web site hit counter The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry: An Anthology - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry: An Anthology

Availability: Ready to download

A major bilingual anthology of twentieth-century Latin American poetry During a century of extraordinary change, poets became the chroniclers of deep polarizations. From Rubén Darío's quest to renew the Spanish language to César Vallejo's linking of religion and politics, from Jorge Luis Borges's cosmopolitanism to Pablo Neruda's placement of poetry as uncompromising speake A major bilingual anthology of twentieth-century Latin American poetry During a century of extraordinary change, poets became the chroniclers of deep polarizations. From Rubén Darío's quest to renew the Spanish language to César Vallejo's linking of religion and politics, from Jorge Luis Borges's cosmopolitanism to Pablo Neruda's placement of poetry as uncompromising speaker for the downtrodden, and from Alejandra Pizarnik's agonies of the self to Humberto Ak'Abal's examination of all things indigenous, it is through verse that the hemisphere's cantankerous collective soul in an age of overhaul might best be understood. A brilliant, moving, and thought-provoking summation of these forking paths, The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry invites us to look at an illustrious literary tradition with fresh eyes. Ilan Stavans, one of the foremost scholars of Hispanic culture and a distinguished translator, goes beyond easy geographical and linguistic categorizations in gathering these works. This bilingual anthology features eighty-four authors from sixteen different countries writing in Spanish, Portuguese, Mapuche, Nahuatl, Quechua, Mazatec, Zapotec, Ladino, and Spanglish. The poems are rendered into English in inspired fashion by first-rate translators such as Elizabeth Bishop, Galway Kinnell, W. S. Merwin, Alastair Reid, Mark Strand, and Richard Wilbur. In these pages the reader will experience the power of poetry to account for a hundred years in the life of a restless continent.


Compare

A major bilingual anthology of twentieth-century Latin American poetry During a century of extraordinary change, poets became the chroniclers of deep polarizations. From Rubén Darío's quest to renew the Spanish language to César Vallejo's linking of religion and politics, from Jorge Luis Borges's cosmopolitanism to Pablo Neruda's placement of poetry as uncompromising speake A major bilingual anthology of twentieth-century Latin American poetry During a century of extraordinary change, poets became the chroniclers of deep polarizations. From Rubén Darío's quest to renew the Spanish language to César Vallejo's linking of religion and politics, from Jorge Luis Borges's cosmopolitanism to Pablo Neruda's placement of poetry as uncompromising speaker for the downtrodden, and from Alejandra Pizarnik's agonies of the self to Humberto Ak'Abal's examination of all things indigenous, it is through verse that the hemisphere's cantankerous collective soul in an age of overhaul might best be understood. A brilliant, moving, and thought-provoking summation of these forking paths, The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry invites us to look at an illustrious literary tradition with fresh eyes. Ilan Stavans, one of the foremost scholars of Hispanic culture and a distinguished translator, goes beyond easy geographical and linguistic categorizations in gathering these works. This bilingual anthology features eighty-four authors from sixteen different countries writing in Spanish, Portuguese, Mapuche, Nahuatl, Quechua, Mazatec, Zapotec, Ladino, and Spanglish. The poems are rendered into English in inspired fashion by first-rate translators such as Elizabeth Bishop, Galway Kinnell, W. S. Merwin, Alastair Reid, Mark Strand, and Richard Wilbur. In these pages the reader will experience the power of poetry to account for a hundred years in the life of a restless continent.

