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Leaves of grass;: Selected poetry and prose

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With an introduction by Walter Lowenfels.


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With an introduction by Walter Lowenfels.

30 review for Leaves of grass;: Selected poetry and prose

  1. 4 out of 5

    ZaRi

    Out of the rolling ocean the crowd came a drop gently to me, Whispering, I love you, before long I die, I have travell’d a long way merely to look on you to touch you, For I could not die till I once look’d on you, For I fear’d I might afterward lose you. Now we have met, we have look’d, we are safe, Return in peace to the ocean my love, I too am part of that ocean, my love, we are not so much separated, Behold the great rondure, the cohesion of all, how perfect! But as for me, for you, the irresistible Out of the rolling ocean the crowd came a drop gently to me, Whispering, I love you, before long I die, I have travell’d a long way merely to look on you to touch you, For I could not die till I once look’d on you, For I fear’d I might afterward lose you. Now we have met, we have look’d, we are safe, Return in peace to the ocean my love, I too am part of that ocean, my love, we are not so much separated, Behold the great rondure, the cohesion of all, how perfect! But as for me, for you, the irresistible sea is to separate us, As for an hour carrying us diverse, yet cannot carry us diverse forever; Be not impatient – a little space – know you I salute the air, the ocean and the land, Every day at sundown for your dear sake, my love.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    My favorite thing about reading this book is that one night I read a part of a poem I liked, Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, to my 10 year old son. The next evening when he was ready for bed he asked, "Could you read some more of that Walt Whitman poetry to me?" Although it's sometimes difficult to read it's obvious that there is beauty in most of the words. We talked about how one theme is that he is talking and you are listening, but also he feels that since you are listening (reading), that the poet My favorite thing about reading this book is that one night I read a part of a poem I liked, Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, to my 10 year old son. The next evening when he was ready for bed he asked, "Could you read some more of that Walt Whitman poetry to me?" Although it's sometimes difficult to read it's obvious that there is beauty in most of the words. We talked about how one theme is that he is talking and you are listening, but also he feels that since you are listening (reading), that the poet knows you as well. And it's very nice to know Mr. Whitman.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eugenea Pollock

    So many iconic poems (Song of Myself, I Hear America Singing, Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking, When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomed, O Captain! My Captain!) fill these pages that it’s hard to know where to begin. So I will confine my comments to the last 20% of the book, which deals with the Civil War and the poet’s last years. Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night placed me right there with a dying soldier, a “brave boy” whose wounds were too mortal to treat. And I marched beside So many iconic poems (Song of Myself, I Hear America Singing, Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking, When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomed, O Captain! My Captain!) fill these pages that it’s hard to know where to begin. So I will confine my comments to the last 20% of the book, which deals with the Civil War and the poet’s last years. Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night placed me right there with a dying soldier, a “brave boy” whose wounds were too mortal to treat. And I marched beside the troops on “...The Road Unknown” going where?? I mourned Lincoln’s death over a century and a half ago as if it were yesterday because Whitman put me in that time and place, thanks to a couple of those iconic poems. But So Long! affected me profoundly. It made Whitman real to me as a person in the here and now. “Camerado, this is no book,/Who touches this touches a man,/(Is it night? are we here together alone?)/It is I you hold and who holds you,/I spring from the pages into your arms—decease calls me forth.” He goes on to describe the timeless contact through fingers, breath, pulse, kiss—all generated by his words into the reader’s ears. Do yourself a favor—read it, close your eyes, time travel, meet the man himself. It is a remarkable literary experience.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Linda DiMeo Lowman

    So much of Whitman's poetry in Leaves of Grass is to be savored, like a sunset or a walk on the beach or a stroll in the rain. Nature is firmly rooted in his poetry, hence the title. His poetry about the Civil War captures the fervor and devastation that came with it. Finally, can you imagine anyone writing a poem like Oh Captain! My Captain! upon the death of any other sitting president except Abraham Lincoln? So much of Whitman's poetry in Leaves of Grass is to be savored, like a sunset or a walk on the beach or a stroll in the rain. Nature is firmly rooted in his poetry, hence the title. His poetry about the Civil War captures the fervor and devastation that came with it. Finally, can you imagine anyone writing a poem like Oh Captain! My Captain! upon the death of any other sitting president except Abraham Lincoln?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I loved everything about my first Walt Whitman reading experience except the font size and style. I know that is a dumb thing to say, but honestly, font counts. Check out my review of my maiden voyage with Whitman here I loved everything about my first Walt Whitman reading experience except the font size and style. I know that is a dumb thing to say, but honestly, font counts. Check out my review of my maiden voyage with Whitman here

  6. 5 out of 5

    Margaret McLane

    My copy, Inscribed: "Dear Dinny, 10/10/75 . . . Love, Cathy" My copy, Inscribed: "Dear Dinny, 10/10/75 . . . Love, Cathy"

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ratatoskr

    I read the edition edited by Christopher Morley with illustrations by Lewis C. Daniel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tatra

    Yeesh, it took forever to get past that 52 part long poem at the start of the book, but after that I found that I actually kind of liked Walt Whitman's poetry. Most of this book was read in October, because that 52 part poem really was killer. Yeesh, it took forever to get past that 52 part long poem at the start of the book, but after that I found that I actually kind of liked Walt Whitman's poetry. Most of this book was read in October, because that 52 part poem really was killer.

  9. 5 out of 5

    E

    I first read Whitman in my junior year of high school (thank you, Mrs. McClanahan). My mother gave me this edition when I graduated from high school in 1976. I have loved Whitman ever since. Even overexposure in graduate school did not take that away from me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hufflepuff Book Reviewer

    "We frolic in the meadow all day long!" This was all I got from this disjointed, peculiar, and rambling poem. "We frolic in the meadow all day long!" This was all I got from this disjointed, peculiar, and rambling poem.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Varner

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Dyhr

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eef

  15. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Bingman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Buster2u

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aja

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lee Hall

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ainsley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Max

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elisha

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kat Ikerd

  24. 4 out of 5

    Herminia Gomez

  25. 4 out of 5

    Norat

  26. 5 out of 5

    Inna Santo

  27. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mspen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Malin

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