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Gaunt's Ghosts: The Saint

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This omnibus edition follows the second cycle of the Gaunt's Ghost stories in a collection called, "The Saint". It includes the four novels, Honour Guard, The Guns of Tanith, Straight Silver and Sabbat Martyr. The story arc follows the First & Only from warzone to warzone of the Chaos-infested Sabbats World system fighting enemies in many guises and shapes. This omnibus edition follows the second cycle of the Gaunt's Ghost stories in a collection called, "The Saint". It includes the four novels, Honour Guard, The Guns of Tanith, Straight Silver and Sabbat Martyr. The story arc follows the First & Only from warzone to warzone of the Chaos-infested Sabbats World system fighting enemies in many guises and shapes.


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This omnibus edition follows the second cycle of the Gaunt's Ghost stories in a collection called, "The Saint". It includes the four novels, Honour Guard, The Guns of Tanith, Straight Silver and Sabbat Martyr. The story arc follows the First & Only from warzone to warzone of the Chaos-infested Sabbats World system fighting enemies in many guises and shapes. This omnibus edition follows the second cycle of the Gaunt's Ghost stories in a collection called, "The Saint". It includes the four novels, Honour Guard, The Guns of Tanith, Straight Silver and Sabbat Martyr. The story arc follows the First & Only from warzone to warzone of the Chaos-infested Sabbats World system fighting enemies in many guises and shapes.

30 review for Gaunt's Ghosts: The Saint

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    An excellent collection of grimdark military scifi stories. One of the finest.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim Maidment

    Hits hard and keeps hitting. The term 'gritty' is over-used these days, but you can feel the hard surfaces and ash-blown environments in his writing. He's particularly adept at building characters enough that when/if they die (and often in the typically senseless ways of war as an aside in a sentence) it really does shock. It won't be to everyone's taste, but if you like a good shot of testosterone with your coffee, tempered with mysticism and half an eye on historical conflicts, this is a book t Hits hard and keeps hitting. The term 'gritty' is over-used these days, but you can feel the hard surfaces and ash-blown environments in his writing. He's particularly adept at building characters enough that when/if they die (and often in the typically senseless ways of war as an aside in a sentence) it really does shock. It won't be to everyone's taste, but if you like a good shot of testosterone with your coffee, tempered with mysticism and half an eye on historical conflicts, this is a book to go for.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Not as good as its predecessor, The Founding, but still enjoyable. The Guns of Tanith as a whole and bits of Straight Silver really stood out, and the pitched armor battles in Honour Guard are also very well done. Sabbat Martyr is literally one long cityfight, with a small break between a skirmish at the beginning and the real battle about a third of the way in. It makes the book feel rather shorter than the previous three, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, and only fitting for the climax of t Not as good as its predecessor, The Founding, but still enjoyable. The Guns of Tanith as a whole and bits of Straight Silver really stood out, and the pitched armor battles in Honour Guard are also very well done. Sabbat Martyr is literally one long cityfight, with a small break between a skirmish at the beginning and the real battle about a third of the way in. It makes the book feel rather shorter than the previous three, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, and only fitting for the climax of the Saint saga, really. The ending is appropriately epic and satisfying, and, of course, bittersweet--this is a Gaunt's Ghosts novel, after all. The space battle before the ground assault also stands out as particularly enthralling, though all too brief. Time to see if Abnett has anything on the Imperial Navy! Another point: Abnett handles Soric's 'gift' and the general uptick in miraculous events in this saga quite well. True, the WH40k universe gives him a lot of leeway on this front. Still, mixing gritty, footslogging, uber-rational military fiction with non-weaponized psychic powers--that is, miracles--without crossing the thin line into deus ex machinae doesn't strike me as an easy task. Abnett does it well. One minor annoyance: I understand that Gaunt is basically invulnerable--no more novels without him, after all--and while Abnett's insistence on noting every MINOR WOUND, NEAR MISS, etc. as they occur is probably intended to offset that back-of-the-mind fact, it only serves to call unneeded attention to it. Very minor, though--it only really jumped out at me in the climactic melee at the end of Sabbat Martyr.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Berry

