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Kelsey Grammer is one of America's best-loved performers - a Shakespearean actor who became an instant celebrity when he joined the cast of Cheers and went on to expand his legion of fans with his own top-rated, Emmy Award-winning show, Frasier. But Kelsey Grammer could never be confused with Dr. Frasier Crane, the uptight, buttoned-down psychiatrist he plays on television Kelsey Grammer is one of America's best-loved performers - a Shakespearean actor who became an instant celebrity when he joined the cast of Cheers and went on to expand his legion of fans with his own top-rated, Emmy Award-winning show, Frasier. But Kelsey Grammer could never be confused with Dr. Frasier Crane, the uptight, buttoned-down psychiatrist he plays on television. His life has been anything but in control - and in So Far..., his unsparing account of his roller-coaster past, he touches every base, from the deeply tragic to the comically sublime.


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Kelsey Grammer is one of America's best-loved performers - a Shakespearean actor who became an instant celebrity when he joined the cast of Cheers and went on to expand his legion of fans with his own top-rated, Emmy Award-winning show, Frasier. But Kelsey Grammer could never be confused with Dr. Frasier Crane, the uptight, buttoned-down psychiatrist he plays on television Kelsey Grammer is one of America's best-loved performers - a Shakespearean actor who became an instant celebrity when he joined the cast of Cheers and went on to expand his legion of fans with his own top-rated, Emmy Award-winning show, Frasier. But Kelsey Grammer could never be confused with Dr. Frasier Crane, the uptight, buttoned-down psychiatrist he plays on television. His life has been anything but in control - and in So Far..., his unsparing account of his roller-coaster past, he touches every base, from the deeply tragic to the comically sublime.

30 review for So Far

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Audiobooks have been a fantastic way for me to pass the time when stuck doing housework, yardwork and any other sort of long, dreary thing involving the word "work." They make it possible to muscle through a dry read and, because I'm able to get through so many more books than I otherwise would, audiobooks occasionally get me reading something outside of my comfort zone and I think that's a good thing. The first audiobook I ever listened to was Kelsey Grammer's confessional So Far.... It was mom Audiobooks have been a fantastic way for me to pass the time when stuck doing housework, yardwork and any other sort of long, dreary thing involving the word "work." They make it possible to muscle through a dry read and, because I'm able to get through so many more books than I otherwise would, audiobooks occasionally get me reading something outside of my comfort zone and I think that's a good thing. The first audiobook I ever listened to was Kelsey Grammer's confessional So Far.... It was mom's and this was back in the mid '90s. It would be about 15 years before I picked up another audiobook, but that's on me, not this book's fault. Grammer's fans from his "Cheers" and "Fraiser" days who clamor for behind-the-scenes, personal details will find plenty. The man had drug problems. It wasn't pretty. But now you can read all about it! In this, the Age of Rehab, So Far offers nothing new that hasn't been written a thousand times since. I gave it a good rating mainly because anyone willing to bare their faults to the world in such a revealing manner deserves a pat on the back, even if only out of pity.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Let me just start by saying that many parts of this book deserve 5 stars. When it comes to the ability to write the self-aggrandizing statements of a megalomaniac, Kelsey Grammar is second to none. He's able to convince himself of anything and everything. The best part is that these sentences come out of nowhere. For example: As "The Kels" as he likes to refer to himself, is describing a time when he was riding his motorcycle he announces, nonchalantly that he got hit by lightening. No talk of h Let me just start by saying that many parts of this book deserve 5 stars. When it comes to the ability to write the self-aggrandizing statements of a megalomaniac, Kelsey Grammar is second to none. He's able to convince himself of anything and everything. The best part is that these sentences come out of nowhere. For example: As "The Kels" as he likes to refer to himself, is describing a time when he was riding his motorcycle he announces, nonchalantly that he got hit by lightening. No talk of how he knew it that was what happened, what it felt like, what the medical consequences were, no time for that. Instead Grammer writes, " I drove all night with images of Greek mythology in my head, of Zeus and his lightening bolts...I took that as a sign, of God's blessing on my journey. 'Kelsey Grammer, I bear you witness. You're going to be alright.'" WOW. This book is full of gems like this one. Gems that seem a lot like a load of crap. Kelsey really wants the reader to know that he is just a self conscious "every man." Kelsey Grammer would also like you to know that he's blessed in a way. For example, when he was IN SEVENTH GRADE, he wrote down his own "motto to capture life's imperative." It was, "stagger on, rejoicing." Then, when he's older, he finds that, lo and behold, W.H. Auden had written THAT EXACT LINE in a famous poem. Does this cause THE KELS to think, um, I probably pilfered my motto unknowingly because I was just a little kid? Nope! Grammer basically insinuates that he a genius with such a deep soul that he totally randomly came up with that exact phrase of his own twelve-year-old devices, and that it was a brilliant coincidence that that line was also written years and years earlier by a super famous poet. Oh, what an artist! Lots of really sad stuff happens to the KELS in his younger years, including the deaths of some family members, however, it's just really hard to like this dude. It's like the character of Frasier is Grammer, except TONED DOWN. I was inspired to read this book by an article on JEZEBEL in which one of the columnists sees it on the bookshelf of friend and decides it would be hilarious to give it a go. I really do like the show Frasier, and also I remember one bazillion copies of this book coming through the Savers thrift store while I worked there in college. This book is nuts. Interesting, but nuts. Nothing "real" is really developed upon. Entire relationships pass in the span of 2 pages, relationships that if Grammer chose to develop the stories more thoroughly for the reader, would humanize him. He barely writes about Cheers. He does, however, write about how he feels a deep connection to the lost city of Atlantis. This motif recurs throughout. Why? WHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHY?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I picked this book up for a dollar at Goodwill, excited to get some insight to an actor who I thought must surely be brilliant. Sadly, I didn't really get any. Grammer has certainly had many experiences that would provide for a very interesting (if quite sad) memoir, but they're glossed over so quickly that it's about as emotional as reading a Wikipedia article on his life. He does stop to mention personal pain, but it feels so very distant that there are few moments where the reader feels truly I picked this book up for a dollar at Goodwill, excited to get some insight to an actor who I thought must surely be brilliant. Sadly, I didn't really get any. Grammer has certainly had many experiences that would provide for a very interesting (if quite sad) memoir, but they're glossed over so quickly that it's about as emotional as reading a Wikipedia article on his life. He does stop to mention personal pain, but it feels so very distant that there are few moments where the reader feels truly engaged. He tells you about his pain rather than making you feel it. By definition, memoirs are a bit self-indulgent for the author. While some are honest and sincere to the point where "self-indulgent" never so much as crosses your mind, others fall quite short of that. This book is the latter, unfortunately. The book seemed arrogant and self-indulgent, while at the same time as if Grammer's heart wasn't truly into writing it. Perhaps he would have benefited from waiting another decade or two before telling his story. The book was not difficult or painful for its flaws, in fact I read through it quite quickly, if only because I was hoping it was going to truly get interesting. If you find yourself particular curious, by all means, pick up a copy and go through it. It's not so terrible that you'll truly regret the decision to do so, but rather you will likely just feel a bit disappointed. Frasier might be less funny, once you see how uncomically true to character Grammer really is.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elspeth

