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Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1: Power and Responsibility

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In a retelling of the Spider-Man saga that has been updated for the twenty-first century, teenager Peter Parker is bitten by an experimental spider from the laboratory of Osborn Industries, and develops super powers as a result.


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In a retelling of the Spider-Man saga that has been updated for the twenty-first century, teenager Peter Parker is bitten by an experimental spider from the laboratory of Osborn Industries, and develops super powers as a result.

30 review for Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1: Power and Responsibility

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Spider-Man borns again in modern times! This TPB collects "Ultimate Spider-Man" #1-7. Creative Team: Writer: Brian Michael Bendis Illustrator: Mark Bagley POWER The Amazing Spider-Man "borns" again for a new generation in the 2001's Ultimate Marvel Universe. This first storyarc re-tells the classic origin of Spider-Man but setting in the new millenium, with current technology, modern storytelling style and... ...an excellent choice for any Spider-Man fan (like me!) for reading Peter Parker's fir Spider-Man borns again in modern times! This TPB collects "Ultimate Spider-Man" #1-7. Creative Team: Writer: Brian Michael Bendis Illustrator: Mark Bagley POWER The Amazing Spider-Man "borns" again for a new generation in the 2001's Ultimate Marvel Universe. This first storyarc re-tells the classic origin of Spider-Man but setting in the new millenium, with current technology, modern storytelling style and... ...an excellent choice for any Spider-Man fan (like me!) for reading Peter Parker's first steps into being the amazing neighborhood hero, in a modern scenario. The creative team didn't rush the process, and a proof of that is that Peter doesn't go into his formal Spider-suit until the 4th issue of this title, and he doesn't do really super-hero stuff until the 5th issue, that for me it's an (indeed) amazing bold move, since when you're reading it in a TPB, maybe you can't picture the angle that people who got the first three issues of the title, they didn't have the main title hero in his super-hero suit and doing super-hero stuff in three issues!!! People, that's a bold creative team! (They ruined it later, but right now, it's bold!) RESPONSIBILITY Peter Parker has one of the greatest super-hero origins (if not the best) since he makes mistakes and due his own mistakes, terrible things happened, and since then he promised to use with responsibility his powers. Peter Parker isn't millionaire, isn't an alien with access to advanced technology, isn't trained by masters in different fields,... ...he needs to do even his own costume! And more important than everything else... ...he doesn't have the luxury of taking aside his personal life when he is doing hero-time, nope, he is Peter Parker all the time, even when he is wearing the wall-crawler costume. When he's battling a super-villain, he still needs to deliver homework at school next day, he still needs to help with chores at home, he still needs to find ways to bring some extra money to support his Aunt May, etc... Peter Parker is one of the most amazing super-heroes in New York, with a very large and dangerous rogue gallery, but he always is a teenager trying to do what is right... ...since he learn in the very hard way what happens when he doesn't. Power isn't for your personal gain... ...it's a responsibility about others' safety. Not matter if they thank you for that or calling you a menace. Doing what is right is never easy. Being Peter Parker never is easy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Saddle up, buckaroos - it’s another re-telling of the Petey Parker/Spider-Pants origin story! Brian Bendyman goes through the well-worn checklist: nerdy bully-magnet Peter gets bit by a magic spider, gets superpowers, doesn’t use them to stop crime, loses his Uncle Ben (the non-rice guy), and learns that With Great Blahblah Comes Blah Blahblah. And then decides to punch Norman Osborn who’s transformed himself into the Green Wheelie Bin! While Bendis’ writing and Mark Bagley’s art are both fine, Saddle up, buckaroos - it’s another re-telling of the Petey Parker/Spider-Pants origin story! Brian Bendyman goes through the well-worn checklist: nerdy bully-magnet Peter gets bit by a magic spider, gets superpowers, doesn’t use them to stop crime, loses his Uncle Ben (the non-rice guy), and learns that With Great Blahblah Comes Blah Blahblah. And then decides to punch Norman Osborn who’s transformed himself into the Green Wheelie Bin! While Bendis’ writing and Mark Bagley’s art are both fine, there’s not a whole lot here to hold the attention of someone like me who saw the first Sam Raimi Spider-Pants movie gawd knows how many times, not to mention read multiple versions of the origin in the comics. I didn’t think much of Bagley’s Uncle Ben, who’s got a naff ponytail for some reason, and his Green Goblin is ridonkulously ‘roided out so he looks more like the Hulk villain Abomination. And, while this isn’t really Bendis’ problem, the way everything slots into place, from Peter getting the outfit to the webbing fluid that his dad just happened to be working on before he disappeared, was all too damn eye-rollingly convenient. Ultimate Spider-Man, Volume 1: Power and Responsibility isn’t a bad comic by any means, it’s just a book of table-setting that I was already over-familiar with to be too enamoured by. It’s a fine jumping-on point for new readers though or anyone looking for an accessible and fairly entertaining, if by-the-numbers, version of the Spidey origin. I’m glad I finally read this one but I’m a-heading back to Miles Morales/Ultimate Spider-Man whose story I find much more interesting than Peter’s same old, same old.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This may be my all time favorite run of Spider-Man. Bendis for all his crime comics is one of the best writers of teenagers I've ever come across. He made Spider-Man fun again after a decade of grim-dark Spider-Man comics and clone sagas throughout the 90's. At this point, I'd given up on my favorite character when I picked this up on a whim. It's fantastic. Mark Bagley is a fantastic pairing for Spider-Man. At this point, he's probably drawn Spider-Man more than anyone else. The man knows how t This may be my all time favorite run of Spider-Man. Bendis for all his crime comics is one of the best writers of teenagers I've ever come across. He made Spider-Man fun again after a decade of grim-dark Spider-Man comics and clone sagas throughout the 90's. At this point, I'd given up on my favorite character when I picked this up on a whim. It's fantastic. Mark Bagley is a fantastic pairing for Spider-Man. At this point, he's probably drawn Spider-Man more than anyone else. The man knows how to draw realistic looking teens. If I was introducing someone to Spider-Man, this is the comic I'd hand them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I am not a big fan of the Ultimate line. It seems like, for most of them, the writers decide to push for "edgy", and just end up writing a lot of painfully unsympathetic people acting horribly to everybody around them until they happen to save the world. Frankly, it's kind of boring to read, when it isn't irritating. Bendis went a totally different route with Peter Parker. He wrote just wrote a modern Spider-Man. Which means that Peter isn't an insufferably arrogant jerk for no reason, he's a ki I am not a big fan of the Ultimate line. It seems like, for most of them, the writers decide to push for "edgy", and just end up writing a lot of painfully unsympathetic people acting horribly to everybody around them until they happen to save the world. Frankly, it's kind of boring to read, when it isn't irritating. Bendis went a totally different route with Peter Parker. He wrote just wrote a modern Spider-Man. Which means that Peter isn't an insufferably arrogant jerk for no reason, he's a kid with a good heart who can still make serious and hurtful mistakes. And that is what makes Ultimate Spider-Man a compelling read. It helps that Bendis executes really, really well. I love that he takes him time getting to the inevitable (Uncle Ben's death, of course) so we can get a real attachment to these characters before the bottom falls out from under them. This trade could really be subtitled "Exposition", because there's far more setup than action. That's fine. There's a lot to setup here. Honestly, I'm wondering now why I never persisted in reading Ultimate Spider-Man past the first five or six trades. Time to fix that.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Loved the art! The Green Goblin actually looked pretty scary! I'm used to seeing his skinny version, so it was kinda shocking to see him as a hulking monster. It was a good shock, though. Peter wasn't quite as snarky and funny as he usually is at first, but by the end some of the old humor was back. It's a good thing, too. Spidey's sense (Get it? Spidey sense?!) of humor was always the best thing about the comic, to me anyway. Uncle Ben as a hippie? Still not sure about that one. All in all, I lik Loved the art! The Green Goblin actually looked pretty scary! I'm used to seeing his skinny version, so it was kinda shocking to see him as a hulking monster. It was a good shock, though. Peter wasn't quite as snarky and funny as he usually is at first, but by the end some of the old humor was back. It's a good thing, too. Spidey's sense (Get it? Spidey sense?!) of humor was always the best thing about the comic, to me anyway. Uncle Ben as a hippie? Still not sure about that one. All in all, I liked it!

