the mindless violence that go with the territory. The Mafia Queens of Mumbai by S Hussein Zaidi written along with Janes Borges makes for a fascin Most human beings hate crime and would be appalled at the violence and depravity often displayed by the underworld. But few can claim to be completely disinterested in reading about the underworld or watching movies made around the underworld. I guess I am not an exception. I keep buying books and read them even as I abhor the utter lack of morals and the mindless violence that go with the territory. The Mafia Queens of Mumbai by S Hussein Zaidi written along with Janes Borges makes for a fascinating reading experience. Usually, when I read, I try to get a visual imagery of what the author describes. The writing is simple but evokes strong visual imagery that is vivid, powerful and gory. Frankly I must admit that I had not even heard of the mafia queens whose stories are told in this book, except a few. The story of Jenabhai Daruwali is extremely interesting as she appears to have been a powerhouse in the underworld even during the male-dominated heydays of Haji Mastan, Karim Lala and Varadharajan. The authors have researched the story in a painstaking manner and for that alone, the book is a worthwhile buy! The story of Gangubhai who appears to be elevated to the status of a deity in the red light areas of Mumbai is equally powerfully narrated. She controlled several brothels and implemented her will in that area most effectively and ruthlessly. She was respected mostly for the reason that she also protected those involved in prostitution, and fought for decriminalization of prostitution. The anecdote about her meeting Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru and the short conversation between them is priceless. It is a pity that we do not have much information on the last few years of her life. Of all the stories, the one about Ashraf, who came to be later known as Sapna Didi, affected me most. She goes on a path of revenge when her husband is murdered in front of her. She dares to take on Dawood Ibrahim, who had already moved out of India and has been out of reach of the law since then. She turns informer and goes about hurting Dawood’s business in small, but effective manner. Enough to earn the wrath of the Don who has her murdered in a most brutal manner. This is a real life story that creates visions of a Bollywood thriller. The story of Papamani who dominated the drug scene in the 1990’s is well-researched and well-narrated. One wonders what the lady is up to these days. The co-author Jane Broges who interviewed her is just all of 24 years, after having started her journalistic career at a ripe age of 11! Must be some gutsy and committed writer. I can’t make out her writing style in this jointly written book. Looking forward to more from this young writer. Power to you, young lady! The media had covered the episode involving Abu Salem and Monica Bedi. I had also read Hussein Zaidi’s book on Abu Salem. It was good to read the story of Monica Bedi, narrated in a matter of fact manner. These stories take up almost 70% of the book. The rest of the stories (there are 13 in all) are briefly narrated without much details. It was almost as though the authors kept their eyes on the size of the book. I wish that these narrations, too, were in more detail. If you are one that is fascinated by stories of the underworld, here is a book that is a must-read – at least for getting the facts straight. Some of the stories are told elsewhere with titillation or gory details in mind. In this book, the one aspect that I liked was that the narration was not salacious nor sensational. A damned good read!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vimmy

    S. Hussain Zaidi & Jane Borges has thrown some lights on the lives of Mafia queens of of Mumbai. Though there are numerous books and movies on life of underworld dons, mafia queens who can / are running underworld are unknown to normal people. In men's world underworld, it is very difficult to make and sustain a position for woman. The ladies like Jenabai, Ashraf, Mahalakshmi Papamani made Mumbai's don under their control. Even dons like Dawood, Karim lala respected these ladies and their suggest S. Hussain Zaidi & Jane Borges has thrown some lights on the lives of Mafia queens of of Mumbai. Though there are numerous books and movies on life of underworld dons, mafia queens who can / are running underworld are unknown to normal people. In men's world underworld, it is very difficult to make and sustain a position for woman. The ladies like Jenabai, Ashraf, Mahalakshmi Papamani made Mumbai's don under their control. Even dons like Dawood, Karim lala respected these ladies and their suggestions. Lady like Ganga tai who also handle social work in red light area despite being a prostitute. She converted traditional brothels and applied management & commercial view; and converted views of sex workers. Asha Gauli and Neeta Naik have done remarkable work and from being gangster they went in politics. There is a side of underworld which normal people don't know. This book has shown that in very smooth way with cinematic view in front of readers eye. Each and every story is different and amazing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    curleduptoes