    The second Omnibus covering the campaigns of the 1st Tanith Regiment of the Imperial Guard. Orphans from a dead world, they are the Tanith Only, First and Last. Led by the imposing Colonel-Commissar Ibrahm Gaunt, they serve in the Empire's endless wars against the alien, the mutant, and Chaos. This is ripping good military fiction with great characters that make me think of some of the people I served with. Each new battlefield is fully realized, with new challenges and complications. The thrust The second Omnibus covering the campaigns of the 1st Tanith Regiment of the Imperial Guard. Orphans from a dead world, they are the Tanith Only, First and Last. Led by the imposing Colonel-Commissar Ibrahm Gaunt, they serve in the Empire's endless wars against the alien, the mutant, and Chaos. This is ripping good military fiction with great characters that make me think of some of the people I served with. Each new battlefield is fully realized, with new challenges and complications. The thrust of this trilogy is the concept that the long-dead Saint Sabbat has returned to lead Imperial forces to victory. The truth of this claim takes several twists, and Gaunt and his Ghosts are nearly torn apart in the process.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul Hebron

    In the grim dark future of the 41st century, there is only war. And war. And more war. And another war. Dan Abnett's Gaunt's Ghosts books scratch a similar itch to Sharpe, Derek Robinson's RAF books, and a multitude of lesser books with a mix of grand military strategy, technical descriptions of people being blown apart in creative ways, and warm, lively characters (of whom any could die). It's been a long time since I've been involved in the hobby, but Gaunt's Ghosts still keeps that connection In the grim dark future of the 41st century, there is only war. And war. And more war. And another war. Dan Abnett's Gaunt's Ghosts books scratch a similar itch to Sharpe, Derek Robinson's RAF books, and a multitude of lesser books with a mix of grand military strategy, technical descriptions of people being blown apart in creative ways, and warm, lively characters (of whom any could die). It's been a long time since I've been involved in the hobby, but Gaunt's Ghosts still keeps that connection alive for me (for better or worse); I tried another Imperial Guard book this year, but it didn't quite match how the series makes me feel. Anyway, I'll definitely be getting the next one, although 40k books are definitely an absurdly guilty pleasure at this point.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Schiller

    Warhammer and Warhammer 40k fluff has always been a guilty pleasure of mine. None more so than Dan Abnett’s novels concerning Gaunt’s Ghosts. To my dismay my original copies went missing following a couple house moves, I sought these stories out and found them contained in these very convenient omnibuses. Needless to say I was more than happy that these stories lost none of their enjoyment over the intervening years. If you’re a fan of 40k I don’t see how you cannot be entertained by the Ghost’s Warhammer and Warhammer 40k fluff has always been a guilty pleasure of mine. None more so than Dan Abnett’s novels concerning Gaunt’s Ghosts. To my dismay my original copies went missing following a couple house moves, I sought these stories out and found them contained in these very convenient omnibuses. Needless to say I was more than happy that these stories lost none of their enjoyment over the intervening years. If you’re a fan of 40k I don’t see how you cannot be entertained by the Ghost’s. Non-stop action from start to finish with characters that have fully developed personalities that you care about. Can’t wait to pick up and start the next one!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Darroch

    Saintly Ghosts Dan Abnett continues with another excellent omnibus of Ghost novels. The Tanith have new blood added to the regiment fresh from their pyrrhic victory at Verghast. The disillusioned verghast ghosts bring new heroes and new discord to the senior staff as the Ghosts arrive in new deadly battlezones and begin to face the archenemies elite soldiers, The Blood Pact.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James L

    Great read. Abnett really gets you involved and invested in his character's. Almost like losing a close friend when one inevitably dies ..... Final 100 pages are gut wrenching and nail-biting. Great read. Abnett really gets you involved and invested in his character's. Almost like losing a close friend when one inevitably dies ..... Final 100 pages are gut wrenching and nail-biting.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    WOW fantastic , very hard to put down all the way thru!!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mansor

    keep em' coming keep em' coming

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stiubhart MacChoille

    Favourite Gaunt's Ghosts novel? Well that's hard, but definitely this one... I think! Favourite Gaunt's Ghosts novel? Well that's hard, but definitely this one... I think!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Zhou

    Possibly the best of the Gaunt's Ghosts Omnnibus that are available. Possibly the best of the Gaunt's Ghosts Omnnibus that are available.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Derek Weese