  6. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Upon re-reading comics that got me into comics I decided to pick up my volume 1 of Ultimate Spider-man. I remember first opening this book at around 12 or 13 and just loving every minute of it. Now that I'm 31 years old, does it still hold up? Well...YES. This was prime time Spidy. While amazing Spider-man in the 616 was in good hands and focused on an adult Peter dealing with being a teacher and soon to be husband, this was all about Pete back in High School. The thing Bendis does really well b Upon re-reading comics that got me into comics I decided to pick up my volume 1 of Ultimate Spider-man. I remember first opening this book at around 12 or 13 and just loving every minute of it. Now that I'm 31 years old, does it still hold up? Well...YES. This was prime time Spidy. While amazing Spider-man in the 616 was in good hands and focused on an adult Peter dealing with being a teacher and soon to be husband, this was all about Pete back in High School. The thing Bendis does really well back then is teenage talk, and everyone here bounces back and forth but it works 100%. On top of that you got Peter's origins but also Green Goblin. A two in one! I really dug this Peter. It's similar to the 616 of being a nerd who gets bullied, gets powers, kind of a jerk, and learns his lesson. So that's all here. What they VASTLY improve on is MJ, who really clicks with Peter from the get go. I also think Green Goblin is scary as shit in this universe, and even not in his final form, his massive hulk like figure is scary in comparison to Spider-man's small features. The pacing works well and I think the change of how Ben died, and also the fact Peter's breakdown is near perfect, really help here. The art? SOOOO GOOOOOOD. I wasn't a huge fan of Harry in Ultimate Universe and this re-read doesn't change my mind. But even with Harry being meh, the rest is sooooo good it's easy to still give this great scores. A very very very easy 4.5 out of 5.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jedhua