    Working on a long review of this because boyyyyy Update (I warned you this was long): If you think you know Kelsey Grammer from his iconic role as a pompous, pretentious pseudo-intellectual, think again! He is one thousand times worse. Take all the arrogance and know-it-allness of Frasier Crane, crank it up to 11, then remove any trace of wit and charm and you'll have someone infinitely more sufferable than Kelsey Grammer. I didn't go into this book with too many preconceived notions about Kelsey Gr Working on a long review of this because boyyyyy Update (I warned you this was long): If you think you know Kelsey Grammer from his iconic role as a pompous, pretentious pseudo-intellectual, think again! He is one thousand times worse. Take all the arrogance and know-it-allness of Frasier Crane, crank it up to 11, then remove any trace of wit and charm and you'll have someone infinitely more sufferable than Kelsey Grammer. I didn't go into this book with too many preconceived notions about Kelsey Grammer. I always liked Frasier (the show mainly, not really the character), and just assumed Grammer was in on the joke that Frasier was a stuck up buffoon whose intellectual arrogance consistently led to embarrassing social pratfalls. I heard a few years ago that he was a Republican and thought "awww darn, he probably sucks" and never thought of him again. From this book I now know that he had a tragic and lonely childhood and used that suffering to fuel his growth into a truly nasty man who blames his many interpersonal problems on everyone other than himself and definitely not his own shitty behaviour, drug and alcohol problems, and mistreatment of women, and who thinks of himself as God's gift to humanity doing His work as an... actor. Seriously. In his own words: "It occurred to me, and I know this might sound strange, that I might be Jesus. And I prayed that God would let me know. I didn’t mind the idea of having to die for mankind; I was just sick and tired of not knowing. After a while it became painfully clear that I was not Jesus. That this was not exactly what He had in mind for me. Still, it was the same desire to do good, to serve mankind, if you will, that led me to become an actor." TO BECOME AN ACTOR!!!!! You'd might have thought that all the tragedies in his life, multiple family members either murdered or killed accidentally, would have given him some depth of perspective, or at least an interesting take on life, but noooooooo Kelsey Grammer is just another self-obsessed, misogynistic actor who can't imagine any lovelier sight than his own reflection. Or maybe a woman staring lovingly at that reflection saying nothing. Instead of the profound musings on life and love he clearly believes this book to be it is nothing more than a diatribe against every woman he's ever known. Throughout the book, he skims over the interesting and possibly poignant parts of his life; his father's and sister's murders, his half-brothers' drowning, his struggles with addiction, his sudden rise to fame; and spends most of the book pontificating about his many "spiritual" epiphanies, boasting about shit he achieved by luck, putting down all the women in his life, and dwelling on petty feuds and rivalries. Sooooo many feuuuuuds... some which made me actually laugh out loud, like when he gets all jealous over Moose, the dog who played Eddie. "The only difficulty I have is when people start believing he's an actor. Acting to me is a craft, not a reflex. It takes years to master, and though it does have its rewards, the reward I seek is not a hotdog. Moose does tricks; I memorize lines, say words, even walk around and stuff. But I don't need a trainer standing off-camera, gesticulating wildly and waving around a piece of meat, to know where I'm supposed to look." Yes, Kelsey. Congratulations. Your acting requires slightly more work than a dog doing tricks. Have all the non-hotdog rewards. I think maybe his resentment of Moose has to do with the similarity to the name of his own first dog, Goose, whom he spends more time talking about than anyone else in the whole book. One of his girlfriends "allowed" her to run away, which he never forgave her for. This was so devastating because Goose was his rock, his only touchstone. In fact, his life with his first wife was so miserable that the night he separated from her he took Goose for a walk and she *sob* kissed him and he felt reborn. Normally an obsession with a dog would endear me to a person, but he shows so much more empathy to Goose, his first "daughter", than to the human women in his life it infuriates me. It's clear that all he wants from women is absolute and unconditional devotion without question or requests for consideration in return. I love this quality about dogs but I would never expect the same behaviour from a human being I claimed to love. In fact, his voice in the audiobook holds more emotion when he talks about how Goose ran away and was never seen again (entirely his girlfriend's fault, of course) than when he talks about his sister's murder. "I miss Goose in a different way, perhaps, but just as deeply as I do my sister". And then he talks so much more about his sex life than either of them. Even though so many of the plotlines in Frasier revolved around his own romantic life, I never could imagine him having sex. He just seemed so buttoned up and, well, not that attractive. Yet 80% of what Grammer talks about in this book is sex. I felt compelled to google him after finishing this book so I now know that he has a pattern of dating new, younger women while still in the process of divorcing the old model. He's now on his fourth wife but had just divorced his second when this book came out and was wildly in love with his fiancee at the time (whom he dumped not too long after). Grammer spends a lot of time talking about his failed relationships and manages to paint himself as the victim in every one, while casually describing his cruel treatment of his partners with zero awareness. Every time he paints himself as the poor beleaguered man struggling to reason with the irrational feelings of human women, ex. "...armed only with my thin rapier of reason against her machine gun of contempt." And it's surprising how he judges how well his relationships are going by the frequency with which she'll give him sex. His first wife wouldn't let him touch her for a while and he begged and pleaded and thought the relationship was over except for the brief interlude