    I can't say too much, if anything, more than what has already been said about this book. So I'll keep the review brief. This omnibus contains books IV-VII of Dan Abnett's amazingly good 'Gaunt's Ghosts' series detailing the exploits of a single regiment of the Imperial Guard during the Sabbat Worlds Crusade. As I said, amazingly good. If you've not read these, even if you don't care for Warhammer 40,000, do so. They're among the best military science fiction EVER written (truly) and they all have I can't say too much, if anything, more than what has already been said about this book. So I'll keep the review brief. This omnibus contains books IV-VII of Dan Abnett's amazingly good 'Gaunt's Ghosts' series detailing the exploits of a single regiment of the Imperial Guard during the Sabbat Worlds Crusade. As I said, amazingly good. If you've not read these, even if you don't care for Warhammer 40,000, do so. They're among the best military science fiction EVER written (truly) and they all have a heart and soul, not just shooty death kill. Though there's nothing wrong with plenty of shooty death kill. This is military science fiction we love, not Buddhist science fiction. Honour Guard: The omnibus kicks off with Honour Guard, an excellent book that highlights a sacred trek to retreive the remains of Saint Sabbat on the Shrineworld of Hagia from Chaos forces. The book has the best, thus far that I've read at any rate, armor (tank) battle in any IG book to date. (I'm still catching up on the back catalog so this is tentative...) Many of the characters have to battle their own personal demons in this one, and the level of danger the individual characters are in gets cranked up, and never lets go the rest of the series. The Guns of Tanith: A very good book, though not as good as Honour Guard in my view. The Tanith have to assault, via an air drop, the world of Phantine. For the first time we run into the professional auxiliary force of Khorne: the Blood Pact-professional soldiers for Chaos, not your run of the mill heretics. Easily the most senselessly tragic event, thus far, occurs in the whole series. Straight Silver: I guess most fans hated this one. Not I, I loved it. The Tanith 1st find themselves on Aexe Cardinal, a world defending against a Chaos incursion that has been going on for roughly half a century (hopefully I remembered that right...) utilizing old school tactics and leadership styles...and not in the good way. I think because the background war never gets resolved is why so may fans hate this one. Regardless, I liked the level of character depth and development in this one. Sabbat Martyr: I, literally, finished this ten minutes ago (as I'm writing this.) Very, very, very good. Saint Sabbat has been re-born. She arrives on Heredor to showcase her presence, drawing pilgrims, the Tanith (as an Honour Guard) and Chaos. A massive battle unfolds as the Blood Pact, a Dark Eldar mandrake, some psyker's (including someone you learned to hate earlier), some niftily cool xenos, a badass sniper and a Chaos dreadnaught all arive to try to, personally assassinate the beati. Too bad the real terror is in their own ranks... Easily the most shocking, and heartbreaking, event occurs in this book. I literally almost cried manly tears of loss over a friend I had come to love since book I. Read this series!! That's an order! From this omnibus, I'd have to say books IV and VII were my favorites, with VI bringing up a very close second. I liked book V, just not as much as the others. Well worth the time, please read and enjoy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    The Black Library delivers a route into the 41st Millennium far beyond that of paintbrushes and dice. Producing literature to expand, elucidate and invigorate the darkly Gothic era is both a blessing and a curse: the world is so richly drawn, with a cornucopia of historical references, that one scarcely knows where to begin; the scope of eternal conflict, however, is restricted to the point of anaemia. It is this limited purview that forms the core of The Saint, Dan Abnett’s second omnibus of hi The Black Library delivers a route into the 41st Millennium far beyond that of paintbrushes and dice. Producing literature to expand, elucidate and invigorate the darkly Gothic era is both a blessing and a curse: the world is so richly drawn, with a cornucopia of historical references, that one scarcely knows where to begin; the scope of eternal conflict, however, is restricted to the point of anaemia. It is this limited purview that forms the core of The Saint, Dan Abnett’s second omnibus of his ‘Gaunt’s Ghosts’ series of novels. Here the dog-soldiers of the Imperial war machine are the focus, an Imperial Guard regiment, orphaned by the destruction of its home, campaigning to liberate worlds from an eternal and relentless enemy. Such is the narrative grandeur; such is the barren creativity. Within this limited remit, Abnett nevertheless spins an elaborate and gripping story of conflict. Foremost in the tale is that of people, whilst bullets’ whiz, explosions’ blast and blades’ slice, it is the large cast of believable well-drawn characters that maintain interest beyond the sell-by-date of the events. This is not to demean Abnett’s pacy, taught delivery, indeed, it is testament to his initiative that the many scenes of combat do not become both boring and repetitive. Nevertheless, even this would tire, no matter how skilfully delivered, after ten novels. It is the dextrous handling of the company of heroes and villains that maintains both interest and, all too fleetingly, emotional attachment. However, one cannot escape the feeling that this level of vim is achieved in part thanks to the barren scope of the series. The world of the 41st Millennium is impossibly vast, and yet for all the variation, all the inventiveness, the novels boil-down to one war-zone after another. This feels, and consequently reads, like the result of writing in the comfort zone. The outcome of which is simple, single-serving entertainment. Fundamentally this feels like profligacy given the highly literate world from which to draw inspiration. It is sad testament to the Black Library that, for all their many authors, there yet remains a Philip Pullman-sized hole in their repertoire. For all the well-drawn, learned and absorbing aspects of the world it is wasteful that there is yet to emerge a work which is even half as deep, multi-threaded and thought provoking as His Dark Materials. This is the literary equivalent of daytime television: charming, enjoyable and ultimately disposable.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Luc