    Book Info: This collection contains Ultimate Spider-Man issues #1-7. Other Useful Reviews: Sesana's review and Nicole's review ABSOLUTE RATING: {3.5/5 stars} (Rounded Up) STANDARDIZED RATING: <4/5 stars> "I was selfish. So selfish, and you paid the price. You did. I did. Aunt May did. I will never ever forgive myself for that. I will never ever forget that I could have stopped it... You were right; with power comes responsibility. Absolutely. For some reason I've been given great power. And with Book Info: This collection contains Ultimate Spider-Man issues #1-7. Other Useful Reviews: Sesana's review and Nicole's review ABSOLUTE RATING: {3.5/5 stars} (Rounded Up) STANDARDIZED RATING: <4/5 stars> "I was selfish. So selfish, and you paid the price. You did. I did. Aunt May did. I will never ever forgive myself for that. I will never ever forget that I could have stopped it... You were right; with power comes responsibility. Absolutely. For some reason I've been given great power. And with great power then must come great responsibility. I will never let you down again, Uncle Ben." – Spider-Man Orphaned by his parents many years before, Peter Parker lives with his loving Aunt May and Uncle Ben in a quiet, suburban neighborhood in Queens. A 15-year-old high school science whiz and book nerd, Peter is mercilessly harassed by the popular kids at school, and has silently internalized his status as helpless victim. One day, while on a field trip to Osborn Industries (i.e. a very well-known bioengineering corporation), Peter is bitten by a radioactive spider that has escaped containment. In the days following this incident, Peter finds that he has gained numerous spider-like abilities including super-strength, tactile cohesion, enhanced agility/perception, and a "spider-sense" which instantly alerts him to impending danger. Struggling to rationalize what has evidently become his new reality, Peter suddenly finds himself fighting in school, skipping class, and failing his courses, all the while lying to his Aunt and Uncle about why he's been acting so strangely. Meanwhile, Norman Osborn – Osborn Industries' power-hungry CEO – catches wind of Peter's situation, and starts to organize a plot to use the boy to satisfy his own sinister ambitions. For me, there has always been something about Peter Parker and his cycle of problems that struck me as just a little bit too overdramatic. At the heart of it all is his precarious financial situation, which has put a perpetual strain on his marriage and other aspects of his life. I never really understood why, for instance, he refrained from using his superhero connections to land him reliable, flexible, and well-paying employment. If not for him, you'd think he'd do it to provide for Mary Jane or his Aunt May. Besides, I wouldn't call it dishonest or unfair if he secures a position that even marginally reflects his extensive qualifications for once, especially considering all he sacrifices regularly for the greater good. But with Ultimate Spider-Man, however, Bendis is able to exploit the character's age and youthful uncertainty to make these struggles more believable. Plus, he manages to more convincingly match Peter's carelessly flippant personality to a Spider-Man that should very understandably be less composed or jaded by the harsh realities of the adult world. As a Spider-Man book, and especially one written by Bendis, the humor here can be a bit relentless at times. But for me, it's far more appropriate here than, say, most of his Avengers books where the stakes are higher and the characters *ought* to be more mature (but aren't). So as you might expect, Spider-Man spews a constant stream of playful taunts and quips while on the job. Some are more funny than others, but thankfully none of them cross the line into being painfully cheesy – an apparently very easy thing to happen when it comes to YA superhero books (ex: Invincible or Batgirl ). At its worst, there are a few (relatively sparse) moments in Peter's high school where I had to endure some trivial adolescent banter, and this was probably my least favorite aspect of the book. Other than the humor, Bendis' characteristically energetic writing style (which is moderately toned down here) lends itself very well to capturing the insecure and volatile emotional state Peter navigates throughout the story. As responsible and level-headed a kid as Peter clearly is, he's faced with a profound challenge, and the semi-linear thought processes and impulsive decisions he makes during the course of this ordeal seem quite credible. And I love that Bendis never veers too far from the good kid Peter truly is deep down, and constantly shows his ambivalence about the power and popularity his newfound abilities have granted him. All the while, his Aunt and Uncle, who are struggling financially, manage to balance their frustration with immense support and understanding toward Peter, even after he nearly gets the family sued for accidentally breaking a classmate's hand during a fight. Even secondary characters like Flash Thompson and Kong, who were once Peter's main tormentors, somewhat defy their stereotypical high school bully archetype, and their relationship with Peter gradually evolves. Just skimming some of the reviews, I see a lot of reviewers complain about the book's artwork. It's strange to think that there was a time when I would have listed Bagley as one of my top five comic artists, considering that I now find his style merely decent. In my opinion some of his best moments are the ones where he's depicting expressions of fear, sadness, and concern on his character's faces. But probably the best thing I could say about his style is that he's somehow able to draw the perfect Spider-Man; I've seen a couple artists come close, and perhaps a few match it, but never have I seen anyone exceed it. And during fight scenes, the guy's talent really shines, and actually puts some of the artwork surrounding these segments to shame. So though it doesn't seem quite as impressive as I remember it, I think Mark Bagley's work will always inhabit a special place in my heart. Overall, this was a strong first volume to a series that I recall gets better during the later volumes. My only complaint is that it started off a bit slow (which explains the half-star reduction), and well-written though it was, it wasn't classic or poignant