30 review for The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry: An Anthology

  1. 4 out of 5

    s.penkevich

    In honour of World Poetry Day (March 21st) There is something eminently satisfying about holding a tome of a text in your hands. You know, the big brick of a book that makes you feel like Atlas carrying the weight of literature, the kind that leaves bruises on your chest when you read in bed. The best are those beast whose physical weight seems necessary to further emphasize the literary weight within (think Ulysses, think Gravity's Rainbow, definitely think Women and Men); the sort that smacks y In honour of World Poetry Day (March 21st) There is something eminently satisfying about holding a tome of a text in your hands. You know, the big brick of a book that makes you feel like Atlas carrying the weight of literature, the kind that leaves bruises on your chest when you read in bed. The best are those beast whose physical weight seems necessary to further emphasize the literary weight within (think Ulysses, think Gravity's Rainbow, definitely think Women and Men); the sort that smacks you right in your book-loving heart with the same sort of punch you'd experience had you taken a blow to the head from said book (oh, you better believe I bought the hardcover). FSG has done us all a great service with their satisfyingly bulky Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry anthology which captures a broad landscape of modern Latin-American poets and serves them up like those overwhelmingly bountiful appetizer sampler plates at a dirty, late-night diner. The selection is incredible and contains many expected names—Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz (there is a fantastic Paz poem about Joseph Cornell I was previously unfamiliar with), Alfonso Reyes, Julio Cortazar, and the Prince himself, Roberto Bolaño— many of my beloved Latin-American poets like Enrique Lihn, Nicanor Parra, Mario Benedetti and Juan Gelman, but most importantly a whole ocean of poets I was unfamiliar with. This book is a wonderful chance to sift for gold, and believe me, there is much to be found. This collection introduced me to Alejandra Pizarnik whom I've since ordered everything and anything I can find in translation until her Selected Poems appears this spring (calling her the Argentina's answer to Sylvia Plath—which I will surely do in an upcoming review I'm sure—isn't wrong but also seems too catchy to be accurate. In short, Pizarnik is dark but with a comforting and incredible light.) The selection in this volume is amazing and everyone is sure to walk away with a new-found obsession with a poet. Additionally impressive are wide variety of translators found in this volume, many of which you are sure to recognize. There are W.S. Merwin, Elizabeth Bishop, Alastair Reid, Samuel Becket, Alan Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Laura Healey, and people I outright adore like Mark Strand and Eliot Weinberger. The translators were reason enough to purchase this. I also very much appreciate when a book of translated poems is printed bilingually. It seems like a move of honesty and not tricking the reader into feeling the translation is a definite ruling. More importantly, it opens up an avenue of insight into the art of translation by allowing the reader to make their own judgement on what they feel the translation would be and then compare them to the translator's work to learn and guess from the nuances why a specific word selection might have been preferable to an alternative. If you are interested in poetry even in the slightest, this is a wonderful collection. I have a certain love for Latin-American literature and especially poetry, but this is a collection everyone will walk away from with a new poet to fall in love with. 4/5 To Be Read In the Interrogative - Julio Cortazar. Have you seen Have you truly seen the snow the stars the felt steps of the breeze Have you touched really have you touched the plate the bread the face of that woman you love so much Have you lived like a blow to the head the flash the gasp the fall the flight Have you known known in every pore of your skin how your eyes your hands your sex your soft heart must be thrown away must be wept away must be invented all over again