    The 2nd omnibus in the Gaunt's Ghosts series collects books 4-7. At the end of the 3rd book, Necropolis, Warmaster Macaroth issued the Act of Consolation: with Vervunhive burnt to ashes, any survivors who didn't want to be relocated to a nearby hive were invited to join the Imperial Guard. The scratch companies of Verghast joined the Tanith First and Only, and why wouldn't they? There certainly wasn't anywhere else for them to go. These four books document Colonel-Commissar Gaunt's difficulties The 2nd omnibus in the Gaunt's Ghosts series collects books 4-7. At the end of the 3rd book, Necropolis, Warmaster Macaroth issued the Act of Consolation: with Vervunhive burnt to ashes, any survivors who didn't want to be relocated to a nearby hive were invited to join the Imperial Guard. The scratch companies of Verghast joined the Tanith First and Only, and why wouldn't they? There certainly wasn't anywhere else for them to go. These four books document Colonel-Commissar Gaunt's difficulties in integrating soldiers from 2 very different worlds. The beauty of Warhammer 40k is that the galaxy is such a big, big place that creators can experiment with any setting and scenario they want, consequence-free. Thus we get: * Honour Guard - TANK WARFARE! The remains of Saint Sabbat, the eponymous martyr of the Sabbat Worlds, must be evacuated from the shrineworld of Hagia prior to the Archenemy's counterattack. The clock is ticking as the reader wonders why an army evacuating by spaceship can't spare a single aircraft for the job. What can light infantry do against tanks? Quite a bit, especially when they're backed by tanks of their own! Ignore the spooky "miracles"; they get explained in the end and you shouldn't let them distract you from the fluid situation. * The Guns of Tanith – AIRBORNE ASSAULT WARFARE! For the campaign on Phantine to succeed, the Archenemy's commander must die. The task falls to the First and Only to secure a foothold on the airborne city of Ouranberg. * Straight Silver – TRENCH WARFARE! That's right, it's been World War I for 40 fething years on this planet. The Blood Pact, the Archenemy's elite troops, and their super siege guns are the least of the Ghosts' worries: they must somehow survive the hideous incompetence of the Alliance leadership. * Sabbat Martyr – URBAN WARFARE! Saint Sabbat has been reincarnated on Herodor, and she demands the Tanith First and Only be her bodyguards after the amazing show they put on defending her corpse. The Archenemy is not pleased, and he sends 9 assassins to put an end to the Beati. In the preface, Dan Abnett writes "this is where we start to say goodbye." It's a testament to his storyweaving ability that each character death, even when he warns us of their impending doom, is so painful. If you enjoyed The Founding omnibus, then you don't need me to tell you to keep going.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mary Catelli

    The second Gaunt's Ghosts omnibus, after The Founding. I recommend reading that one first. As with that one, these works are military SF. Bad things happen in them. Good characters get killed. But they have very dramatic plots, and many vividly drawn characters. Filled with honor and friendship and valor. Ibram Gaunt is a deeply developed character, and at any time, a dozen or so Ghosts are major characters. He does a massively multi-POV that lets in him get in a large scope of the battles they The second Gaunt's Ghosts omnibus, after The Founding. I recommend reading that one first. As with that one, these works are military SF. Bad things happen in them. Good characters get killed. But they have very dramatic plots, and many vividly drawn characters. Filled with honor and friendship and valor. Ibram Gaunt is a deeply developed character, and at any time, a dozen or so Ghosts are major characters. He does a massively multi-POV that lets in him get in a large scope of the battles they are in. The Ghosts get sent to battlefield after battlefield -- an escort mission in Honour Guard, an aerial assault in The Guns of Tanith, slogging trench warfare in Straight Silver, and city fighting in Sabbat Martyr. The Saint has more arcs tying it together. One in particular dragged me through all four, trying to get to where it resolved. It did, and I was pleased, but one of the last scenes in Sabbat Martyr started another arc that I desperately wanted to get to the end of. And I did. In Only in Death, it was resolved, and I am quite glad that I didn't pick up this series until that was out. (I will warn that The Lost is rather darker than the earlier seven works.)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Conor