enough to entirely compensate for that. This was a series I've been meaning to revisit for a while now in a limited capacity, but I'm suddenly a little more motivated to go right through from beginning to end. Guess I'll have to put off Ultimate Comics Spider-Man a bit longer than I had hoped... Postscript: When Peter first comes face-to-face with the Green Goblin during the second half of the story, this is what happens (WITHOUT spoilers): The gap between this confrontation and his superhero debut seems something like a matter of a few weeks. This period occurs between issues, and there really was no reason I could to assume Peter has faced anything even close to that before. So although he later attributes his teasing as a mask to conceal his fear, I don't quite buy his outward display of bravado; you ask me, that kid should have pissed his pants right there and then. ------------------------------------------------ This second point is probably just me being nitpicky again, but as a pivotal moment is Spider-Man lore, I'd ask that you just hear me out. Take a look below: While it's true that Peter could very easily have stopped this robber well before he ultimately got to Uncle Ben, there is no reason whatsoever for that storeowner to have expected what outwardly looks like an ordinary teenage boy to jeopardize his safety to foil a petty crime that doesn't directly concern him; such an obligation would very greatly exceed the level of civic duty, and cross far into selfless heroism. Now I'm not so sure how this scene was handled in previous incarnations or in the 2002 movie, but if it too was like this, then that alone is no good excuse to perpetuate that mistake. But maybe that's just me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    ​Who needs a good reason for a re-read of some of the most fun comics in history? Not this guy. (Well, maybe a little kick in the pants. I'm in the middle of devouring the more tolerable chunk of Hickman's Secret Wars and it's tie-ins and I needed a break - lo and behold, the /r/MUBookClub subreddit called for a reading of the first 13 issues of this amazing series. Who am I to argue with Internet Authority? (Spoilers ahead, for anyone who has been living in a cave for the last 50 years. But still ​Who needs a good reason for a re-read of some of the most fun comics in history? Not this guy. (Well, maybe a little kick in the pants. I'm in the middle of devouring the more tolerable chunk of Hickman's Secret Wars and it's tie-ins and I needed a break - lo and behold, the /r/MUBookClub subreddit called for a reading of the first 13 issues of this amazing series. Who am I to argue with Internet Authority? (Spoilers ahead, for anyone who has been living in a cave for the last 50 years. But still...) Bendis does an amazing job right out of the gate in establishing a more relatable Peter Parker pre-spider bite. Still downtrodden: And yet not completely outcast from the more decent of characters in Spidey mythology: [Not to mention giving MJ a brain from the get-go - nice touch, Mr. 21st Century Comics Dude] Bendis has a few encounters with some rather forced teen-speak: [ooof] And Bagley hadn't immediately embraced the more modern Aunt May look: But they're also doing a great job helping to explain where all the science wizardry came from for a teenaged high schooler: There's the obligatory spider-bite: [Peter, meet the source of all your misery for the rest of your life. Misery, meet Peter, your new favourite victim.] And the semi-obligatory Norman Osborn-is-a-nefarious-agent-who-knows-too-much-about-Parker revelation: [Norman likes when kids get attacked by science experiments?] What's most enjoyable though is the easy, adult relationship between Aunt May and Uncle Ben. They're just such a blast to hang around - like the kind of parents everyone wishes they had. Centred, sense of humour, assertive and caring. Like the decent parents some of us have been lucky to have (I can't really complain), but a little more. It hurts to get to know May and Ben this well, knowing what Fate has to do to Ben. (Which makes it hard to blaze through this first book - kinda notice I keep setting it aside, like I don't want that bullet to be shot.) It doesn't hurt to be having revelatory fun with Peter as he discovers his powers: And it's pretty cool to meet future villains in off-the-cuff ways: [He's a genius lackey of Osborn - because that always plays out fine with Otto] And other future antagonists: And see the first super-powers battle of his career unfold: [image error] But it's the quiet moments of characters talking that gets under your skin the most - especially Bendis' take on the big Uncle Ben speech: And Bendis really plays the killer heartstrings moment of Peter's life: As much as we owe so much of our comic-book enjoyment to Stan Lee (tangent: wouldn't you want to see this movie?)... ...we owe our 21st-century continued enjoyment as much to Bendis as to anyone. This is one damned ballsy and effective modernization of our Spidey hero. Still rates five stars years after reading it the first time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    A fresh start for the web slinger. We get to see Spider-Man's origin story for the millionth time, and I don't mind that. It's more fleshed out, which is something I can appreciate. The dialogue, for the most part, is functional. I wasn't super keen on the new Green Goblin design though. What Bendis excels at is writing for teenagers, and in this case, it works well enough. Sometimes the dialogue can be a little bit repetitive, but that's kinda the charm of it. What I liked about it is the way Bendi A fresh start for the web slinger. We get to see Spider-Man's origin story for the millionth time, and I don't mind that. It's more fleshed out, which is something I can appreciate. The dialogue, for the most part, is functional. I wasn't super keen on the new Green Goblin design though. What Bendis excels at is writing for teenagers, and in this case, it works well enough. Sometimes the dialogue can be a little bit repetitive, but that's kinda the charm of it. What I liked about it is the way Bendis is developing his characters, and because of that, we get some nice moments in it. On the same note, Mark Begley's art started to grow on me after reading this. In short, a solid yet fun start for the ultimate Spider-Man run. 7.5/10