  2. 5 out of 5

    B. P. Rinehart

    "Yo soy un hombre sincero De donde crece la palma. Y antes de morirme quiero Echar mis versos del alma." - de Versos sencillos por José Martí This book was recommended to me years ago and I'm sorry it took me so long to read it. It is a testament to good poetry, the amazing diversity of the poets of Latin America (which most English-speakers won't know beyond the Chilean and Argentine (and maybe the Cuban I quoted above), and to the power of translation. The book is edited by the scholar Ilan Stavan "Yo soy un hombre sincero De donde crece la palma. Y antes de morirme quiero Echar mis versos del alma." - de Versos sencillos por José Martí This book was recommended to me years ago and I'm sorry it took me so long to read it. It is a testament to good poetry, the amazing diversity of the poets of Latin America (which most English-speakers won't know beyond the Chilean and Argentine (and maybe the Cuban I quoted above), and to the power of translation. The book is edited by the scholar Ilan Stavans who does some of the translation work in this book and wrote an amazing introduction which does for Latin American poetry what James Weldon Johnson's introduction in The Book of American Negro Poetry did for Black American poetry. It is good to learn about how Latin American poetry evolved and developed between different languages and different historical circumstances. "I have a word inside my mouth and don't let it get out and don't get rid of it, though its blood-gush pushes at me. If I let it out it would scorch the bright grass, drain blood from lambs, drop birds from air." - 1st stanza of A Word by Gabriela Mistral, translated by Ursula K. Le Guin. A quick note on the translators: besides Stavans himself, there is a whole host of translators, known and unknown, in this book. We have usual suspects of Spanish to English translation like Gregory Rabassa & W. S. Merwin, but also folks like Samuel Beckett & Allen Ginsberg. It is very interesting to see how these folks go about translating Spanish, Portuguese, Judaeo-Spanish, and the indigenous languages of Latin America. Because this book is a dual-translated, you get to see the poem in the original language as well as in English. I'm glad that they did not just include Spanish and Portuguese. "Hay golpes en la vida, tan fuertes... ¡Yo no sé! Golpes como del odio de Dios; como si ante ellos, la resaca de todo lo sufrido se empozara en el alma... ¡Yo no sé! Son pocos; pero son... Abren zanjas oscuras en el rostro más fiero y en el lomo más fuerte. Serán tal vez los potros de bárbaros Atilas; o los heraldos negros que nos manda la Muerte. Son las caídas hondas de los Cristos del alma de alguna fe adorable que el Destino blasfema. Esos golpes sangrientos son las crepitaciones de algún pan que en la puerta del horno se nos quema. Y el hombre... Pobre... ¡pobre! Vuelve los ojos, como cuando por sobre el hombro nos llama una palmada; vuelve los ojos locos, y todo lo vivido se empoza, como charco de culpa, en la mirada. Hay golpes en la vida, tan fuertes... ¡Yo no sé!" - Los heraldos negros por César Vallejo (One of my favorite poems from this collection.) So many good poets in this book, from Nicolás Guillén to Pueblo Neruda, Carlos Drummond de Andrade to Natalio Hernández Xocoyotzin, Dulce María Loynaz to Myriam Moscona. There's something so amazing about poetry. It can do things and work in ways that other literary genres can't. It can tell a story and express a sentiment in ways that prose can't. I grew-up in a culture of poets--of lyricists. I love the genre with all my heart. I like words with all my heart. I know the power of translation and its discontents. " to León Ostrov Lord The cage has become a bird and has flown away and my heart is crazy because it howls at death and smiles behind the wind at my ravings What will I do with my fear What will I do with my fear Light no longer dances in my smile nor do seasons burn doves in my ideas and gone where death teaches the dead to live Lord The air punishes my body Behind the air there are monsters that drink my blood It is a disaster It is the hour of emptiness not empty It is the moment to bolt closed the lips to hear the screaming of the condmned to study each one of my names hanged by its neck in nothingness Lord I am twenty years old My eyes are also twenty Yet say nothing Lord I have lived out my life in an instant The last innocence shattered Now is never or nevermore or simply was How is it I don't kill myself in front of a mirror and disappear to reappear in the sea where a great ship would await me with its lights burning? How is it I don't pull out my veins and with them build a ladder to flee to the other side of night? The beginning has given birth to the end Everything will remain the same The worn-out smiles The concerned concern The questions of stone on stone The grimaces that mimic love Everything will remain the same But my arms insist on embracing the world because they still haven't been taught that it's too late Lord Throw the coffins out of my blood I remember my childhood when I was an old woman Flowers died in my hands because the savage dance of joy destroyed their heart I remember the black mornings of sun when I was a girl which is to say yesterday which is to say centuries ago Lord The cage has become a bird and has devoured my hopes Lord The cage has become a bird What will I do with my fear." - The Awakening by Alejandra Pizarnik