where "things must have been going well" because they conceived a child. He congratulates himself on not having sex with one girlfriend until the second date and concludes that was when they fell in love. Because they had sex. That same girlfriend is the one who allowed beloved, sainted Goose to run away. And of course Grammer handled that in the best way humanly possible. "The only thing I felt at the time was how much Cerlette(sp?) needed my forgiveness so I forgave her and I vowed to myself no matter how bad things might get between us I would never throw this back at her. But I felt then, as I do now, there was nothing quite so unforgiveable. Cerlette had taken my greatest companion, the dog I cherished more than myself, and lost her. It was careless and selfish and showed a total disregard of me. Cerlette had promised to take care of my dog. She didn't. I know she was miserable about it but there was absolutely no excuse for what she did." How is this not throwing it back at her??? He's held on to this resentment so hard he's calling her out in a published book but he doesn't think he's throwing anything back at her??? This isn't the only time he relates telling the women he was with what they wanted to hear at the time and then getting mad at her later because she doesn't understand his feelings. And somehow he thinks he's the good guy and the victim every time!!?! Oh, and then he says this. "I'd stay out for nights in a row or pass out on my boat instead. Cerlette accused me of cheating on her, which I had not. But once accused, I thought 'I might as well'". "I THOUGHT 'I MIGHT AS WELL'". And then he got a DUI and it was entirely, 100% her fault His problems with women, apparently, all stem from the fact that after his father was murdered and his grandfather died, Kelsey had to become "the Man of the House" and his sister, mother, and grandmother all relied on him and asked wayyyyy to much of him. Because of this he's always sought out needy women and put his own needs aside to please them. Ahh yes it is just so hard to deal with the demands of nagging women such as 'please stop staying out all night doing cocaine and crashing cars'. He has such little sense of responsibility that he describes the 11 days he spent in jail on a cocaine possession conviction as "the best 11 days I'd had in years. Life was simple there, not full of turmoil as it was at home. No problems to take care of. No demands to meet. No frantic nights of accusation to bear. It was peaceful there. I was kept fed and warm and found solitude. Something I hadn't had for a long, long time. In jail I had everything I needed. Everything but freedom." We'd all love to just be taken care of and never have to deal with any problems but that's adult life, my dude. That's being in an adult relationship. His most overwhelming burden is having to consider the feelings of the girlfriend he supposedly loves and make the huge compromise of not being an asshole to her. And what does he think is the appropriate way to treat a woman? Well: "She was everything I'd ever dreamed of. Strong, sexy, independent, outspoken and unafraid of anyone or anything. Best of all, she didn't need me. She had no need at all. They say great actors have great insight. If that's so then I'm a fucking genius. A monument to perspicacity. There was no proof, no behavior to inform me, not a clue to tip me off, but I spotted it. Leanne had need beyond my wildest dreams. I knew it. I could see it buried deep within her and I undertook its excavation. All I had to do was take away her independence. The chief requirement for independence is having one's own money so I insisted she quit her job. It worked." I'm 70% convinced that Kelsey Grammer lives in a fantasy world of his own making and most of this stuff never happened. Being put in the maximum security wing of the prison because the warden was afraid the guys in the general population "would talk your ear off"? Having the police woman who arrested you for drunk driving tell you "I didn't think you were drunk. If it weren't for your girlfriend making all that fuss..." and telling her "It's not your fault. It's not even entirely hers. I just... stopped thinking."? A writer on Cheers telling you "you're brilliant. We keep having bets to write lines you couldn't possibly make funny and yet you do every time"? Being struck by lightning while riding your motorcycle and being completely fine????? And this is all before the end where he casually brushes over the fact that in 1993 he was accused of raping the 15-year-old babysitter of his young daughter. I REPEAT: HE WAS ACCUSED OF RAPING HIS 15-YEAR-OLD BABYSITTER. I only learned these details after looking them up because he gives one paragraph to the whole thing, in which he accidentally implies his own guilt while both self-victimizing and self-aggrandizing. What a talent: "It was on this trip that I met The Girl who has become the topic of so much controversy. And although I've been exonerated by the courts in New Jersey and in Arizona, a fact which was printed but not nearly as publicized as the accusations I endured, there is still a civil suit pending so I cannot go into much detail. I will say this though. The Girl in question is or was a wonderful girl. I met her at a time in my life when my opinion of myself was extremely low and she gave me an extraordinary gift. Through her eyes, for the first time in my life, I could see myself as beautiful. In spite of all that has happened, I still think of her with fondness. And I know as she knows, we did nothing wrong." I can't begin to describe how much bile this brings to my throat. YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT AN UNDERAGE GIRL, YOU SHITBAG. It was interesting to get a glimpse into the mind of a man like this but I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone. Maybe if you're a masochist like me who loves a hateread but, even then, please don't do this to yourself. Thanks to the googling I did after reading this book I do now know that Kelsey Grammer is a Trump-supporting, Roseanne-defending, anti-choice, serial-cheating, child rapist so that's improved my life a whole lot. This extremely long review is me holding back on the many other shitty things he revealed about himself in this book for length and my sanity. For now I'm just gonna sit here looking forward to the day #MeToo finally catches up with this asshole.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Larissa Rose

