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Island In The Stream: A Quick Case Study Of Taiwan's Complex History

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From the inside jacket of the book: Taiwan (Ihla Formosa) has long experienced the fate and of being an "island in the stream." Caught up and by numerous historical, cultural and physical crosscurrents running between the East and South China Seas, the people of this island have struggled with identity and survival. Outside forces have had their shaping influence. Strong a From the inside jacket of the book: Taiwan (Ihla Formosa) has long experienced the fate and of being an "island in the stream." Caught up and by numerous historical, cultural and physical crosscurrents running between the East and South China Seas, the people of this island have struggled with identity and survival. Outside forces have had their shaping influence. Strong also has been the influence of the island's many immigrants and indigenous peoples. Taiwan's history is a story of struggle and adaptation. In the new millennium the people have directly elected a new president in a democratic transference of power; but the island faces new challenges, that of membership in the United Nations and the World Trade Organization and the unresolved "one China question" with the People's Republic of China.


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From the inside jacket of the book: Taiwan (Ihla Formosa) has long experienced the fate and of being an "island in the stream." Caught up and by numerous historical, cultural and physical crosscurrents running between the East and South China Seas, the people of this island have struggled with identity and survival. Outside forces have had their shaping influence. Strong a From the inside jacket of the book: Taiwan (Ihla Formosa) has long experienced the fate and of being an "island in the stream." Caught up and by numerous historical, cultural and physical crosscurrents running between the East and South China Seas, the people of this island have struggled with identity and survival. Outside forces have had their shaping influence. Strong also has been the influence of the island's many immigrants and indigenous peoples. Taiwan's history is a story of struggle and adaptation. In the new millennium the people have directly elected a new president in a democratic transference of power; but the island faces new challenges, that of membership in the United Nations and the World Trade Organization and the unresolved "one China question" with the People's Republic of China.

38 review for Island In The Stream: A Quick Case Study Of Taiwan's Complex History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    A very high level primer of Taiwan's history over the last 400 years. Didn't really contain much in terms of new insights for me, but poses some interesting questions and good suggestions for further reading. A very high level primer of Taiwan's history over the last 400 years. Didn't really contain much in terms of new insights for me, but poses some interesting questions and good suggestions for further reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rúben

    Quick and useful read in preparation for my second trip to Taiwan. It covers the last 400 years of Taiwan's history. Would have preferred more information about its recent past. Quick and useful read in preparation for my second trip to Taiwan. It covers the last 400 years of Taiwan's history. Would have preferred more information about its recent past.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peter A

    As the book title promises, this is a quick read, and is divided into four chapters, each less than 20 pages: I. The Era of Global Navigation II. The Qing Era III. The Japanese Era IV. The Republic of China The book has a very nice chronology, and a collection of images about Taiwan’s history. The Preface lays out some issues that the book discusses, such as “What defines a nation?”, how is it that the 23 million people in Taiwan have no international political voice while the 11,000 on Tuvalu do, an As the book title promises, this is a quick read, and is divided into four chapters, each less than 20 pages: I. The Era of Global Navigation II. The Qing Era III. The Japanese Era IV. The Republic of China The book has a very nice chronology, and a collection of images about Taiwan’s history. The Preface lays out some issues that the book discusses, such as “What defines a nation?”, how is it that the 23 million people in Taiwan have no international political voice while the 11,000 on Tuvalu do, and how does Taiwan maintain sovereignty. Taiwan’s is a complex history, and one with some major missed opportunities. Following the titles lead as an “island in a stream”, the stream is about the external events that impact the island and of the people who come to the island and stay. As the authors state, “the work can be read not only as a brief history of this controversial island, but also as a case study that presents the deeper complex questions and issues involved in nationhood and sovereignty. If you are traveling to Taiwan, this is a very nice book to read on the plane. While the book’s narrative stops in 2008, it sets the stage for many of the issues that confront the people of Taiwan. Note, as with any short book, some issues will be left out, or mentioned in passing. But I was surprised how the authors seemed to cover most of the key points articulated in other books that I have read about Taiwan. As for where I found the book, there is a very nice, but small, museum close to the National Palace Museum in Taiwan. The Shang Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines (http://www.museum.org.tw/symm_en/inde...) has a nice collection of history, costume, video about the aboriginal people of Taiwan, as well as a very nice collection of books about Taiwan.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Womersley

    After already having lived in Taiwan for 2 and a half years and learning about its history this book was a great way to put it all together in a concise and clear manner. What I loved most about this book were the simple, straight explanations without any extra nonsense so many writers seem to love doing when writing. This book will teach you the history of Taiwan from the indigenous up to around 2008. It's also different in that it poses questions at the end of each chapter to help you think ab After already having lived in Taiwan for 2 and a half years and learning about its history this book was a great way to put it all together in a concise and clear manner. What I loved most about this book were the simple, straight explanations without any extra nonsense so many writers seem to love doing when writing. This book will teach you the history of Taiwan from the indigenous up to around 2008. It's also different in that it poses questions at the end of each chapter to help you think about what you just read. Some parts are written from a pro-Taiwanese stance but isn't overly-aggressive. It supports Taiwan as an independent country that is and uses it's history to make that case.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mirko Liang

    A very VERY brief summary of the history of Taiwan, useful as a small manual or for those who are interested in said subject. I couldn't agree with some of the choices but I particularly liked the section at the end of every chapter dedicated to the questions. Overall okay as I didn't feel it was completely non-partisan. A very VERY brief summary of the history of Taiwan, useful as a small manual or for those who are interested in said subject. I couldn't agree with some of the choices but I particularly liked the section at the end of every chapter dedicated to the questions. Overall okay as I didn't feel it was completely non-partisan.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M DeJ

    Quick cut and dry history of Taiwan. Written in an academic style, but not dense. Would have preferred some deeper analysis though. Regardless, good at conveying the history of the island in a brief, easy to read format.

  7. 4 out of 5

    arkadi cloud

    Short but essential book to understand the complicated history of the country of Taiwan. It is true that is brief, but I would argue that it boils down Taiwanese history to it's most essential points. It also is a book that is singular in its focus on Taiwan as usually, Taiwan has the indignity of having its history rolled in with China's. It also poses great questions that should be explored further...such as why does Tuvalu, a country of 11,000 people, have a seat at the UN while Taiwan, a cou Short but essential book to understand the complicated history of the country of Taiwan. It is true that is brief, but I would argue that it boils down Taiwanese history to it's most essential points. It also is a book that is singular in its focus on Taiwan as usually, Taiwan has the indignity of having its history rolled in with China's. It also poses great questions that should be explored further...such as why does Tuvalu, a country of 11,000 people, have a seat at the UN while Taiwan, a country of 23,000,000, people does not? This book shows that Taiwan has always been a pawn, a prize for imperialist nations to seize upon. An interesting fact from this book: 5 flags have flown over Taiwan but never the People's Republic of China flag!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tc

    short

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ktcamara

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adam Walker

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ladislav

  12. 4 out of 5

    David

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharonya

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Capell

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leila

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cody

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wade Kaardal

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hannah H.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Faiza

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ekaterina

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Cannings

  22. 5 out of 5

    William Thomas

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  25. 5 out of 5

    Youse_da_force

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tim Stolzenberger

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Joy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marcus

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Angela Lu

  31. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  32. 5 out of 5

    Klagleder

  33. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Goh

  34. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  35. 5 out of 5

    Thanh Tai

  36. 4 out of 5

    Nahlee

  37. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lee

  38. 5 out of 5

    J

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