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Introduction: I have been growing up with “Spider-Man” ever since I was a child and so far, the only comic I had read from the “Spider-Man” series was The Amazing Spider-Man: Origin of the Hobgoblin which I did enjoyed. Now, I had stumbled upon the Marvel Ultimate Universe and after I read Mark Millar’s run on “Ultimate X-Men” and kept hearing so many good things on this run, I decided to give Brian Michael Bendis’ run on “Ultimate Spider-Man” a chance. Now at first, I was a little hesitant Introduction: I have been growing up with “Spider-Man” ever since I was a child and so far, the only comic I had read from the “Spider-Man” series was The Amazing Spider-Man: Origin of the Hobgoblin which I did enjoyed. Now, I had stumbled upon the Marvel Ultimate Universe and after I read Mark Millar’s run on “Ultimate X-Men” and kept hearing so many good things on this run, I decided to give Brian Michael Bendis’ run on “Ultimate Spider-Man” a chance. Now at first, I was a little hesitant to read this volume because since I had only read one comic from the original “Spider-Man” series, I felt that I need to be informed on how the origins of the original Spider-Man went before I actually read a remake on this series. However, after I read this volume, I was so happy and satisfied with the results, with or without the original origin stories! What is this story about? In this volume, Peter Parker was your average school nerd who is constantly picked on by the popular kids, including Flash Thompson and yet is best friends with Mary Jane. One day however, when the students ended up going on a school field trip to the Osborn Industries Inc., Peter ends up being bitten by a radioactive spider and he slowly starts to develop powers and a boost of confidence that he never had before. While Peter is enjoying his new powers, he will soon realize that Harry Osborn is up to no-good… What I loved about this story: Brian Michael Bendis and Bill Jemas’ writing: Now from my understanding of the “Ultimate Universe,” it is supposed to be a remake of the original Marvel Universe and after I immensely enjoyed Mark Millar’s revised stories of “Ultimate X-Men,” I started reading “Ultimate Spider-Man: Power and Responsibility” and getting the same results! Brian Michael Bendis’ writing might feel a bit clunky at times, but I really loved the way that we are able to get inside Peter Parker’s head when he started experiencing the spider powers and how he tries to improve on his powers. I also liked the fact that Brian Michael Bendis kept some of the concepts from the original “Spider-Man” origin (Peter Parker getting bitten by a radioactive spider and his relationship with Uncle Ben and Aunt May), but is able to reinvent this origin into a more modern day setting, which I found pretty impressive! I also liked the relationship between Peter and Mary Jane as they just start out as friends in this version and I liked the banter between them as it was hilarious and heartwarming at the same time. I liked the way that Brian Michael Bendis made us really sympathize with Peter Parker as he is constantly being bullied, while at the same time is trying to find his place in the world, which really brought so much depth to this story. Mark Bagley’s artwork: Mark Bagley’s artwork is truly unique to me since the characters’ expressions and bodily structures are extremely different from any other artwork I have seen from other comic books. I loved the way that Mark Bagley made the characters glow on each page as it made the images so beautiful to look at and it really brought out the intensity of the situations. There were times however, where the characters’ teeth seem to show up too much on each panel and I was wondering to myself about why the characters are smiling so much, but it did not totally distract me from the story. What made me feel uncomfortable about this story: The only problem with this comic is that there is some language and violence in this volume, although it is pretty toned down and it is not at all graphic or strong, so young teens should be able to handle this volume. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Ultimate Spider-Man: Power and Responsibility” is a fantastic introductory volume for anyone who wants to read an alternative version of “Spider-Man!” I will admit that diving into the Ultimate universe of “Spider-Man” was really new and a bit weird for me, but this volume greatly set up the characters and you will definitely not be disappointed! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 stars. Good, solid re-imagining and updating of the Spider-man character that I thought was pretty well done. With all of the inconsistencies and conundrums that developed over the four decades of Spidey's comic career, it is nice to be able to say, hey let's start fresh for a new generation of readers. Recommended. 