    I admit that I read this book out of curiosity because I saw it mentioned on a blog as an example of a terrible celebrity memoir. And I was pleasantly surprised. He comes across as a little pompous and full of himself at times, but also open and honest. I also admire his determination and his sense that his life has inherent meaning and purpose.

  6. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Maughan

    I've been a huge fan of Fraiser Crane since my Dad would put on Cheers reruns during lunch on Saturday afternoons. When I came across Kelsey's memoir I knew I had to read it (all be it nearly three decades later than it was published). As such, a lot of the information is out of date. If you're looking for gossip and/or juicy insights to the behind the scenes of Cheers or Fraiser, you'll have to look elsewhere. Kelsey spends a lot of time going over his devotion to God (huge WTF for me, seeing a I've been a huge fan of Fraiser Crane since my Dad would put on Cheers reruns during lunch on Saturday afternoons. When I came across Kelsey's memoir I knew I had to read it (all be it nearly three decades later than it was published). As such, a lot of the information is out of date. If you're looking for gossip and/or juicy insights to the behind the scenes of Cheers or Fraiser, you'll have to look elsewhere. Kelsey spends a lot of time going over his devotion to God (huge WTF for me, seeing as I had no idea he was so spiritual) and he paints himself in a rather, fantastic light. He tends to throw others under the bus in favor of portraying himself this way and glosses over the more drastic, important things in his life. He only briefly touches on his drug and alcohol addiction, saying that he's been through years of therapy and that God is helping him through it. He writes in a way that seems very charged and direct; as if he wrote the book solely to address rumors while still withholding the nitty gritty. It was an interesting, fast read. I'm certainly glad I picked it up, but am disappointed in the writing. It seems to have been written too soon in his career (he was only two years into Fraiser at the books completion). Kelsey Grammer seems like such a stoic man on the screen. Reading about his inability to make relationships work and the way he talks of others was really off putting and made him much more smaller in my mind. The book jumps around a lot in time. He drops important actors/producers names quite frequently as if this is impressive. He mentions, almost to a fault, about how insightful he is. There's a few good facts that will be useful for conversation at the next dinner party I find myself at, but otherwise this is just a neat book to have read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    molly Matthews

    okay, i admit it. one night at work i had no reading materials and this book was there. i read it cover to cover in under two hours. i laughed out loud. this book was hysterical. surely not in the way mr. grammer intended it to be. i don't recommend it, per se. but it has some great one-liners that reveal the twisted psychology behind the man. enjoy! okay, i admit it. one night at work i had no reading materials and this book was there. i read it cover to cover in under two hours. i laughed out loud. this book was hysterical. surely not in the way mr. grammer intended it to be. i don't recommend it, per se. but it has some great one-liners that reveal the twisted psychology behind the man. enjoy!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Once when locked in a room and trapped under something heavy, I read this entire book. Actually I wish that were my excuse. Read this only if you find yourself in the situation mentioned above, or if you need reasons to detest Kelsey Grammer. Ruined Frasier for me! Plum ruined.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Molly Rosen Marriner