    This is the best book in the series so far. At least, from what I can remember. The early books were great too, and subsequent novels missed the mark (Honour Guard in particular). This is a return to form. Abnett explores issues of faith, as Chaos prepare to launch a massive attack on a tactically worthless world: why? Because Saint Sabbat has been reincarnated. Gaunt is sceptical in the beginning. He knows in his heart the saint is an imposter, simply a pawn Lugo is attempting to use for his po This is the best book in the series so far. At least, from what I can remember. The early books were great too, and subsequent novels missed the mark (Honour Guard in particular). This is a return to form. Abnett explores issues of faith, as Chaos prepare to launch a massive attack on a tactically worthless world: why? Because Saint Sabbat has been reincarnated. Gaunt is sceptical in the beginning. He knows in his heart the saint is an imposter, simply a pawn Lugo is attempting to use for his political ends. But then odd things happen. In an opening skirmish with Blood Pact forces a young girl protects civillians with Saint-like powers, and in spite of Milo’s efforts to save her, a high-blast tank round spells her abrupt demise. Presumably she was the reincarnation, and what happens next means I can only conclude that the Saint gets re-re-incarnated in the posing saint. I mean, Gaunt, upon seeing her again, knows she has changed; is different; is this time truly the Saint. I can’t be bothered writing up the synopsis or anything like that now, except to say that for once Abnett writes a good ending, one that doesn’t collapse in 10 pages, but ties up several loose ends as the Ghosts fight in one of their most desperate conflicts yet against overwhelming odds. ‘Stop the nine’, Soric advises Gaunt, by which he means 9 assassins gunning for the Saint, but thanks to Milo the nine are taken care of. Well, it seems that way, a happy ending in the works. And then it happens. Corbec’s death. I won’t attempt to sum it up. Larkin finally nails Cuu, but it comes at a hefty price. As Larkin says, ‘I just wish I’d been a little bit quicker.’ Bring on the next novel. The Ghosts are limited, their numbers thinned every engagement, even with Verghastite reinforcements. Corbec’s death won’t be the last. Not by a long shot.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ding Ong

    Just when i thought the first omnibus was good enough, Dan Abnett outperforms himself with his second omnibus, The Saint. Once again the most interesting and fun story to read was the last in the book, Sabbat Martyr. The first two stories were mostly preoccupied with the in-rivalry between the Tanith and Verghast troopers nad i have to admit it adds a good flavour into the stories. The rivalry was a little too over-emphasized for a little too long though, as things were starting to get a little Just when i thought the first omnibus was good enough, Dan Abnett outperforms himself with his second omnibus, The Saint. Once again the most interesting and fun story to read was the last in the book, Sabbat Martyr. The first two stories were mostly preoccupied with the in-rivalry between the Tanith and Verghast troopers nad i have to admit it adds a good flavour into the stories. The rivalry was a little too over-emphasized for a little too long though, as things were starting to get a little irritating with all the rivalry getting in the way of things. Still, it was all just building up for the last story, which was once again a really made the book what it is. The last story had a few references back to the first two stories which gave the reader some sense of consistency and keeping the reader in the impression that Gaunt was involved in a fight much bigger than himself and he is just a pawn in the huge war game between order and chaos. There were quite a good number of twists which kept the reader entertained and surprised. One of my favourite parts was how badass Mkoll was to simply outplay the Eldar Mandrake in a hunting game and that Agun Soric was a Level Beta Psyker who in the end was captured by the Black Ships. Very well played and well written. Definitely a worthy read not just for Warhammer40k fans, though some background knowledge of the warhammer40k universe is needed to fully enjoy this wonderful masterpiece.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Potato