    Women are amazing indeed. The book throws light on some prominent women in the world of tuffest men..the Underworld! Captivating read. Fascinating to no extent. Realized that for some women..security, society, men and family are not everything. Hussain Zaidi did a wonderful job of penning down somethong that's not spoken out loud. Visualizing all that was written in the book excited me... then I thought how would those women have lead the world..facing and living everything that was written? A t Women are amazing indeed. The book throws light on some prominent women in the world of tuffest men..the Underworld! Captivating read. Fascinating to no extent. Realized that for some women..security, society, men and family are not everything. Hussain Zaidi did a wonderful job of penning down somethong that's not spoken out loud. Visualizing all that was written in the book excited me... then I thought how would those women have lead the world..facing and living everything that was written? A tip to readers : Read the book in one go, if possible. Also, take your time and dont hurry..relish and enjoy every word of the book. Reading such books is a treat that you should never avoid.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Abraham Lewik

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The spoiler is in the last paragraph. An enjoyable book. Strangely, most of the places named are not available on Google StreetView. Maybe it's the scary muggers & maybe I should just watch the films mentioned in this book. The players on this novel's stage lack the humility of Warren Fellow. Photos contained in the book are all in black & white, this lulled me into a placid, ignorant state of mind. The dates of convictions rudely ripped away this serenity, this is no catalogue of a past century The spoiler is in the last paragraph. An enjoyable book. Strangely, most of the places named are not available on Google StreetView. Maybe it's the scary muggers & maybe I should just watch the films mentioned in this book. The players on this novel's stage lack the humility of Warren Fellow. Photos contained in the book are all in black & white, this lulled me into a placid, ignorant state of mind. The dates of convictions rudely ripped away this serenity, this is no catalogue of a past century but an up-to-date recording of facts. After reading through this book, holding in mind 'From Dongri to Dubai', my preference would be for this book. It focuses on a more diverse net of criminals, the chapters read as vignettes united by a common town & common foe. Also, my inability to grasp the names & places wasn't a source of confusion, unlike the criminal intrigue sketched out in that other book. The section on the Tamil matriarch, & preceding liquor baron, has fired anew my curiosity about the structural role of a criminal coterie in a slum. There is not an emphasis on morality of the individual nor of the society, some characters feel like villains, some feel like victims. One matriarch was vigilant against degradation of women. It seemed ironic to me, because I know very well she was exploiting women through pimping / pandering but she spoke to lead change to the generative factors of serious problems. Using a facade of love to abscond with, then sell a naive, rural, young lady into sexual slavery is a criminal act deserving of a harsher punishment than prison can legally provide. Trying to evict the victim is a cruelty not a cure. Regulation not criminalisation!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Parthiv

    Whilst not every story is equally gripping, there are quite a few gems in this melange of journalism and fiction. It’s an interesting genre that I haven’t been all too familiar with—I say this with regret for I have only, now, understood the grey vibrancy (oxymoron, intended) of my own city and its crime culture.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ajitabh Pandey

    This is an excellent book introducing the role some of the women played in the Mumbai underworld. The best part about this book was the narration by all three narrators, their style made this listen a very interesting one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nayonika Roy

    The best part about this book is that it does not try to form an opinion. This is a pure research based book that gives insights into many god mothers who established themselves in the world of crime mostly to make their ends meet! The only disappointment is the writing style. This is a book which definitely needs a strong editor!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Savio Sebastian

    I loved listening to this book. It gave a glimpse into the life of women who led gangs in Mumbai - what led them into crime and how they reigned. The author does a great job telling their story, letting the reader feel their emotions and experience their world in small ways.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zoya

    One the best reads this year. This is so interesting and informative to read. I wish this was made into a series. Rudyard Kipling had it right, The Female of the species is more deadly than the male. My favourite stories were that of Sapna, Gangu and Jenabai. Easiest 5 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali Gupta

    Like all the other works of Zaidi, this too is a result of an extensive research and years of real world knowledge of the ganglords. The beauty lies in the narrative written in first person that rouses empathy and gives it a fiction like quality. Engrossing, revealing and a must-read!