    Reader survey: was this ghostwritten? Feel like it could really go either way. Not sure if The Kels can string a sentence together, but the structure and what he chose to include is SO bad I feel like a professional author couldn't have been involved in the process...? Reader survey: was this ghostwritten? Feel like it could really go either way. Not sure if The Kels can string a sentence together, but the structure and what he chose to include is SO bad I feel like a professional author couldn't have been involved in the process...?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Everyone who has ever watched television, probably knows of the series Cheers, and of its successful spin-off, Frasier, where the Emmy Award-winning actor Kelsey Grammer played the role of psychiatrist Frasier Crane. What may not be so well-known to the public is more about the star's personal life. In a story that is provocative, heartwarming and hysterical, Kelsey Grammer finally sets the record straight on his often painful yet always uplifting life. Behind-the-scenes stories from his profess Everyone who has ever watched television, probably knows of the series Cheers, and of its successful spin-off, Frasier, where the Emmy Award-winning actor Kelsey Grammer played the role of psychiatrist Frasier Crane. What may not be so well-known to the public is more about the star's personal life. In a story that is provocative, heartwarming and hysterical, Kelsey Grammer finally sets the record straight on his often painful yet always uplifting life. Behind-the-scenes stories from his professional life makes Kelsey Grammer's personal story both highly entertaining and supremely insightful. I must say that I knew little of Kelsey Grammer's life before I read his autobiography. I knew only of his substance abuse, and was vaguely aware of some of the loss he experienced. I had absolutely no idea that Kelsey Grammer had actually experienced such overwhelming tragedy in life. Anyway, I found this book to be very well-written - very engaging, enlightening and humorous. I was quickly immersed in the author's story because of his easy writing style. I give this book an A+!

  11. 5 out of 5

    ╟ ♫ Tima ♪ ╣ ♥

    Don't read this book if you want to like Kelsey Grammer afterwards. He is much like his famous character, Frasier. Pompous, selfish, a braggart who truly finds himself a gift to all. He spends most of the book gloating of himself and skims over the top of all the things that humanize him. The horrible loss of his sister, his grandparents, his life with his mother and father. If he had elaborated on his life stories rather than his celebrity ones, this book would've been brilliant. I think the key Don't read this book if you want to like Kelsey Grammer afterwards. He is much like his famous character, Frasier. Pompous, selfish, a braggart who truly finds himself a gift to all. He spends most of the book gloating of himself and skims over the top of all the things that humanize him. The horrible loss of his sister, his grandparents, his life with his mother and father. If he had elaborated on his life stories rather than his celebrity ones, this book would've been brilliant. I think the key to enjoying Kelsey Grammer is to never read one of his books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Roberta

    I always liked him on Cheers and I truly enjoyed Frasier. I knew little (to nothing) of Kelsey Grammer's life before I read his autobiography. I had absolutely no idea that he had experienced such overwhelming tragedy in life. I always liked him on Cheers and I truly enjoyed Frasier. I knew little (to nothing) of Kelsey Grammer's life before I read his autobiography. I had absolutely no idea that he had experienced such overwhelming tragedy in life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I can watch Fraiser over and over and not get tired of the show. Between Kelsey and David I adore them both. I’ve been meaning to read Kelsey’s book for the longest time, finally buying it at book sale. Since I’m a fan, I was not disappointed. I have read quite a few autobiographies and only two annoyed me. It’s my opinion that an actor’s life is tough. Whether it was the studio system or the present day it can’t be easy to survive and maintain a relationship, much less a job that’s always at the I can watch Fraiser over and over and not get tired of the show. Between Kelsey and David I adore them both. I’ve been meaning to read Kelsey’s book for the longest time, finally buying it at book sale. Since I’m a fan, I was not disappointed. I have read quite a few autobiographies and only two annoyed me. It’s my opinion that an actor’s life is tough. Whether it was the studio system or the present day it can’t be easy to survive and maintain a relationship, much less a job that’s always at the whim of the “suits” that be in power at the moment. Kelsey’s early home life certainly was no picnic. This is a short book, written way back in 1995. So I’m sure he’d have more to say if he’d written it now. I did like what John Houseman told him when he left Julliard, “Oh, yes, by the way. Read the great novels. That’s the only way to learn of worlds outside your own, of lives and manners, customs and relationships, that now are vanished. “This was said in regards to acting. I liked it because it relates to all of life…