3.0 stars. Good, solid re-imagining and updating of the Spider-man character that I thought was pretty well done. With all of the inconsistencies and conundrums that developed over the four decades of Spidey's comic career, it is nice to be able to say, hey let's start fresh for a new generation of readers. Recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I like a good origin story. I'm very much into knowing why. And this is a very good reboot of the Spider-Man origin story, taking us back to when Peter Parker was 15. The writer does a good job of updating the story for the 21st century while including all the elements Spidey fans expect. Peter Parker has long been one of my favourite characters. He's proof that "good" doesn't have to be boring. I like him and sympathise with him. I cringe when he gets picked on. He's the kind of guy I would've w I like a good origin story. I'm very much into knowing why. And this is a very good reboot of the Spider-Man origin story, taking us back to when Peter Parker was 15. The writer does a good job of updating the story for the 21st century while including all the elements Spidey fans expect. Peter Parker has long been one of my favourite characters. He's proof that "good" doesn't have to be boring. I like him and sympathise with him. I cringe when he gets picked on. He's the kind of guy I would've wanted for a lab partner, friend, and/or boyfriend. There's an impressive emotional complexity to the story, the highs and lows and stuff in-between. There's also some really good sarcastic dialogue (you can't have Peter Parker/Spider-Man without some wisecracks) and a little homage to Ferris Bueller's Day Off that made me snicker. It was an interesting idea to make Uncle Ben an old hippie. Aunt May is pretty much the same as always--although this version has her threatening to look up social anxiety disorder online in an effort to figure out what's wrong with her nephew. The depiction of Mary Jane as smart and kind is in line with how I remember her from the daily series I read in the newspaper as a kid, as well as the Marvel Civil War incarnation. The art is very nice for the most part, the highly-detailed sort of style that I appreciate. Peter is cute--sometimes a little too emo-looking (especially his hair), but that does mesh with 21st century fashion. I will definitely get the next volume.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    56th book read in 2018. Number 133 out of 716 on my all time book list. My first book from the Ultimate universe, pretty great.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    I think I used to watch Spider-man cartoons, or certainly I had Spider-man somewhere in my consciousness, but I haven't seen the films (although I got a free download of the latest one for my PS Vita when I bought it, I should look into that) and I wasn't entirely clear on Spider-man lore. So the Ultimates collection seems to be a good choice for me, given that they update and clarify the origin stories as a start. And lucky me, my girlfriend has a whole stack of them. (I hear Ultimate Cap is a d I think I used to watch Spider-man cartoons, or certainly I had Spider-man somewhere in my consciousness, but I haven't seen the films (although I got a free download of the latest one for my PS Vita when I bought it, I should look into that) and I wasn't entirely clear on Spider-man lore. So the Ultimates collection seems to be a good choice for me, given that they update and clarify the origin stories as a start. And lucky me, my girlfriend has a whole stack of them. (I hear Ultimate Cap is a dick, though. Bluh.) Peter is a fun hero -- snarky and sassy, but not cocksure. He's sassy because he doesn't know what he's doing, he doesn't know what's happening. This volume establishes the way he gets his powers, and why he becomes a superhero. Definitely enjoyed it, and I recommend it. It's not bogged down by extraneous details, there are no other heroes muddying the waters (i.e. Young Avengers style: they're somewhat hampered by nursemaid!Cap and Iron Man), and the art is clear with all characters easily distinguishable. Peter's an adorable dork, and I'd like to see a lot more of Mary Jane.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Unimpressed is the understatement of the year as far how I feel about this first volume. Let's get something out of the way first : I really, and I do mean really, dislike Mark Bagley's art. Never liked it, never will. Thick storytelling, cartoony heads with too big eyes, no real dynamics and poor actions scenes. In a nutshell. Colors are ugly too. The plot now... Well, no surprise here. I mean, no. surprise. at. all. It's the same story we all know already with minor cosmetic changes but the Gobl Unimpressed is the understatement of the year as far how I feel about this first volume. Let's get something out of the way first : I really, and I do mean really, dislike Mark Bagley's art. Never liked it, never will. Thick storytelling, cartoony heads with too big eyes, no real dynamics and poor actions scenes. In a nutshell. Colors are ugly too. The plot now... Well, no surprise here. I mean, no. surprise. at. all. It's the same story we all know already with minor cosmetic changes but the Goblin, a miserable ugly troll from whatever video game, and uncle Ben's uncalled for pony tail (!) So, this is a mere retelling of an old story without any significative improvement except it's set in the 00's. And poorly drawn too boot! Unusual flop from the Bendis from back then.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    A fun and fresh new take on a 'modern' origin story for a young Spiderman struggling to become a super-hero and deal with high school. A fun and fresh new take on a 'modern' origin story for a young Spiderman struggling to become a super-hero and deal with high school.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey.parks

