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Positive Psychology In A Nutshell

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Book is unread and like new, despatched from London, allow 3 working days for delivery, with quick and friendly customer service.

30 review for Positive Psychology In A Nutshell

  1. 5 out of 5

    Clare O'Beara

    This book gives a brief explanation of how psychology used to be thought of as 'what's wrong with that person,' and when positive psychology came along it was immediately accepted and acceptable. Many quotes are given showing schools of thought and studies. The famous Stanford marshmallow test is referenced, indicating that children who displayed delayed gratification were/ are more successful in life. Character study has been expanding but we get plenty about Maslow's order of needs and nothing This book gives a brief explanation of how psychology used to be thought of as 'what's wrong with that person,' and when positive psychology came along it was immediately accepted and acceptable. Many quotes are given showing schools of thought and studies. The famous Stanford marshmallow test is referenced, indicating that children who displayed delayed gratification were/ are more successful in life. Character study has been expanding but we get plenty about Maslow's order of needs and nothing about the Myers–Briggs Type Indicator character profiles we now see (Google ENTJ for example); and we don't get a mention of how many people with positive mindsets and prone to optimism are entrepreneurs, or anything similar. A list of ten strengths we can handle, but the author provides variants including over 30 strengths. Some can clearly create problems if overdone, for instance strong self-image and assertion leads to pomposity; we are rightly told we need a balance. The author is far too prone, in my opinion, to generalisation; "we all watch many more hours of tv, we have more free time now but fill it with watching tv which does not make us happier, watching soap operas can make people happier," none of which applies to me, nor ever did. "We get twenty kinds of orange juice in shops but no shop stocks pear or cherry juice," well they do in my supermarket, even prickly pear cactus, and hibiscus and ginger; and Ireland gets variety many years after Britain, and USA or Europe probably had all these earlier. Mainly it's a matter of when something can be easily brought to mass market. I also thought that telling someone their mindset can be improved by thinking of gratitude isn't doing much for someone whose home life is chaotic and violent, who has a controlling, belittling partner or who needs to lose ten stone and get active. No mention of decluttering which improves someone's life both physically and mentally, helping them make choices and discard bad memories but get ready for new life chapters. No mention of neuroplasticity which can identify why people get stuck in ruts and literally, physically, find change hard to attempt or accomplish. The physical, the home life, the environment of the patient / client / reader might need positive change far more than the person. The book contains many handy references to other writers and studies so could be useful to anyone writing up a paper without time to read lots of books. I borrowed this book from the Dublin Business School Library. This is an unbiased review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Evan Micheals

    I have become increasingly interested in the Positive Psychology movement. The idea is that “Psychology has more often than not emphasized the short comings if individuals rather than their potentials. This particular approach focuses on the potentials. It is not targeted at fixing problems, but is focused on researching things that make life worth living instead” (p – 15). I found this statement tied in well with the recovery model which we are supposed to be using in our service. Too often in I have become increasingly interested in the Positive Psychology movement. The idea is that “Psychology has more often than not emphasized the short comings if individuals rather than their potentials. This particular approach focuses on the potentials. It is not targeted at fixing problems, but is focused on researching things that make life worth living instead” (p – 15). I found this statement tied in well with the recovery model which we are supposed to be using in our service. Too often in Mental Health I believe we have been focused on recognising people’s pathologies, rather than their strengths. I just think there is a lot more in this type of psychology in helping people (such as myself) to become better. This is a well written, concise introduction to Positive Psychology. In 15 short chapters, she briefly goes over some of the concepts inherent within the movement. It provides a lot of references and avenues to further investigate the readers area of interest without trying to become too deep. Boniwell is well balanced, freely giving both sides of the debate on contentious issues. Whilst describing (the same feeling I have) that Positive Psychology is for her, she does criticize the movement and expresses a concern that it is in danger of becoming an ideology (and the latest fad). She emphasises the important of rigorous scientific methods being used to support its findings. One of my mantras has been to recognise the wisdom and truth of the middle path. You can trace the idea of the middle path back as far as Aristotle, who postulated that any virtue taken to an extreme becomes a vice. Boniwell reinforced this principle by showing the importance negative experiences in assisting with personal growth. According to Boniwell, we are need to find ourselves within the middle of 3:1 or 8:1 ratio of positive to negative experiences (p 23). Below 3:1 we will not be happy, above 8:1 we will not be challenged. I found myself thinking “Ahh the middle path”. This seems to be reflect in Buddha’s concept of the middle path as well. How many times was I told as a young nurse that I needed to improve my time management, so I was pleased to read “Contrary to popular belief, research shows that time management training has little effect on our time use and performance” (p 74). I remain interested in the concept of Post Traumatic Growth. Boniwell introduces it briefly as a legitimate thing (which I plan to learn more about and reminded me that exercise is as effective as anti-depressants in the treatment of depression (p 119). This book opened a lot more doors than it closed and reminded me of how much I still have to learn. It provided me with a map of where I might find the knowledge that interests me. I look forward to re-reading the last three chapters which gives suggestions of interventions and practice of positive psychology.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sunchana

    Very clever, good read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    EV

    This was a supplemental textbook for class; very basic but gave clear definitions of concepts with pointers for further research. Great for an intro class.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Chapé

    This book helped me through a difficult time in my life. It's quite self-explanatory, but you need someone else to tell you you're good enough when you're down. It's ok, but I wouldn't read it again. This book helped me through a difficult time in my life. It's quite self-explanatory, but you need someone else to tell you you're good enough when you're down. It's ok, but I wouldn't read it again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    This interesting little book is an excellent introduction to positive psychology. It is written in a way which is easy to understand for the general reader even though it is also aimed at academics. I liked the cartoon style illustrations which really help to get the author’s point across. The book looks at how positive psychology came into being and explains how psychology up until then had primarily looked at disease and what was abnormal rather than what was normal. The book looks at the thing This interesting little book is an excellent introduction to positive psychology. It is written in a way which is easy to understand for the general reader even though it is also aimed at academics. I liked the cartoon style illustrations which really help to get the author’s point across. The book looks at how positive psychology came into being and explains how psychology up until then had primarily looked at disease and what was abnormal rather than what was normal. The book looks at the things which makes us happy – not money surprisingly enough! It looks at the importance of what motivates the individual and how everyone needs to work out both their intrinsic values and their strengths. Psychology mainly studies weaknesses where positive psychology looks at strengths. Each chapter is divided into short sections and there is at least one book listed as recommended reading at the end of each chapter. One chapter towards the end of the book looks at things the individual can do to change their level of happiness which do not involve very much effort but may help people feel happier. One thing which positive psychology has discovered is that happiness/unhappiness is something which is innate and there is only so much we can do to influence our individual happiness level. If you enjoy reading self-help books then this will be a useful addition to your bookshelves as it talks about the science behind many self-help ideas. The book contains a list of references which will be useful to the reader who wants to take the subject further. There is an index

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Mozayani

    This was a set reading for a course I am studying at university. It was a quick engaging read. It provides an overview of the field of positive psychology and has a good reference list which directs you to further authors and books or journal articles for a more in depth look at the topics covered.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Inny

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Rodriguez Cruz

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yesenia

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tarun

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nanda

  13. 4 out of 5

    Holley

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Trusca

  16. 5 out of 5

    Philip Joubert

  17. 4 out of 5

    Prina Patel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karl

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elias Moreno

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Kent

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alistair Smith

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Tisera

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vivi Mark

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marvels Greene

  26. 4 out of 5

    George C H Fearnehough

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Lew

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pepa

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alden Witman

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm on the sofa

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