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well what can I say I've read quite a few of Dan's novel and he never ceases to surprise we with the poor tainth there like a vary big punching bag that he just keeps hitting. The first book was quite interesting though IMO it doesn't show some of the true horror of the Warhammer world. Our second book is pretty much what you expect from 40k humanity desperately clinging to life on the edge of a deadly sea. And it also exposes Cuus true colors and his level of evilness. The third book is really Well what can I say I've read quite a few of Dan's novel and he never ceases to surprise we with the poor tainth there like a vary big punching bag that he just keeps hitting. The first book was quite interesting though IMO it doesn't show some of the true horror of the Warhammer world. Our second book is pretty much what you expect from 40k humanity desperately clinging to life on the edge of a deadly sea. And it also exposes Cuus true colors and his level of evilness. The third book is really what every one pictures with an IG regiment. Stuck in a war that they really shouldn't be in. With another crushing death (caused by Cuu) and a few looks into the strangeness of 40k. And the last book is quite a test of our beloved colonel Commissar guant faith along with even more crushing kills of vary dear characters. Though some will revisit the regiment that were presumed lost due to the warps time travel. Anyways it was a great book from a good author that will keep you looking for the sequel.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Dan Abnett could spend an evening headbutting his keyboard and I'm still pretty confident he'd nut out a great story. Fantastic omnibus. I'll admit I find it hard at times to adapt to the whole idea that, for all their awesomeness, the Ghosts aren't the heroes of the war (yet, anyway). Each book tends to end rather suddenly, usually with an epilogue that ties up the current conflict in a few pages, a conflict that's won by, well, everyone else. It's more about the soldiers than the war, how the ac Dan Abnett could spend an evening headbutting his keyboard and I'm still pretty confident he'd nut out a great story. Fantastic omnibus. I'll admit I find it hard at times to adapt to the whole idea that, for all their awesomeness, the Ghosts aren't the heroes of the war (yet, anyway). Each book tends to end rather suddenly, usually with an epilogue that ties up the current conflict in a few pages, a conflict that's won by, well, everyone else. It's more about the soldiers than the war, how the act and react to all the horrid shit they go through. Which makes it worse when they bite it. There's two big ones in this collection - one at the very end that's a serious gut punch (ie. a very "Awwwww, nutbunnies!" ending). I don't fault Abnett in the slightest for writing that way; if anything it makes the series feel more worthwhile to read. It just sucks when a character you've gotten comfortable with cops a shot to the back. Ahh well, onto The Lost!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Locked Out

    The second installment in this warhammer sega finds Gaunt and his ghosts once again called into aciton during the Sabbat world crusade. In these three installments Gaunts ghosts find themselves in a trench war, involved in an air operation, finally leading to a desperate defence of the holy Saint Sabbat's city. These adventures are a blast and the action is adrenaline fueled as well! The twists and turns keep you guessing throughout and by the end of it you feel the need to keep reading! I enjoy The second installment in this warhammer sega finds Gaunt and his ghosts once again called into aciton during the Sabbat world crusade. In these three installments Gaunts ghosts find themselves in a trench war, involved in an air operation, finally leading to a desperate defence of the holy Saint Sabbat's city. These adventures are a blast and the action is adrenaline fueled as well! The twists and turns keep you guessing throughout and by the end of it you feel the need to keep reading! I enjoyed these new tales immensely and I recommend this book to everyone just like before. Oh and remember, The Emperor Protects..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Chute

    Yes it is fantasy and yes you probably want to have some knowledge of the warhammer theme's to understand some of the references, however. As a piece if writing it is fantastic, as a war themed book it delivers and makes you want to keep reading.. Very good, would recommend.. I have jjust bought the next series, the Lost and was laughed at a lot by my wife who noticed the 'Geek chic' sign right above the books...ok yes I may have got involved with the warhammer world about 20 years ago and am now Yes it is fantasy and yes you probably want to have some knowledge of the warhammer theme's to understand some of the references, however. As a piece if writing it is fantastic, as a war themed book it delivers and makes you want to keep reading.. Very good, would recommend.. I have jjust bought the next series, the Lost and was laughed at a lot by my wife who noticed the 'Geek chic' sign right above the books...ok yes I may have got involved with the warhammer world about 20 years ago and am now revisiting it through books rather than models, games, quests etc :-) still, the books have stood this test of time well :-)