    It pains me to say this, but I prefer this to the original Amazing Spider-Man first issues. Also Uncle Ben with a ponytail, radical.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    3 1/4 stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    sam

    Oooooo pretty colours and Peter sass, what more can a girl ask?

  20. 5 out of 5

    RG

    This eas extremely well done and fun!! A good introduction into a teenage Peter Parker

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    Solid start. It's the familiar origin story we all know, but it's always fun to revisit. I'm excited to read the rest of this series. Solid start. It's the familiar origin story we all know, but it's always fun to revisit. I'm excited to read the rest of this series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jill_378

    *4.5 I don’t normally read comic books, but this one was pretty good.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kadi P

    Pre-reading thoughts: (13/1/2021) I love Spidey and I dislike Bendis—sounds like the perfect recipe for disaster! We’ll see in February...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nigar Osmanlı

    Oh no, I’m getting addicted. Again.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matisse

    This was the Seinfeld of comic books. I'll explain. You know how it's hard to watch the non-famous episodes of Seinfeld? How jokes frequently don't land, or how Kramer's antics seem like they're less funny than they should be? It's because Seinfeld has been so mercilessly copied by other shows in the last twenty years. Nothing about Seinfeld is original now, so while it's a nice thing to watch, it's not a juggernaut of entertainment. You respect it for what it is and what it brought to the mediu This was the Seinfeld of comic books. I'll explain. You know how it's hard to watch the non-famous episodes of Seinfeld? How jokes frequently don't land, or how Kramer's antics seem like they're less funny than they should be? It's because Seinfeld has been so mercilessly copied by other shows in the last twenty years. Nothing about Seinfeld is original now, so while it's a nice thing to watch, it's not a juggernaut of entertainment. You respect it for what it is and what it brought to the medium. So. Ultimate Spider-Man vol 1. Nothing in this book is original. The Andrew Garfield and Tobey Maguire movies both used this origin story for the character: the former duology took Peter's dynamic with his love interest and his aunt & uncle, and the latter used Peter's relationship to the affable bullies, Norman Osborne as the villain, and almost the entirety of the I'm-going-to-be-a-wrestler arc. Bendis is a legendary writer, but his pen has aged. Sure, we still talk like these characters, but not to the hip-and-radical extent that Peter and his friends do. Plot-wise, this is a thoroughly pleasant read, but there are no surprises or twists to be had. Everything is predictable. The Ultimate line was started twenty years ago to reboot the Marvel continuity and exist alongside the canon; ironically, I would argue that this is the canon Spider-Man for millennials such as myself. (This is also a very, very white cast. In retrospect, it's fitting that the second Ultimate Spider-Man was the half-black-half-latino Miles Morales.) That said, as someone who LOVED the previous two Spider-Man film series and adored Spider-Man Homecoming, I appreciate and respect Bendis' story. This poor comic was copied to hell and back, but without it, we wouldn't have the genius of the Sam Raimi movies, we wouldn't have the Andrew Garfield reboot, we wouldn't have Miles Morales, we wouldn't have Tom Holland playing a definitive Peter Parker in the MCU...hell, we might not even have *had* an MCU. Recommended read, for sure. = )