  14. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    I'm interested in Narcisstic Personality Disorder and how they think - so this was a good book for me for that reason. I could've really hated Kelsey throughout this book, but I will give him some credit....he's not 100% deluded like most narcissists as he does realise that he's got a problem (well sometimes he does and other times he's a typical narcissist). He gets caught drinking and driving one night and blames the whole thing from beginning to end on his poor suffering wife! His character F I'm interested in Narcisstic Personality Disorder and how they think - so this was a good book for me for that reason. I could've really hated Kelsey throughout this book, but I will give him some credit....he's not 100% deluded like most narcissists as he does realise that he's got a problem (well sometimes he does and other times he's a typical narcissist). He gets caught drinking and driving one night and blames the whole thing from beginning to end on his poor suffering wife! His character Frazier is also a narcissist, but where Frazier is 'written' to be very likable.....Kelsey is not (in my opinion). I read somewhere that the actors who play Roz, Daphne, Niles and Martin are all close friends in real life but don't have much to do with Kelsey.....I can see why now!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    eh...not the best thing i ever read, nor the worst...kind of boring, there was like maybe 1 or 2 chapters on "cheers"...not so much a biography...was mostly his retelling of what he learned in therapy and arrogance about his acting ability...kinda pointless, in my opinion. his therapist should get writing credit. eh...not the best thing i ever read, nor the worst...kind of boring, there was like maybe 1 or 2 chapters on "cheers"...not so much a biography...was mostly his retelling of what he learned in therapy and arrogance about his acting ability...kinda pointless, in my opinion. his therapist should get writing credit.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brock Williams

    i chose some strange audio books to listen to sometimes, because that's all there was at the library. i chose some strange audio books to listen to sometimes, because that's all there was at the library.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karlton

    Enjoyed hearing Kelsey read - he should do more audiobooks!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Interesting to learn more about Kelsey. Good stuff. =)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Bradley

    Typical of celebrity autobiographies, the writing is not top shelf. That said, Grammer's cerebral brand of wit shines through even the darkest of his life's chapters. A worthy summer read. Typical of celebrity autobiographies, the writing is not top shelf. That said, Grammer's cerebral brand of wit shines through even the darkest of his life's chapters. A worthy summer read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I honestly have no idea how to rate this book. I read it mostly because it’s Frasier-related and I am nothing but a rabid Frasier fan. But Kelsey Grammer is truly a wild human, and he was really trying with this memoir. Is it entertaining and interesting to read? Yes, but not in the way originally intended by Grammer. I’m more puzzled by him now than I was before I found this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    The TBR Pile *Book review site*

    This is an interesting read and it is a testament to Grammar’s strength to have survived all that has happened to him. FULL REVIEW - http://thetbrpile.weebly.com/reviews/... This is an interesting read and it is a testament to Grammar’s strength to have survived all that has happened to him. FULL REVIEW - http://thetbrpile.weebly.com/reviews/...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Most of the world may know him as an American actor, voice actor, comedian, singer, producer, director, writer and activist. You certainly remember him for his two-decade-long portrayal of psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane on the NBC sitcoms Cheers and Frasier. You may also know that he has won five primetime Emmy awards, three Golden Globe awards, and one Tony award. But, do you know him as the husband of at least four wives, (not all at the same time!), the father of seven children, (apparently o Most of the world may know him as an American actor, voice actor, comedian, singer, producer, director, writer and activist. You certainly remember him for his two-decade-long portrayal of psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane on the NBC sitcoms Cheers and Frasier. You may also know that he has won five primetime Emmy awards, three Golden Globe awards, and one Tony award. But, do you know him as the husband of at least four wives, (not all at the same time!), the father of seven children, (apparently one of those as the result of an affair with a hair and make-up stylist), and a grandfather to at least one grandchild? That’s been Kelsey Grammer’s life, (as the title of this 1995 autobiography indicates), “so far.” Within the 238 pages of this 24-year-old tell-all, Grammer shares the “weirdness” of his life. “Such weirdness as the murder of (his) father, the rape and murder of (his) beloved and only sister, the drowning deaths of (his) two half-brothers, and a marriage that went south even before the ceremony.” Given that less than normal background, Grammer reveals what led him to become an actor: “the desire to do good, to serve mankind.” Apparently, a music department chairman at one of the author’s prep schools “played a very important role in (Grammer’s) life. He got (Grammer) on the stage by recruiting him for a school choir. Grammer discovered he “liked it. And it was something (he) was good at.” Later in his thespian journey, Grammer discovers who he is as a person. Echoing author John Gunther, in “Death Be Not Proud’s” autobiographical account of the death of Gunther’s own son, Grammer too feels as if he is two people at the same time: “one involved, and one aloof. One in pain, and one recording it.” As Gunther explained it to Grammer, this is “a condition of the artistic personality. A gift of sorts, of logging all experience for future use. The fact that we record emotions as we feel them doesn’t make them any less genuine. It’s who we are.” As Grammer points out, “actors, writers, painters, musicians all have (one thing) in common: in everything we do, each of us are two. One for life, one to hold the mirror up to life.” But in this intimate look at a TV psychiatrist, we see the dark side of Grammer off camera and off stage. The author briefly mentions the “escape” he found in cocaine. Grammer shares what years of therapy taught him: (His) “understanding of love was that it meant being needed . . . as long as (he) was needed, it meant that (he) was loved.” We also see Grammer behind bars, eleven of a thirty-day sentence in the Los Angeles County Jail for a DUI conviction, not to mention sentencing for cocaine possession. Also, in these pages, consciously or not, deliberately or not, Grammer may have explained why he’s taken so many trips to the marriage altar. The author admits, “for obvious reasons I have a great fear of abandonment. Everyone I’ve ever loved has left me. The pain of losing them was so unbearable, I had to find a way of making sure I’d never feel such pain again. Subconsciously I worked out this formula: If I can make them need me, they can never leave. I realize now that to make a woman need me meant I had to destroy her. It’s a terrible thing to destroy the one you love because, once successful, it destroys the love as well.” Trapped in that “pattern of despair and loneliness” may tell us all we need to know about Grammer’s marital failures. Largely missing from this nearly twenty-five year-old journal: Grammer’s heart problems, his legal troubles and his political views. Not to mention more wives! “So Far” ends with Grammer’s relationship with Tammi Baliszewski, (a/k/a Tammi Alexander.) We, of course, don’t get to hear about his August, 1997 marriage to Camille Donatacci. Nor do we get to read about the official end of that relationship. Even six months before Grammer’s divorce to Camille was final on February 10, 2011, the previous August 12, 2010, the actor announced his girlfriend, Kayle Walsh, was expecting their love child.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Berman