  18. 5 out of 5

    LyricTrotter

    Precise, meticulous.A definite read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Devika Das

    I have read the book twice. It is an interesting read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sanjukta Kundu

    Quite crisp yet detailed! 👌

  21. 4 out of 5

    Monika

    I somehow missed reading this when it came and then when Audibles launched in India thought it was the perfect way to *read* this one

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kulpreet Yadav

    This is a fabulous book. Stories of women, all from Mumbai, who chose the path of crime, a few by choice, and a few because they were not left with any choice. Latter, yes you guessed it right, for love. The writing style is experimental: a few chapters where the first person alternates with the third person, even though divided into chapters, but from the same story nonetheless, and that's bold I would say. Does it come in the way? No, and in case if you are wondering how did I spot it then, we This is a fabulous book. Stories of women, all from Mumbai, who chose the path of crime, a few by choice, and a few because they were not left with any choice. Latter, yes you guessed it right, for love. The writing style is experimental: a few chapters where the first person alternates with the third person, even though divided into chapters, but from the same story nonetheless, and that's bold I would say. Does it come in the way? No, and in case if you are wondering how did I spot it then, well, I have been teaching creative writing for a while now, that's why. The writers (yes, it's co-written) have also switched the narrative tenses from past to present back and forth a few times. Does this come in the way? I think it does. That said, the research, the intense prose that's high on imagery, and the honesty that clearly seeps through, make this book a great book. I've been interested in female criminology (there's a term like that, I didn't make it up) for a while now. The mutation of the female psyche from being nurturers to becoming destroyers is unnatural and therefore more intriguing. Perhaps. Overall, an edge-of-seat book. Cliched expression, I know, but suits well here. Therefore, read. You must.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pooja

    3.5 stars I believe it takes great courage for a common man to commit a crime, and cunning to get away with it. I guess thats why a lot of people are fascinated by crime. How did he do it? How did he get away? How was he caught? He? Not here mister. It was a She. Women who unapologetically made their way in crime world of Mumbai. Set in the time when Underworld was a word everyone was scared off, the book is a set of narratives by a criminal journalist. "That the female of the species is deadli 3.5 stars I believe it takes great courage for a common man to commit a crime, and cunning to get away with it. I guess thats why a lot of people are fascinated by crime. How did he do it? How did he get away? How was he caught? He? Not here mister. It was a She. Women who unapologetically made their way in crime world of Mumbai. Set in the time when Underworld was a word everyone was scared off, the book is a set of narratives by a criminal journalist. "That the female of the species is deadlier than the male. “ — Rudyard Kipling Somehow, when I think of women holding the reigns of a crime syndicate, I always imagine her to me more ruthless, cunning, cold than her male counterpart. And that is what you can find in the stories of Jenabai, Gangubai, Ashraf, Jyoti Amma and Asha Gawli. They are a strange mix of strength, cruelty with a tough of wife’s love or a woman’s dedication. In a way they are extremely inspiring. Rest of the stories though were not impactful. Monica Bedi’s story could have been skipped as she does not classify as a mafia queen, however her strength is worth mentioning. It adds an element of glamour in any case. All the others were good but uneventful. It’s definitely worth a read if you’re a woman, and even more if you’re a man. ;-)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shalini Goyal