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Uys

    A fun re-telling of Peter Parker/Spider-Man's origins and earliest adventures, the purpose of the Ultimate comic book line was to modernize classic Marvel characters for younger readers and very much succeeded in that respect. Of course, over a decade later, and the background details are already becoming "dated". Still, Brian Michael Bendis crafts a wonderful story that really benefits from the "written for graphic novel for at" that has become the industry standard (this series certainly led t A fun re-telling of Peter Parker/Spider-Man's origins and earliest adventures, the purpose of the Ultimate comic book line was to modernize classic Marvel characters for younger readers and very much succeeded in that respect. Of course, over a decade later, and the background details are already becoming "dated". Still, Brian Michael Bendis crafts a wonderful story that really benefits from the "written for graphic novel for at" that has become the industry standard (this series certainly led the charge, wanting book stores to help them connect with non-traditional (aka, already fans) readers. Reading like a HBO mini-series, the story might be more drawn out but that doesn't meaning the visual pacing has slowed for a moment. Mark Bagels, an artist I'm not normally big on, slam dunks every page. I haven't seen Spider-Man looking so cool since Todd McFarlane. Every jump, every punch, just bursts from the page, pulling you deeper into the story. Bravo to all the creators involved, this is comics at its most fun & exciting. And best of all, good for all ages! A+

  27. 5 out of 5

    maria

    Peter Parker is my new boyfriend

  28. 5 out of 5

    Masanobu

    This was a solid comic with GREAT art. After reading comics pencilled by George Pérez, reading some by Mark Bagley is such a breath of fresh air - none of the nonsensical bulkiness, much more stylized characters and some incredibly detailed panels. The story, however, is nothing new. If you have ever heard of Spiderman, you know his superhero origins because they have been done to death. As Ultimate Spider-Man was helming the new Marvel Universe of the 2000s, these first few issues had to deal wi This was a solid comic with GREAT art. After reading comics pencilled by George Pérez, reading some by Mark Bagley is such a breath of fresh air - none of the nonsensical bulkiness, much more stylized characters and some incredibly detailed panels. The story, however, is nothing new. If you have ever heard of Spiderman, you know his superhero origins because they have been done to death. As Ultimate Spider-Man was helming the new Marvel Universe of the 2000s, these first few issues had to deal with how Spider-Man got his powers because of a (radioactive?) spider bite, lost Uncle Ben, and learned that "With great power comes great responsibility". Not at all bad, with Peter being an obnoxious teen for the first 3-4 issues before becoming a friendly neighbourhood superhero who loves witty repartee. But it felt like prologue for the real story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim Wilbourne

    I've been meaning to get back into comics for years, and I decided to make this volume my first revisit after my 5-year-old son picked it out while we were at the comic aisle Newbury Comics. I'm a fan of Spider-man, so I loved the idea of starting with his story as a way to ease back into Marvel comics. This is a good series, but not perfect. For everything I liked about the comic, there was something I didn't like. I like the artwork, but the dialog was lacking. I liked the more modern feel, but I've been meaning to get back into comics for years, and I decided to make this volume my first revisit after my 5-year-old son picked it out while we were at the comic aisle Newbury Comics. I'm a fan of Spider-man, so I loved the idea of starting with his story as a way to ease back into Marvel comics. This is a good series, but not perfect. For everything I liked about the comic, there was something I didn't like. I like the artwork, but the dialog was lacking. I liked the more modern feel, but Peter's personality was a bit hard to feel sympathetic for. However, after Peter began to take on the mantle of Spider-man, I found him to be much more enjoyable. Because of this recovery, I'll probably be reading the next volume.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katie Seehusen

    This is my first foray into Spider-Man, I know a lot about his origin story because both of my brothers love Spider-Man, but I wanted to experience them myself. I wanted to start from the beginning, but I am really excited to get to Miles Morales. This was really fun, I of course knew the story but I loved seeing it on the page. What I really love about comic books/graphic novels is seeing how the the author and illustrator come together and create something beautiful. I loved how Mark Bagley cr This is my first foray into Spider-Man, I know a lot about his origin story because both of my brothers love Spider-Man, but I wanted to experience them myself. I wanted to start from the beginning, but I am really excited to get to Miles Morales. This was really fun, I of course knew the story but I loved seeing it on the page. What I really love about comic books/graphic novels is seeing how the the author and illustrator come together and create something beautiful. I loved how Mark Bagley created movement, I can really see Spider-Man moving through the pages and it doesn't look awkward at all. His colors are vibrant and the illustrations are great. The Green Goblin was the best, a lot scarier than you usually get to see, which made me happy.

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