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    If it wasn't a borrowed book and I wouldn't have to hurry with finishing it, I could savour most of the texts for months and months, if not for longer. It is a beautiful collection, an appetizer, of a poetry from Latin America. An amazing bilingual poetry, which is addressed to everyone - those who know nothing about this particular literary tradition but also to those, who are well acquinted and just want to refreshen their memory or even discover new names (knowing almost nothing about Brasili If it wasn't a borrowed book and I wouldn't have to hurry with finishing it, I could savour most of the texts for months and months, if not for longer. It is a beautiful collection, an appetizer, of a poetry from Latin America. An amazing bilingual poetry, which is addressed to everyone - those who know nothing about this particular literary tradition but also to those, who are well acquinted and just want to refreshen their memory or even discover new names (knowing almost nothing about Brasilian poets, it was an interesting experience to discover new names).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    A wonderful anthology, beautiful translations. It would have been improved by including poems from every Latin American country, but this collection focuses on Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and Chile. The poetry of Latin America is often nature poetry, evincing a deep love of homeland and astonishing cultural diversity amid the turmoil of post-colonialism in the 20th century.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cristy

    Read Harder Challenge #23(a): Read a book of poetry in translation on a theme other than love. This book could easily work as a textbook for an entire semester's worth of study. It is broad in voice, country of origin, gender and original language. Read Harder Challenge #23(a): Read a book of poetry in translation on a theme other than love. This book could easily work as a textbook for an entire semester's worth of study. It is broad in voice, country of origin, gender and original language.

  6. 5 out of 5

    D S

    As with most poetry collections, it's like getting Al Bundy drunk off of Manischewitz, when what you really need is a little dip here and there of stronger stuff. Some of these poems, if you happen to open up to the right ones, will remind you of your first case of vertigo, and the limitless possibilities of the dreaming world that you leave at home in a locked drawer as you go about your daily language functions. If only the rest of these selections were as aptly and funnily translated as Ginsbe As with most poetry collections, it's like getting Al Bundy drunk off of Manischewitz, when what you really need is a little dip here and there of stronger stuff. Some of these poems, if you happen to open up to the right ones, will remind you of your first case of vertigo, and the limitless possibilities of the dreaming world that you leave at home in a locked drawer as you go about your daily language functions. If only the rest of these selections were as aptly and funnily translated as Ginsberg / Ferlinghetti's rendition of Nicanor Parra's Soliloquy of the Individual. It almost feels like a lounge act. I'm the Individual. Hey.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kenning JP Garcia

    This is a decent introduction to Latin American poetry. A few authors were left out and a few authors were given way too many pages but there are some real gems in this collection. And, it ends really strong. But, if you can read Spanish, you should read the originals as some of the translations aren't very faithful and/or the rhythm is lost and the poem is the weakened. This is a decent introduction to Latin American poetry. A few authors were left out and a few authors were given way too many pages but there are some real gems in this collection. And, it ends really strong. But, if you can read Spanish, you should read the originals as some of the translations aren't very faithful and/or the rhythm is lost and the poem is the weakened.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    i can't stop reading this! i can't stop reading this!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    protip: if you're making a bilingual anthology, don't somehow leave out the translation for one of the poems. protip: if you're making a bilingual anthology, don't somehow leave out the translation for one of the poems.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I'm generally not a fan of poetry collections. But this one was pretty awesome. Also, it gave me an excuse to brush up on my Spanish. I'm generally not a fan of poetry collections. But this one was pretty awesome. Also, it gave me an excuse to brush up on my Spanish.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    I loved this book and even found some great new favorite poets!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karlo Mikhail

    Great compilation of Latin American poetry. A wide-ranging selection by poets I've been meaning to read more from and poets I just encountered in this book. Great compilation of Latin American poetry. A wide-ranging selection by poets I've been meaning to read more from and poets I just encountered in this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lane Melchor

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alycia

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sergei

  17. 5 out of 5

    Seamus Thompson

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Berg

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kieran Blackwood

  20. 4 out of 5

    Catharine Wall

  21. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jim McGarrah

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

  24. 5 out of 5

    matissa

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Breese

  28. 4 out of 5

    Miami University Libraries

    King Library (2nd floor) | PQ7087.E5 F78 2011

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rick

  30. 4 out of 5

    Manuel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.