  23. 5 out of 5

    James

    Dan Abnetts tour de force story 'arc' with the ghosts. Extremely well tied together with the finale novel - Sabbat Martyr tying together all the themes and plots explored into an climactic encounter that will have you grinning at the battle sequences as much as on the edge of your seat. The best thing about The Saint is that I never felt like anyone had too much 'plot armour.' There was always enough risk to your favourite characters to feel, y'know, actually dangerous. After all they're only the Dan Abnetts tour de force story 'arc' with the ghosts. Extremely well tied together with the finale novel - Sabbat Martyr tying together all the themes and plots explored into an climactic encounter that will have you grinning at the battle sequences as much as on the edge of your seat. The best thing about The Saint is that I never felt like anyone had too much 'plot armour.' There was always enough risk to your favourite characters to feel, y'know, actually dangerous. After all they're only the imperial guard!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wrong Way

    If you are a fan of World War Two novels you might want to give this book a try. The world it is set in is far in the future, but it has a very real and accurate take on military tactics. That said if you are a fan of character interaction this is also a good book to read. Some of the main characters die later in the series, but for a reason. This book kicked off a multi book series that stunned me with the author's ability to sacrifice his characters on the alter of war. If you are a fan of World War Two novels you might want to give this book a try. The world it is set in is far in the future, but it has a very real and accurate take on military tactics. That said if you are a fan of character interaction this is also a good book to read. Some of the main characters die later in the series, but for a reason. This book kicked off a multi book series that stunned me with the author's ability to sacrifice his characters on the alter of war.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey

    Excellent book. Dan Abnett utilizes a very intense and engaging universe to hook you in and keep you there until the final page turns. Using a lot of different characters, at first it may seem overwhelming, but they all develop rather deeply and you'll find yourself wondering whats going to happen to all your favorites. This is the second omnibus in the series and only adds to the engaging story the first one began. Excellent book. Dan Abnett utilizes a very intense and engaging universe to hook you in and keep you there until the final page turns. Using a lot of different characters, at first it may seem overwhelming, but they all develop rather deeply and you'll find yourself wondering whats going to happen to all your favorites. This is the second omnibus in the series and only adds to the engaging story the first one began.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    An amazing book, my first from the Black Library. It's the 2nd Omnibus (a collection of three books in the same story line) of three, so after getting hooked on the characters you have to buy 5-6 more of these books. There is really nothing I don't like about this book (except the end: it has one) and it is not a bad book (as in PG-13) and is by far the most "kid-friendly" of all the Dan Abnett books. An amazing book, my first from the Black Library. It's the 2nd Omnibus (a collection of three books in the same story line) of three, so after getting hooked on the characters you have to buy 5-6 more of these books. There is really nothing I don't like about this book (except the end: it has one) and it is not a bad book (as in PG-13) and is by far the most "kid-friendly" of all the Dan Abnett books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Scott

    The saint was just awesome as the first omnibus, full of twists and turns not even nostradamus could predict! Honour Guard and Sabbat Martyr, the first and last of the omnibus, are my favourites, mostly for the armour action in Honour Guard, and the sheer scope of the battle to protect herodor and the saint in Sabbat Martyr. Also, Honour Guard begins the Lijah Cuu/Larkin storyline with its heartbreaking conclusion in Martyr (I'll never forgive Abnett for that one *sniff*). The saint was just awesome as the first omnibus, full of twists and turns not even nostradamus could predict! Honour Guard and Sabbat Martyr, the first and last of the omnibus, are my favourites, mostly for the armour action in Honour Guard, and the sheer scope of the battle to protect herodor and the saint in Sabbat Martyr. Also, Honour Guard begins the Lijah Cuu/Larkin storyline with its heartbreaking conclusion in Martyr (I'll never forgive Abnett for that one *sniff*).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Johannes Marks

    Though I still like Mr. Abnetts style and stories even years after I´ve first read them and even thought myself maybe to old for them, the only thing not quite satisfying about his novels is his urge to always plot his works to be self-contained (if that´s the word called for here). In my opinion, it reduces significantly the fun of reading them all in succession because they feel like a collection of single novels and not like an ongoing story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mhoram

    The massive tank-battle in Honour Guard makes me want to start an Imperial Guard mechanized company... Too bad I cannot currently afford to. Wondering if Dan Abnett has spent time in New Zealand - some of the language he uses certainly seems to indicate as much. Bloody good novel thus far, anyway. Now up to Straight Silver.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    While darker than the first omnibus (and that is saying something in the Warhammer 40,000 universe) this is a more involved series of books with well-developed characters (even the ones who only appear briefly.)

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