    I remember rifling through the pages of Dongri To Dubai : Six Decades of The Mumbai Mafia almost six to seven years ago. I had found the book in the back of a shelf in my college library. Dog-eared with pages scrunched up and stained yellow here and there, the book had the mark of a well used book, read by many people, albeit its inhuman treatment. Up until then, I had lived a very sheltered life, where the news channels were changed when any news of mafia, gangsters or their illicit affairs had I remember rifling through the pages of Dongri To Dubai : Six Decades of The Mumbai Mafia almost six to seven years ago. I had found the book in the back of a shelf in my college library. Dog-eared with pages scrunched up and stained yellow here and there, the book had the mark of a well used book, read by many people, albeit its inhuman treatment. Up until then, I had lived a very sheltered life, where the news channels were changed when any news of mafia, gangsters or their illicit affairs had been broadcasted. It was natural that I had only heard the echoes of the names of the likes of Dawood Ibrahim, Chota Rajan or Abu Salem. When I held 'Dongri to Dubai' in my hands, I had only a vague idea of underworld or what it meant, I was blissfully unaware of the D-company, 93' Mumbai blasts or in fact Monica Bedi scandal. (Ironically, I knew about the other Monica scandal with a certain president, nuff' said.) I had turned the book over to look at it's back cover to read the synopsis and had discovered some names I faintly remembered hearing here or there. My excitement grew as I came across more names which held familiar echoes. Little time passed before I was cradling the book in my lap and rifling through its pages to read the story of one of scariest mafia lords in the history of India, the part of my brain which knew all that to be true was horrified, while the other part of me, which felt that stories like these happened only in fiction or fantasy was deeply engrossed. Little did my eighteen year old self knew that fiction itself is borne out of the shadows of reality and sometimes latter is more horrific. An hour had passed before I realised that I had been sitting on the ground, beside the shelf itself. I stood up and went up to the librarian to get the book checked out, who promptly refused and asked me to return the already checked-out five books before I could take this book home. (Oh Well). I brought my library card and one of the five books next day to return, but found out that the book on the D-company CEO had already been checked-out by someone else. To this day, I regret shelving the book out in open instead of stashing it behind some old dusty ones. I did not get the chance to get my hands on the book again, but it left a strong impression on my mind and piqued my curiosity in this subject. Meanwhile, my understanding of the underworld, gangs and mafia grew more, thanks to some friends, internet and Anurag Kashyap (Black Friday, Gangs of Wasseypur etc.) Oh and I did not know that 'Black Friday' was adapted into a screenplay from a book by the same author, I got to know that just two days back when I started listening to 'Mafia Queens of Mumbai'. That's right. I bought the audiobook. I just bought it on a whim, thinking that it would contain the accounts of kept women of Mafia gangsters. By the end of the book, my thinking changed and I realised that in some cases, it was the other way around. I had long been intrigued with controversial figures like Phoolan Devi, whose tremendous suffering and acts of rebellions and crimes have made me shy away from labelling them with black or white stickers. I have come to realise that it is not my place to judge these people from my sheltered glass house, while I remain unaware of the circumstances in which they turned towards a life of bloodshed and illegal activities. In no way I am saying that every gangster or gangstress were forced into this life because of circumstances, some of them crossed over this bridge willingly and eagerly. But, for some of them, upbringing had been despicable, circumstances dire and they had to fend for themselves in a labyrinth-like metropolis with its share of shady alleyways juxtaposing glittering extravaganza. And that had been the case for some of the women whom Hussain Zaidi has mentioned in his book. Listening to Radhika Apte, with husky undertones in her voice, telling the story of Gangu Bai, the madame of a brothel who was revered by the entire locality of Kamathipura, spunkily asking then Prime Minister Jawahar Lal Nehru to marry her, made me laugh out loud. While Kalki Koechlin, in her accented english gave an account of Mahalakhsmi Papamani, a drug baroness of Sonapur, Mumbai. How she rose to prominence and was brought down by her own husband and daughter made me cringe in my seat. Rajkumar Rao, in a little rushed but articulated way went on to describe the story of Ashraf a.k.a. Sapna, narrated to Hussain and Vikram Chandra (That's right. Surprise!) by Hussain Ustraa (Her friend and admirer) when they went to interview him. Her story of revenge and sorrow made me root for her, she shed her naivety to don a cloak of shrewdness and bravado and locked horns with one of biggest dogs on the underworld street. (view spoiler)[ Though her ending made me recoil back in horror. (hide spoiler)] All of the thirteen women, whose stories adorned pages in this book were real, the narrative was strong and unforgiving, yet non judgmental. The writer did not mince the words when he wrote down the stories of these notorious queens of Mafia. It made me believe that woman can be a maker or a breaker of a man's destiny. She can use her wit and be an advisor to the likes of Dawood Ibrahim and Haji Mastan, or be spunky and banter with the likes of Jawahar Lal Nehru, or she can be ruthless and order the killing of twenty two men with the snap of her finger, and let's not forget the coquetry a woman can use as a power weapon to make men dance on their tunes with purses inside out. In conclusion, I would say that this is a tale of survivors, there are moments when you feel sympathy for these women, and others when you cringe at their actions, but my advise is to give it a read with a non-judgmental mindset and admire the sheer spunk of the women who made it in the man's world and boy, did they rule.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Akshay

