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Sabotage in the American Workplace: Anecdotes of Dissatisfaction, Mischief, and Revenge

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Here are all the fantasies you've ever had about getting back at an employer but didn't dare try. Many of the stories would be funny if their causes hadn't been fed by such discontent. And lest you think this is unique or endemic to late-20th-century America, there are scores of historical quotations and anecdotes. Here are all the fantasies you've ever had about getting back at an employer but didn't dare try. Many of the stories would be funny if their causes hadn't been fed by such discontent. And lest you think this is unique or endemic to late-20th-century America, there are scores of historical quotations and anecdotes.


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Here are all the fantasies you've ever had about getting back at an employer but didn't dare try. Many of the stories would be funny if their causes hadn't been fed by such discontent. And lest you think this is unique or endemic to late-20th-century America, there are scores of historical quotations and anecdotes. Here are all the fantasies you've ever had about getting back at an employer but didn't dare try. Many of the stories would be funny if their causes hadn't been fed by such discontent. And lest you think this is unique or endemic to late-20th-century America, there are scores of historical quotations and anecdotes.

30 review for Sabotage in the American Workplace: Anecdotes of Dissatisfaction, Mischief, and Revenge

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    A little talked about subject that goes on in every workplace every day: angry employees taking revenge on their companies. It is a shame that this revenge often involves innocent co-workers who had nothing to do with the situation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    A book of interviews with people who sabotaged their workplaces. The editors define "sabotage" very broadly, more or less as "doing pretty much anything at work you shouldn't be doing." For example, one secretary they interviewed stole a ream of paper every month. Then there were the more extensive instances of sabotage, like climbing into the ceiling to dismantle the Muzak system (which I would probably do, frankly). My favorite has to be one where a restaurant worker tapes over selected (and u A book of interviews with people who sabotaged their workplaces. The editors define "sabotage" very broadly, more or less as "doing pretty much anything at work you shouldn't be doing." For example, one secretary they interviewed stole a ream of paper every month. Then there were the more extensive instances of sabotage, like climbing into the ceiling to dismantle the Muzak system (which I would probably do, frankly). My favorite has to be one where a restaurant worker tapes over selected (and unpredictable) sections of the bad music the restaurant played in the dining room, so that the restaurant has to throw away all the tapes. That guy described his boss as "Charles Nelson Reilly meets Captain Kirk" -- a description I've plagiarized many times since I've read it. A fun read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kai (CuriousCompass)

    CuriousCompass Reviews: Amazing. If you love a good scandal, this is the book for you--various employees from dozens of industries describe ways in which they screwed over their workplaces or fought back against abusive conditions. Some make good social commentary, others are just about average people messing shit up for their own kicks. Either way it's all gloriously entertaining. And very cathartic if you've ever had a cappy job. CuriousCompass Reviews: Amazing. If you love a good scandal, this is the book for you--various employees from dozens of industries describe ways in which they screwed over their workplaces or fought back against abusive conditions. Some make good social commentary, others are just about average people messing shit up for their own kicks. Either way it's all gloriously entertaining. And very cathartic if you've ever had a cappy job.

  4. 4 out of 5

    HeavyReader

    This book is SO GOOD! I have read it twice and gotten a huge kick out of it both times. It's all about how people purposely messed things up at their jobs, mostly because they had been mistreated or had seen a wrong perpetrated against a fellow worker. These clever true stories are told in first-person accounts by the people who did the deeds. Highly recommended. This book is SO GOOD! I have read it twice and gotten a huge kick out of it both times. It's all about how people purposely messed things up at their jobs, mostly because they had been mistreated or had seen a wrong perpetrated against a fellow worker. These clever true stories are told in first-person accounts by the people who did the deeds. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Mckinney

    read this pdf in a day. honestly, it's inspiring. read this pdf in a day. honestly, it's inspiring.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nathan "N.R." Gaddis

    Work sucks! Just have fun with it!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Half of these jobs don't exist anymore, so I'm not sure who the joke's on, ultimately. Half of these jobs don't exist anymore, so I'm not sure who the joke's on, ultimately.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Worker-Dandy

    A collection of anecdotes detailing the various small ways that American employees have gained some modicum of satisfaction by getting back at their petty-minded bosses and companies. Very enjoyable but I would love to read a British version.

  9. 4 out of 5

    space

    This'd be better if Martin Sprouse wasn't so annoying. It only gets three stars 'cause I'm in it. :) This'd be better if Martin Sprouse wasn't so annoying. It only gets three stars 'cause I'm in it. :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tyler K

    Really excellent storytelling. Dozens and dozens of people explain, in their own words, why they commit sabotage at work — from stealing pens to disconnecting patients from their life support when they’re ready to die (but the law says they can’t). Bad bosses, revenge, boredom, maintaining one’s ethics, the reasons go on and on. Work can rob people of so much, but what about when people rob back?Required reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Woodall

    Although the content is rather dated with professions that no longer operate in the same capacity or even exist at all, (catalogers who still use a printed card catalog or the use of a videocassette dating service!) this was still a very interesting collection and rather revealing study into the American cultural psyche. I have to admit, I was rather startled at some individuals’ confessions into their sabotage activities at work. But with that said, I am also curious as to what type of confessi Although the content is rather dated with professions that no longer operate in the same capacity or even exist at all, (catalogers who still use a printed card catalog or the use of a videocassette dating service!) this was still a very interesting collection and rather revealing study into the American cultural psyche. I have to admit, I was rather startled at some individuals’ confessions into their sabotage activities at work. But with that said, I am also curious as to what type of confessions can be had with those businesses whose purpose it is to produce a profit? (After all, isn’t that the definition of capitalism?) Who is really screwing who? And are any of us better people in the spectrum of life? Okay, I think I’m ready to step off my soapbox for today. Thank you.

  12. 4 out of 5

    джаймс X

  13. 4 out of 5

    Destiny

  14. 5 out of 5

    James Tracy

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sébastien McLaughlin

  16. 5 out of 5

    Damian Murphy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  18. 4 out of 5

    Johnnie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marco López

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  21. 4 out of 5

    Evan Pazur

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Sherman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Kahn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ally Gorey

  27. 4 out of 5

    steve

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul Corupe

  29. 5 out of 5

    John

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tim Lockwood

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