    I'm not sure I completely trust one aspect of Kelsey Grammer's autobiography, "So Far." Grammer blames every divorce on the wife, he takes no responsibility for his failed marriages. He approaches them as if he was a victim of a crazy woman and he had the sensibility to call it quits... but the complete absence of any remorse or responsibility is what gives me some pause, but also the way he talks of women is one of forced respect. He loves a beautiful woman, a dancer, appearances, but never spe I'm not sure I completely trust one aspect of Kelsey Grammer's autobiography, "So Far." Grammer blames every divorce on the wife, he takes no responsibility for his failed marriages. He approaches them as if he was a victim of a crazy woman and he had the sensibility to call it quits... but the complete absence of any remorse or responsibility is what gives me some pause, but also the way he talks of women is one of forced respect. He loves a beautiful woman, a dancer, appearances, but never speaks of his love interests with actual love, or even respect. I think Kelsey Grammer has had a very rough life, one with great loss, and is a very good actor who has steller ideals when it comes to acting, being authentic, telling the truth, but his approach to women rubs me the wrong way. He objectifies women, not just in thought but words, in emotion. Oh well, no one's perfect. Concerning Grammer sleeping with a 15 year old baby sitter? The autobiography implies something definitely happened, and the act whatever it was, was one of Grammer awakening the hurt child within, perhaps due to his sister's death, a part of himself that never grew up... but whether they did have sex or not, I guess we'll never know. But to say that is all he is, is a great disservice. Kelsey Grammer is also a very spiritual and struggling soul, who has had profound spiritual experiences, and sought a life of truth and authenticity, and in the face of great loss, was broken in some ways, I think meditation in his adult life, zen.. could help him... the way it did when he was younger. It is strange that he was so into meditation growing up, but never speaks of it again as an adult... got too busy, forgot about it perhaps. His sister, who he was so close to growing up, was raped and murdered when he was a kid, I think that alone shines a huge light on this man, how it broke him in ways, how it deepened him in others, how it made him real, capable of giving and receiving love. I listened to his entire autobiography in two sittings, I started it yesterday... it was worth listening to.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    More contemptible than you could hope for. He outright compares himself to Jesus Christ, and in the author's note he thanks his mother, his father, and WH Auden. --- My Snow dog, my malamute The Paul Simon of tel Aviv Mystery guest at a dinner of my own decisions My slim rapier of common sense against her machine gun of contempt and rage - and then he breaks to say this was when she got pregnant I was in fact quite proud of the note because I had written it. Its tone was very civil, but peppered w More contemptible than you could hope for. He outright compares himself to Jesus Christ, and in the author's note he thanks his mother, his father, and WH Auden. --- My Snow dog, my malamute The Paul Simon of tel Aviv Mystery guest at a dinner of my own decisions My slim rapier of common sense against her machine gun of contempt and rage - and then he breaks to say this was when she got pregnant I was in fact quite proud of the note because I had written it. Its tone was very civil, but peppered with the slightest hint of sexual innuendo. It was a brilliant note. We went back to her apartment but we did not have sex. I liked this girl. and then we did have sex. So it was bouncy and romantic, and that was fun; upright, as well as in bed. Missing his dog goose in a different way, but just as much, as his sister, who was raped and murdered She lord to tease a man and feel his eyes UPON her ass when she bent over. They say great actors have great insight. If that's true then I'm a fuckin genius. A monument to perspicacity. There was no proof, not a clue to tip me off. But I spotted it. LeAnn had need beyond my wildest dreams. I could see it buried deep within her and I undertook its excavation. All I had to do was take away her independence. The chief requirement for ind is having ones own money. So I insisted she quit dancing. This may sound manipulative but I was so deeply rooted in my pattern I was unaware of it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carson hall

