web site hit counter Visitor Attractions in the Florida Keys: Indian Key State Historic Site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Theater of the Sea, Blue Hole - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Visitor Attractions in the Florida Keys: Indian Key State Historic Site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Theater of the Sea, Blue Hole

Availability: Ready to download

Chapters: Indian Key State Historic Site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Theater of the Sea, Blue Hole, Fort Jefferson. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 27. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Indian Key State Historic Site - Chapters: Indian Key State Historic Site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Theater of the Sea, Blue Hole, Fort Jefferson. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 27. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Indian Key State Historic Site - body{behavior: url("/w/skins-1.5/vector/csshover.htc")} Indian Key State Historic Site Indian Key State Historic Site is an island within the Florida State Park system located just a few hundred yards southeast of U.S. 1 within the Florida Keys. The island was briefly inhabited in the middle of the 19th century, but is now an uninhabited ghost town. It is frequently visited by tourists, and is the subject of an archaeological project to uncover the historic building foundations. The park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. Some of the survivors of the 19 ships of the 1733 Spanish treasure fleet wrecked in the Florida Keys by a hurricane camped on Indian Key until they were rescued. Beginning in the 18th century, Bahamians and Cubans used Indian Key as a base for fishing, turtling, logging and wrecking. Crews might stay on the island for months at a time, but there were no permanent settlers. In 1821, Florida was transferred from Spain to the United States, and in 1824, two Key West men, Joshua Appleby and a man named Snyder, sent an employee, Silas Fletcher, to open a store on Indian Key. The store was to serve wreckers, settlers and Indians in the upper Keys, and settlement of primarily Bahamian wreckers and turtlers grew up on the island. By 1829, the settlement was large enough to include a dozen women. Jacob Houseman, a wrecker who was at odds with the established wreckers in Key West, moved to Indian Key in 1830 and began buying property on the island. He soon became the leader of the community and its chief landlord. He ma...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=17751


Compare

Chapters: Indian Key State Historic Site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Theater of the Sea, Blue Hole, Fort Jefferson. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 27. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Indian Key State Historic Site - Chapters: Indian Key State Historic Site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Theater of the Sea, Blue Hole, Fort Jefferson. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 27. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Indian Key State Historic Site - body{behavior: url("/w/skins-1.5/vector/csshover.htc")} Indian Key State Historic Site Indian Key State Historic Site is an island within the Florida State Park system located just a few hundred yards southeast of U.S. 1 within the Florida Keys. The island was briefly inhabited in the middle of the 19th century, but is now an uninhabited ghost town. It is frequently visited by tourists, and is the subject of an archaeological project to uncover the historic building foundations. The park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. Some of the survivors of the 19 ships of the 1733 Spanish treasure fleet wrecked in the Florida Keys by a hurricane camped on Indian Key until they were rescued. Beginning in the 18th century, Bahamians and Cubans used Indian Key as a base for fishing, turtling, logging and wrecking. Crews might stay on the island for months at a time, but there were no permanent settlers. In 1821, Florida was transferred from Spain to the United States, and in 1824, two Key West men, Joshua Appleby and a man named Snyder, sent an employee, Silas Fletcher, to open a store on Indian Key. The store was to serve wreckers, settlers and Indians in the upper Keys, and settlement of primarily Bahamian wreckers and turtlers grew up on the island. By 1829, the settlement was large enough to include a dozen women. Jacob Houseman, a wrecker who was at odds with the established wreckers in Key West, moved to Indian Key in 1830 and began buying property on the island. He soon became the leader of the community and its chief landlord. He ma...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=17751

0 review for Visitor Attractions in the Florida Keys: Indian Key State Historic Site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Theater of the Sea, Blue Hole

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.