    The Mumbai underworld, or the Mumbai Mafia is as much a part of the city as Bollywood is, and as much a stuff of legends. The well known stories from this murky world are all male-centric. Haji Mastan, Dawood Ibrahim, Varadarajan Mudaliar, and Karim Lala, to name a few. Thirteen true stories of black marketeers, prostitution ringleaders and trained assassins hit the pages of "Mafia Queens of Mumbai" with a convincing splatter. Sure, critics may call it trade paper, but this is pulp at its graphi The Mumbai underworld, or the Mumbai Mafia is as much a part of the city as Bollywood is, and as much a stuff of legends. The well known stories from this murky world are all male-centric. Haji Mastan, Dawood Ibrahim, Varadarajan Mudaliar, and Karim Lala, to name a few. Thirteen true stories of black marketeers, prostitution ringleaders and trained assassins hit the pages of "Mafia Queens of Mumbai" with a convincing splatter. Sure, critics may call it trade paper, but this is pulp at its graphic best, steeped in details and relishing every suspenseful twist. The book is a valuable piece of reportage, as it offers new insights into a world for which people like me have an endless fascination and it does so in a unique perspective. A book like "Mafia Queens of Mumbai" peels back into the thin veneer of civilisation that isn't merely sensational but also essential to completing the portrait of a corrupt city.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Poorni

    We've all heard and read about the men of the Mumbai underworld. Many have been portrayed in screen by our favourite heroes as well. But what of the women? Hardly do we come to know of them. This book is an attempt to right that wrong. It was wonderful in an albeit perverse way to read about the women whose names have been forgotten in the murky waters of the Mumbai underworld. Women who, for whatever reasons, decided to take the plunge into a life of crime and paid for it. Loved the fact that t We've all heard and read about the men of the Mumbai underworld. Many have been portrayed in screen by our favourite heroes as well. But what of the women? Hardly do we come to know of them. This book is an attempt to right that wrong. It was wonderful in an albeit perverse way to read about the women whose names have been forgotten in the murky waters of the Mumbai underworld. Women who, for whatever reasons, decided to take the plunge into a life of crime and paid for it. Loved the fact that the book wasn't completely black or white. There's no judgement. Zaidi writes it as it is. He has gone overboard with his creative license at times but it's still a good read. Some of the stories come off as too hard to believe but then, who am I to make that judgement? A short and fast read. Four stars just for the subject matter. Pick it up if you want to take a peek at the female face of the Mumbai underworld.

  27. 4 out of 5

    D

    As they say behind every successful man there is a woman. So true. And those women are more strong as compared to these men. Its non fiction but didn't feel like it. Very interesting novel. Made me wonder what went wrong with women these days. In those days women used to be so strong and a single woman could handle an entire gang of men. My favorite characters were Gangu and Ashraf. Loved reading it. As they say behind every successful man there is a woman. So true. And those women are more strong as compared to these men. Its non fiction but didn't feel like it. Very interesting novel. Made me wonder what went wrong with women these days. In those days women used to be so strong and a single woman could handle an entire gang of men. My favorite characters were Gangu and Ashraf. Loved reading it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Disha Naik

    Dongri to Dubai was my first Hussain Zaidi book - and I couldn't help getting hooked! I absolutely love how he keeps you on your toes from the first word to the last. You just can't help but feel restless until you read and finish the entire book. The language is plain, simple and just perfect. He explains the workings of Mumbai mafiosi with such ease and comfort - it's amazing. I've already got My Name is Abu Salem from the local library - and I can't wait to start. Dongri to Dubai was my first Hussain Zaidi book - and I couldn't help getting hooked! I absolutely love how he keeps you on your toes from the first word to the last. You just can't help but feel restless until you read and finish the entire book. The language is plain, simple and just perfect. He explains the workings of Mumbai mafiosi with such ease and comfort - it's amazing. I've already got My Name is Abu Salem from the local library - and I can't wait to start.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vishnu

    AMAZING !!!! Never knew that females had played a brilliant role in the Mumbai Underworld.Thanks to the author for this well researched genuine fiction.. It would be even better and enjoyable if we can watch it as a movie.. Its time for me to grab another work of the same author "Black Friday".. I have already ordered it from Flipkart but not yet received.. AMAZING !!!! Never knew that females had played a brilliant role in the Mumbai Underworld.Thanks to the author for this well researched genuine fiction.. It would be even better and enjoyable if we can watch it as a movie.. Its time for me to grab another work of the same author "Black Friday".. I have already ordered it from Flipkart but not yet received..

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandip Balakrishnan

    A peep into the mesmerising world of female dons and the reasoning why the became what they did.Its a hash of all the circumstances which made Mumbai a grow bed of crime even with the fairer race joining the bandwagon.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.