    I know I'm in the minority but I enjoyed this book. I have always thought Mr. Grammer was kind of an ass, but after reading this I can see why. The cocaine, the bad relationships and what he has been through with his sister has some clarity for me now. He admits that what he looked for in women was skewed. His one relationship with Leigh-Anne really reminded me of Courtney Love and her treatment of Kurt Cobain. There seems to be so many women who give themselves power by putting down their partn I know I'm in the minority but I enjoyed this book. I have always thought Mr. Grammer was kind of an ass, but after reading this I can see why. The cocaine, the bad relationships and what he has been through with his sister has some clarity for me now. He admits that what he looked for in women was skewed. His one relationship with Leigh-Anne really reminded me of Courtney Love and her treatment of Kurt Cobain. There seems to be so many women who give themselves power by putting down their partners, but I must say that I doubt Mr. Grammer was completely blameless. The book is mostly just little vignettes, so it is an easy read. I think there is a lot of misunderstandings going on because he doesn't go into too much detail so he missed the chance to explain himself and why he said certain things. I was a little disturbed about his seeming lack of empathy for the lady who committed suicide, as well as the man who died of AIDS, but other than that I did not see this as a book that made him look like any more of a narcissist than most actors seem to be.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I can only give this book two stars. I was looking forward to learning more about this actor. I was disappointed. I feel like I didn't get to know him as a person at all. I know he has been through a lot and suffered more trauma than anyone should have to endure. He came across as narcissistic, egotistical and unable to take any blame for his actions. Driving drunk wasnt his fault, the coke he got caught with he didn't even remember having it on his person. All his failed relationships.... There I can only give this book two stars. I was looking forward to learning more about this actor. I was disappointed. I feel like I didn't get to know him as a person at all. I know he has been through a lot and suffered more trauma than anyone should have to endure. He came across as narcissistic, egotistical and unable to take any blame for his actions. Driving drunk wasnt his fault, the coke he got caught with he didn't even remember having it on his person. All his failed relationships.... There is so much more that happened in his life that he barely touched on like the drug addiction and recovery for one.... I wanted to like it but it left me with a bad and phony taste in my mouth.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    1.5 stars This book reaffirms my suspicion that many actors are not acting, but rather just being themselves. It is not “so far” a stretch for Kelsey Grammer to play essentially himself as the egocentric and self-absorbed Frasier Crane. The book covers the first 4 decades of Grammer’s life. If you are interested in the two since (the book was printed in ’95), I suggest you Google So Far 2.0; i.e., Wikipedia. Tossing this back into to the Friends of the Library donation stack, which, coincidentall 1.5 stars This book reaffirms my suspicion that many actors are not acting, but rather just being themselves. It is not “so far” a stretch for Kelsey Grammer to play essentially himself as the egocentric and self-absorbed Frasier Crane. The book covers the first 4 decades of Grammer’s life. If you are interested in the two since (the book was printed in ’95), I suggest you Google So Far 2.0; i.e., Wikipedia. Tossing this back into to the Friends of the Library donation stack, which, coincidentally, is where I got it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Val Robson

    Kelsey Grammer had already had a life filled with some extreme dramatic events, including murders in his immediate family, by the time he wrote this in 1995. Plus had played Frazier on Cheers for 12 years. Oh and had already had 2 wives (now 4 as of 2018) and countless girlfriends. And yet all of these barely make a page each in this scant tale. He comes across as someone needing a lot of attention and wishing others to see him as a deeply spiritual man of great intellect. Maybe he'll write an h Kelsey Grammer had already had a life filled with some extreme dramatic events, including murders in his immediate family, by the time he wrote this in 1995. Plus had played Frazier on Cheers for 12 years. Oh and had already had 2 wives (now 4 as of 2018) and countless girlfriends. And yet all of these barely make a page each in this scant tale. He comes across as someone needing a lot of attention and wishing others to see him as a deeply spiritual man of great intellect. Maybe he'll write an honest account one day but somehow I doubt his ego will let him.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Daryll

    Love the art, not the artist - A sentence I have used many times to describe some musical performers, athletes, and historical figures. It also is a sentence I will use to describe this book, and along with that, Kelsey (literally thinks he's God) Grammer. There are some moments of good storytelling in this book, so thus two not one star, but that is all I can say that is a positive of an otherwise terrible book. I cannot for the life of me think of any other autobiography that made me end up ha Love the art, not the artist - A sentence I have used many times to describe some musical performers, athletes, and historical figures. It also is a sentence I will use to describe this book, and along with that, Kelsey (literally thinks he's God) Grammer. There are some moments of good storytelling in this book, so thus two not one star, but that is all I can say that is a positive of an otherwise terrible book. I cannot for the life of me think of any other autobiography that made me end up hating the writer. Hopefully it never happens again.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Not the kind of book I usually read, or have ever read, but I ended up with it in a stack of books I got at a thrift store while out-of-state. It was interesting, though, to see the process of "making it" in such a competitive field. It was sad, however, to see the tragedy that has struck the life of this fellow human being, and the pain and emptiness in many parts of his life. (Language was rough a few times.) Not the kind of book I usually read, or have ever read, but I ended up with it in a stack of books I got at a thrift store while out-of-state. It was interesting, though, to see the process of "making it" in such a competitive field. It was sad, however, to see the tragedy that has struck the life of this fellow human being, and the pain and emptiness in many parts of his life. (Language was rough a few times.)

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